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Crime Fiction Thread 2.0. - Page 51

post #2501 of 3063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Levine View Post

 

I loved the Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death

That's a really funny novel. I read it was picked up by Showtime and it would have been a great partner to Dexter, mom and pop death scene cleaners competing in L.A., but I haven't heard anything since. I liked his Hank Thompson trilogy which felt like honest to God noir like how Jim Thompson and Cain did it. Not a big fan of the Pitt novels which started to feel too relentlessly grim.

 

I also really like The Shotgun Rule, which sort of reminds me of Stand By Me.


Edited by Cameron Hughes - 12/10/12 at 10:40am
post #2502 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Levine View Post

 

I loved the Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death

 

   So do I, David.  HBO actually filmed a pilot of Mystic Arts, with Huston as a producer, but it didn't get picked up, dang it.  It would have brought a lot of folks to Huston, who is a marverlous writer.  I love his Hank Thompson novels, which are probably the best examples of an everyman getting swept up into more and more extraordinary experiences as you can find.

 

   For you Hunter fans: sorry if I came on a bit strong earlier.  This is all subjective, I guess, anyway.  As Count Korzybski would say, there's no such thing as a good or bad book.

 

   Cameron: You should check out Schow's Internecine and Upgunned.   As you are a conspiracy nut like me, Internecine would be right up your alley. 

post #2503 of 3063
Thread Starter 

So, after re-watching Tarantino's great adaptation of Elmore Leonard's Rum Punch, Jackie Brown, I looked at the reviews included on the DVD. The one from EW is the worst and very wrong-headed, not only does he not like it, but he goes onto say Leonard is "just" a trashy genre writer and Tarantino is far superior. My blood boiled a little at that, especially after he says Tarantino's work is so inspired by Leonard (and judging by the extras on the DVD, Tarantino worships Leonard).

 

Arrgh, I shouldn't be surprised. It's Entertainment Weekly.

 

http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,281411,00.html
 

post #2504 of 3063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave618 View Post

 

   So do I, David.  HBO actually filmed a pilot of Mystic Arts, with Huston as a producer, but it didn't get picked up, dang it.  It would have brought a lot of folks to Huston, who is a marverlous writer.  I love his Hank Thompson novels, which are probably the best examples of an everyman getting swept up into more and more extraordinary experiences as you can find.

 

   For you Hunter fans: sorry if I came on a bit strong earlier.  This is all subjective, I guess, anyway.  As Count Korzybski would say, there's no such thing as a good or bad book.

 

   Cameron: You should check out Schow's Internecine and Upgunned.   As you are a conspiracy nut like me, Internecine would be right up your alley. 


I read them, they're good. I wouldn't say I'm a nut about them, but I do enjoy a good conspiracy theory. They make for good entertainment.

 

You should really read Dirty White Boys, it's fantastic, much better than the Swagger novels.


Edited by Cameron Hughes - 12/10/12 at 5:12pm
post #2505 of 3063

I can't wait for Django Unchained. I have nothing really to add but that. :)

post #2506 of 3063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecallahan View Post

I can't wait for Django Unchained. I have nothing really to add but that. :)

Oh, me too. Just saying, without Leonard's influence, Tarantino's writing wouldn't be nearly as good.

post #2507 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post

So, after re-watching Tarantino's great adaptation of Elmore Leonard's Rum Punch, Jackie Brown, I looked at the reviews included on the DVD. The one from EW is the worst and very wrong-headed, not only does he not like it, but he goes onto say Leonard is "just" a trashy genre writer and Tarantino is far superior. My blood boiled a little at that, especially after he says Tarantino's work is so inspired by Leonard (and judging by the extras on the DVD, Tarantino worships Leonard).

 

Arrgh, I shouldn't be surprised. It's Entertainment Weekly.

 

http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,281411,00.html
 

 

Even worse, he gave Heat a B- a few years earlier.  17 years ago and the memory of that review is still burned into my brain.  Hopefully I run into that PNG one of these days,

post #2508 of 3063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subotai View Post

 

Even worse, he gave Heat a B- a few years earlier.  17 years ago and the memory of that review is still burned into my brain.  Hopefully I run into that PNG one of these days,

PNG?

 

Wow, that Heat review is wrong-headed.


Edited by Cameron Hughes - 12/10/12 at 9:26pm
post #2509 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post


I read them, they're good. I wouldn't say I'm a nut about them, but I do enjoy a good conspiracy theory. They make for good entertainment.

 

You should really read Dirty White Boys, it's fantastic, much better than the Swagger novels.

 

   I'll give it a shot, only because you recommend it and say it's better than the Swagger books.  My Dad loves the Swagger books, but then he and my Mother both love all sorts of books, music and films I can't stomach.;-) lol 

post #2510 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subotai View Post

 

Even worse, he gave Heat a B- a few years earlier.  17 years ago and the memory of that review is still burned into my brain.  Hopefully I run into that PNG one of these days,

 

   Wow.  Heat is one of my all-time favorite films.  Neil McCauley is easily my favorite DeNiro character.

 

   Now the Heat starring Burt Reynolds, from the 80's, that film would be lucky to get a B-.

post #2511 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post

Oh, me too. Just saying, without Leonard's influence, Tarantino's writing wouldn't be nearly as good.

 

   In Reservoir Dogs, anyone familiar with the Parker novels would see their influence on Tarrantino's script.  Including the various POVs and non-linear continuity.

 

   Wonder if Quentin is/was a reader of Westlake's or if it's a strange coincidence...?

post #2512 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post

PNG?

 

 

 

Pencil-necked geek.

post #2513 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave618 View Post

 

  

   Wonder if Quentin is/was a reader of Westlake's or if it's a strange coincidence...?

 

Tarentino is a huge crime buff.  At least he has good taste in books.

post #2514 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subotai View Post

 

Tarentino is a huge crime buff.  At least he has good taste in books.

 

QT also has great taste in film. He has encyclopedic knowledge of the classics, the grindhouse, and the drive-in B's. He loves Siegel and Aldrich. And pimped ROLLING THUNDER, MR. MAJESTYK, and BLOW OUT before anyone else and it was cool. His championing led to reappraisals in geek circles, and even from critics. I love how eclectic his taste is, and how he never puts himself above even the trashiest of genre films. I would think fans of pulp crime fiction would appreciate this.

 

Anyway, just dropped in to say I'm starting an Elmore Leonard marathon. I checked out from the library the omnibuses of his early 70's novels - DUTCH TREAT & DOUBLE DUTCH TREAT. It's been a while since I worked my way thru his stuff, and i've never read past the early 90's. Hopefully this time I will. Favorites?

post #2515 of 3063

Not as knowledgeable of Elmore Leonard as I should be.  I enjoyed Cameron's recommendation Pagan Babies.  I tried a couple others a while back that didn't overly impress me. 

 

I agree with your assessment of QT.  He seems to be a kid at heart, and gushes more about cheaply made 70's grindhouse films than the movies serious--or should I say pretentious--directors and critics usually wax ecstatic about.  I've enjoyed all of his films.  I think I've seen all of them. 

 

Coincidentally, his writing partner from Pulp Fiction, Roger Avary, wrote and directed one of my favorite Crime films: Killing Zoe.  It's a dark, existentialist, heist film that is highly underrated.

post #2516 of 3063

I got into Leonard last year, I started with his westerns and worked my way through to his crime novels. His Detroit era is just plain brilliant, he owns that city the same way Chandler owns LA. I really liked Gold Coast, that probably has one of Leonard's most complex female characters.

post #2517 of 3063

I enjoy Leonard's crime novels but I actually prefer his westerns - just my thing.
 

post #2518 of 3063

I love both the westerns and the crime novels.

 

But I adore Leonard something fierce.

post #2519 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave618 View Post

 

   In Reservoir Dogs, anyone familiar with the Parker novels would see their influence on Tarrantino's script.  Including the various POVs and non-linear continuity.

 

   Wonder if Quentin is/was a reader of Westlake's or if it's a strange coincidence...?

Tarantino has mentioned reading Stark, but on RESERVOIR DOGS the influence was more likely from Lionel White (Clean Break, the novel that became Kubrick's THE KILLING), who was writing non-linear, multi-perspective heist thrillers long before Westlake. If you read the original DOGS script, you'll see Tarantino even includes a dedication to White.

post #2520 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malmordo View Post

Tarantino has mentioned reading Stark, but on RESERVOIR DOGS the influence was more likely from Lionel White (Clean Break, the novel that became Kubrick's THE KILLING), who was writing non-linear, multi-perspective heist thrillers long before Westlake. If you read the original DOGS script, you'll see Tarantino even includes a dedication to White.

 

   Oh, cool, Malmordo, thanks for that info.  I LOVE The Killing.  The ending is one of my favorite endings of any film.  I have Clean Break and The Big Caper on my Kindle and will be getting to them shortly.

 

   I know Peter Rabe and W.R. Burnett were influences on Westlake, and as I am a Westlake fanatic, I have started reading them as well.  I liked Burnett's High Sierra, much more than I liked the film, but Rabe's work is really really good.  I'm making an effort now to go back and read those little-known writers from the PB original days of the 50's/60's.  There's an amazing amount of talented writing there that's virtually forgotten aside from book geeks like us. 

post #2521 of 3063
Thread Starter 

I kinda, sorta, hate new author Roger Dobbs. He was 22 when he finished his novel Ghostman and 24 getting it published, wrote his thesis on writing a novel that's (ugh) un-putdownable and cites Lee Child (That's okay) and He Who Shall Not Be Named  (he's the most bought author in America and wrote a series that riffed its titles on nursery rhymes) as influences.

 

But Ghostman is good.

 

Jack is a professional criminal, he's been robbing banks since he was a teenager. He's very rich and very smart, knowing several languages and a master of staying off the grid and changing his identity.

 

He's another version of Jack Reacher, basically, but the interesting twist here is that he's a criminal and a bit of a sociopath. Sort of a much more ambitious Thomas Crown. It's more than a little Tarantino and I think Dobbs knows that by using the old trope of a bad guy facing a much badder guy, named The Wolf.

 

A casino robbery goes very badly in Alantic City and one robber is dead and the other is on the run, with millions of dollars in a federal payload. Jack is called in by the guy who planned it and uses blackmail/guilt(explained in flashbacks. A heist gone wrong when Jack was green) to get Jack to fix the mess and find the money before the dye pack on it explodes. He has a little less than two days.

 

It's fast and fun, but I wish it had stayed in 3rd person like the great first chapter. The first person narrative makes Jack look too impressed with himself. It's one of those books that's well-researched and the author can't help but show off, but not in a fun way like Beat The Reaper. Still, I like it. It'll be one of the most talked about books of 2013.

post #2522 of 3063

Not sure it's my cup of tea, but good for him.
 

post #2523 of 3063

I have to say, though, that these semi-contrived blockbusters are often one-offs.  This guy sounds like he's watched a lot of movies, as opposed to a guy like Van Rooy, who lived a lot of life.

post #2524 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post

I kinda, sorta, hate new author Roger Dobbs. He was 22 when he finished his novel Ghostman and 24 getting it published, wrote his thesis on writing a novel that's (ugh) un-putdownable and cites Lee Child (That's okay) and He Who Shall Not Be Named  (he's the most bought author in America and wrote a series that riffed its titles on nursery rhymes) as influences.

 

But Ghostman is good.

 

Jack is a professional criminal, he's been robbing banks since he was a teenager. He's very rich and very smart, knowing several languages and a master of staying off the grid and changing his identity.

 

He's another version of Jack Reacher, basically, but the interesting twist here is that he's a criminal and a bit of a sociopath. Sort of a much more ambitious Thomas Crown. It's more than a little Tarantino and I think Dobbs knows that by using the old trope of a bad guy facing a much badder guy, named The Wolf.

 

A casino robbery goes very badly in Alantic City and one robber is dead and the other is on the run, with millions of dollars in a federal payload. Jack is called in by the guy who planned it and uses blackmail/guilt(explained in flashbacks. A heist gone wrong when Jack was green) to get Jack to fix the mess and find the money before the dye pack on it explodes. He has a little less than two days.

 

It's fast and fun, but I wish it had stayed in 3rd person like the great first chapter. The first person narrative makes Jack look too impressed with himself. It's one of those books that's well-researched and the author can't help but show off, but not in a fun way like Beat The Reaper. Still, I like it. It'll be one of the most talked about books of 2013.

 

   Now you know I'm gonna have to check this out.  Keep these Criminal Procedural recommends comin' Cameron, 'ol buddy!;-)

post #2525 of 3063

Dang it, Ghostman isn't even out yet.  I saved it to my wishlist though.

 

So this new character, Jack, comes off as a mix of Parker, Danny Ocean, and Repairman Jack from the description I read. 

 

Oh, man, why am I feeling like an 11 year old girl when a Justin Bieber video comes on the tube...;-) lol

post #2526 of 3063

The knowledge displayed in this both intimidates and amazes me, from Cameron, Lauren and Subotai etc. I just wanted to say thank you to the people in this thread who continue to throw authors name's at me that I've never heard of (without this thread, I never would've discovered Don Winslow)

post #2527 of 3063
Thread Starter 

One of my big fears is a common one. Getting arrested for something l didn't do. Let's add another factor: In a foreign country. I'm not talking about civilized Europe or even Mexico, but somewhere really foreign, like China, Africa, or the Middle East.

 

That's Layover in Dubai.

 

Sam Keller is on a business trip and on a six hour layover in Dubai, the middle east's playground for the rich, their answer to Las Vegas, but it has so much crime and corruption that it makes Sin City look like LegoLand. Sam's colleague is murdered and Sam is tagged for the crime. This may be a playground, but Dubai is still a conservative Arabic Country, and getting arrested there would be a bad thing. Their laws and penalties are..extreme. His only ally is police detective Anwar Sharaf who was a former gold smuggler and pearl diver.

 

It's an interesting book because of the country its in. Fesperman shows the glitz and glamour and how connected the crime, corporate players and the religious extremism is. I'd like to see more books starring Sharaf, who is a far less tired international detective and setting than American, European, and especially Nordic ones.

post #2528 of 3063
Thread Starter 

One of my big fears is a common one. Getting arrested for something l didn't do. Let's add another factor: In a foreign country. I'm not talking about civilized Europe or even Mexico, but somewhere really foreign, like China, Africa, or the Middle East.

 

That's Dan Fesperman's Layover in Dubai.

 

Sam Keller is on a business trip and on a six hour layover in Dubai, the middle east's playground for the rich, their answer to Las Vegas, but it has so much crime and corruption that it makes Sin City look like LegoLand. Sam's colleague is murdered and Sam is tagged for the crime. This may be a playground, but Dubai is still a conservative Arabic Country, and getting arrested there would be a bad thing. Their laws and penalties are..extreme. His only ally is police detective Anwar Sharaf who was a former gold smuggler and pearl diver.

 

It's an interesting book because of the country its in. Fesperman shows the glitz and glamour and how connected the crime, corporate players and the religious extremism is. I'd like to see more books starring Sharaf, who is a far less tired international detective and setting than American, European, and especially Nordic ones.

post #2529 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave618 View Post

 

   Oh, cool, Malmordo, thanks for that info.  I LOVE The Killing.  The ending is one of my favorite endings of any film.  I have Clean Break and The Big Caper on my Kindle and will be getting to them shortly.

 

   I know Peter Rabe and W.R. Burnett were influences on Westlake, and as I am a Westlake fanatic, I have started reading them as well.  I liked Burnett's High Sierra, much more than I liked the film, but Rabe's work is really really good.  I'm making an effort now to go back and read those little-known writers from the PB original days of the 50's/60's.  There's an amazing amount of talented writing there that's virtually forgotten aside from book geeks like us. 

I have 12 Rabes on my Kindle but have only gotten around to reading Anatomy of a Killer, which I wasn't crazy about, but I'll definitely get to the rest ... hopefully soon.

 

Do you like Charles Williams? His books on Kindle came down in price on Cyber Monday, so I picked up a lot of the titles. I'm a huge fan of Dead Calm -- it's white-knuckle stuff, the Philip Noyce movie never really captured the book's suspense. I also loved Williams' relatively laid-back The Long Saturday Night

 

To be honest, I couldn't give a hoot about crime writers after the 1970s, with the exception of some who started in the late-50s/early60s (Westlake, Leonard, Willeford, Garfield, and Block when he's on). So most of the posts you'll see from me are about the golden age greats.

post #2530 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malmordo View Post

I have 12 Rabes on my Kindle but have only gotten around to reading Anatomy of a Killer, which I wasn't crazy about, but I'll definitely get to the rest ... hopefully soon.

 

Do you like Charles Williams? His books on Kindle came down in price on Cyber Monday, so I picked up a lot of the titles. I'm a huge fan of Dead Calm -- it's white-knuckle stuff, the Philip Noyce movie never really captured the book's suspense. I also loved Williams' relatively laid-back The Long Saturday Night

 

To be honest, I couldn't give a hoot about crime writers after the 1970s, with the exception of some who started in the late-50s/early60s (Westlake, Leonard, Willeford, Garfield, and Block when he's on). So most of the posts you'll see from me are about the golden age greats.

 

   Williams is on my to-read list, Malmordo.  I have about 4 or 5 Rabes on my Kindle.  I have The BoxA Murder in NaplesA Shroud for Jesso, Murder Me For Nickels...a couple others, I think.   I don't have Anatomy, but I want to get my hands on some of Rabe's Daniel Port books, which were a clear influence on Westlake.  Daniel Port may have been one of the first criminals that was the protagonist of a series of novels.  Well, after Fu Manchu, I guess.

 

   I love David Goodis' The Burglar.  My favorite Jim Thompsons are The Grifters and The Getaway ( I liked both adaptations but the novel is a masterpiece and both movies leave out the book's gruesome ending) I have some stuff by Horace McCoy, Lionel White, W.R. Burnett, and a little known writer named Clifton Adams.  He wrote a book called Whom Gods Destroy that I thought was quite good.  It's the ultimate "get revenge on the girl you had a huge crush on in High School who never gave you the time of day" novel. 

 

   Lots of Dan Marlowe.  I love his Earl Drake character.  Marlowe's best Drake books were The Name of the Game is Death and One Endless Hour.  Excellent stuff. 

 

   And all this stuff is available on Kindle, most for under 3 bucks.

 

   I agree that the writers of the 50's and 60's were, on whole, much better than the writers working today, but there are some current writers who knock my socks off.  They're just few and far between.   And you usually have to search them out.  I don't know if you've noticed, but the reading public usually has pretty bad taste.  The fact that the new Alex Cross movie and the Jack Reacher film are highly anticipated is ample evidence. (Again: no insult meant to the fans of those books here; just stating my opinion).

post #2531 of 3063

I was talking with some friends about this the other day.  I think unfortunately what you see in crime you also see paralleled in the fantasy and science fiction genres - writers who become successful but  lack discipline, become self-indulgent, and their works are more and more filled with bloat. 

 

Writers in the 1950s and 60s wrote with economy, and I also think they had the advantage of growing up and living in a time where people were by virtue of society's mores spent more time amongst one another (unless you were a minority, of course), where you generally did military service and expanded your horizons.  It made you a better writer.  They were influenced by what they had read in the genre as teenagers, Poe or Hammett or whomever, but they also studied the classics.  When you dig deep in interviews and read what authors the greats read and loved it's not folks on the B&N top 10 list.  Block's favourite writer? John O'Hara.  David Morrell? Henry James.  I once read that Mickey Spillane of all people could quote Shelley for hours.  The current crop of crime writers, some of them are as bad as the fantasy writers who were inspired by Tolkien (who did writer with economy).  They stick to the field, and it hamstrings them.  I can tell just by reading a book flap if a book by a new author will be a cliche or not - but Westlake could write a hundred books about armed robbers, and none of them would be a cliche.

 

I will say a couple of things about the current generation of writers, though.  There are gems out there in the genre, but they tend to be, I find, authors who could flourish in any genre.  Mitchell Smith can write crime, science fiction, horror, whatever.   

 

Another thing is we now have great books coming from people who would have been marginalized in the 50s and 60s - women and minorities.   
 

post #2532 of 3063
Thread Starter 

A really good neo noir film is Wayne Kramer's The Cooler, which feels like it could have just as easily been set in the 60's or 70's Las Vegas as the 21st century. William H. Macy plays a gambling addict working off a debt for a mobster and casino owner played by Alec Baldwin who got a deserved Oscar nom for the role. Macy's job is an odd one. He's a Cooler. He sits at the table of a winner and his bad luck aura sort of rubs off on others and they lose. And then he meets a girl, a waitress at the casino played by Monica Bello and they go on a date and she sleeps with him. They fall in love and his luck begins to change, everyone around him starts to win, Baldwin starts losing money and a corporation is swooping in to take over, the casino being the last of the old school casino's (It shares a lot of themes with Scorcese's Casino and feels like it could be in the same universe). Things get dark for everyone, but at its core, The Cooler is a noir fairy tale with all that that implies, but I love it, expertly balancing light and dark. Everyone's great, I love Running Scared, but this is Kramer's written and directed masterpiece so far.

 

Baldwin's excellent monologue about old Vegas versus New. Nobody swears like Baldwin!

 

post #2533 of 3063
Quote:
When you dig deep in interviews and read what authors the greats read and loved it's not folks on the B&N top 10 list.  Block's favourite writer? John O'Hara.  David Morrell? Henry James.  I once read that Mickey Spillane of all people could quote Shelley for hours. 

 

 

Yeah and I remember Elmore Leonard talking about southern and English gothic literature in one interview, and it's amazing how many references Charles Willeford got into his writing.

post #2534 of 3063

Hmmm.  I'll have to give Mitchell Smith a try.  Thanks Subotai.

post #2535 of 3063

If you do give him a go, Stone City was recently put up in the Kindle bookstore.

post #2536 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subotai View Post

The current crop of crime writers, some of them are as bad as the fantasy writers who were inspired by Tolkien (who did writer with economy).  They stick to the field, and it hamstrings them.  I can tell just by reading a book flap if a book by a new author will be a cliche or not - but Westlake could write a hundred books about armed robbers, and none of them would be a cliche.

 

Completely agree. A lot of what I've seen from the newer crime fiction writers (especially Charles Ardai) are highly derivative, pastiches essentially. And my feeling is, with so many great writers that I haven't read who basically invented this stuff, why would I waste my time with the copycats?

post #2537 of 3063
Never read much of the Hard Case line tbh. I don't have much of an opinion on them; I know some of their stuff is highly rated but I suppose I find it easier to read the originals, old-school Westlake, Willeford, etc.
post #2538 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subotai View Post

If you do give him a go, Stone City was recently put up in the Kindle bookstore.

 

   Yeah, I downloaded Stone City about an hour ago to my Kindle.  Looks good.  Sacrafice looks good as well, but unfortunately not available for Kindle yet.

post #2539 of 3063

I noticed Hard Case Crime put out two Crime/Mystery novels by writers largely associated with Fantasy/Sci-Fi.  The Dead Man's Brother by Roger Zelazny and Blood on the Mink by Robert Silverberg.

 

Haven't read the Silverberg but I really liked the Zelazny.  He was such a good writer he could have probably written convincingly in any genre.  His son, Trent, is a writer as well, and I liked his heist novel, To Sleep Gently, quite a bit.

post #2540 of 3063

I love Zelazny, will have to check that out. 

post #2541 of 3063

Zelazny's one of my favorite writers period. ADORE HIM.

post #2542 of 3063

My favorite Zelazny is Isle of the Dead, followed closely by Lord of Light and This Immortal

post #2543 of 3063

Declan Burke's Best of 2012 list.

 

I've read maybe half of these, and I'm as glad to see what's not on there as on.  Not all crime.  Like Burke, I love sports novels and The Art of Fielding is my favourite book from the past year; but not surprised to see the sublime Adrian McKinty up there, and a couple of others whose works we won't see until the new year (or you're a lucky devil who gets ARCs, like Cameron!).
 

post #2544 of 3063

So I'm half way through 8 Million Ways to Die and loving it so far. It's my first Scudder book, mostly cos getting a hold of anything written by Lawrence Block down here is a fucking bitch. Thank god for the kindle store. The book does such a great job of communicating what a drag being a PI really is. At this point in most crime novels you'd at least be feeling the edges of some twisted conspiracy, yet here all he does is talk to people and talk to people and talk to people and... nothing. Pretty much exactly as I imagine 99% of all investigating to be.

 

Anyway, there are quite a few Scudder novels and I know that the quality ranges, so anyone mind making a list of the other ones that are worth reading?


Edited by Evi - 12/17/12 at 3:06am
post #2545 of 3063

Hmm.  That's a hard question.  If I dig a writer/character combination, I tend to think even the lesser offerings contain gems. 

post #2546 of 3063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evi View Post

So I'm half way through 8 Million Ways to Die and loving it so far. It's my first Scudder book, mostly cos getting a hold of anything written by Lawrence Block down here is a fucking bitch. Thank god for the kindle store. The book does such a great job of communicating what a drag being a PI really is. At this point in most crime novels you'd at least be feeling the edges of some twisted conspiracy, yet here all he does is talk to people and talk to people and talk to people and... nothing. Pretty much exactly as I imagine 99% of all investigating to be.

 

Anyway, there are quite a few Scudder novels and I know that the quality ranges, so anyone mind making a list of the other ones that are worth reading?


They're all good and worth reading in order because Matt/New York changes. My favorites in italics

 

post #2547 of 3063

Did anyone else find the killer in Hope to Die and Flowers kind of hokey and out of place in the Scudder series? Starting Hard Stuff soon, and hope it's half as good as the other flashback book, Ginmill.

post #2548 of 3063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarence Boddicker View Post

Did anyone else find the killer in Hope to Die and Flowers kind of hokey and out of place in the Scudder series? Starting Hard Stuff soon, and hope it's half as good as the other flashback book, Ginmill.

They are easily the weakest books and Elaine almost getting raped left a bad taste in my mouth. A Drop of the Hard Stuff was great though, a real return to form.

post #2549 of 3063
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post


They're all good and worth reading in order because Matt/New York changes. My favorites in italics

 

 

Thanks Cam! Yeah, I'm sure they're all worth reading but since the books are pretty expensive down here, figured I'd prefer to not shell out for the ones that are merely OK.

post #2550 of 3063
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evi View Post

 

Thanks Cam! Yeah, I'm sure they're all worth reading but since the books are pretty expensive down here, figured I'd prefer to not shell out for the ones that are merely OK.

No offense, but don't call me Cam. I hate it.

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