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The Rolling Stones- Your Thoughts

post #1 of 68
Thread Starter 
What does everybody think of them. They are definitely one of my favorite rock bands ever and while they have done many so so albums like the last 25 years they're late 60s and early 70s music is still the best rock music to me. I love their early blues stuff and nobody including the Beatles have had a better album run than Beggers Banquet to Exile On Main Street. I've never really understood why that seem to get dumped just becuase they continued on way past their prime. They could make a hundred bad records that doesn't really change the awesomeness of Let It Bleed or Sitcky Fingers.
post #2 of 68
Here's my deal with The Stones - I can dig why they're so universally loved, I can appreciate their status alongside The Beatles and such - but for some reason they don't resonate with me as anything more than a band that I like. And I like a LOT of their songs ("Angie" being my favorite for some odd reason), but I just can't put them on that pedestal like a lot of other people do.
post #3 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by JGButler View Post
Here's my deal with The Stones - I can dig why they're so universally loved, I can appreciate their status alongside The Beatles and such - but for some reason they don't resonate with me as anything more than a band that I like. And I like a LOT of their songs ("Angie" being my favorite for some odd reason), but I just can't put them on that pedestal like a lot of other people do.
I'm mostly in the same boat, but I've really come to love Sticky Fingers over the last year or two. I like some of the others - Aftermath, Between the Buttons, Exile (which I just recently warmed up to after years of not getting the hype). But I love Sticky Fingers. "You Gotta Move" is the only one on there that I'm lukewarm on.
post #4 of 68
Thread Starter 
Sticky Fingers has one of my favorite album closers with "Moonlight Mile"
post #5 of 68
I want to clock Mick Jagger so badly that it hurts.

That being said, Exile is an incredible album.
post #6 of 68
I'll echo the Sticky Fingers love. It's got "Moonlight Mile" and "Sway" on it. Teh awesome.
post #7 of 68
This is one of those bands where I've got the greatest hits 'n stuff, but I've never dug much deeper. But I've always loved what I know. For shame on me... for shame.
post #8 of 68
So this will be the Sticky Fingers appreciation thread. It was my first Stones purchase and is still my favorite (Let It Bleed (and Exile! and...!) is close behind).

Can't You Hear Me Knockin still blows my socks off and it encapsulates what I love about the Stones: it's sloppy and TIGHT at the same time, it's a bunch of posing British boys but with so much swagger that they own it anyway. You know what? If I had a favorite SONG, this would be it.

And anytime you are talking about the Rolling Stones two words should always come up: Charlie. Watts.
post #9 of 68
I respect the Rolling Stones for what they've accomplished, and I acknowledge their influence on the bands that I like. That being said, I could never get into them apart from a few scattered songs here and there. It sure sounds like 'Sticky Fingers' would be a good starting point if I wanted to dive in, though.
post #10 of 68
Just to mix things up, my favorite is Exile, with Sticky Fingers and Let It Bleed close behind. Exile features 80 minutes of the Stones rocking out in Keith's basement, and it sounds like it was recorded on a 4-track. Plus it has "Shine a Light," "Loving Cup," "Rocks Off," "Tumbling Dice," etc...
post #11 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingfan View Post
nobody including the Beatles have had a better album run than Beggers Banquet to Exile On Main Street.
This.

Mick Taylor was definitely an integral part of that run.
post #12 of 68
I never really liked them all that much until I picked up Beggar's Banquet and really liked it, I subsequent picked up Let it Bleed, Exile and Sticky Fingers. I've never cared for their early stuff but I'll check it out just the same. Sticky Fingers is their most diverse album, Mick Taylor was The Stones secret weapon during their classic run.

They created a mould much like The Beatles, there are other band's I'd take over The Rolling Stones though, I really wish they'd release Sticky Fingers with remastered sound, tracks like Sister Morphine Can't hear me knocking do not deserve to be listened to with subpar sound.
post #13 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by machiav View Post
This.

Mick Taylor was definitely an integral part of that run.

very true
post #14 of 68
"Beggars Banquet" and "Let It Bleed" are where it's at for me with the Stones. Then again, I think "Gimme Shelter" is better than "Satisfaction", so there ya go.
post #15 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Goldberg View Post
Then again, I think "Gimme Shelter" is better than "Satisfaction", so there ya go.
Yeah, but that's only because it is.
post #16 of 68
The "heroin country" phase of their career (from Beggar's to Exile) is win streak rarely matched in pop music. Loaded with classic (in the best sense of the word) rock & roll. But before and after that, they were much more of a singles band. Still, I wholeheartedly love tracks like Under My Thumb and Emotional Rescue.
post #17 of 68
They need to retire. It's getting a little ridiculous, and very creepy. Keith Richards looks like he needs the blood of virgins to keep him alive and moving.
post #18 of 68
Mick is one of the few singers that left me "stuck" in the middle of a song.
Some Girls is a great example.

You already mentioned the best ones (LIB, SF, EMS, BB).
For several reasons, Jumpin' Jack is better than Satisfaction too.
post #19 of 68
I agree that Beggars Banquet through Exile on Main Street is an incredible run of albums, with the middle two (Let it Bleed and Sticky Fingers) being my two favorites.

I think what happens sometimes with people getting into the Stones is that they get distracted by the hits. We've heard them a thousand times and when they come over the speakers, people mentally hit the "next" button and start tuning out, which prevents them from getting into the deeper cuts on the album. But if you sit down and listen to them long enough, you realize how incredible they are as complete works of musicianship, and how good the instrumentation is. They're blues musicians through and through, and damn good ones to boot.

Also, I can't recommend the Stones on vinyl enough. I've got the four above. Totally richer sound then anything I've heard on CD, including the remasters.
post #20 of 68
First of all, disagree on The Beatles not having a better run. Rubber Soul thru The White Album is untouchable.

As for the Stones, prefer the Brian Jones era myself. Bluesy, rebellious, Pop. Whether introducing slide guitar to the isle or rocking the sitar--Something cool about this doomed, multi-instrumental genius and early leader. He's not given enough credit. After he died, a lot of the experimentation ended. (For some reason, he doesn't even have songwrting credit on "Paint It Black" or "Ruby Tuesday"--his crowning achievements and lasting legacy)

Aftermath & Between the Buttons are brit pop masterpieces; arguably their best or most important records.

The Begger's Banquet through Exile records owe a great deal to Gram Parsons' influence. Without him no "Honkey Tonk Women", "Wild Horses", or "Dead Flowers". I think he assumed he'd be asked to join the band, but Mick and Keith had a history of bleeding the talent around them dry. A Lot of bodies left by the side of the road. (Ry Cooder basically accused Richards of stealing his style)

All that said, love Sticky Fingers. One of those albums you have to make yourself take out of the player. Not a wasted track. "Sister Morphine" is spooky good.

After Exile, Mick Jagger took over the group and they really were never the same.
post #21 of 68
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
First of all, disagree on The Beatles not having a better run. Rubber Soul thru The White Album is untouchable.

As for the Stones, prefer the Brian Jones era myself. Bluesy, rebellious, Pop. Whether introducing slide guitar to the isle or rocking the sitar--Something cool about this doomed, multi-instrumental genius and early leader. He's not given enough credit. After he died, a lot of the experimentation ended. (For some reason, he doesn't even have songwrting credit on "Paint It Black" or "Ruby Tuesday"--his crowning achievements and lasting legacy)

Aftermath & Between the Buttons are brit pop masterpieces; arguably their best or most important records.

The Begger's Banquet through Exile records owe a great deal to Gram Parsons' influence. Without him no "Honkey Tonk Women", "Wild Horses", or "Dead Flowers". I think he assumed he'd be asked to join the band, but Mick and Keith had a history of bleeding the talent around them dry. A Lot of bodies left by the side of the road. (Ry Cooder basically accused Richards of stealing his style)

All that said, love Sticky Fingers. One of those albums you have to make yourself take out of the player. Not a wasted track. "Sister Morphine" is spooky good.

After Exile, Mick Jagger took over the group and they really were never the same.

Interesting I didnt know about all this history.
post #22 of 68
Might be my fave band ever. I've always liked them more than The Beatles. *cough* *cough*

As for their post-Some Girls output, the majority of it is very good, when you compare it to every other hard rock outfit out there. I always get in the mood for the likes of Tattoo You, Steel Wheels, Voodoo Lounge, and A Bigger Bang from time to time.

Voodoo Lounge is a highly underrated gem in their catalogue. There's nary a filler track to be found, the performances are tight and lively, and that old bluesy/raunchy bombast of yesteryear is back in full force. The Stones sound like they mean it on this album, and that's because they do. 'Sparks Will Fly', 'I Go Wild', and 'Mean Disposition' are three of my fave Stones rockers. The ballads even make me wilt ('New Faces', 'Out of Tears', 'Sweethearts Together', 'Blinded by Rainbows'). The production isn't as flashy and shiny as that found on Steel Wheels, but just modern enough to give it a freshness and vitality.
post #23 of 68
If you can find it on VHS, I recommend 25 X5 : The Continuing Adventures of the Rolling Stones. Gives No Direction Home and The Beatles Anthology a run for best Rock documentary.
post #24 of 68
Has anyone checked out Scorsese's SHINE A LIGHT? I've been meaning to do it for awhile. That might be a Christmas gift I buy myself this year.
post #25 of 68
Because it was there...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMecXZdpN4Q

Also, if you are a fan of Keef and haven't got Talk Is Cheap or Main Offender, FIX IT! (especially Talk Is Cheap).
post #26 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
Aftermath & Between the Buttons are brit pop masterpieces; arguably their best or most important records.
This is the truth. But only for the U.S. Aftermath. "Paint It Black" makes up for the dropped tracks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Abed
As for their post-Some Girls output, the majority of it is very good, when you compare it to every other hard rock outfit out there.
I'm a big fan of the weird and sleazy Undercover. But yeah, compare their 80's output to nearly any other famous rock band from an earlier decade and the Stones come out looking great.
post #27 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feral Akodon View Post
For several reasons, Jumpin' Jack is better than Satisfaction too.
I can't go there with you. I've never really understood Jumpin' Jack's place in the cannon, since it just sounds like a re-write of Satisfaction to me. Now, Get Off My Cloud, that's a great one.
post #28 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Abed View Post
Has anyone checked out Scorsese's SHINE A LIGHT? I've been meaning to do it for awhile. That might be a Christmas gift I buy myself this year.
I actually think it's the best they've been since the 70's. In fact, it might be the best live set I've ever seen from them, and certainly the best live set they've released since the days of Ya-Ya's, Gimme Shelter and Rock n Roll Circus. Check this.
post #29 of 68
I'm not as big into their albums as I am their songs. You absolutely have to respect any band that's written the sheer amount of classic music that they have, but Exile on Main Street aside, I don't really LOVE any of their albums the way I love, say, The Beatles' albums.

Not sure if I can pick a favorite, but I can probably name a handful: Tumblin' Dice, Get Off of My Cloud, Sympathy for the Devil, Shattered, Rip This Joint, and Let's Spend the Night Together.
post #30 of 68
Been a big fan for many long years (first saw them in '69), my favorite run the '68-'72 period that goes from Jumpin' Jack Flash to Exile on Main Street, and I'd have to say that they delivered me a big surprise a couple years back, with their album A Bigger Bang, which for no good reason at all was their best since at least Tattoo You, or maybe Some Girls.

Yeah, they're old and wrinkly, and half the time Mick can't be arsed to remember the lyrics. But as long as Keith and Charlie keep dragging their carcasses to the studio, I'll keep listening.

Concerts are another matter-- can't justify those prices. Haven't seen them since the Steel Wheels tour, though people tend to give me the concert DVD's as gifts, so it looks like not much has changed. Shine A Light is certainly great, but there's also some choice stuff on those mega-DVD packs that they've released the past few years.
post #31 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z-Man View Post
Now, Get Off My Cloud, that's a great one.
vs. Out of Time or Under my thumb?
post #32 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feral Akodon View Post
vs. Out of Time or Under my thumb?
Ha, those are two that I straight-up don't like. Wait, actually I'm having trouble remembering how "Out of Time" goes, but I remember not liking it much. You know what's a really great one? "She Said Yeah." First song on December's Children. It's a cover, and I've never heard the original, but that's one that deserves to be on everyone's Stones mix.
post #33 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z-Man View Post
Ha, those are two that I straight-up don't like.
I started listening to them with the London Years collection and only recently moved to 6 LP. From Out of time I love the way the drums sound. As other chewers said is all about Charlie.
post #34 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z-Man View Post
You know what's a really great one? "She Said Yeah." First song on December's Children. It's a cover, and I've never heard the original, but that's one that deserves to be on everyone's Stones mix.
Great song-- original by Larry Williams (The Beatles covered his Dizzy Miss Lizzy and Bad Boy), though the Stones rip the original to shreds.
post #35 of 68
I'm a drooling Stones fanboy so I'm keeping this short [eta: OH, FUCK ME] or I'll never get any work done (though as much as I'll make a case for their later stuff, even for me the masters for Bridges to Babylon should be dropped in an active volcano; christ, even this apologist hates it).

I love the whole spectrum, from (especially) the days of ripping off Muddy Waters and Otis Redding (who trumped em back with a phenomenal Memphis soul cover of "Satisfaction" -- done on the first take) to Jagger's yanking the band around into whatever the day's fashionable sound was ("Miss You"s only a disco-like track 'cause of the 4-on-the-floor beat Mick insisted Charlie maintain, and half of the SOME GIRLS and EMOTIONAL RESCUE albums are stabs at punk). Fuck, I even think UNDERCOVER's fun as a campy groove.

I will admit I was in love with STEEL WHEELS when it came out, but I was a teenager and just discovering their old stuff, and now I almost never return to it. VOODOO LOUNGE, though, is half to 2/3 fangoddamnfuckingtastic, and, after the Bridges utter failure, A BIGGER BANG is way better than I ever thought these old fucks had any right to be. Still, a good third filler, though; if they'd trimmed it to a lean 44-minute LP-sized album, it'd be up there with SOME GIRLS and TATTOO YOU (the Some Girls outtakes!) as far as plain damn fun. But on the whole, a shallow bit of throwback bar rock; at least they were throwing back to their better days, for once.

Useless trivia from the London Years notes: On the night Brian Jones died, the other Stones were recording a Stevie Wonder cover "I Don't Know Why (aka I Don't Know Why I love You)."

Apparently, there was a lot of pushback to the Taylor influence at the time; fans then weren't taken with the addition of long "self-indulgent" guitar solos -- get to the damn ROCK already! And EXILE ON MAIN STREET just had people confused. It's completely different from any other album of theirs, before or since, and had critics scratching their heads. Here's this massive 18-track double album from one of the world's biggest bands fronted by the world's most infamous rock gods... and everywhere the vocals are buried (and more indecipherable than usual, even for Jagger), the mix is mud, there's horns and pianos and chorus singers clogging up almost all the tracks, it jumps from rockabilly to Mississippi blues to gospel, sometimes in the same damn song... It took people a while to figure this fucking thing out. Even now you'll hardly ever hear singles from it on the radio.

The song "It's Only Rock and Roll" started out as a Ron Wood song he was knocking around for Rod Stewart's next solo album (Wood was pretty much the unsung hero of his old Faces frontman's successful early solo career); he started jamming with Keith one time and they knocked it around, but neither had any lyrics but the chorus. Wood said, "Sure, take it to Mick" -- probably already angling for Taylor's spot, which was looking to open up sooner rather than later. Mick did his thing (Jesus, do I miss the guy who wrote poetry like "Wild Horses") and yadda yadda yadda, boozy rocker becomes one of the great rock anthems of the 70s.

One of the reasons Mick Taylor was getting bitchier with the band and his role in it and eventually walked, he felt he wasn't getting enough credit on the albums. Almost definitely true (but man was he killing the goose). Then on the Stones' first album without him, BLACK AND BLUE (too often overlooked), Ronnie Wood (who was apparently "auditioning" while the album was recorded) gets an "inspired by" credit. No hard feelings, Taylor!

Tripling the love for Charlie Watts. For fans of pretty much just the '68 to '72 run (and seems like most here are) get your hands on the live albums in between. GET YER YA-YAS OUT! is a live masterpiece, IMO. If the only version of Sympathy for the Devil you've heard is the album track, get this immediately and sink into the James Brown-esque beat Watts lays down throughout. The man replicates the layers of percussion instruments used in making the studio track so iconic with what sounds like, maybe, a 5-piece kit. On the minimalist end on the scale of drummer styles (Pert, say, way over on the other end), Watts is non pareil.

One of my most prized possessions is a poster I found in the back of some record shop 2 decades ago; it's a simple blowup of a b&w photo of a very young Keef, full shot. He's wearing an unzippered hoody with the hood up, hands in its pockets, cig in mouth, glaring blankly at the camera, leaning back with his hands pulling the jacket open, revealing a tight T-shirt over his skinny frame that says "WHO THE FUCK IS MICK JAGGER?"

I need very badly to have this signed by one or both Glimmer Twins before springing for the framing. If anyone can make this happen, my eternal soul is an option for trade.
post #36 of 68
Honkey Tonk Woman, Sympathy for the Devil, Paint it Black and Gimme Shelter are my favorite songs of theirs. They are second only to the Beatles in my mind.

That said, lately when they've been popping up on the sat radio I've been switching stations and seeing what else is on. I don't know why.

And just to add, their Super Bowl halftime preformance was aweful. Easily the worst since the NFL started playing it relativley safe.
post #37 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trav McGee View Post
One of my most prized possessions is a poster I found in the back of some record shop 2 decades ago; it's a simple blowup of a b&w photo of a very young Keef, full shot. He's wearing an unzippered hoody with the hood up, hands in its pockets, cig in mouth, glaring blankly at the camera, leaning back with his hands pulling the jacket open, revealing a tight T-shirt over his skinny frame that says "WHO THE FUCK IS MICK JAGGER?"

I need very badly to have this signed by one or both Glimmer Twins before springing for the framing. If anyone can make this happen, my eternal soul is an option for trade.
Wow, there was a large framed print of that photo hanging in one of the bars in Athens when I lived there (The Roadhouse), but I swear it was Steven Tyler and not Keith.
post #38 of 68
RE: Sticky Fingers - Holy shit, I didn't know so many people liked this album. I still have the vinyl with the working zipper on the front of the sleeve.
post #39 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z-Man View Post
Wow, there was a large framed print of that photo hanging in one of the bars in Athens when I lived there (The Roadhouse), but I swear it was Steven Tyler and not Keith.


Nope, s'Keef.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake View Post
RE: Sticky Fingers - Holy shit, I didn't know so many people liked this album. I still have the vinyl with the working zipper on the front of the sleeve.
Had one, first press. STOLEN. So bitter.
post #40 of 68
The worlds greatest rock n' roll band. Period. The Rolling Stones are for people who would be fans of The Beatles except for the fact that they aren't asexuals, intellectuals, or weaklings.
post #41 of 68
Can't help on the Keef poster, but I was recently in Vegas, and ran across a gallery of Woody's paintings. It's pretty clear that he knows every single line in Keef's face.
post #42 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trav McGee View Post
[IMG]Nope, s'Keef.
Yeah, that's the one. I guess I never looked at it very closely.

I think they stayed pretty good up until Undercover. I remember Dirty Work coming out, and that song "One Hit to the Body" was like The Phantom Menace--I managed to convince myself it was a great song the first time I listened to it, but subsequent listens proved that I was deluded. I think I was hyped up by a quote in SPIN from the albums producer (I think?) comparing it to Husker Du!

Steel Wheels...there's some OK stuff on there if you really want there to be, and there's "Continental Drift" which is pretty remarkable, but "Mixed Emotions" is just unforgivable. Worse than "Emotional Rescue", which at least has a WTF appeal. That song sounds like Billy Joel or something. I saw them that tour, pretty much quit following their new stuff after that.
post #43 of 68
^^That's a weird jumping off point - Voodoo Lounge is honestly pretty good. If you ask me, their freakish longevity is one of the most interesting things about the band. I'm interested in exactly how long they can keep it up and encourage them to do so for as long as they're physically capable.

But frankly of all the 60's legends they're one of the few that do very little for me. I can acnowledge many of their songs as classics and respect their place in music history, but not a single one of their albums has strikes me as anything more then pretty good, and I even then I never, ever feel like listening to any of them.
post #44 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad Man Mundt View Post
The worlds greatest rock n' roll band. Period. The Rolling Stones are for people who would be fans of The Beatles except for the fact that they aren't asexuals, intellectuals, or weaklings.
I think you just made my weekend.
post #45 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trav McGee View Post
And EXILE ON MAIN STREET just had people confused. It's completely different from any other album of theirs, before or since, and had critics scratching their heads. Here's this massive 18-track double album from one of the world's biggest bands fronted by the world's most infamous rock gods... and everywhere the vocals are buried (and more indecipherable than usual, even for Jagger), the mix is mud, there's horns and pianos and chorus singers clogging up almost all the tracks, it jumps from rockabilly to Mississippi blues to gospel, sometimes in the same damn song... It took people a while to figure this fucking thing out. Even now you'll hardly ever hear singles from it on the radio.
Jagger is still pissed by the mixing. (RS interview along J. White)
post #46 of 68
Goat's Head Soup is a weird record. Half is crap ("Dancing With Mr. D" the most embarrassing bad boy attempt of the classic period-and a shitty opener for a band that usually comes out smokin'). A big step down from the highs of Exile. Still there's some great songs and buried treasures. "Angie", "Winter", "Silver Train", and "Coming Down Again" are all worthy of showing up on a Stones mix tape or Ipod shuffle. (last gasp of the vintage sound)

Is it just a rumour, or truth that Jeff Beck got the gig for Black and Blue, but insulted the legendary rhythm section and was not only fired but erased of the album? (Can't remember where I heard that)

I echo the love for Get Your Ya-Ya's Out. A blazing live record. It's really grown on me over the years. "Jumpin' Jack Flash", "Midnight Rambler", and "Little Queenie" are stand-outs with the latter two destroying the studio versions.

*Can't remember the title, but the Stanley Booth book covering the ill fated '69 Tour is essential.
post #47 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feral Akodon View Post
Jagger is still pissed by the mixing. (RS interview along J. White)
Yeah, well, fuck him!

On the other end of producing decisions, he also shouldn't have left UNDERCOVER in the hands of the C and the C who would later become The C&C Music Factory, with the instructions "Just don't add a bunch of stupid synthesizers and electric drum loops," who then proceeded to blithely slap on the synths and drum loops. Went out anyway, didn't it, Mick? There's a good decade there they hilariously didn't give a shit.
post #48 of 68
Yeah, I like Goat's Head Soup a lot, even though it's obviously a step down from the albums that preceeded it. I even like "Mr. D" OK. That whole first side is quite nice, and I like the bits of wah-wah guitar that show up. And "Heartbreaker" is one of my favorite Stones tunes.
post #49 of 68
Thread Starter 
I agree with the songs mentioned on Goats Head particuraly "Winter". Great song.


Also as far as song post Exile I have some really strong love for "Girl With The Faraway Eyes" off of Some Girls. Such a fun song.
post #50 of 68
Both Exile and Goats Head Soup have material that just explodes onstage, lending some credence to the production complaints. There's not a Stones album without something I find redeeming, but I will admit that Dirty Work and Steel Wheels don't make it easy.
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