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Crime Fiction Thread 2.0. - Page 52

post #2551 of 3059
Thread Starter 

So, is John Godey's Johnny Handsome worth tracking down? I really liked The Taking of Pelham 123 when it was re-published a few years ago with the Tony Scott remake. Both movies were pretty faithful to the book. I love Walter Hill's movie with the great Mickey Rourke. I'd bet good money that Frank Miller's A Dame To Kill For was inspired by it, an ugly guy getting a new face to get revenge on somebody.

 

The 70's- Where it was perfectly acceptable and believable to cast Walter Matthau as an action hero. When was the last time they cast a regular guy as the hero? Bruce Willis in Die Hard? I know he was a muscular guy, but not overly so. It looked like the kind of physique you could get in a gym and regular cardio. Our movie heroes look like Ken dolls now, Nu-Captain Kirk is much prettier than Shatner and 60's Shatner was damn good looking. That's why I liked Tony Scott's Unstoppable, Denzel and Chris Pine looked like a couple Midwestern blue collar types that punched a card at the end of the day. I also liked Stallone in CopLand with his paunch and tired, wrinkled face. Don Winslow's heroes may be good looking and buff, but they're Californians that surf and do other stuff on the beach and that builds muscle.
 

post #2552 of 3059

I watched Charley Varrick not so long ago and I still can't wrap my head around Matthau putting the moves on that woman and succeeding.

post #2553 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanW View Post

I watched Charley Varrick not so long ago and I still can't wrap my head around Matthau putting the moves on that woman and succeeding.

 

  I was talking about Charley Varrick with someone on IMDB the other day and it prompted me to rewatch it.  Great stuff.  Varrick is probably the closest thing to a genuine Parker film as we're likely to get.

 

   Except for that idiotic scene where Matthau shags John Vernon's secretary.

post #2554 of 3059

I don't know about that, Varrick is nowhere near as sociopathic as Parker. He's a criminal more out of necessity than anything else.
 

post #2555 of 3059

He's the Last of the Independents, just like his crop-dusting company's motto states.  Isn't that what Parker was proving he was when he went up against the Outfit?  Varrick is methodical, an excellent planner, is married to a wife "in the life", and works with people who do not always do the smart thing.

 

Remind you of anyone?

 

Even the way Matthau looks jibes with how Parker was described: tall, shaggy, big hands, long arms, etc. 

 

And I disagree with your statement that Parker is a sociopath.  Parker isn't like 99.999999% of humanity.  Sociopaths usually like inflicting pain and violence and Parker likes neither.  For him, violence is a tool of the trade, just like a lock-pick, a car, a ski-mask, a gun is.  No more, no less. 

post #2556 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave618 View Post

He's the Last of the Independents, just like his crop-dusting company's motto states.  Isn't that what Parker was proving he was when he went up against the Outfit?  Varrick is methodical, an excellent planner, is married to a wife "in the life", and works with people who do not always do the smart thing.

 

Remind you of anyone?

 

Even the way Matthau looks jibes with how Parker was described: tall, shaggy, big hands, long arms, etc. 

 

And I disagree with your statement that Parker is a sociopath.  Parker isn't like 99.999999% of humanity.  Sociopaths usually like inflicting pain and violence and Parker likes neither.  For him, violence is a tool of the trade, just like a lock-pick, a car, a ski-mask, a gun is.  No more, no less. 

Parker may not go out of his way to hurt someone or enjoy inflicting pain, that'd make him a psychopath, but he doesn't care if he has to hurt someone to achieve his goal and only avoids it if it would make his life harder, that makes him a sociopath.

post #2557 of 3059
Thread Starter 

I've liked Chris Pratt since Everwood and adore him on Parks and Recreation where he plays the good-hearted but dim Andy. He got absolutely ripped for Zero Dark Thirty and as a result I no longer want Bradley Cooper as Don Winslow's Boone Daniels as much. One of the things I like about Seal Team Six and why I made Moses Johnson in Moving Black Objects one of them is because A) They're the badasses you call when you need a real badass and B) They're fit, but they have to blend in, hence facial hair and stuff.

 

post #2558 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post

Parker may not go out of his way to hurt someone or enjoy inflicting pain, that'd make him a psychopath, but he doesn't care if he has to hurt someone to achieve his goal and only avoids it if it would make his life harder, that makes him a sociopath.

 

   Dammit, you got me there, Mr. Smarty Pants!

 

   How can I come across as intelligent and worldly if you're here to call me on my mistakes?;-) lol

 

   Seriously, good point.  I clearly was on the wrong "path".biggrin.gif

 

   See?  I'm still the master of bad puns around here.wink.gif

post #2559 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave618 View Post

 

   Dammit, you got me there, Mr. Smarty Pants!

 

   How can I come across as intelligent and worldly if you're here to call me on my mistakes?;-) lol

 

   Seriously, good point.  I clearly was on the wrong "path".biggrin.gif

 

   See?  I'm still the master of bad puns around here.wink.gif


Seriously, the Parker novels taught me the difference between socio and psycho. Parker is a shark, but God made a mistake and he was born as a man. TV and book Dexter Morgan goes out of his way where the sole goal is hurting someone, Parker doesn't do that.

post #2560 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post


Seriously, the Parker novels taught me the difference between socio and psycho. Parker is a shark, but God made a mistake and he was born as a man. TV and book Dexter Morgan goes out of his way where the sole goal is hurting someone, Parker doesn't do that.

 

   Agreed.  I think I may have gotten my "paths" crossed.cool.gif  Psychos are delusional, dresses up in women's clothes and hack away at people because they hear dogs talking to them.  Socios are just people who have no guilty conscience and could care less if they kill you if that means they get what they want.  But they don't see or hear things that aren't there.

 

   Parker has been described as a wolf by new poster Pisher, a shark by you...  Are you sure you guys aren't thinking of that rotten TV series Manimal from the 80's? biggrin.gif

 

   Parker is the guy I'd love to be.  Totally off the grid, pulling major heists once a year or so, a beautiful woman to come home to in a secluded cabin, totally in the moment with no sense of regret, remorse, or anxiety.  Of course, the potential outcome of standing in a prison shower surrounded by dudes names Bubba, Evil Eric, and Jake "The Jackhammer" make an attempt at this lifestyle highly unlikely.eek.gif

post #2561 of 3059
Thread Starter 

Reading a novel that's pretty good so far, but there's still time for it to fly off the rails, but I have hopes. Caravan of Thieves by David Rich. Like Matthew Quirk's really good The 500, The protagonist Rollie Waters is the estranged son of a grifter. Rollie grows up and joins the Marines where they recognize his talents and give him dangerous jobs doing intelligence as a spy. It's the only time Rollie really feels comfortable, living on the edge and lying like a politician caught in a scandal. Then, A lot of Saddam's gold is stolen and they think Rollie's daddy had something to do with it. Rollie has to find the stolen goods..or else.

 

I like it because it respects my intelligence and mostly doesn't hold my hand. Rollie is a good character, not a cocky asshole, but not a boring wimp. The scenes where he has to use his skills are really cool. It's a stylish and gritty thriller covering different, diverse countries and cultures. Even if I had read it in time I don't think It'd make my best of the year, but I like it a lot.

post #2562 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave618 View Post

 

   Agreed.  I think I may have gotten my "paths" crossed.cool.gif  Psychos are delusional, dresses up in women's clothes and hack away at people because they hear dogs talking to them.  Socios are just people who have no guilty conscience and could care less if they kill you if that means they get what they want.  But they don't see or hear things that aren't there.

 

   Parker has been described as a wolf by new poster Pisher, a shark by you...  Are you sure you guys aren't thinking of that rotten TV series Manimal from the 80's? biggrin.gif

 

   Parker is the guy I'd love to be.  Totally off the grid, pulling major heists once a year or so, a beautiful woman to come home to in a secluded cabin, totally in the moment with no sense of regret, remorse, or anxiety.  Of course, the potential outcome of standing in a prison shower surrounded by dudes names Bubba, Evil Eric, and Jake "The Jackhammer" make an attempt at this lifestyle highly unlikely.eek.gif

You want to be a sociopath that has no problem hurting others with no emotions except the most base and carnal?  No offense, I can see the appeal of being the master thief, but Parker is a monster. That would be a terrible life and wish. A saner choice would be Ocean's 11 Danny Ocean or someone on Leverage. (A show I really love.)

post #2563 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post

You want to be a sociopath that has no problem hurting others with no emotions except the most base and carnal?  No offense, I can see the appeal of being the master thief, but Parker is a monster. That would be a terrible life and wish. A saner choice would be Ocean's 11 Danny Ocean or someone on Leverage. (A show I really love.)

 

   No, it's more about being a rebel and not adhering to what society says is the norm.  I don't want to hurt anyone.  I don't think Parker wants to hurt anyone either.  But I would have lines in the sand I wouldn't cross where as Parker, well, his lines are farther out there, if they even exist.

 

   I'm actually a lot more like Grofield.  Weird, goofy sense of humor, a sense of playfulness even in stressful situations, I even hum and imagine movie music in my mind in certain situations, and did it well before picking up my first Stark.  I suspect many of us do.  Who hasn't imagined the James Bond theme when all dressed up and heading out to pick up a girl for a date?cool.gif

 

   No, I'm not into hurting people.  But I admire Parker's sense of will, his mental intensity when planning a heist, the fact he refuses to live the life and stay in the box society wishes they could stick him in.  That's also why I love Travis McGee.

 

   And oh, yeah, I wouldn't mind walking out of a bank with a gym bag full of hundreds. biggrin.gif  But, I'm way too much of a coward to risk what can happen if things go wrong.eek.gif

post #2564 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave618 View Post

 

    Psychos are delusional, dresses up in women's clothes and hack away at people because they hear dogs talking to them.  Socios are just people who have no guilty conscience and could care less if they kill you if that means they get what they want.  But they don't see or hear things that aren't there.

 

Psycho is a pejorative term that most people use to refer to either psychosis or psychopathy.  But those two conditions are quite different.

post #2565 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subotai View Post

 

Psycho is a pejorative term that most people use to refer to either psychosis or psychopathy.  But those two conditions are quite different.

 

   So Psychosis and Psychopathy are different conditions? 

post #2566 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave618 View Post

 

   So Psychosis and Psychopathy are different conditions? 

 

Very.

 

IIRC, Psychosis is being out of touch with reality. Psychopathy is a total lack of empathy or amoral behavior.

 

A psychopath does not have to be out of touch with reality. Dexter Morgan would be a good case of a Pscyhopath (even if they try to make him a little warm and fuzzy for TV), but not psychotic - as he has a full understanding of what he does, of right and wrong, etc. He's essentially sane.

post #2567 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Levine View Post

 

Very.

 

IIRC, Psychosis is being out of touch with reality. Psychopathy is a total lack of empathy or amoral behavior.

 

A psychopath does not have to be out of touch with reality. Dexter Morgan would be a good case of a Pscyhopath (even if they try to make him a little warm and fuzzy for TV), but not psychotic - as he has a full understanding of what he does, of right and wrong, etc. He's essentially sane.

Dexter has referred to himself as a sociopath, but he's more like a psychopath with his violent tendencies and Dark Passenger stuff, but the show has never been consistent on his sickness, or indeed been very smart. (Michael C. Hall is so great though that it's gotten me through the worst parts of the show, but La Guerta's actions, previously a very smart character, does so many dumb things this season that it's staggering. )

 

That said, the books are so much worse that it's hilarious. Jeff Lindsay, also, is snobby about crime fiction, saying he doesn't read it. It shows.

post #2568 of 3059
Thread Starter 

http://www.avclub.com/articles/jack-reacher,90101/

 

This review makes it sound pretty accurate to the books, which means it's horrible. The review also brings up something not mentioned much about the books, the rampant misogyny. Child writes strong women...who always melt after meeting Reacher and usually need saving. It's not a negative portrayal, but it's a terrible one.

post #2569 of 3059
Thread Starter 

Actually, hilariously, the best portrayal of a sociopath in pop culture today is probably It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia's Dennis Reynolds. Charlie is a glue-sniffing and mentally retarded drug addict, Mac is just stupid and confused about his sexuality, Dee is just a loser, Frank just lives for pleasure, like a modern Caligula, but Dennis? Dennis Reynolds will fucking destroy you if he thinks you wronged or offended him in some (usually minor)  way. Don't get me wrong, it's a really funny show and he's a great actor (and writer!), but Dennis is a monster.

 

A close runner-up might be Archer's Sterling Archer, but he doesn't callously hurt others like Dennis, he just thinks his goals and pleasures are more important than anyone else's.
 

post #2570 of 3059

There's a LOT of rape-as-threat in the Jack Reacher novels. I remember reading the Killing Floor and feeling really uncomfortable with that angle.

 

And yeah, one of the things that gives the Parker novels such staying power is how cold the character is. He's not a loveable rogue, he's a straight up bad man who doesn't care about the people he crosses. In a lot of ways I'd say his closest cousin is Tom Ripley

post #2571 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenOrtega View Post

There's a LOT of rape-as-threat in the Jack Reacher novels. I remember reading the Killing Floor and feeling really uncomfortable with that angle.

 

And yeah, one of the things that gives the Parker novels such staying power is how cold the character is. He's not a loveable rogue, he's a straight up bad man who doesn't care about the people he crosses. In a lot of ways I'd say his closest cousin is Tom Ripley

 I love Ripley, The Talented Mr. Ripley is one of my favorite novels ever. Part of me doesn't want him to win because he's a monster, but I can't wait to see how he does it. Same with Vic Mackey on The Shield.

 

 The review says the alpha male protagonist isn't new, which is true, but it goes onto use Sherlock and Superman as examples. The problem is that those two are interesting or in Superman's case, potentially interesting with a good writer like Mark Waid on Superman: Birthright or Morrison's All-Star Superman. Sherlock is a socially awkward drug addict and crucially, the POV is from his long-suffering but loyal partner and Superman has that immigrant thing going where he's vastly different from everyone else, but his upbringing by the Kents makes him the best humane and decent guy alive even though he's not from here. Grant Morrison's and Dwayne McDuffies Batman in JLA and JLU would be the best comparison, but there was a fun winking quality to those JLA/JLU stories. Even Robert B. Parker's Spenser was vulnerable, especially if you went after those he loves. Reacher is just boring.

 

 Reading a book in a series it's pretty safe to assume the protagonist will survive and win, but there's always that "But maybe NOT this time..." feeling in a well-written thriller like Don Winslow's The Gentleman's Hour that put all the characters through hell, or the original Alpha Male Travis McGee, who got his ass handed to him all the time, which made the eventual victories all the better. With Reacher, you know he'll utterly dominate everything in his path and it is so boring.

 

 And I really love Christopher McQuarrie. The Way of The Gun, which he wrote and directed, is one of my favorite movies ever.

post #2572 of 3059
Quote:
eading a book in a series it's pretty safe to assume the protagonist will survive and win, but there's always that "But maybe NOT this time..." feeling in a well-written thriller like Don Winslow's The Gentleman's Hour that put all the characters through hell, or the original Alpha Male Travis McGee, who got his ass handed to him all the time, which made the eventual victories all the better. With Reacher, you know he'll utterly dominate everything in his path and it is so boring.

 

 

Interestingly the only time I ever felt Reacher worked was in Echo Burning. And that's mostly because the idea of a central Ross Macdonald mystery with all the family sins and bigotry you can expect, being interrupted by this complete force of nature of a character is a fairly fascinating contrast.

 

It's not good by any means, but I love the idea of somebody who's seemingly from the wrong story wandering in and fucking things up.

post #2573 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenOrtega View Post

 

 

Interestingly the only time I ever felt Reacher worked was in Echo Burning. And that's mostly because the idea of a central Ross Macdonald mystery with all the family sins and bigotry you can expect, being interrupted by this complete force of nature of a character is a fairly fascinating contrast.

 

It's not good by any means, but I love the idea of somebody who's seemingly from the wrong story wandering in and fucking things up.

Parker did that a lot with Spenser, but Parker was a much better writer.

post #2574 of 3059

Absolutely!

post #2575 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Levine View Post

 

Very.

 

IIRC, Psychosis is being out of touch with reality. Psychopathy is a total lack of empathy or amoral behavior.

 

A psychopath does not have to be out of touch with reality. Dexter Morgan would be a good case of a Pscyhopath (even if they try to make him a little warm and fuzzy for TV), but not psychotic - as he has a full understanding of what he does, of right and wrong, etc. He's essentially sane.

 

   Well, is Parker a Psychopath or a Sociopath?  Both share the quality of being totally amoral.  Am I wrong in stating the major difference is that a Psychopath uses violence more indescriminately?

post #2576 of 3059

Sociopathy and Psychopathy are really so closely linked together that it's sometimes hard to separate them. Parker most certainly has severe anti-social tendencies at the very least, and most of his behavior is text-book sociopath.

 

 

Which considering that he's a professional criminal is pretty realistic. I'd imagine the number of guys who don't tick off boxes in sociopath tests are fairly low.

post #2577 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenOrtega View Post

Sociopathy and Psychopathy are really so closely linked together that it's sometimes hard to separate them. Parker most certainly has severe anti-social tendencies at the very least, and most of his behavior is text-book sociopath.

 

 

Which considering that he's a professional criminal is pretty realistic. I'd imagine the number of guys who don't tick off boxes in sociopath tests are fairly low.


  "I'd imagine the number of guys who don't tick off boxes in sociopath tests are fairly low."

 

   Was that a Freudian slip? wink.gif

 

post #2578 of 3059

Well I've known some pretty awful guys in my life.

post #2579 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post

 

That said, the books are so much worse that it's hilarious. Jeff Lindsay, also, is snobby about crime fiction, saying he doesn't read it. It shows.

 

Didn't the Dexter Books go all Clive Barker from the third book on? Is it now more horror than crime

 

(I've only read/seen book/season one so only going on what I've heard)

post #2580 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Love Machine View Post

 

Didn't the Dexter Books go all Clive Barker from the third book on? Is it now more horror than crime

 

(I've only read/seen book/season one so only going on what I've heard)


Yeah, third or fourth book reveals the Dark Passenger is some kind of ancient entity. I stopped reading after that. Imagine my shock when the show was decent with a great lead.

post #2581 of 3059
Thread Starter 

Also, book Dexter is a much worse guy, torturing his victims for awhile before killing them, which makes book Deb's (Who is an IDIOT) allowance of his crimes much more baffling. I imagine if TV Dexter tortured people like in the books that Deborah wouldn't have such trouble deciding what to do.
 

post #2582 of 3059

That I don't have too much of a problem with. But Dexter as a character in both show and books is a character I've never been able to get behind.

post #2583 of 3059

Not to revive all the psychiatric discussion, but this is a pretty good read on the story behind Michael Bay's new film:

 

http://www.miaminewtimes.com/1999-12-23/news/pain-gain/

post #2584 of 3059

It's a great read! Also horrifying.

 

It also FEELS like something that would just happen in Florida.

post #2585 of 3059

No offense to any Floridians here on the board, but weirder than weird stuff seems to happen in FLA way more than other states.  Thorn creator James W. Hall even wrote a book of essays about some of the "only in FLA" oddities.

post #2586 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenOrtega View Post

It's a great read! Also horrifying.

 

It also FEELS like something that would just happen in Florida.


Totally, right? I find Carl Hiassen, Elmore Leonard and to a lesser extent, Tim Dorsey, completely plausible because of what really happens in that shit-hole state.

 

I can't wait for the movie, and even though it's Michael Bay, I hope the trailer is a bait and switch and it goes really dark like the real story. Fargo, in the Sunshine State style.

post #2587 of 3059
Thread Starter 

 My current favorite crime show, Leverage is airing its series finale, Christmas night. It was a really good show, breezy enough that you could relax to it (haaaaate the term "turn your brain off." Why would you want to do that? Entertainment should be engaging.), but smart enough that you had to pay attention with some great character writing and beats. Hutton's Nathan Ford was a great anti-hero, a wolf hunting wolves and completely human.

 

 Every season finale worked as an ending, in case it never came back. Season two was my favorite ending. "Who...are you, Nate?" "My name is Nathan Ford, and....I AM A THIEF."

 

http://www.avclub.com/articles/hoping-nobody-notices-the-friday-before-christmas,90206/

post #2588 of 3059

I wonder if the blonde woman in Hutton's crew named Parker is a homage to the Great One, DEW?

post #2589 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave618 View Post

I wonder if the blonde woman in Hutton's crew named Parker is a homage to the Great One, DEW?

 

She was. Cameron actually asked Executive Producer John Rogers that very question back in 2009:

 

 

Quote:
CH: It is no coincidence that your crazy thief character is named Parker, and that your bank robbery episode last season was partially named after Westlake’s second John Dortmunder novel, Bank Shot (1972). Are you a big crime-fiction fan?
 
JR: I’m more of a sci-fi geek than a mystery geek, but I had my classic mystery education. Weird blend of Ellery Queen and the pulps. But yeah, of course Parker is named after Westlake’s character. Hell, her name’s not even really Parker. I leave it to you whether she chose the name, or even if in “Leverage world,” thieves give that nickname as a sign of respect.

 

 

http://therapsheet.blogspot.com/2009/07/thieves-like-them.html

post #2590 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Levine View Post

 

She was. Cameron actually asked Executive Producer John Rogers that very question back in 2009:

 

 

 

 

http://therapsheet.blogspot.com/2009/07/thieves-like-them.html

Thanks for saving me the trouble of linking that.

 

I choose to believe Parker is a name passed down only to the best thieves and that in the world of Leverage, Westlake's Parker existed and was their Yoda.

 

Leverage really was the perfect response to the greed of corporations and the banks and the crash of '08. I elaborate on this in my curse-happy intro into that interview.


Edited by Cameron Hughes - 12/22/12 at 1:44pm
post #2591 of 3059

I finished Justified Season 2 and holy hell it was a good ride. Goggin's performance as Boyd Crowder was fantastic (that fucking hair) and he sold Crowder's Road to Damascus arc with brilliance before arriving at the truth of acceptance. I really liked that this season was essentially driven by strong female characters like Ava, Aunt Helen and Mags Bennett (I'm not including Winona because her character irritates me for some reason). I loved the scene with Mags and Aunt Helen in the diner because it illustrated how much power those two women had, especially in the case of Aunt Helen. Raylan's scene with Dicky in the forest was a great piece of acting from Olyphant, terrifically written and performed and a summation of Raylan's feelings about Aunt Helen.

post #2592 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanW View Post

I finished Justified Season 2 and holy hell it was a good ride. Goggin's performance as Boyd Crowder was fantastic (that fucking hair) and he sold Crowder's Road to Damascus arc with brilliance before arriving at the truth of acceptance. I really liked that this season was essentially driven by strong female characters like Ava, Aunt Helen and Mags Bennett (I'm not including Winona because her character irritates me for some reason). I loved the scene with Mags and Aunt Helen in the diner because it illustrated how much power those two women had, especially in the case of Aunt Helen. Raylan's scene with Dicky in the forest was a great piece of acting from Olyphant, terrifically written and performed and a summation of Raylan's feelings about Aunt Helen.

Yeah, the show really captures how Leonard writes powerful but feminine women.

 

I want Michael Keaton as Ray Nicolette on the show in the worst way, and the guy that Samuel L. Jackson played at the end of Out Of Sight.

 

I still think Terriers sounded more like Leonard than Justified does, but I love listening to them talk on Justified.

post #2593 of 3059
Thread Starter 

Margo Martindale singing High on a Mountain-Top on Justified

 

post #2594 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post

Yeah, the show really captures how Leonard writes powerful but feminine women.

 

I want Michael Keaton as Ray Nicolette on the show in the worst way, and the guy that Samuel L. Jackson played at the end of Out Of Sight.

 

I still think Terriers sounded more like Leonard than Justified does, but I love listening to them talk on Justified.

 

"I get a hard-on just thinking about it" "Well, then, we've both been warned"

post #2595 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanW View Post

 

"I get a hard-on just thinking about it" "Well, then, we've both been warned"


I don't know what this is from, sorry. Justified or Terriers?

post #2596 of 3059

Justified but I mangled the quote it should've been "I love this shit. It get's me hard" "Well then, we've both been warned"
 

post #2597 of 3059

Just finished The Black Book, which I thought was really good. It's nice to see that Harry has a douchebag supervisor again. I kinda missed Pounds. 

 

I'm finally giving White Jazz another try after quitting it about five years ago. Sometimes you just have to brace yourself for Ellroy's staccato style, because it's pretty good about 50 pages in. I'll finally finish the quartet, which has been my shame for a while!

post #2598 of 3059

I listened to a commentary of Crime Wave with Ellroy and Eddie Muller which was alot of fun. Sterling Hayden IS Bud White according to Ellroy. Happy Holidays to everyone in this thread.

post #2599 of 3059
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanW View Post

I listened to a commentary of Crime Wave with Ellroy and Eddie Muller which was alot of fun. Sterling Hayden IS Bud White according to Ellroy. Happy Holidays to everyone in this thread.

If you haven't, read Muller's San Francisco 1940's boxing noir The Distance, it's excellent.

post #2600 of 3059
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanW View Post

I listened to a commentary of Crime Wave with Ellroy and Eddie Muller which was alot of fun. Sterling Hayden IS Bud White according to Ellroy. Happy Holidays to everyone in this thread.

 

   Sterling Hayden, besides being an excellent actor, was an excellent writer.  Check out his autobiography Wanderer

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