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Horror RECOMMENDATION or WARNING thread. - Page 384

post #19151 of 19191
So I started reading Pet Sematary last week, and the impending dread with Gage is starting to weigh on me.

If this new movie happens, please, please let them realize the importance of the parents being cast properly. The death of a young child is fairly heavy, thematic stuff. Best to not skimp on acting ability.

Oh and the theatre down the way from me is playing The Shining tomorrow for one day only. And I have the day off. Super excited.
post #19152 of 19191
Call me a wuss but Gage's death in the movie is seriously one of the hardest things for me to watch in any movie, period..
post #19153 of 19191
You’re no wuss. That’s s pretty rough scene. It’s almost for the best that the abilities of Dudikoff weren’t really up for the challenge. A more experienced actor could have made the movie a one watch for a lot of people.
post #19154 of 19191

The original movie, questionable acting aside, follows pretty close to the novel.  It helps that King wrote the screenplay.  If they are going to remake it, I think they should lose some of the more "comedic" moments, especially with Pascow, and bring back a little bit of the...

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
...way the Pet Sematary can expose their deepest secrets, like when Jud tells the story about how the "only" person, that he knows of, comes back and starts telling them about how he knows that Jud gets hookers on the side and that his wife is a whore and has been cheating on him.  Having the burial ground, not only bring people back to life, but also with a "new" malevolent consciousness, definitely adds more to the dread of what bringing someone back to life means for the characters... 
post #19155 of 19191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post

It’s almost for the best that the abilities of Dudikoff weren’t really up for the challenge. A more experienced actor could have made the movie a one watch for a lot of people.

I think you mean Midkiff? Although the American Ninja's big NOOOOOO at witnessing Gage (played by Steve James) get run over by an 18 wheeler would have automatically turned this movie into a classic.
post #19156 of 19191
Steve James would've run over the truck..
post #19157 of 19191

Just finished Channel Zero: No End House. Really damn good. I think I enjoyed it more than season 1 and I really liked season 1.

post #19158 of 19191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waaaaaaaalt View Post
 

Just finished Channel Zero: No End House. Really damn good. I think I enjoyed it more than season 1 and I really liked season 1.

 

Ditto.  Still hard to believe SyFy had it in them to make 2 quality seasons of television like this.  Sounds like season 3 is underway now; Rutger Hauer is the big name in the cast.

post #19159 of 19191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post

I think you mean Midkiff? Although the American Ninja's big NOOOOOO at witnessing Gage (played by Steve James) get run over by an 18 wheeler would have automatically turned this movie into a classic.

Oh shit I’m dumb.. now I wanna see American Ninja Semetary
post #19160 of 19191

The later season 2 eps didn't quite match the surreal majesty of the first few but Dead End House still ended quite strongly. A lot more distinct than season 1. Interesting that the creator was a producer on Hannibal, since they both share some similar imagery.

post #19161 of 19191

Also im not even sure I would call No End House a horror show like the first season. More of a supernatural drama. 

post #19162 of 19191

I would rather see The Stand get a new movie than Pet Sematary.

 

Starry Eyes is a good flick.

post #19163 of 19191

2  competing John Carpenter Rankings for your enjoyment:

 

Every John Carpenter Movie, Ranked from Worst to Best

by Kalyn Corrigan     October 31, 2017

 

http://collider.com/john-carpenter-movies-ranked/?wt=2&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=collidersocial&utm_medium=social#the-thing

 

 

Editorials

A Definitive Ranking of John Carpenter’s Films!

by Trace Thurman

 

October 31, 2016

 
 
The Bloody Disgusting one especially sucks.
 

 

 

 

 

11. Escape From New York (1981)

 

"Here’s my one really controversial ranking. A few months ago I chastised a commenter on Bloody-Disgusting for not loving Halloween because they has seen many films do the same thing but better. This is of course because that commenter had just seen Halloween after seeing so many of its imitators over the years. It’s a lamentable situation, but after watching Escape From New York for the first time, I now understand how that person feels, so my foot has been firmly planted in my mouth. There have been countless films that ripped off Escape From New York, and I saw many of them before I actually saw Escape From New York. Suffice it to say I was not entirely blown away by it. The premise sees the Manhattan turned into a maximum-security prison surrounded by 50-foot containment walls. When Air Force One crashes onto the island, the government sends criminal Snake Plissken (Kurt Russell, having a ball here) into the prison in order to retrieve the President. The only catch is that he is injected with explosives that will destroy his carotid arteries within 22 hours, so he’s in a bit of a time crunch. This has all the makings of an exciting, suspenseful film. Carpenter’s score is fantastic and the performances (specifically from Russell and Ernest Borgnine as Cabbie) are charismatic, but there was an energy lacking here that is palpable in some of Carpenter’s other films."

post #19164 of 19191

Both those lists have ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 and VAMPIRES too high, and IN THE MOUTH OF MADNESS too low.  

post #19165 of 19191

Naw, ASSAULT has to be Top 5. It's everything Carpenter is about. Probably my favorite.

 

And I also feel like HALLOWEEN has to be ranked over THE THING.

post #19166 of 19191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

 

And I also feel like HALLOWEEN has to be ranked over THE THING.

 

I understand the rationale, but I could never do it.  

post #19167 of 19191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

Naw, ASSAULT has to be Top 5. It's everything Carpenter is about. Probably my favorite.

 

And I also feel like HALLOWEEN has to be ranked over THE THING.


I could go with Halloween and The Thing being ranked 1 and 2 depending on the person's personal preference. I don't know how I'd rank them myself. 1A and 1B.

post #19168 of 19191

Most Horror fans would never argue about the perfection of HALLOWEEN + THE THING. They're undisputed kings. However, I feel like ASSAULT is in its own way just as perfect. It's low budget, but Carpenter works wonders with what he has; masterfully creating a mood of escalating tension and dread. It's always thought of as Carpenter's riff on RIO BRAVO, but it owes even more to Romero's NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD.

 

The extended ice cream truck sequence, infamously climaxing with the shocking death of adorable Kim Richards, is as master class as anything Carpenter would ever do.

 

Austin Stoker is a great hero.  Darwin Jostin's Napoleon Wilson is awesomely proto-Snake.  And Laurie Zimmer is smoldering Bacall cool. And of course Tony Burton rules!

 

"The very least of our problems is that we're out of time."

"It's an old story with me. I was born out of time."

 

 

"It would be a privilege if you'd walk outside with me."

[deadpan] "I know it would."

 [smiles] "You're pretty fancy, Wilson."

 [smiles] "I have moments."

 

God, so fuckin' cool.

 

Image result for assault on precinct 13 1976

 

Related image

post #19169 of 19191

I like Assault on Precinct 13, but when I hear people say it's Carpenter's best, I gotta scratch my head. It's like when some of you guys try and tell me The Duelists is Ridley Scott's best. It's a fine movie and all, but have you seen Alien and Blade Runner?

post #19170 of 19191
I've seen Alien and Blade Runner.
post #19171 of 19191
FE gets it.
post #19172 of 19191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

I've seen Alien and Blade Runner.

Pics, or it didn’t happen.
post #19173 of 19191
Discredited! But sexily so.
post #19174 of 19191

There's a genre festival going on in Chicago called Cinepocalypse, and I caught one of the flicks tonight.  Dead Shack is comedy/horror hybrid about teen friends on a camping trip with one of the dads where they find a woman who has zombies for a family.  The story could've used a bit more padding, but the gore is solid and the comedy is pretty damn good.  The drunken father steals the show, but the kids are fine too.

 

I'd imagine this one will hit streaming services next year, so I'll try to remind everyone then (*sighs* I'll sadly forget).  

post #19175 of 19191
Creep 2 wasn't as enjoyable as the first, but Duplass is really nailing the most memorable killer in years.
post #19176 of 19191

Yeah, Duplass is amazing. Apparently they're busy working on a Creep 3 that the director says will be this franchise's Army of Darkness.

post #19177 of 19191

I watched the new Jeepers Creepers 3 movie. I'm guessing it was the equivalent of PG13, threatening situations but no cursing or on screen bloodletting--actually little to no blood. Very watered down, very thin story wise. I liked the previous entries quite a bit, the Creeper is a real interesting character, but sadly underused. Kinda wonder why they made this unless it's something they could sell to 'normal' TV without having to edit out stuff to air in a general market. Maybe the DVD release will have more of a bite edited back into it. This installment doesn't add anything to the mythos. Disappointed.

post #19178 of 19191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evi View Post

Yeah, Duplass is amazing. Apparently they're busy working on a Creep 3 that the director says will be this franchise's Army of Darkness.

I’m hoping it goes full on slasher with Peachfuzz fully taking over his psyche. Maybe have a Leslie Vernon style documentary vibe to it with Duplass doing in-between victim narrative.
post #19179 of 19191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evi View Post

Yeah, Duplass is amazing. Apparently they're busy working on a Creep 3 that the director says will be this franchise's Army of Darkness.

I guess it was always supposed to be a trilogy. Really looking forward to the next.

I loved the breakdown he had not being able to get his shot in the river. Fantastic stuff.
post #19180 of 19191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post
I think you mean Midkiff? Although the American Ninja's big NOOOOOO at witnessing Gage (played by Steve James) get run over by an 18 wheeler would have automatically turned this movie into a classic.

 

In an alternate universe where that movie actually happened, that would be one of my all time favorites.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Iron Maiden View Post

There's a genre festival going on in Chicago called Cinepocalypse, and I caught one of the flicks tonight.  Dead Shack is comedy/horror hybrid about teen friends on a camping trip with one of the dads where they find a woman who has zombies for a family.  The story could've used a bit more padding, but the gore is solid and the comedy is pretty damn good.  The drunken father steals the show, but the kids are fine too.

 

I'd imagine this one will hit streaming services next year, so I'll try to remind everyone then (*sighs* I'll sadly forget).  

 

I'll try to remember hte movie in the future. I did hear about Cinepocalypse from elsewhere.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevehauk View Post

I watched the new Jeepers Creepers 3 movie. 

 

I am not surprised it was made considering how much attention its screenings got. But I have only heard a few people actually talk about the movie. I do understand it actually did hear on the SyFy Channel so I suppose that could be the reason why it feels neutered.

post #19181 of 19191
Watching "John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars," directed by John Carpenter. This movie is going to be 90 minutes of people entering rooms and looking confused, right? Please tell me it is! That's about all that's happened in the first half hour.
post #19182 of 19191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

Watching "John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars," directed by John Carpenter. This movie is going to be 90 minutes of people entering rooms and looking confused, right? Please tell me it is! That's about all that's happened in the first half hour.

With some really nifty model train action.  Groan.

post #19183 of 19191
God, this is awful. If only Carpenter had retired after he stopped directing movies.
post #19184 of 19191

Divided By Fear: THE MIST At 10

How Frank Darabont's quintessential King adaptation is also the perfect post-9/11 horror picture.
 
 

 

"Stephen King first published The Mist in the ‘80 horror anthology Dark Forces – a 134-page fictionalization of a real-life event, where a thunderstorm knocked out the power in Bangor. The next day, the author journeyed to the grocery store to purchase some food. Per the “Notes” section in Skeleton Crew (where the tale was re-printed in ’85), King recalls that he was searching for hot dog buns and experienced a vision, in which a “big prehistoric flying reptile” was flapping around the store. By the time he’d brought the bread to the checkout counter, the basic blueprint for The Mist had already formed in his mind: a group of survivors, trapped following some apocalyptic occurrence, would have to fight for their lives against unknown malevolent forces.

 

It’s a quintessential King set up – blue collar, relatable, and yet totally fucked. For many readers, that first installment in Skeleton Crew was difficult to top, as it combined the author’s plainspoken knack for everyday terror with the unknowability of H.P. Lovecraft’s existential New England dread. Frank Darabont responded to the story upon its initial publication, and after the former Hell Night (’81) production assistant climbed the Hollywood ladder – co-writing A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: The Dream Warriors (’87) and the splattery remake of The Blob (’88) with Chuck Russell along the way –  he helmed the critically lauded adaptation of King’s Different Seasons novella, The Shawshank Redemption (’94). Viewed by many to be one of the very best pieces of King cinema (by even the writer himself), Darabont began discussing an adaptation of The Mist with the Maine horror maestro, resulting in King selling him the rights. Still, it’d take another thirteen years (and a Green Mile [‘99]) before cameras finally rolled on the project."

post #19185 of 19191

MAYHEM is a lot of fun!

post #19186 of 19191

I liked MAYHEM too, kind of a better version of THE BELKO EXPERIMENT.

post #19187 of 19191

A Moral Comic: CREEPSHOW At 35

In 1982, Stephen King and George Romero delivered a movie that still stands as the best horror anthology of all time.
 
 
 
 
"George A. Romero initially hooked up with Stephen King after showing Martin (’78) at the US/Utah Film Festival (which would later morph into the Sundance Film Festival), when two studio executives approached him, saying the writer/director would be perfect to helm a new property they’d just acquired from the up-and-coming horror author. The book they’d bought the rights to was Salem’s Lot – a New England vampire spook show that eventually became a stellar two-part CBS Movie of the Week under Texas Chain Saw Massacre (’74) director Tobe Hooper (Romero exited the project just before it headed to TV). However, because of a meeting the suits had set, a friendship had been kindled, as the two scare masters shared a love of cinema (with King professing to be a huge fan of Night of the Living Dead [‘68]) and macabre storytelling. 

 

The movie Romero really wanted to direct was The Stand – King’s post-apocalyptic American epic that could’ve never been financed under a major studio (despite Dawn of the Dead [‘78] dealing with similar End Time themes). However, the Pittsburgh auteur had an idea for an anthology that could trace the history of horror pictures, complete with aspect ratio and film stock changes. Each vignette would be set in a different era; from a Val Lewton inspired B&W chiller, to the in-theater gimmicks of William Castle, to a 3D segment meant to cap the entire affair. Instead, King suggested to both Romero and his longtime producing partner Richard P. Rubinstein that they should craft a tribute to the old EC Comics each had grown up reading as children. Romero and Rubinstein were bowled over by the pitch, and King promised them a script within sixty days, which he delivered right on time. "

post #19188 of 19191

Oh, I did not know Creepshow came out on November 12, 1982. I just presumed it was earlier in the year for some reason.

 

Tonight I watched something on Amazon Prime I first heard about a long time ago. After all, it's hard to forget the plot to 1986's The Supernaturals when it's zombie Confederate soldiers rising up to attack a 1980's regiment training in the woods, and the cast includes Maxwell Caufield, Talia Balsam, LEVAR BURTON, and as the Sergeant of the regiment, NICHELLE NICHOLS. No kidding. I finally watched the film, and it's awful! What a cheap piece of crap. The film is just boring as hell. Not a lot happens, and what little zombies you do see typically either stand around or walk slowly. It's not scary in the least and there's like a trickle of blood so I guess that's "gore"... the story is utter nonsense and poorly told to boot. Plus, the troops are buffoons that belong in a Police Academy film; Nichols does chastise them but I wish she would have been like her Dorinda character in Truck Turner, where she's constantly yelling and angry. Not even the cast or the novelty of hearing Burton cursing up a storm is worth watching this tedious bore, a true waste of time.

 

Although, I do have to mention the hilarity of what a Prime video sometimes does; they make it obvious it's a VHS or DVD rip and don't remove the FBI warning or the beginning/end notice of what company put it out on video. In this case, the print looked like it came directly from a 31 year old VHS, and it was, as the very end told me Embassy Home Video was the one who released it in that format.

post #19189 of 19191

http://www.filmfreakcentral.net/ffc/2012/05/david-cronenberg-re-examines-david-cronenberg.html

 

FILM FREAK CENTRAL takes a look at David Cronenberg's body of work--with a little help from the master himself

 

March 9, 2003 | Offered the opportunity to visit with David Cronenberg a second time recently, I sat down with the legendary director the morning after moderating a post-screening Q&A with him at Denver's Landmark Mayan Theater (where a sell-out crowd of over 450 was enthusiastically in attendance for a sneak of Spider) to discuss his work from student films Stereo and Crimes of the Future all the way through to what is arguably his best--certainly his most mature--film, the oft-delayed Spider. Dressed in casual cool as is the director's habit, Mr. Cronenberg exudes supreme confidence; gracious in the extreme and unfailingly polite, not given to displays of false modesty or overly interested in compliments, his speech is pleasant and carefully modulated--a sort of intellectual detachment that has marked even his earliest, "tax shelter" work. It seemed clear to me that Mr. Cronenberg was not generally accustomed to talking of his earlier work on the junket circuit. Speaking only for myself, it was a wonderful break from the usual stump.-Walter Chaw

post #19190 of 19191

NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD getting a Criterion release:

 

https://www.criterion.com/films/29331-night-of-the-living-dead

 

 

 

Disc Features

  • New 4K digital restoration, supervised by director George A. Romero, coscreenwriter John A. Russo, sound engineer Gary R. Streiner, and producer Russell W. Streiner
  • New restoration of the monaural soundtrack, supervised by Romero and Gary R. Streiner, and presented uncompressed on the Blu-ray
  • Night of Anubis, a never-before-presented work-print edit of the film
  • New program featuring filmmakers Frank Darabont, Guillermo del Toro, and Robert Rodriguez
  • Never-before-seen 16 mm dailies reel
  • New piece featuring Russo about the commercial and industrial-film production company where key Night of the Living Dead filmmakers got their start
  • Two audio commentaries from 1994, featuring Romero, Russo, producer Karl Hardman, actor
    Judith O’Dea, and more
  • Archival interviews with Romero and actors Duane Jones and Judith Ridley
  • New programs about the editing, the score, and directing ghouls
  • New interviews with Gary R. Streiner and Russel W. Streiner
  • Trailer, radio spots, and TV spots
  • More!
  • PLUS: An essay by critic Stuart Klawans
post #19191 of 19191
It's about friggin time. Have to say though, I'm loving that Wrightsonesque cover art.
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