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post #15651 of 18468
In hindsight, one could argue that the film is transphobic as well. However, I don't believe that a film should cater to my political leanings, so none of the shaky sociopolitical implications of the film bother me a fraction of the amount that the sheer narrative stupidity of the ending bothers me.
post #15652 of 18468

The mood of it is so effective, I never get hung up on complaint of narrative inconsistency.

 

I caught it right when it hit DVD, and it was the first film to rattle me in quite sometime.

post #15653 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny View Post

The killer is a closeted lesbian whose male alt-personality is a necrophilic psychopath.

It's fucking dumb.

I disagree with that reading. I never saw it as her alternative personality, but that the story she was telling to the police was a complete lie to hide her killing spree and eventually the film switches perspective from her biased pov to an objective pov of what actually happened. The beginning where they have the camera and she asks "Are we recording?" is the start of her story and why the killer is such a cliche since she's just making shit up to hide her crimes. But the way it's filmed can be open to many interpretations. It's not a well scripted or edited movie at all.

post #15654 of 18468
That reading only works if you don't see the killer alone, masturbating himself with a decapitated head in his first appearance. That scene alone kills the idea that she's telling this to the police as a cover story and concurrently serves as one of the reasons why the twist doesn't work. I haven't seen it in awhile, but it's obviously meant to be a dual personality and a wildly improbable expression of her repressed sexuality and "penis envy".
post #15655 of 18468

"Extras announced for LADY IN WHITE. Extended Director's Cut! Out 9/27"

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/ScreamFactoryDVD/photos/a.130215417115478.24939.103961936407493/824048767732136/?type=3&theater

 

"The wait is over! After a few delays we can finally announce the goods that will be on our upcoming release of the 1988 cult classic LADY IN WHITE. Writer/Director Frank LaLoggia was quite involved with our release and we thank him for his help.
Read on for the exciting details…"
...
DISC ONE:
• Director’s Cut of the film (117 minutes)
• EXTENDED Behind the Scenes Footage – production and post production
• Introduction by Frank LaLoggia
• Audio Commentary with Frank LaLoggia
• Behind the Scenes Footage with introduction by Frank LaLoggia
• Deleted Scenes with introduction by Frank LaLoggia
• Promotional Short Film
• Theatrical & Alternate Trailer
• TV & Radio Spots
• Behind the Scenes Photo Montage
• Extended Photo Gallery

DISC TWO:
• Extended Director’s Cut (126 minutes) with never-before-seen footage
• Original Theatrical Cut (113 minutes)

 

post #15656 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

"Extras announced for LADY IN WHITE. Extended Director's Cut! Out 9/27"

I've always heard good things about LADY IN WHITE, but have never seen it.  I trust it's well worth a look?  The tagline/copy at the top of that image (which I assume comes from the theatrical poster) definitely intrigues me.

post #15657 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by smugbug View Post
 

I saw The Ring before I had seen Ringu. And The Ring, I found, was a very effective horror film. Creeped me the fuck out and still does. Helps it had a brilliant marketing campaign at that year's (year it was released) SDCC. Just brilliant. 

 

Then I watch Ringu and all I could do was chuckle. I did not like that one. 

 

OK, I guess since this is (tragically) my field of (relative) expertise, I should share. I could be wrong in a lot of places, though. It gets complicated. Strap yourself in, it's going to be a wild ride.

 

The Ring Series started with a series of books by Koji Suzuki.

 

Ring

Spiral

Loop

 

There was a short story collection called Birthday which was events that happened before Ring. Then came two more novels, 'S' and 'Tide' which I believe were set after Loop. Seems fairly straightforward, right?

 

Well, judge for yourself with what happened to the Ring universe after it made the jump to film and TV.

 

1995: The Ring (Kanzenban) 'Complete Edition'. TV movie based on the first book.

1998: The Ring (Ringu) - The Japanese cinema version probably the best known to the rest of the world and also based on the first book.

1998: Rasen (Spiral) - The Japanese cinema version of the second book made at the same time as the cinema version based on the first book. A few cast members carried over, different production team though and it bombed.

 

1999: The Ring (The Final Chapter): A twelve part TV Series that amalgamated book ideas and new ones from the cinema version.

1999: The Ring 2: Because Rasen (based on the book) did so badly, they got the cast and crew of the first cinema version (Ringu), including the director, Hideo Nakata to make a new sequel, which was not. They basically pretended Rasen never happened and came up with a whole new story. 

 

1999: Ring Virus: Korean remake of Ringu. Uses a few elements from the book that Ringu didn't. Drops a few things that Ringu did use.

 

1999: Rasen (The series): Sequel to the The Ring (The Final Chapter) TV series. 

 

2000: Ring Zero: Based on Birthday (the book) and tells the story of Sadako before she ended up down the well. That at least seems fairly straightforward.

 

2002: The Ring (US remake): Largely follows Ringu except for all that stuff about the horses. 

 

2005: Rings (a short film which leads into the events of The Ring Two - US sequel)

2005: The Ring Two. Let's get Hideo Nakata, who directed Ringu and The Ring 2 (but not Rasen) to direct the sequel to the American version, which is not even remotely based on either of them. I just remember lots of deer and Sissy Spacek being weird. Not even remotely a good film.

 

2012: Sadako 3D - supposedly the canonical sequel to the film Rasen (the one everyone pretends didn't happen and replaced with The Ring 2, not to be confused with The Ring Two). Based, or at least draws material from the novel 'S'.

 

2013: Sadako 3D 2 - sequel to Sadako 3D, appropriately enough.

 

Remember the novel Loop I mentioned right back up the top there? As far as I know, that's never been made into a film or TV. Here's where ... spoilers to follow ...

 

It turns out that ...

 

The events of the books Ring, Rasen and Birthday all happened inside a computer simulation. That's right, just like The Matrix - except remember this book came out the year before. I bought it as an import and read it. Turns out the 'real world' is being plagued by something called The Metastatic Cancer Virus and a powerful computer system is tasked with finding a cure but maybe the system actually created the disease which manifested as Sadako and it escaped as an infective disease (and not a spooky ghost girl, though in the earlier books, Sadako is also connected to the smallpox virus somehow) and it turns out one of the characters is an analogue to the journalist character in the first ... I want to say two books - like that character's a simulation or something. He's male in the books and some of the filmed adaptations but Nanako Matsushima plays her in the Japanese film and I guess that's who Naomi Watts is based on and ... well I don't know at this point.

 

As far as I know, Loop's never been adapted and 'S' may well skip over this revelation, at least in the film works that are derived from it (haven't read it or seen the films, Loop was enough for now, thank you - 'now' approaching 10 years if I haven't passed that mark already).

 

Then of course, there's the planned sequel? continuation? reboot? of the American version, have they filmed that yet? I want to say ... maybe ... ? I think it's due out in 2017, was supposed to be this year ... perhaps.

 

And finally for now, they went and did a crossover where Sadako battles Kayako from The Grudge, because ... well, at this point, why not? Of course, there's some humans caught in the middle, so it's Aliens Versus Predator (I prefer to use the comic book title as ... well ... they were much better) all over again.

 

As for the history of The Grudge on TV and film ... well ... that's a whole other story if anyone wants to hear it. It's slightly less tangled than the above. I'm not kidding or overstating that either. It's its own special mess.

 

Did I miss anything in the above? Probably. I didn't even touch on Sadako's appearances at Japanese baseball games for starters (and now she's even pitching balls at Kayako ... or is Kayako doing the pitching? Or do they each get a go?). 

post #15658 of 18468
Lady in White is a very good kids horror film, along the lines of Something Wicked This Way Comes. It's more Halloween creepy than actually scary, but if that tone appeals to you, it's solid.
post #15659 of 18468
I only remember seeing it young, based on that awesome movie poster (/VHS cover). I remember it being pretty effective when I was young. Worth a look.
post #15660 of 18468
I used to watch The Lady in White when it was in semi-regular cable rotation when I was a kid in the early 90's. I was around Lukas Haas' age in the film when I saw it and I'm sure that actually made it scarier for me (I haven't seen it in over twenty years, but the eerie atmosphere of the thing lingers). I can't say whether it's good or not, but like THE KINDRED, THE CURSE, and CAMERON'S CLOSET, it's one of those relatively obscure horror films / spook stories that got under my skin when I was coming up.


I'm actually curious about revisiting Richard Franklin's LINK (1986). It's probably not great, but I remember having an attachment to that film. It was definitely the first Franklin film I saw before PSYCHO II, followed by ROAD GAMES (my favorite film of Franklin's and the one where I learned his name) and eventually PATRICK.
post #15661 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny View Post

I'm actually curious about revisiting Richard Franklin's LINK (1986). It's probably not great, but I remember having an attachment to that film. It was definitely the first Franklin film I saw before PSYCHO II, followed by ROAD GAMES (my favorite film of Franklin's and the one where I learned his name) and eventually PATRICK.

LINK isn't anything special, but it's certainly not awful.  The best thing about it is Jerry Goldsmith's score, which is all kinds of crazy...

 

 

ROAD GAMES is my favorite Franklin entry, as well.  It's a wonderful blend of REAR WINDOW and DUEL, and Stacy Keach is terrific in it.  Really underrated/underseen thriller.

post #15662 of 18468

Speaking of horror, its H.P. Lovecraft's birthday, today.

 

A birthday portrait just for him.

 

post #15663 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan View Post
 

 

OK, I guess since this is (tragically) my field of (relative) expertise, I should share. I could be wrong in a lot of places, though. It gets complicated. Strap yourself in, it's going to be a wild ride.

 

The Ring Series started with a series of books by Koji Suzuki.

 

Ring

Spiral

Loop

 

There was a short story collection called Birthday which was events that happened before Ring. Then came two more novels, 'S' and 'Tide' which I believe were set after Loop. Seems fairly straightforward, right?

 

Well, judge for yourself with what happened to the Ring universe after it made the jump to film and TV.

 

1995: The Ring (Kanzenban) 'Complete Edition'. TV movie based on the first book.

1998: The Ring (Ringu) - The Japanese cinema version probably the best known to the rest of the world and also based on the first book.

1998: Rasen (Spiral) - The Japanese cinema version of the second book made at the same time as the cinema version based on the first book. A few cast members carried over, different production team though and it bombed.

 

1999: The Ring (The Final Chapter): A twelve part TV Series that amalgamated book ideas and new ones from the cinema version.

1999: The Ring 2: Because Rasen (based on the book) did so badly, they got the cast and crew of the first cinema version (Ringu), including the director, Hideo Nakata to make a new sequel, which was not. They basically pretended Rasen never happened and came up with a whole new story. 

 

1999: Ring Virus: Korean remake of Ringu. Uses a few elements from the book that Ringu didn't. Drops a few things that Ringu did use.

 

1999: Rasen (The series): Sequel to the The Ring (The Final Chapter) TV series. 

 

2000: Ring Zero: Based on Birthday (the book) and tells the story of Sadako before she ended up down the well. That at least seems fairly straightforward.

 

2002: The Ring (US remake): Largely follows Ringu except for all that stuff about the horses. 

 

2005: Rings (a short film which leads into the events of The Ring Two - US sequel)

2005: The Ring Two. Let's get Hideo Nakata, who directed Ringu and The Ring 2 (but not Rasen) to direct the sequel to the American version, which is not even remotely based on either of them. I just remember lots of deer and Sissy Spacek being weird. Not even remotely a good film.

 

2012: Sadako 3D - supposedly the canonical sequel to the film Rasen (the one everyone pretends didn't happen and replaced with The Ring 2, not to be confused with The Ring Two). Based, or at least draws material from the novel 'S'.

 

2013: Sadako 3D 2 - sequel to Sadako 3D, appropriately enough.

 

Remember the novel Loop I mentioned right back up the top there? As far as I know, that's never been made into a film or TV. Here's where ... spoilers to follow ...

 

It turns out that ...

 

The events of the books Ring, Rasen and Birthday all happened inside a computer simulation. That's right, just like The Matrix - except remember this book came out the year before. I bought it as an import and read it. Turns out the 'real world' is being plagued by something called The Metastatic Cancer Virus and a powerful computer system is tasked with finding a cure but maybe the system actually created the disease which manifested as Sadako and it escaped as an infective disease (and not a spooky ghost girl, though in the earlier books, Sadako is also connected to the smallpox virus somehow) and it turns out one of the characters is an analogue to the journalist character in the first ... I want to say two books - like that character's a simulation or something. He's male in the books and some of the filmed adaptations but Nanako Matsushima plays her in the Japanese film and I guess that's who Naomi Watts is based on and ... well I don't know at this point.

 

As far as I know, Loop's never been adapted and 'S' may well skip over this revelation, at least in the film works that are derived from it (haven't read it or seen the films, Loop was enough for now, thank you - 'now' approaching 10 years if I haven't passed that mark already).

 

Then of course, there's the planned sequel? continuation? reboot? of the American version, have they filmed that yet? I want to say ... maybe ... ? I think it's due out in 2017, was supposed to be this year ... perhaps.

 

And finally for now, they went and did a crossover where Sadako battles Kayako from The Grudge, because ... well, at this point, why not? Of course, there's some humans caught in the middle, so it's Aliens Versus Predator (I prefer to use the comic book title as ... well ... they were much better) all over again.

 

As for the history of The Grudge on TV and film ... well ... that's a whole other story if anyone wants to hear it. It's slightly less tangled than the above. I'm not kidding or overstating that either. It's its own special mess.

 

Did I miss anything in the above? Probably. I didn't even touch on Sadako's appearances at Japanese baseball games for starters (and now she's even pitching balls at Kayako ... or is Kayako doing the pitching? Or do they each get a go?). 

 

 

Wow, nice. Always been a fan of the Ring series, and this seems like a pretty complete list of everything so far. To me, Hideo Nakata's original Japanese film adaption is simply a perfect modern ghost story. Different era, different country and language, yet it captures the essence of M.R. James brilliantly. It is moody and spinechilling and just great. I can't believe it is nearly 20 years old. Jesus!

 

Only watched the Verbinski version once, and that was more than enough.

post #15664 of 18468

Asking as someone who doesn't watch much J Horror. But is it true a lot of them end with most of the characters losing and getting killed? 

post #15665 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny View Post

In hindsight, one could argue that the film is transphobic as well. However, I don't believe that a film should cater to my political leanings

 

Possible transphobia in horror seems like something that isn't discussed enough. Hitchcock's Psycho, various giallo flicks, De Palma's Dressed to Kill, Silence of the Lambs, Sleepaway Camp, etc. Curious if anything has ever legitimately offended you?

post #15666 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post
 

Asking as someone who doesn't watch much J Horror. But is it true a lot of them end with most of the characters losing and getting killed? 

That seems to be a running theme to most J-Horror I've come across.

post #15667 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan View Post

I sort of get why they did that...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan View Post

I might as well fill in the rest of the plot. 

 

Wow. What a baffling movie all around. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post
Has anyone seen "Shark Night?" I heard it was pants.

 

Unfortunately I have, via Netflix Instant a few years ago. From what I remember, the story was lame instead of fun and the lead characters were both dumb and obnoxious.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny View Post
Haute Tension is garbage.

 

I agree. As I said way back when, I am an outlier in that of the French New Wave horror films I have seen (I've watched most of the well-known ones) I did not like any of them. I thought that they all tried way too hard and thought that extreme gore and vulgarity automatically made it awesome, which to me was definitely not the case. If people want to dismiss my opinions because of that, then it is something which won't bother me.  Haute Tension, I hated it long before the stupid plot twist; the story was just dumb and not believable the entire time and when you can't stand the dopey protagonists and get no enjoyment from the bad guy killing people... I thought it was crap.

post #15668 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post

Possible transphobia in horror seems like something that isn't discussed enough. Hitchcock's Psycho, various giallo flicks, De Palma's Dressed to Kill, Silence of the Lambs, Sleepaway Camp, etc. Curious if anything has ever legitimately offended you?

The dread of difference is a recurring meme in horror films, so I mostly accept it. I won't hear a bad word against PSYCHO and I am a long time lover of the sleaziest and dopiest gialli, so no problem there.

I think I've only been viscerally angered by a film once, and that was watching the Spanish horror film H6: Diary of a Serial Killer. It was released something like ten years ago or more and was one of many films that exploited extreme sexual violence as a feature around that time.

What pissed me off is that the director made this statement that the film was meant to be a quasi-satirical indictment of the justice system in Spain or somesuch bullshit, but what you see on film is no more than a guy humiliating, raping and murdering women in a special room he built, again and again and again.

Whatever trite social commentary the director was going for is drowned out by the pervasive ugliness of the story. I couldn't engage with anything in it, so I was left to concentrate on the content, and it was a punishing experience.
post #15669 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Perfect Weapon View Post
 

 

Wow. What a baffling movie all around. 

 

 

Unfortunately I have, via Netflix Instant a few years ago. From what I remember, the story was lame instead of fun and the lead characters were both dumb and obnoxious.

 

 

I agree. As I said way back when, I am an outlier in that of the French New Wave horror films I have seen (I've watched most of the well-known ones) I did not like any of them. I thought that they all tried way too hard and thought that extreme gore and vulgarity automatically made it awesome, which to me was definitely not the case. If people want to dismiss my opinions because of that, then it is something which won't bother me.  Haute Tension, I hated it long before the stupid plot twist; the story was just dumb and not believable the entire time and when you can't stand the dopey protagonists and get no enjoyment from the bad guy killing people... I thought it was crap.

 

I think in the case of "Alarmed" aka "Ghost Boat", they worked out the story they wanted to tell without really looking at the wider implications of it. Which is that Hell clearly works out who goes to Hell based on things like TV reports and newspaper and magazine articles as there's no other way they could have come to the conclusions they did over who to eternally punish. Undoubtedly not intended by the makers but that's the inference you have to draw about their selection process, isn't it?

 

I actually like films like this where they make me think about the wider implications of the world and the rules they set up even if the final product itself didn't work out as well as it could have. I prefer those kinds of films (even if the actual end result turns out to be a failure - and they often do) over competently assembled but ultimately forgettable ones (especially ones you forgotten the moment you've left the cinema). I still think about the film Surrogates and the way the technology of that world could have changed it from what it is today (both technologically and especially socially) outside the scope of what the film itself showed and how it was executed. 

 

Seeing that film reminded me of another film I'd seen a trailer for which seemed on the surface at least to be along a similar premise of reliving your crimes and punishment for it over and over again. Had to get creative with the search terms but I found it and it actually turned out to be really good. Much better than I expected, especially as the film went on to reveal and more back story about the characters and all the information behind particular things that happened, it's remarkable how much your opinion can be changed by more information (and this rule is just as true in real life).

 

I'm definitely adding it to the list of single room/limited setting films that I highly recommend like: Cube, Circle, Exam and the like. It has more locations than these films but not that many more. I thought it was really good, especially the run up to ending where all the pieces were put together. I generally find those are among the best films where the home stretch is the best part because it ends up elevating all of the material as a whole and leaves you with a very satisfying experience. Obviously we all know that the converse is also true, a bad ending can to varying degrees wreck what came beforehand. Fortunately, it was the former and not the latter situation that happened here in my opinion at least.

 

 

Finally as for Haute Tension, this is what I use to try and make the storyline make sense to me. Sorry if this has already been said, I don't think it has but I could have missed it.

 

Only the scenes with the killer and the truck are 'real', except for that we're being shown it as that character perceives it, not how it actually is. Everything where she in the car with the friend driving up to the parents place, meeting the parents and so on, the entire relationship she has with that character and her family is a complete fabrication/hallucination in her mind. She didn't actually know these people at all and just made all of this up. Everything from the point of view of the hulking killer observing the house and the people in it from outside, that's real except for how the killer sees themselves. Everything else is not. It would at least explain how the truck got there, for starters I guess.

 

Still a horrible film, though. 

post #15670 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny View Post

That reading only works if you don't see the killer alone, masturbating himself with a decapitated head in his first appearance. That scene alone kills the idea that she's telling this to the police as a cover story and concurrently serves as one of the reasons why the twist doesn't work. I haven't seen it in awhile, but it's obviously meant to be a dual personality and a wildly improbable expression of her repressed sexuality and "penis envy".

I can't wrap my brain around scenes like the two women in the back of the van talking while the man is up front driving. Like, there's dialogue exchanged and the friend is shown cowering, which is meant to be a hint that our lead is actually the killer...but the scene can't be happening if she's actually driving the van.

 

WHAT.THE.FUCK?

post #15671 of 18468
Someone mentioned earlier about Cecille de France's character starting the movie with the lines

"Is it recording?"

With that shot of the camera, to imply (I suppose) this is her testimony.

And if she murdered all these people (which apparently she did) it is the testimony of a crazy person, under the circumstances.

Which, would explain ridiculous plot logic and storytelling...

It is a cop out in writing, but the mindset I have to get into if I am to enjoy it.

When the lines begin to blur in the narrative (like the scene that shows her in the surveillance footage) I can only surmise this is us witnessing WHAT REALLY HAPPENED, albeit without any captions or whatnot telling us so.

I have always viewed the inconsistencies as a detective with her in the interrogation room being told the story, with him interrupting, calling "bullshit" on her, then him putting in HIS course of events, explaining said plot contrivances.

Yea, you're all right, it is a lazy and fucked up way to tell a story, but one of the ways I have found to enjoy it.
post #15672 of 18468

The only joy I could conceivably get out of Haute Tension is imagining that Philippe Nahon's killer trucker character is real and that he's the same tormented, daughter-fucking character Nahon played in the shared universe of Noe's I STAND ALONE and IRREVERSIBLE and has now completely lost all of his shit. 

post #15673 of 18468
God, I'm just seeing this HAUTE TENSION talk. I don't have much commentary to add except I'm completely with Jacknife.

And I don't know what's worse: The original reveal that Aja had in mind, where you found out in literally the final two shots. Or the one Luc Besson (producer) insisted on, where you find out in a fucking off moment and the whole third act is that terrible twist.

I kind of think Aja's was better. If only because you can enjoy the entire film before it slaps you in the face with a big, greasy cock. Instead of making you throw your hands in the air and shake your head, with 30 minutes left to cry to yourself in anguish.

I love his HILLS remake, though. It was nasty and fun enough. I love the lead being the biggest asshole until he's pushed into the situation. And the crazy moments land for me.
post #15674 of 18468
I think I've mentioned this before in relation to Haute Tension, but THE RICH MAN'S WIFE, a really terrible Halle Berry vehicle from years ago, ends exactly the way you describe Aja's original ending. It's THE USUAL SUSPECTS ending, but without any contextualizing flashbacks that show where her character had constructed her story. It just ends with the reveal that her character was lying to the police and that she was colluding with another supporting character - again, with zero context.

M. Night gets a lot of grief for his gargantuan ego and reliance on twist endings, but he at least has the basic storytelling skillsets necessary to lay the groundwork for those twists before they occur. HAUTE TENSION does it because other movies did it and because Aja felt it needed that beat. No spoilers, but the blatantly obvious trajectory of GOODNIGHT, MOMMY (which is almost impossible to miss w/in five minutes of the movie starting), while deeply cliched and kind of terrible, at the very least doesn't completely curb-stomp its own script in the end.
post #15675 of 18468

Nobody seems to have mentioned Aja's so bad it's good classic, Mirrors. Jack Bauer pulls a gun on a nun!

post #15676 of 18468

I don't even like that one!

post #15677 of 18468
I skipped MIRRORS and have only seen bits of HILLS HAVE EYES; PIRANHA 3D is the last Aja movie I've seen. I went into it because I thought it might be trashy fun, but alas, the CHUD collective and my own instincts failed me. That was the last time I allowed the CHUD collective to influence me.

What was it called? "The Splat Pack"? A collective term for new schoolers like Roth, Aja, and Marshall. Yeah, that didn't last too long. I will say that Marshall and Roth are better filmmakers than Aja, that's for damn sure.
post #15678 of 18468

Oh God, the Splat Pack thing. I don't think Aja is completely untalented (his Hills remake is pretty great) but if Marshall was their Sinatra, Aja was Joey Bishop.

post #15679 of 18468
i didn't hate mirrors
post #15680 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post

i didn't hate mirrors

I do. They always have this ugly man staring back at me.

post #15681 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post
 

Nobody seems to have mentioned Aja's so bad it's good classic, Mirrors. Jack Bauer pulls a gun on a nun!

 

Oh yes, Mirrors. A movie they claimed wasn't a remake of the Korean Into the Mirror but there's no way I can see that they didn't get away with not cutting them a cheque given so much that happened was so similar in both films. Someone I know made a point of seeing the sequel just to see how well they got away with hiding the fact it's filmed in Romania (that and other films made there as that's where they are). 

 

I'm not sure anything's going to ever top this for brandishing of firearms in the most incongruous of places, though.

 

 

... and here's some more of the greatest hits from that film ...

 

 


Edited by Shan - 8/21/16 at 10:40pm
post #15682 of 18468
I just can't see how that WICKER remake happened like that. I know it's just the worst idea for a movie to be remade, but come the fuck on. What?! Take out the entire, brilliant message, remove all of it's teeth, and make it completely scareless?
post #15683 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raynis View Post

I just can't see how that WICKER remake happened like that. I know it's just the worst idea for a movie to be remade, but come the fuck on. What?! Take out the entire, brilliant message, remove all of it's teeth, and make it completely scareless?


I was in college when the movie opened, and I remember sitting in the theater on opening night.  I was the only one there, and I don't think the level of disbelief at what I was seeing can be adequately conveyed, even now.  It's a baffling movie on every level...

 

... though admittedly kind of a fun time with a group.

post #15684 of 18468

10 Killer Horror Flicks from the 2000s that You May Have Missed

 
 
 

10 More Horror Films from the 2000s that You May Have Missed

 
post #15685 of 18468

No pun intended, but I've been on a Chuck Norris "kick" lately.  Norris wasn't exactly known for horror movies, but he did make ​Silent Rage​ and ​Hellbound​.  I saw ​Hellbound​ once as a kid, but I remember very little.  Until last night, I had never seen ​Silent Rage​.  After digging ​Lone Wolf McQuade​ recently, I was thinking that "Norris meets Michael Myers" would be a blast, but ​Silent Rage​ never picked up much steam. 

 

It's a tale of two movies.  On one hand, there's the comedy/romance hybrid.  You might laugh a few times, but the romance was a total bore and wholly unnecessary (and has a montage straight out of a particularly bad romcom).  None of these aspects ever really fitted with the rest of the movie. 

 

I could understand a midnight crowd getting riled up for the action/horror aspect of things.  There were plenty of John Carpenter point-of-view shots, for instance, and Norris has a few fights scenes that are enjoyable.  Unfortunately, not enough was really done to set apart the horror from the usual Norris action flicks.  Norris never really finds out what he's dealing with, and I spent half the movie thinking that it would've worked a lot better if the killer had escaped the hospital sooner and Norris had to use his detective skills to scour the town with Ron Silver trying to get inside the mind of his patient.  But, that wasn't what we got...

post #15686 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan View Post

Seeing that film reminded me of another film I'd seen a trailer for which seemed on the surface at least to be along a similar premise of reliving your crimes and punishment for it over and over again.

 

Cruel & Unusual, that is a film new to me; I'll have to look into it in the future.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

10 Killer Horror Flicks from the 2000s that You May Have Missed

10 More Horror Films from the 2000s that You May Have Missed

 

Some of those movies I hadn't heard of before; As I figured, I have only seen a percentage of the ones I have heard of. I am the one person who wasn't blown away by Lake Mungo but I can always give it another shot. At least I can say Severance is pretty cool.

post #15687 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Perfect Weapon View Post
I am the one person who wasn't blown away by Lake Mungo but I can always give it another shot. At least I can say Severance is pretty cool.

LAKE MUNGO pretty much exists solely for one reveal, but it's a hell of a reveal.

post #15688 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iron Maiden View Post
 

After digging ​Lone Wolf McQuade​ recently, I was thinking that "Norris meets Michael Myers" would be a blast, but ​Silent Rage​ never picked up much steam. 

 

Yeah, Silent Rage isn't so good. It did give Edgar Wright some fun material for Hot Fuzz, though.

 

The world needs more good "tough guy vs monster" flicks. We do have Arnold in Predator and Kurt in Bone Tomahawk and a couple others, but there's not exactly an abundance. I was quite looking forward to both "Stallone vs The Thing" and "Van Damme vs Bigfoot" when they were announced several years ago, but both those projects fell through.

post #15689 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post
 

LAKE MUNGO pretty much exists solely for one reveal, but it's a hell of a reveal.

Oh how good Lake Mungo was.

post #15690 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waaaaaaaalt View Post
 

Oh how good Lake Mungo was.


I went into it knowing nothing other than a good friend of mine liked it and recommended it to me.  She literally told me nothing else about it.  So as I was sitting there watching, I was mildly engaged, but not too terribly impressed.

 

And then THE MOMENT happened.

 

It's a profoundly chilling moment - both for the visceral, spooky nature of it and for the implications of it - and it really takes what is otherwise just an okay movie and elevates it to something truly memorable.

post #15691 of 18468

Late Show:

 

Demonsposter1986.jpg

post #15692 of 18468
One of my favs as a teen! After seeing EVIL DEAD 2 so young, I was always trying to satisfy my splatter-itch. That's was the best one for me.

The sequel is a little more obscure, but still fun!
post #15693 of 18468
Wait, is Silent Rage different than Hero and the Terror?

Lake Mungo is great! I love recommending it to people.
post #15694 of 18468
Yeah, Silent Rage and The Hero and the Terror are indeed two (slightly) different movies....and sadly, are both lame as hell..
post #15695 of 18468
What I remember about THatT is that it's basically the same movie as Silent Rage but the killer is a bit more memorable because he is played by Jack "Non" O'Halloran, aka the poor man's Richard Kiel. It is crap, though.
post #15696 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post
 

 

Yeah, Silent Rage isn't so good. It did give Edgar Wright some fun material for Hot Fuzz, though.

 

The world needs more good "tough guy vs monster" flicks. We do have Arnold in Predator and Kurt in Bone Tomahawk and a couple others, but there's not exactly an abundance. I was quite looking forward to both "Stallone vs The Thing" and "Van Damme vs Bigfoot" when they were announced several years ago, but both those projects fell through.


​I was pretty intrigued by Stallone's idea to have Rambo face a monster (is that the "Stallone vs The Thing" you're speaking of?).  Too bad we didn't get that.

 

I never caught ​Hero and the Terror​.  Not sure why I never even assumed it might be a horror flick (maybe more of a thriller). 

 

Does anyone remember ​Hellbound​?  I was thinking of seeking it out since I was probably 11 when I last saw it.

post #15697 of 18468
Hellhound is worse than either of those..
post #15698 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waaaaaaaalt View Post

Oh how good Lake Mungo was.

Out of all the hyped up indi horror films that I've seen, the praise for Lake Mungo continues to mystify me the most. The film was one of the blandest horror movies I've ever seen. The story of the film failed on every level as a horror movie to engage or scare me even though the film had a solid cast giving good performances. This combination resulted in a movie so unmemorable that I just now had to look up the Wikipedia entry on it to remind myself of the plot.

I think it didn't work for me because the film's structure made it impossible for me to buy into the premise. The kind of documentaries it was imitating is one my subconscious mind associates with nonfiction and unfortunately in real life I don't believe that ghosts exist.
post #15699 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post
 

LAKE MUNGO pretty much exists solely for one reveal, but it's a hell of a reveal.

Yep, and it's one of the best moments in 00s horror. 

 

Saw the found footage movie The St Francisville Experiment from the year 2000. which has some underground following in the online horror community. 

 

Christ knows why, as it's filled with some of the most annoying characters in horror film history, and the ending is a wet fart. Avoid. 

post #15700 of 18468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim K View Post


Out of all the hyped up indi horror films that I've seen, the praise for Lake Mungo continues to mystify me the most. The film was one of the blandest horror movies I've ever seen. The story of the film failed on every level as a horror movie to engage or scare me even though the film had a solid cast giving good performances. This combination resulted in a movie so unmemorable that I just now had to look up the Wikipedia entry on it to remind myself of the plot.

I think it didn't work for me because the film's structure made it impossible for me to buy into the premise. The kind of documentaries it was imitating is one my subconscious mind associates with nonfiction and unfortunately in real life I don't believe that ghosts exist.

Well it worked for me because it felt so real. The actors were able to replicate that thing where you have real people on a camera giving interviews that are normally on camera so they are just slightly not themselves. It's such a perfect recreation that my friend who I was watching it with (who I gave no info to really) thought it was real until the very last shot. 

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