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Horror RECOMMENDATION or WARNING thread. - Page 363

post #18101 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

I don't know if "not as good" is the right description for the Sleepaway Camp sequels. "Not as memeorable" is probably better. But....then again, the sequels really aren't any better than the first either so I guess either one applies. All I know is the first one is the only one I'm even remotely interested in.

I have seen the ones with Bruce Springsteen's sister as Angela, and unmemorable is a pretty perfect description (although I did kinda like that old poster for whichever sequel it was where Angela was popping out between surprised Jason & Freddy). Just found out that there was a later sequel which saw the return of the original director, original Angela Felissa Rose, and even original Ricky. Is it worth checking out at all?
post #18102 of 19251
The one that brings all the old crew back is so cheaply made that I hesitate to recommend it but it at least recaptures the spirit of the original in a way that SC 2 and 3 didn't. Really the first one is the only truly worthwhile one..
post #18103 of 19251
Thanks, will probably skip it then.

BTW if anyone here is on a budget and wants to stream some horror for free, if you download the Vudu app they have a "Movies On Us" section. The catch is you have to watch a bunch of ads every so often, but free is free. In the horror section right now they have AWIL, Paranormal Activity 1-4, The Dentist 1 & 2, Sleepaway Camp, Q the Winged Serpent, Dark Night of the Scarecrow, & few more interesting ones
post #18104 of 19251
I grew up with the SLEEPAWAY CAMP films at our local rental place. I remember as a youngster that the sequels were terrible. But revisiting them on the Scream Factory blus, I enjoy them a little more. There's a tongue-and-cheek aspect to them that was lost on me at the time. And there's hardly a moment when someone isn't naked or bloody.

And I gotta say the newest sequel with the old crew may be the cheapest looking horror film of all time, but the spirit carries it a long way. It has a decent script (You know, for this sort of thing) with a lot of memorable characters and deaths. It apes a lot of story beats from the original but it always has its own ambitions. I dug it.
post #18105 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post


BTW if anyone here is on a budget and wants to stream some horror for free, if you download the Vudu app they have a "Movies On Us" section. The catch is you have to watch a bunch of ads every so often, but free is free. In the horror section right now they have AWIL, Paranormal Activity 1-4, The Dentist 1 & 2, Sleepaway Camp, Q the Winged Serpent, Dark Night of the Scarecrow, & few more interesting ones

Thanks for the heads up. There are a couple on there that I am going to check out.

post #18106 of 19251

The Savage Stack - SALEM’S LOT (1979)

That time the director of TEXAS CHAIN SAW helmed a Stephen King TV Movie and it turned out to be genuinely terrifying.
 
 
"Forty-plus years into Stephen King movies being part of our pop lexicon, it’s sometimes difficult to comprehend where the starting point was for these qualitatively dubious yet constantly diverting horror adaptations. Yet after Brian De Palma’s Carrie was a rather resounding success at the box office (though not the Jaws-level smash the auteur hoped it’d be), producers began buying options to King’s cocaine-fueled library expansion. His second novel (which laid the foundations for what we’d expect from future King texts), Salem’s Lot, was snatched up and then suffered numerous developmental setbacks – including a rejected script from Larry Cohen (which the writer fought and was denied screen credit for). Originally envisioned as a feature, the final product became a two-part CBS Movie of the Week, beginning the miniseries trend that would later be applied to King’s longer (The Stand, It) and shorter (The Langoliers) works.
 

Tobe Hooper feels like an obvious choice to helm this second filmic foray into King’s terrible universe, and producer Richard Kobritz echoed this sentiment in interviews, citing a single viewing of Hooper’s immortal Texas Chain Saw as birthing the notion in his brain. Hooper replaced George A. Romero, who’d been developing a big screen take on the novel, but abandoned the project once it was shifted to television (Romero didn’t think his concept could survive the format’s content restrictions). However, once the film begins, it’s difficult to recognize Hooper’s particular brand of jangly, hot house sensationalism, as Salem’s Lot is distinctly old fashioned in terms of composition. Utilizing a 1.33 frame fit for a wooden idiot box, the town of Jerusalem’s Lot is bathed in golden sunlight. Exiting a surreal prologue set in a Guatemalan cathedral, we’re introduced to seasoned vampire hunters Ben Mears (singer David Soul), and his surrogate son, Mark Petrie (Lance Kerwin), as they endure their initial battle with pure evil. Hooper’s film is an origin story of sorts, as we flash back to the idyllic New England borough, which is overshadowed by the creepy Marsten house that sits high on the hill. Hooper creates a coziness that clashes with his usual Deep South oddity, lulling us into comfortable submission while we watch from our living rooms, before submerging us in the inky darkness that dominates the Hitchcockian opening credit sequence."

post #18107 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post

It's an expectations thing.  Pure horror fans will probably hate it, but those who can appreciate subtlety will find a lot to admire about it.  It's also quite psychologically rich in terms of the way its protagonist is written and performed.

 

If you go in expecting a European art film with genre story components, I think you'll be fine.  If you can appreciate something like DON'T LOOK NOW, you may dig it, because it operates on a very similar level; it's a tale about murder and the supernatural, with unsettling elements, but it never truly blossoms into full-on, all-caps HORROR.  It's much more a character study.

 

DON'T LOOK NOW is by far the superior film, to be clear, and much creepier.  I'm just using it as a point of reference.

 

Oh, that does make sense. Thank you for framing it that way.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post
The second was called Bat P*ssy (the asterisk is mine). I mean...what the fuck. Just...look it up.

 

A 70's pornographic film literally discovered in a Memphis adult theatre storeroom where there were no credits so no one knows the identity of anyone who made it and the lead guy was actually impotent... that was something new to me until you mentioned it and I read its Wiki article. I don't ever want to see that even for curiosity's sake.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Benenson View Post

Since I loved TBD should I check out Perkins' other horror film (I Am the Pretty Thing... something something) on netflix, or is it significantly less good?

 

I haven't seen I Am the Pretty Thing That Lives in the House but I've heard many different things, here and elsewhere. It's the type of thing that will naturally be polarizing, as I understand it's unconventional.

post #18108 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Benenson View Post
 

Okay I swear I'm not intentionally going against the grain here but I watched The Blackcoat's Daughter and The Void in the last couple days and loved both. Maybe the mixed reactions in this thread helped, though I think I'd have liked them either way. Since I loved TBD should I check out Perkins' other horror film (I Am the Pretty Thing... something something) on netflix, or is it significantly less good?

I hated it.

post #18109 of 19251

Did you guys have a two page discussion of 90s horror and completely forget to mention Ringu? 

post #18110 of 19251
Oh man.. Aracnaphobia! On the cusp, like Tremors: released in 1990 and also a bit more comedy, but still...
post #18111 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Love Machine View Post

Did you guys have a two page discussion of 90s horror and completely forget to mention Ringu? 
Sadly, I always associate The Ring, and by extension Ringu, with 2002 so yeah I'm guilty of not giving that one it's props. I actually prefer The Ring. But that doesn't mean that I dislike the original. The Ring is just that (very) rare remake..
post #18112 of 19251

Kim Morgan talks w/ Neil LaBute abt The Wicker Man & the greatness of Nicolas Cage & more.

 

http://thenewbev.com/blog/2017/04/the-wicker-man/

 

KM: "Exactly. The Wicker Man is obviously this very extreme vision of a matriarchy and a vision someone like Aaron Eckhart from In the Company of Men or Jason Patric from Your Friends and Neighbors might think all women are like. Like, all the time, whether outwardly or buried down. It’s like man’s ultimate nightmare of female revenge…"

 

NL: "Yeah, that would be it. [Laughs] Landing on the shores of this island, and it actually existing. It was probably just the right place having heard – I don’t know how many years at that point, close to ten years – but hearing of [having] this kind of misogynistic or misanthropic view. And when they were looking to change the story – and I think we’ve talked about this before – but it wasn’t me going to anybody else and saying, “Hey, I’d love to remake The Wicker Man.” While I had always thought it was a movie kind of ripe for remake because I always loved it, [but] I didn’t think it was particularly well made.  It was a blast to watch but it makes you giggle too, but then the ending. It was completely sobering. It was, “Oh fuck. They’re gonna kill this guy.” And in fact they do. And that’s when you stop laughing. And so the idea was very much the same here. So it was: What’s another version? We can’t exactly do the same religious idea here. I mean, not that you couldn’t, but we opted not to. So … I threw out this notion of this matriarchal society, and this sort of honeycomb of a plot, and they said, “Great.” And they thought, who better to create it. And so off I went. And I think a lot of things happened along the way that chipped away at making it even stronger. When you have too many people with too many different ideas, even [ideas about] the kind of genre you’re working in, that’s tricky. I’ve now learned how difficult it is to make people scared when the sun is shining. It makes me watch The Shining in much more awe. It’s really tough to do that. Night is often used in horror films and thrillers for a particular reason: what you can’t see frightens us. But you know, we were fully aware that this guy is running around in a fucking bear suit  [laughs] and you know, the karate chop battles with women. We thought: this is going to make people giggle. They’re going to think this is funny, especially with Cage unleashed, doing his thing. But in the end, we’re gonna kill him. They’re going to actually string him up and burn that son of a bitch. And I hoped that the end result was the same. I don’t know that it ultimately was, but that was certainly the intent anyway."

 

 

KM: "Well, I think, that the picture falls more into the realm of emotional honesty rather than what people perceive as realism, whatever realism means, and it feels like this terrifying male fantasia. So even the parts that are humorous play real to me, because men are so often fearful of looking ridiculous and especially a cop! There’s also a kind of satirically extreme aspect of super politically correct feminism. Were you riffing on that?"

 

NL: "Oh, I think so. There was definitely an idea to make, not so much a cautionary tale, but to take this to its illogical conclusion, and have fun with it. Put this guy in this position, the position that the young woman usually finds herself in – running through some town of backwoodsman, and this guy who thinks he’s got the power of the police and the patriarchy and all of these things in his pocket. And then take those things away and put him on a bike [laughs] and he’s running around on the island in his little shirt and tie… We thought that there was a lot of stuff to mine that would be, at least a shift; something you’d never seen before. For me, that’s part of what this is – to not do what somebody else does, especially if you’re doing a remake. I’ve now done a remake of a film where they wanted almost like, a shot for shot remake, not that close but pretty damn close, when we did Death at a Funeral. Talk about feeling like someone for hire…. You know, you’re like a photographer at a wedding. It’s a very different animal to be given a kind of carte blanche to say, “Hey, let’s come up with some crazy stuff here.” And certainly [Nicolas] Cage was egging me on to do the same thing. I think he’s happy to do work that he hasn’t seen before. To do characters that are out there. That’s success to him, whether it’s lauded by people or laughed at by people. It’s hard to say what’s going to happen. It’s such a fine line, that kind of movie. I’m doing it on a daily basis with this vampire show I’m writing, and half the time you look at each other going, “This is the dumbest thing I’ve ever thought of. This is ridiculous.” And then they watch this and love it. And you throw a bucket of blood at it and they’re happy. It’s a really fine line between being really arch and serious and becoming a parody of yourself and you just have to walk that line and hope that you don’t. I mean, there are bits in this movie that people have famously, for ten years, made videos of: of him screeching out lines, or the bees … Does that make it hard to sleep at night? Not really. It’s interesting, some people love it some people hate it and I guess that means it’s something people keep thinking about."

post #18113 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post

The Faculty!


I won't go so far as to call The Faculty a good movie, but its a fun movie.

post #18114 of 19251

Rewatched THE RUINS yesterday for the first time in years. Fuck, it is way more intense than I remembered it being. I know it was dismissed upon release but that's one movie that could really use a popular reappraisal. Also a shame that Carter Smith the director hasn't done anything of note since - it's actually really impressive for a first feature.


Edited by Evi - 4/28/17 at 6:07am
post #18115 of 19251
Carter Smith did a fantastic job adapting the (pretty damn good) book. I'm not sure if you've read it. The film didn't change the events at all. But it did a pretty cool thing where they switched all the characters around so they played different parts in the story and had different fates. It kept the readers guessing and I appreciated that.
post #18116 of 19251
The Wicker Man remake is probably due for some kind of reappraisal. It's certainly not a good movie, but you don't make such a hilariously weird one without intention. Certainly not a filmmaker as basically competent as LaBute. It's no small thing, being so utterly Nicholas Cage-y of a film. It would make for a great double feature with legitimate good movie Bad Lieutenant.
post #18117 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raynis View Post

Carter Smith did a fantastic job adapting the (pretty damn good) book. I'm not sure if you've read it. The film didn't change the events at all. But it did a pretty cool thing where they switched all the characters around so they played different parts in the story and had different fates. It kept the readers guessing and I appreciated that.


I haven't read it but I hear it's brutal. Having penned only this and A Simple Plan, Scott Smith's got a hell of a record.

post #18118 of 19251
I see The Girl with All the Gifts is at redbox now... is this worth a rent?
post #18119 of 19251

THE RUINS is great.  The amputation sequence still fucks me up.  Its so rough.

post #18120 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evi View Post


I haven't read it but I hear it's brutal. Having penned only this and A Simple Plan, Scott Smith's got a hell of a record.

Definitely. The book has some neat little details that the movie couldn't do. For instance: The plant has acidic pollen that sticks and eats away at their clothes. In their last day on the pyramid they're totally nude and exposed. The ending is way different, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzy dunlop View Post

THE RUINS is great.  The amputation sequence still fucks me up.  Its so rough.

I agree. That scene is awesome. In the book it's much, much nastier. And turns out even worse...
post #18121 of 19251
The audio mimickry is something that shouldnt work, but mostly does. Goes too far when it feels like the flowers are teasing them. The phone bit is a nice "Holy shit!" moment.
post #18122 of 19251
That's was a make-or-break moment for the crowd I saw it with. Half were scoffing and the rest of the audience was fully-alarmed.
post #18123 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post

I see The Girl with All the Gifts is at redbox now... is this worth a rent?

 

 

"THE GIRL WITH ALL THE GIFTS is the best new horror movie I've seen in a while."

 

http://outlawvern.com/2017/04/27/the-girl-with-all-the-gifts/

post #18124 of 19251

Finally opened my Blu of GINGER SNAPS last nite. Seeing it in proper aspect ratio was like seeing it again for the first time.  Besides power of the allegory, it's so well directed. I'll go so far as to call it perfect. Seriously.

 

Last tear Arjen bemoaned how few great werewolf/ lycanthrope movies we've gotten, but I'd put THE HOWLING, AMERICAN WEREWOLF, GINGER SNAPS, and THE WOLF-MAN up with anything. All masterpieces. All probably in my top 50 alltime.

 

 

I followed up with what I thought would be my first viewing of GINGER SNAPS 2 ... I was impressed with it, even if it was vaguely familiar.

 

Not instant classic of original, but an interesting sequel that like HALLOWEEN II, 28 WEEKS LATER, THE DESCENT 2 is a welcome direct continuation/ return to the world.

 

I'm in love with Emily Perkins' beautifully awkward powerhouse performances in both films.  (genre hero!)

post #18125 of 19251

"Public Service Announcement: FADE TO BLACK (1980) is now available to stream on Amazon Prime."

 

 

 

Dennis Christopher IS amazing.

post #18126 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post

I see The Girl with All the Gifts is at redbox now... is this worth a rent?


It's alright. I recommend you read the book rather.

post #18127 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

Finally opened my Blu of GINGER SNAPS last nite. Seeing it in proper aspect ratio was like seeing it again for the first time.  Besides power of the allegory, it's so well directed. I'll go so far as to call it perfect. Seriously.

 

Last tear Arjen bemoaned how few great werewolf/ lycanthrope movies we've gotten, but I'd put THE HOWLING, AMERICAN WEREWOLF, GINGER SNAPS, and THE WOLF-MAN up with anything. All masterpieces. All probably in my top 50 alltime.

 

 

I followed up with what I thought would be my first viewing of GINGER SNAPS 2 ... I was impressed with it, even if it was vaguely familiar.

 

Not instant classic of original, but an interesting sequel that like HALLOWEEN II, 28 WEEKS LATER, THE DESCENT 2 is a welcome direct continuation/ return to the world.

 

I'm in love with Emily Perkins' beautifully awkward powerhouse performances in both films.  (genre hero!)

Feel free to avoid Ginger Snaps 3.

post #18128 of 19251
It's crazy that the production of the third SNAPS is so much bigger, but nothing is there.

I'd love some soft sequel down the line. A new werewolf story. There are plenty of interesting directions you could take Bridget. Have her in limited capacity or not.
post #18129 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waaaaaaaalt View Post
 

Feel free to avoid Ginger Snaps 3.

 

I was wondering about that one.

post #18130 of 19251

So has anyone I trust seen this? 

 

 

 

 

I only ask because whenever I see a modern slasher movie mask I like (a very rare occurrence) I tend to get jealous and irritable because like Most Likely Die, I generally expect that the movie itself is a waste of a good slasher maniac look.

 

Which brings me to my second query, not entirely dissimilar to a thread I created a few years ago: What makes the perfect slasher killer look? Anyone who knows anything about your classic '78 -' 87 slasher movie knows that the killers didn/t always wear a mask or have some other physically distinguishing characteristic. Sometimes it was just a guy (or woman) with some whacked out backstory that drove them to kill. Many of them didn't even use a signature weapon, often going for a "kitchen sink" approach to dispatching the 35-year-old teenagers that populated these films. 

post #18131 of 19251
I haven't seen it.
post #18132 of 19251
What is everyones opinion here on The Prowler?Saw this about ten years ago, suuuuper drunk and remember little. I liked the look of the killer though.

Also, how much better is the unedited original My Bloody Valentine?
post #18133 of 19251
The Prowler: Brutal and mean little flick. Last scene is unforgettably creepy. Like turn the lights back on before hand unforgettably creepy.
post #18134 of 19251
Yeah, the Prowler is great. A slasher that doesn't mess around. Dark creepy atmosphere, nasty Savini kills, and an interesting mystery element. Always loved that weird WWII backstory, no tragic burning/drowning origin or whatever, just a dude who goes off to war and snaps after his gf dumps him (not a spoiler by the way, the movie opens with that). "Greatest Generation" my ass.
post #18135 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post

Also, how much better is the unedited original My Bloody Valentine?

In the sense that it's the version the director would have preferred been released initially, it's valuable.

 

In practice, though, I actually go with the theatrical cut when I watch the movie.  The extra gore is fun, yes, but I think the way some of the explicitness is edited-around in the theatrical actually gives some of the kills a weirder and more upsetting edge.  For example, the shower kill is so much more disturbing to me because we kind of have to piece together exactly what we're looking at instead of having seen it portrayed in detail moments earlier.

post #18136 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post

What is everyones opinion here on The Prowler?Saw this about ten years ago, suuuuper drunk and remember little. I liked the look of the killer though.

Also, how much better is the unedited original My Bloody Valentine?

 

It was called Rosemary's Killer here in Australia.

 

Kind of obvious from the outset whodunnit, though

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Fishing trip my ass!

 

and that scene where that guy 'went' to 'check' to see if the person they were trying to call was in confirmed it. As a side note, that kind of behaviour where you fake going to look for someone that someone else has called in to find out if they're there because you're too lazy to even look should be punished by the death penalty.

 

Excellent design of the killer's outfit to hide their appearance, both menacing and if anything was going to give away their identity, it wasn't going to be due to poor visual concealment.

post #18137 of 19251

THE HOUSE OCTOBER BUILT - rented this on a lark. A found footage film. The premise is inspired: a group of friends around Halloween take a RV road trip across Texas, vising the most extreme haunted houses. As the trip goes on they seemingly keep running into the same strange and mysterious carnies, always in character, who all may or may not be connected to an underground haunt that moves from location to location.  It's never exactly spooky, but there's an escalating sense of paranoia and mood of unease. I was reminded of a favorite RACE WITH THE DEVIL a little bit.

 

I think it's streaming on Netflix.

 

Trailer in front was for WOLFCOP, reminding me I still need to see it.

post #18138 of 19251

The Houses October Built is a really interesting movie, with some wonderful sequences shot at real life Haunt attractions. It's unfortunately not some hidden masterpiece, as it falls prey to a lot of your standard micro budget Found Footage failings. But its got considerably more charm than most, and if you're the type to watch micro budget Found Footage films, it's definitely worthwhile.

post #18139 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

 

I was wondering about that one.

Stop wondering, it's bad.

post #18140 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

"Public Service Announcement: FADE TO BLACK (1980) is now available to stream on Amazon Prime."

 

 

 

Dennis Christopher IS amazing.

Thanks for posting this, I don't think I'd even heard of it before you did. It's really good! Christopher is, indeed, fantastic. 

post #18141 of 19251

It took sixty miles of driving, but I finally tracked down the Phantasm Collection at a Best Buy.  There were three copies just sitting there, and I was sorely tempted to let my credit card take a major hit.

post #18142 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post

Yeah, the Prowler is great. A slasher that doesn't mess around. Dark creepy atmosphere, nasty Savini kills, and an interesting mystery element. Always loved that weird WWII backstory, no tragic burning/drowning origin or whatever, just a dude who goes off to war and snaps after his gf dumps him (not a spoiler by the way, the movie opens with that). "Greatest Generation" my ass.

 

The Prowler is also one of the few slasher movie maniacs to use a gun, even if it's just twice at the end; the second time with less than ideal results.

post #18143 of 19251
Mike Flanagans Before I Wake just went straight to Netflix in the UK and I was pleasantly surprised.

Ok so it hits every single creepy kid movie beat and Kate Bosworth is a crap actor but I liked the visuals and how it came together at the end with some nice scares along the way.
post #18144 of 19251
Not sure why that film got buried. Flanagan and the cast elevate it well above so much crap that is pumped out DTV. The emotion of the story and the style of of the visuals give it a bit of a dark fairy tale vibe.
post #18145 of 19251

BTW, BEYOND THE GATES is pretty rad.

 

Love the late mini-resurgence for Barbara Crampton.

post #18146 of 19251
So It Comes at Night looks rather intriguing. Can't tell from the trailer if it's horror or not, but either way I really want to see it.
post #18147 of 19251
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post

So It Comes at Night looks rather intriguing. Can't tell from the trailer if it's horror or not, but either way I really want to see it.

I'm looking forward to it, as well, and I think it's clearly part of the genre (unless the marketing is being really misleading).  There's the suggestion of some outside source of danger (paranormal or otherwise), and that's a classic genre element.

post #18148 of 19251
It played at the Overlook Film Fest (held at Timberline Lodge, which served as the exterior for The Overlook in The Shining), and I think everything playing there is genre or genre-adjacent. I saw one rave review as well.
post #18149 of 19251
Interesting. BTW that Overlook fest sounds like the coolest combination of movies and movie pilgrimage ever.
post #18150 of 19251
Oct 14 in Syracuse NY will be the first Freddy Fest. They're playing the first six NIGHTMARE films plus FREDDY VS. JASON in 35mm, with special guests, vendors, and more.
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