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The Pixar Thread - Page 2

post #51 of 310

No.

 

(laconic nooj)

post #52 of 310

For the Birds is an amazing short, the visual gag of the giant bird is awesome
 

post #53 of 310

For some reason, the character designs in For the Birds always struck me as Henson-esque. That perhaps adds to my esteem of it.

post #54 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Spider View Post

For some reason, the character designs in For the Birds always struck me as Henson-esque. That perhaps adds to my esteem of it.
Yes, exactly. Even the plot reminds one of a Muppet sketch (with fewer explosions.)
post #55 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Spider View Post

Geez, I go on a canoe trip for a couple days, and look what happens.

 

You made us do this!

 

On the Pixar shorts: it's even harder to peg down my favorites among those than among the studio's feature-length films. I will say La Luna is stunning, but it also lacks much by way of story. It's maybe more of a creation myth/tone poem than anything else. Very gorgeous.

 

I'm very partial to Day & Night; fie upon its lack of subtlety. It's so well-animated and tells such an arresting story that its utter rejection of such prized concepts as "nuance" and "deft handedness" never bothers me for a second. And Partly Cloudy choked me up without even trying, at least the first time I saw it. But I think my absolute favorite has to be Presto. There's something about its comic sensibilities that feels so steeped in classical approaches to slapstick that just kills me every time.

post #56 of 310

Geri's Game and One Man Band are constantly fighting for my favorite spot, though my sentimental favorite is still Boundin'. I love the way it's animated (I adore that the Jackalope looks like a guy wearing a big felt suit--another Henson-esque quality), but more that the story and its lyrical style always remind me of my grandfather, who was a writer. It was so in his style I actually went back through his papers and double checked that someone hadn't swiped it. "In this world of ups and downs/So good to know there's Jackalopes around" was his kind of punchline.

post #57 of 310
It's a tossup between PRESTO and LIFTED for me. Both of those absolutely killed in my theaters and still make me laugh whenever i rewatch them.
post #58 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Clark View Post

Geri's Game and One Man Band are constantly fighting for my favorite spot, though my sentimental favorite is still Boundin'. I love the way it's animated (I adore that the Jackalope looks like a guy wearing a big felt suit--another Henson-esque quality), but more that the story and its lyrical style always remind me of my grandfather, who was a writer. It was so in his style I actually went back through his papers and double checked that someone hadn't swiped it. "In this world of ups and downs/So good to know there's Jackalopes around" was his kind of punchline.

 

That's cool to hear, Greg! And let me reiterate, I do really like Boundin'. It's just a very different type of Pixar short; most of them are played purely for laughs, pathos, or a bit of both.

 

agracru: Ha! I wasn't so much criticizing Day or Night's lack of subtlety as observing it.

 

And no one else is going to challenge/support my belief that Tom Hanks' Woody is collectively one of his best roles? Bah. I thought we all loved Hanks up in here.

 

Also, I finally watched Leslie Iwerks' The Pixar Story on my Wall-E Blu-ray recently. It covers a lot of information I already knew about Pixar from various books, but it does so in quite an entertaining fashion, and it's interesting to actually see people talking about it. I'm especially impressed with how honest they are about the production troubles on the first two Toy Story films.

post #59 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Spider View Post

 

agracru: Ha! I wasn't so much criticizing Day or Night's lack of subtlety as observing it.

 

And no one else is going to challenge/support my belief that Tom Hanks' Woody is collectively one of his best roles? Bah. I thought we all loved Hanks up in here.

 

Also, I finally watched Leslie Iwerks' The Pixar Story on my Wall-E Blu-ray recently. It covers a lot of information I already knew about Pixar from various books, but it does so in quite an entertaining fashion, and it's interesting to actually see people talking about it. I'm especially impressed with how honest they are about the production troubles on the first two Toy Story films.

 

I think this is the problem with posting on message boards-- tone is really hard to convey in a single post. Yeah, I didn't think you were criticizing it anything. Just saying that it works for me despite that objective observation you made. Definitely a top pick for me. Though again, I'm very flighty when it comes to determining my favorite Pixar shorts because they're all so good. (For the most part!)

 

As for Hanks/Woody...well, I think Woody is a classical Hanks character. I think the notion that Woody represents one of Hanks' best characters more or less speaks for itself, just by virtue of how perfectly he embodies the role through voice alone. I really wish I had more to say but to me that's just kind of a universal truth that's self-evident; Hanks is great as Woody, and Woody is great for Hanks.

 

I feel like The Pixar Story was on Instant at one point. Maybe I'm wrong.

post #60 of 310

It was on Instant.  Now it resides on the Wall-E blu-ray!

post #61 of 310

Well, fuckshitstack. I don't have the Wall-E Blu-Ray! But I do have a birthday next week....

post #62 of 310

You mentioned "classical Hanks" characters; one of the neat brief bits we see in The Pixar Story is the animation test that convinced Hanks to sign on. It's apparently pretty common practice, and one that Pixar would do on later films, but they took an audio clip from Turner & Hooch and animated Woody to it. Obviously it's a bit primitive compared to now, and even to what the final film would look like, but you can see why Hanks was impressed.

 

Also neat in TPS: seeing Steve Jobs talk about how he saw the long-term benefits of his $10 million purchase of Pixar. For all his jackassery, the man had a brilliant knack for seeing future potential in projects.

post #63 of 310

Then it sounds like a keeper. I can't wait until I get the chance to see it myself!

 

In other news, I'm really looking forward to seeing Brave again. 

post #64 of 310

I have friends who want to make a night of going out to see BRAVE when it comes out.  And honestly... I'm not sure if I want to go see it again.

post #65 of 310

Damn, it disappointed you that much? C'mon man, maybe you'll like it more if you give it another shot.

post #66 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

I have friends who want to make a night of going out to see BRAVE when it comes out.  And honestly... I'm not sure if I want to go see it again.

Have a after party where everyone watches The Incredibles.

post #67 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by agracru View Post

Well, fuckshitstack. I don't have the Wall-E Blu-Ray! But I do have a birthday next week....

It's a gorgeous looking Blu...I can't wait till Finding Nemo comes out.

post #68 of 310

It was a very entertaining film with lots of great stuff.  I'm just not feeling the urge to see it again immediately.

post #69 of 310

Oh, agracru...

 

If you happen to purchase the Wall-E blu-ray yourself, go for the 2-disc set.  The 3-disc is only differentiated by the inclusion of a digital copy.  When it was first released, there was a $10 difference between the two!

 

Of course, I don't know if the price is that different now. 

 

Just FYI.

post #70 of 310

It's $22.20 on Amazon. Which is the cheapest I've seen it anywhere.  Usually you find a majority of Disney Blu rays to be about $32

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001EOQWF8/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_2?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B001EOQWFI&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=1YWV16E350W7FV9QM0AQ

post #71 of 310

Shop around on Amazon and you'll sometimes find multiple listings for the same thing.

 

I found another listing there for $21.99

 

And then there are sellers on there putting it out for $15 (with shipping though).

 

http://www.amazon.com/Wall-E-Two-Disc-BD-Live-Blu-ray/dp/B001EOQWF8/ref=sr_1_2?s=movies-tv&ie=UTF8&qid=1340129105&sr=1-2&keywords=wall-e+blu-ray

post #72 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Spider View Post

Damn, it disappointed you that much? C'mon man, maybe you'll like it more if you give it another shot.

 

Don't listen to Nooj! Don't listen to him and his negativity vibes! All harshing the Brave buzz!

 

In seriousness, it's a very, very good entry for Pixar, but I do understand what he's talking about even if the movie didn't disappoint me on any truly appreciable level. I'll be curious to see what you think of it once you've gotten to see it yourself.

 

As for the Wall-E Blu-Ray, I've learned well the lesson of "never buy the 3-disc version unless that third disc isn't just some stupid digital copy they can charge you an extra 10 clams for". Either way I've put it on my birthday list so we'll see!

post #73 of 310

THERE IS NO BRAVE BUZZ!!!!

 

Oh, I'm sure Chris will go wild for BRAVE and *shrug* off most any criticism of it.

 

I'm gonna break those shrugging shoulders of yours, Chris. 

 

Slowly.  Painfully.  To uplifting Giacchino score.

 

(Patrick Doyle scored Brave)

post #74 of 310

*shrugs* Honestly, I've gotten to the point where I just don't let negative criticisms, however valid they might be, destroy my enjoyment of a film. Yes, there will be occasions where I revisit a film and go, "Wow, this actually sucks! What the hell was I thinking?" But it happens less often than you'd think. And I DO think about films; I hope that's not the impression I've been giving. But I've also never thought a film has to be flawless to be enjoyable. And then there are the films that are enjoyable for their badness, or bad films that have a couple good qualities so I don't completely dismiss them.

 

What I'm trying to say is here, I do give criticism of films I enjoy a good deal of thought. Hell, sometimes it's a lot of fun seeing completely different opinions, especially when they're as well-written as, say, Roger Ebert. I love that big lug, but there are PLENTY of times where I've disagreed with him, or thought he cut a film too much slack. At the same time, I just don't worry anymore about whether or not my opinion on something makes me "cool" or not. You all know me. Most of you seem to like me. So I'm comfortable in expressing dissent, as long as I don't act like an idiot while doing it.

post #75 of 310

I MUST BREAK YOU.

post #76 of 310

Ha. In all seriousness, do you get what I'm trying to say? I just feel like we get into a hive mind sometimes around here, even if it's not on purpose.

post #77 of 310

EVERYONE MUST BE BROKEN BEFORE THEY JOIN THE HIVE.

WE ARE LEGION.

 

Ok, in seriousness... I have no problem with dissent.  At all.  But I do love discussion.  And when you respond to someone with a *shrug* and "Meh, it worked for me," without adding much to it, it feels like a brush-off.  And particularly in the Prometheus thread, that's what a lot of your posts came off as without really responding to the specific criticisms in any meaningful way (to me, anyway). 

 

My usual tact?  If I've said my piece and have little more to add, I just let the hive mind play out.  Because I have no doubt that something like the Prometheus thread will have people coming back and reassessing certain negative reactions, the same way I imagine The Avengers thread will have some more negativity once the excitement of the initial release wears off.

 

I'm not one to tell anyone how to post.  But I hope you can see what I mean.  Because I love ya, Chris.  Anyone who is as crazy about animation as you are is cool with me.

post #78 of 310

Yeah, I did get a little brush-offy in the Prometheus thread. I can admit that. I just thought the negative reactions were so extreme that they ignored anything good writing-wise about the film (David, for me, is the most interesting and more-or-less consistently written character in the whole thing). I think I did a little better about giving specific *reasons* for this sort of thing in the John Carter thread, where even my initial reaction was "yeah, it ain't perfect".

 

And thanks.

post #79 of 310

I tend to get brush-offish when I start to grow exhausted of a topic. So it's usually at that point that I abandon the conversation. Prometheus is a great recent example, as I've been writing about it here, there, and everywhere and repeating myself across various boards to the point of just growing nauseated at the process.

 

Brave I'm very much looking forward to discussing. I don't think it lends itself to the same sort of discussion. 

post #80 of 310

Definitely looking forward to discussing that.  I may go see the movie with my friends just to see how it plays for me the 2nd time.

post #81 of 310

Do it! Sometimes a second look is all it takes to change one's perspective on a film.

 

Oldboy, my all-time favorite movie, severely underwhelmed me the first time I saw it (thanks a fucking lot, Quentin Tarantino!), but I watched it again...and then immediately again. And later again. And so on. Just an anecdote to chew on.

post #82 of 310

What did QT say that made Oldboy underwhelming for you?

post #83 of 310

Ha! That belongs in the Oldboy thread! But kidding aside, it's not anything specific-- it's just the fact that he liked it. I think his stamp of approval informed my expectations for that movie in a very warped sort of way. The fact that it was much more of a neo-noir/tragedy than I anticipated it would be threw me off. But now that's exactly why I love the movie.

 

I may be mistaken but I think we've actually talked about Oldboy at length, years ago when I posted on the IMDB (shudder) boards. I seem to remember someone with a really similar name to yours. I could be off.

 

Anyways-- Pixar is great! Let's celebrate Pixar! What do people think of the Monster's University trailer?

post #84 of 310

WAAAAAAAIT A MINUTE.

 

I think it might've been YOU I talked OLDBOY about on the IMDB boards!  Did I send you an essay I wrote about CHINATOWN?

 

EDIT:  Just checked my old e-mails.  I think it IS you!  I actually sent you an e-mail somewhat recently to see how you were doing.  But I guess you don't use your old college e-mail anymore (which makes sense, since I don't either).

 

So this is what it's like... WHEN DOVES CRY!!!

 

ALL ROADS LEAD TO CHUD.

 

lemon-of-troy1.png?w=655

post #85 of 310

Yes! If the Chinatown essay is the one I'm thinking of, I remember being very jealous of how good it was, sort of a "I wish I'd written that" moment. And I also remember that you sent me phonetic transcriptions of the two prayers Wu-jin drops as hints for Dae-su in the film. REUNITED AT LAST! And in a much better place than the IMDB boards. Yowza!


Sorry for losing touch! I actually tried checking my college emails after graduating but alas, access was cut!

post #86 of 310

This is no longer The Pixar Thread.

 

It's the IMDB Board Reunion Thread!

post #87 of 310

Yeah! And if anyone else wants to talk about Pixar stuff-- screw you! We're having a moment!

post #88 of 310

Actually, that was kind of beautiful, guys.

post #89 of 310

Pixar should make a movie about it!

post #90 of 310

Hee. Anyway, I'm currently re-reading Karen Paik's book To Infinity And Beyond!: The Story of Pixar Animation Studios. I'm pretty sure The Pixar Story documentary ended up taking a lot of cues from it, since Leslie Iwerks is credited as providing interviews and research.

 

Much like the documentary, it's fascinating stuff, especially concerning the early days when they were doing medical imaging and satellite surveillance, they helped create Disney's first digital ink-and-paint CAPS system, all while making short films and commercials to prepare themselves for a full feature film. They were also the first people who wanted to make a film out of James and the Giant Peach, but Roald Dahl turned them down.

post #91 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

 

It's the IMDB Board Reunion Thread!

 

I was on (and left) the IMDb boards before the 21st century. It's almost a rite of passage of being a movie geek on the internet.

post #92 of 310

I was on there as well for a couple years, but quickly realized most of the people there were complete idiots. I did have a neat little discussion about Ladyhawke at one point, though.

post #93 of 310

Can I throw IGN comments in to the mix as home to a massive chunk of idiots?

 

ETA: PIXAR is awesome and I like their movies.

post #94 of 310

Well this certainly took a strange turn.

post #95 of 310

I think you mean an AWESOME turn! That must be what you mean.

 

Re: IMDB. It's a cesspool of cinematic thought. I went back there to talk about Kill List after seeing it and wound up arguing with some guy about whether Jay and Gal are realistic hitmen when all I wanted to talk about was meticulousness and intention. Painful!

 

Re: Pixar stuff. Chris, I should have spoken to you weeks ago when I was struggling to put together a birthday list. I'd have put To Infinity on there in a heartbeat. Hell, maybe it's not too late. I could end up with a Pixar-rrific birthday haul.

post #96 of 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by wd40 View Post

Can I throw IGN comments in to the mix as home to a massive chunk of idiots?

 

ETA: PIXAR is awesome and I like their movies.

Hell, throw in some of the staff while we're at it!

 

Anyway, back to actual Pixar thoughts: one thing I've always found remarkable about Pixar is how they dare to make their protagonists unlikable to a certain degree. Granted, they had to scale back on this after the first pass of Toy Story, but even in the finished film Woody has some pretty big asshole moments. To be fair, much of his frustration with clueless Buzz is played for laughs (the classic "YOU! ARE! A! TOOOOOYYY!" rant being a particular favorite), but think about when his main concern with getting back to Andy's with Buzz in tow is more about his reputation with the other toys. The character development he goes through is all the more resonant thanks to this, but I'm just impressed they even dared to do it.

 

Or think about Ratatouille. Remy is perhaps the Pixar protagonist par excellence, and Patton Oswalt is such an inherently likable actor, but the film is unafraid to portray his uglier sides. He's a bit of a snob, and thinks very little of Linguini or Colette at the beginning. He also lets the rats into the kitchen near the climax out of pure spite; true, he recognizes this as a mistake pretty quickly, and this arguably leads to the strengthening of the bond between Remy, Linguini and Colette. One of my favorite small moments in the film is the quick little bit of recognition between Remy and Colette in the bistro at the end of the film; they have come to regard each other as cooking equals.

 

Of course, sometimes this can backfire. One of my larger problems with the first Cars is that McQueen is such an asshole in the first part of the film that his character development doesn't feel quite as earned. It's not bad, and I do like that Doc Hudson's betrayal near the end is portrayed as just as awful as any of McQueen's earlier behavior. But I feel like McQueen should've have been a little more "Sorry I was such a jackass earlier" as the film went on.


Edited by Chris Spider - 6/21/12 at 8:04am
post #97 of 310

agracru: I will say that To Infinity is a pretty large coffee table book, and it only goes up to the Disney purchase of Pixar in terms of chronology. Still, it's a remarkable piece either way, and there are loads of great pictures.

post #98 of 310

My problem with Lightning McQueen was that he was such an uninteresting asshole.  Not how much of an asshole he was.

post #99 of 310

Yeah, I suppose that's part of it too. I do think Owen Wilson did a good job as the voice, perhaps giving McQueen's "turn" more legitimacy from an acting perspective. But McQueen is just not as inherently fascinating a protagonist as, say, Woody, Remy, Marlin or Carl. And all four of those leads had absolutely phenomenal performances coming from the vocal end. Ed Asner's work as Carl in particular is one of my favorite roles of his, and he's no stranger to great voice acting.

 

On the subject of acting in Cars, I also do believe that Paul Newman, Bonnie Hunt and Michael Keaton are fucking great in it. And the ending credits gag of reenacting previous Pixar films with cars is made even funnier by the returning voice actors in those roles. Especially when John Ratzenberger gets to complain about how they keep re-using him.

post #100 of 310

Hey, coffee table books are a-okay with me if they're coffee table books about really interesting and awesome stuff.

 

As far as Pixar and unlikable heroes...well, I'd point to Carl Fredricksen as the textbook example of that. He's just a gruff old jerk. And he remains a gruff old jerk for the vast majority of the film. Even when he starts to turn around on Russell, he's still prone to some truly callous outbursts, and he stays that way until the very end. Like with Woody in the first Toy Story, that curmudgeonly attitude is often played for laughs, but he has some moments of bona fide cruelty. His break with Russell before the climactic third-act dirigible showdown is legitimately painful to watch; I feel nothing but pity for that poor, irritatingly peppy kid.

 

The Remy point is interesting. In Remy's case, his attitude toward, say, Colette makes sense beyond him just being a dick. She's his competition, both in the kitchen-- she's the authority in the kitchen before Luigi's star rises by virtue of Remy's talents-- and out. When Luigi blows up and enjoys some success, he's running off with Colette while Little Chef gets left out. I don't think Remy truly transgresses until he betrays Linguini's trust by letting his brother and, eventually, the entire damn clan into the kitchens (though you could argue that that snowballs courtesy of Emile being kind of an asshole himself). Which is admittedly a really huge transgression. One wonders how the rest of the film would have gone without that calamity.

 

Brave isn't afraid of making Merida unlikable, either. That's definitely a hallmark of Pixar's oeuvre: making its protagonists flawed and giving them something to redeem themselves for.

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