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The best of Blaxploitation

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
There are some good blaxploitation movies out there. Some. I really enjoyed Brotherhood of Death, and I love Across 110th Street even though it BARELY qualifies. Other than those I've only seen Coffy, and I didn't enjoy it all that much.
I recently picked up Cotton Comes to Harlem and Three the Hard Way, which I'm looking forward to watching. I love Fred Williamson, Jim Brown, and Jim Kelly so I'm positive 3 the Hard Way will be good. Even though I tried watching 1 down, 2 to go or whatever it was called and found that it was torture.
post #2 of 30
I love Black Caesar and Hell Up In Harlem, and I also like Truck Turner, Coffy, Foxy Brown, and Black Mama White Mama. Coffy is great, if only for the awesome turns by Sid Haig, and Robert DoQui. Can't forget about Rudy Ray Moore's Dolemite.
post #3 of 30
Thread Starter 
I caught some of Black Caesar on TCM and I'm sure to buy it soon.
post #4 of 30
It's really awesome. As is it's sequel Hell Up In Harlem. Awesome soundtrack to that flick. I have the c.d.
post #5 of 30
Thread Starter 
James Brown, correct? Yeah, I didn't even have to look that up, that's how good I am, dig?
...
The soundtrack I want to get a hold of is the Trouble Man, which is Marvin Gaye rockin' and rollin' all over the place.
post #6 of 30
Yeah, he did the soundtrack for Black Ceasar. I meant the one to the sequel, Hell Up In Harlem. That's the one I have. Pretty rockin', it's by Edwin Starr. Good guess on the Black Ceasar soundtrack, Stephanois. You sure seem to know your blaxpoitation.
post #7 of 30
My favorite blaxploitation film still has to be The Mack. It has probably my favorite soundtrack of any of film in the genre. And Richard Pryor chews the scenery and shoots people, so it has a lot going for it.
post #8 of 30
Superfly must be seen. It's practically the blueprint for the genre. Black Belt Jones is a must as well. Perhaps most important of all: Sweet Sweetback's Badassss Song.
post #9 of 30
I've always been partial to Bucktown, Hitman, Sugar Hill (voodoo/zombie/revenge film), Dolemite & Dolemite 2: The Human Tornado, Uptown Saturday Night (w/ Sidney Poitier and Bill Cosby -though one could argue that it isn't standard blaxploitation) and the aforementioned Coffy and Foxy Brown, myself preferring the former to the latter.
post #10 of 30
They call him Boss! They call him Boss! BOSS NIGGER
post #11 of 30
Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song Is a must see for anyone who is interested in black cinema. It's place in the history of black cinema is undeniable and it's completely and utterly bizarre. It's like Avant Gardesploitation at time. It's a mix of a porno, avant garde, and blaxploitation.

I second Superfly, one of my all time favorite movies. Everything from the soundtrack to the acting to that incredibly edited montage sequence in the middle is fantastic. It's got the chops of a true piece of art, but it's as gritty and real as they come.
post #12 of 30
Blacula and Abby are by far my favorites. The latter is almost impossible to find due to legal reasons, and it's an absolute fucking shame.
post #13 of 30
Sweet Sweetback's Badasssss Song is one I've been meaning to check out for some time. Same with Superfly.
post #14 of 30
This brings up an interesting point of discussion I've had with friends: the order in which to experience a double feature of Sweet Sweetback's Badassss Song and Badassss. The default answer would be to watch Sweetback first, since Badassss is sort of a making-of film. But I can see a valid case for watching Badassss first to set up the time and place, and give a sense of the movie's impact.
post #15 of 30
I saw Badasssss last year, so I hope it works that way for me when I get around to eventually seeing Sweet Sweetback's Badasssss Song.
post #16 of 30
I love Trouble Man and Hit Man was memorable if for nothing else than having Pam Grier get mauled by a cougar.
post #17 of 30
That's one lucky cougar.
post #18 of 30
I know the genre's heyday was the 70s, but have there been any decent recent examples of blaxploitation besides the obvious Shaft remake?
post #19 of 30
Pootie Tang was an excellent take-off of the genre. Jackie Brown was a pretty good representation as well.

But really, it's pretty hard to duplicate that with a modern studio film. The crudity and low budgets and amateur crew were part of the genre to a certain extent. Making a slick, modern take on blaxploitation is sort of missing the point.

In a perfect world, I would get to make the Luke Cage movie, and it would totally be a blaxploitation homage. It would take place in the seventies and everything.
post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by le Stephanois
I love Fred Williamson, Jim Brown, and Jim Kelly so I'm positive 3 the Hard Way will be good. Even though I tried watching 1 down, 2 to go or whatever it was called and found that it was torture.
Three The Hard Way is tremendous fun, and I'd second Greg David's love for Black Belt Jones - sadly not officially released on DVD, but I've seen bootlegs knocking about on eBay. The Thing With Two Heads, in which a white bigot (Ray Milland) has his head stitched to a black death row fugitive (Rosey Grier, no Jim Brown) is hysterically stupid.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Wood
I know the genre's heyday was the 70s, but have there been any decent recent examples of blaxploitation besides the obvious Shaft remake?
I've brought this up in a prior blaxploitation discussion, but if an affectionate throwback to the genre rather than a modern-day,
70s-set caper will do you, the criminally slept-on Undercover Brother is very entertaining - more so, in my opinion, than I'm Gonna Git You Sucka, which I also like. Not up to par is Original Gangstas, the mid-90s movie that, like the earlier Sucka, reunited key blaxploitation talent but without the spoofery.

Of course, you could argue that a lot of the 'hood' movies featuring rappers are essentially movies made to the blaxploitation template. Certainly New Jack City by Melvin Van Peebles' little nipper Mario is pretty much a hip-hop update of Black Caesar (and, by extension Scarface).
post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricardo Brady
I've brought this up in a prior blaxploitation discussion, but if an affectionate throwback to the genre rather than a modern-day,
70s-set caper will do you, the criminally slept-on Undercover Brother is very entertaining - more so, in my opinion, than I'm Gonna Git You Sucka, which I also like.
I love the hell out of both of those films, even though I've never seen more than a glimpse of the movies they're lampooning. I have to go with Sucka as my favorite though. No Chris Kattan for one thing.
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg David
In a perfect world, I would get to make the Luke Cage movie, and it would totally be a blaxploitation homage. It would take place in the seventies and everything.
So your movie would look something like this?

post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricardo Brady
Of course, you could argue that a lot of the 'hood' movies featuring rappers are essentially movies made to the blaxploitation template.
Just be sure to steer clear of the no-budget Urban Horror flicks like Bloodz Vs Wolvez.

Hustle & Flow (and in extension, Black Snake Moan) was certainly slicker than the down & dirty 70's flicks, but it had the right vibe IMO.

EDIT: Shit, banging around imdb, I just found out that Larry Cohen (It's Alive, Q: the Winged Serpent) directed Fred Williamson's Black Caesar and Hell Up in Harlem...
post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by DARKMITE8
Shit, banging around imdb, I just found out that Larry Cohen (It's Alive, Q: the Winged Serpent) directed Fred Williamson's Black Caesar and Hell Up in Harlem...
And, indeed, Original Gangstas.

The Blaxploitation years were good for a couple of directors best known for quickie horror flicks. Jack Hill (after a tip-off from schlockmeister extrordinaire Roger Corman) cast Pam Grier in The Big Doll House, then The Big Bird Cage, Coffy and Foxy Brown.
post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali Mohamed
So your movie would look something like this?

Only without Doctor Doom.

As a kid reading Luke Cage, I actually came across the term "motherlovin" (which actually appeared in that comic a lot) before I ever heard the word "motherfuckin". I kept wondering what was so derogatory about loving your mother.
post #26 of 30
Not blaxploitation; but anyone seen Black Demons, Umberto Lenzi 1991? The cover looks intriguing
post #27 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by the pot.
Not blaxploitation; but anyone seen Black Demons, Umberto Lenzi 1991? The cover looks intriguing
I don't understand why you brought that up if it's not blaxploitation?
post #28 of 30
Its from Lenzi (ok exploitation, not blax-) and is apparently the only movie about black zombies, (only in this they're called demons)
post #29 of 30
Thread Starter 
are there any pimps?
post #30 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by le Stephanois
are there any pimps?
Yes. Black Zombie Pimps.

No I have no idea, i'm trying to find someone who's seen it
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