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I still DO like Star Wars - Page 83

post #4101 of 4311
Every May, I do a series of STAR WARS daily essays on Facebook. There's a lot of discussion and chatter, and it's fun.

Anyway, here's today's.



31 DAYS OF THE FOURTH #16

INTERLUDE:

“LIES I TOLD BECAUSE OF STAR WARS”



One of the best things about being a kid during the release of the original STAR WARS trilogy was the toys. Toys, toys, toys. Their like had not been seen in the world before this time. Every character from every film (including ancillary, bit-part players, many without actual dialogue) was given his or her own action figure and weapon/accessory; every starship or transport vehicle was available as a stunningly faithful* and expertly-designed figure-ready mobile unit; and even the locations from the films were presented as play sets where all these elements could come together to create a perfect storm of commercialism and fertile imagination, granting kids (of all ages) the chance to act out scenes from the films they’d seen, and scenes from the films still unmade. I had many, many, many STAR WARS toys, and I still haven’t forgiven my mother for throwing most of them out during one of the many great Bedroom Purges of my youth.

But there was one collectible that I wanted, NEEDED, more than all the rest: the STAR WARS Micro Collection play set called “Bespin World.”

What happened was, many of the environments from the movies were just too damn big to accommodate 3.75-inch action figures, and so a second line of toys (“Moichandizing!”) was rolled out. These were smaller than the main line by about two hundred percent, and featured areas from various sequences that, when locked together, created locations such as the Death Star and the Rebel base on Hoth. Each set included tiny, die-cast figurines for characters specific to each environment.

I distinctly remember my parents buying me several of these (and my uncle Skip got me a groovy Dagobah-ready X-Wing that, once you pushed a button on the rear flank, became disjointed and lay there on the ground as if it had crashed). I was accumulating quite the STAR WARS horde when, during a shelf-scouting session in the J.C. Penny’s at the Valley Mall during the autumn of 1981, I saw “Bespin World,” and became immediately and irrevocably obsessed.

It included figures and locations from three of the most important (and, for a child of six, impactful) moments in THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK, including Luke’s defeat in the Cloud City reactor core, and his subsequent disarming and emotional castration on the gantry. Given the narrative importance of the moments, it was criminal that play sets hadn’t yet been made for Bespin; but here it was. It even came with a one-handed Luke, which made talking my mother into buying it for me a mission.

But the stand-out feature was the carbon freezing chamber -- the site of Han Solo’s still unresolved fate. And from what I could discern from the packaging, it was real. It FROZE action figures. Look, I was six; I was dumb. I still believed commercials and what was shown on the box. With that said, you’ll have to understand that when I saw the step-by-step procedures that depicted Han Solo being lowered into the pit and then coming back out again sealed in carbonite, I absolutely one hundred percent believed it. And I had to have it.

Mom didn’t buy it for me. It was too expensive. “Maybe for Christmas,” she said in that off-handed way mothers speak when they want you to shut up and behave yourself in the clothes department. I didn’t shut up, though: I talked about it all the rest of that day, and when my Dad came home from work, I gave him a commercial presentation designed to wow him into buying it for me. IT FREEZES STUFF! THINK OF THE POSSIBILITIES! Strangely, my father wasn’t sufficiently impressed by the forty-dollar portable carbon freeze unit that could be used to preserve objects smaller than a chess pawn. Parents just don’t understand.

I couldn’t stop thinking about. I couldn’t stop imagining all the things I’d freeze. So firmly was this in my mind that when I went to school on Monday, I slipped during a conversation in which my classmates were measuring dicks by bragging about which STAR WARS toys they had.

“I’ve got the Imperial Walker,” sniffed one smug bastard.

“I have the Walker AND the snow speeder,” sniffed the little shit across from him.

“I have the Walker AND the snow speeder AND I have the Death Star play set they only make in Australia” boasted some putrid little fuck whose identity I’ve erased from memory.**

Having none of these particular items and wanting all of them, I did the natural thing and lied to one-up these little turds. “Well, I have the Bespin play set with an ACTUAL carbon freezing chamber that ACTUALLY freezes ACTUAL things.” If you’ve met me, you probably know the tone of voice I used, and yes, if I could reach back through time, I’d punch me, too.

Naturally, the previous conversation ended abruptly, the dick-measuring forgotten. Everyone wanted to know about my carbon freezing chamber. It was REAL? It really, no kidding, FROZE things? Why, yes it did, I told them; and when they asked what happened to my Han Solo once he was frozen -- presumably rendering him incapable of re-freezing -- I explained that if you left him in the sun, he’d melt. Made sense, since clearly carbonite and ice are the same thing. I was such a little asshole.

Boy oh BOY, did I have a lot of neighborhood kids showing up on the doorstep unannounced after that. It got to the point where I was having to pick my play areas judiciously since everyone wanted to see the technological marvel stashed inside my bedroom. Why weren’t there any commercials on TV for the play set? everyone asked; for the same reason you didn’t see commercials for microscopes, I improvised: science stuff is too important for advertisements during BRADY BUNCH reruns. It was getting difficult to avoid kids, particularly at school, where my claims were now being disputed, and I was given an ultimatum: bring it in for Show & Tell, or admit I was making it up. Backed into a corner with no place to go, I did the rational thing and promised I’d bring it in the next day. Then I literally went down on my knees and begged my Mom to buy it for me, that very night, so I’d have it the next day. Being a loving, supportive woman who put the needs of her child before her own, she laughed at my dire circumstances and then went to the bowling alley to do aerobics. To this day, I can’t hear “Pac-Man Fever” without imagining my mother in a leotard, dancing without any concern for my impending doom.

When I showed up at school the next morning, the kids were waiting for me. Several jumped up and rushed over. “Where is it?” they asked, eye-fucking my backpack for signs of an unusual bulge. “Did you bring it?” All would be revealed during Show & Tell, I promised. That gave me about three hours to figure my way out of this.

So when the time finally came, and Mrs. Sklencar went down the list of names of the chalkboard and came at last to mine, I got up in front of the room empty-handed. The girls didn’t give a shit (all they were fixated on were Cabbage Patch Kids and My Little Pony); but the boys were all casting expressions that were fifty percent contempt and fifty percent excitement for the confession I was about to make.

And what a confession I made! I opened my mouth, prepared to tell the truth…and then explained that I hadn’t been able to bring my carbon freezing chamber after an accident involving my four year-old sister the night before: an accident during which she’d gotten her finger stuck inside the freezing apparatus, which then activated and caused her to be fused to the chamber shaft. She’d had to go to the emergency room, at which time surgeons had used a laser to remove her finger -- thus separating her from the play set -- and then given her an artificial digit, Skywalker Style. As a consequence, I was grounded, and my parents had taken the carbon freezing chamber away from me until the end of the month (which happily coincided with Christmas).

And they believed it. They ate up every word, the suckers. There were a million raised hands and two million questions, which Mrs. Sklencar tolerated far longer than was typical for Show and Tell. I was on a roll, freewheeling improv and spinning an elaborate tale that grew in the telling; but I was also aware of how my teacher was eyeing me, with eyes that twinkled and a smile that wasn’t quite condescending, but was clearly one born of secret amusement. I became suddenly concerned that she’d call my mom to verify the story, but the most that ever came of it was her hauntingly ambiguous statement on my report card that “Erik tells very interesting stories.” It set the tone for the every review that would follow me throughout life.

Once you get a taste of success, you become an addict. Next week, I knew I needed to top myself. I signed up for Show and Tell, and this time spun an epic tale involving my sister’s malfunctioning cybernetic appendage, a related movie theater fire, three emergency vehicles, and an evacuation. Whether the kids believed me or were just wrapped up in what subsequently became a weekly, serialized adventure best titled “Adventures With a Portable Carbon Freezing Chamber,” I had found an audience. It only ever got weird if my mom came to pick me up at school and she was queried about these events (which typically caused her to laugh and say, “Oh, Erik’s just -- “ before I yanked her out of the classroom by the hand).

Then came Christmas. The smell of fresh gingerbread. A light dusting of snow. And under my tree, the STAR WARS Micro Collection “Bespin World” play set. Santa had delivered my destiny in Snoopy wrapping paper.

I let out a cry as I tore through the paper, decimated the box, and removed the unit. There it was: a miniaturized replica of the movie set. There was a rod coming up out of the top of the structure, and at its base, the platform to which Han Solo would be secured, and lowered. Han was included in a bundle with all the various characters that made up this collection, including Darth Vader, Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Lando, and…a FROZEN HAN SOLO???

Baffled, I reached for the instruction booklet. It was all spelled out there in black and white. Apparently, there were two Hans: one that was pre-freeze, and a second one incased in his carbonite coffin. The platform at the bottom of the lowering rod had two identical sides to which either Han was attached. So what happened was, you had Han Solo on the platform, and then you manipulated the rod to lower him into the pit; then, you turned the rod 180-degrees so that the frozen Han was now in the front position, and then you just raised him up. TA-DA! He went down unfrozen, and came up in a molten block, just like in the movie. No batteries required.

Which meant the whole thing was a sham, and didn’t actually freeze anything.

That was my very first taste of disillusionment. I had been lied to. Even worse, I had lied BECAUSE of it. The world seemed suddenly very antagonistic and full of shit. My parents asked if I was happy to finally have the play set I’d talked about for months, and I grunted, “Yeah, sure, it’s fine,” and just stared at it like a dead animal in the road, its eyes wide and mouth open, a post-traumatic turd slowly but inevitably emerging from its cold and stiffening sphincter to give the buzzing insects new and tasty faire beneath a sweltering sun that burnt children’s’ happiness to a cinder. Had it been in my vocabulary, I would have told “Bespin World” to go fuck itself.

The first week of the New Year, I brought that goddam thing to school to finish this once and for all. I was going to get up there for Show and Tell and freeze Han Solo in carbonite. My plan was simple: pre-load “frozen Han” inside the unit before my presentation, and then dramatically place “unfrozen Han” on the platform for all to see; then, with a little sleight of hand, I’d lower Unfrozen Han and imperceptibly spin the rod 180-degrees, and raise it to reveal the frozen end result. Everyone would gasp and applaud, and I’d take my bow, and then take this shitty toy home and never speak of it again.

So there I was, every kid in class knowing that I’d brought it in with me (I even caught one kid sniffing around my backpack in my cubby when he was supposed to be using the Boys’ Room), and I had the class’s complete and undivided attention. When my name was called to get up and present, I theatrically announced that I had to retrieve the play set from my bag, which I did with calculated slowness; then I returned and held it aloft to OOOHs and AHHHs. The time had come at last: this was my grand performance.

I described it in detail; I discussed what it did and how it did it, and then announced that I was going to ENCASE HAN SOLO IN CARBONITE. Every desk was now about three feet closer than it had been moments before. “I’ve got this,” I thought, filled with renewed confidence, and turned to my baggie of action figures --

-- and realized I’d forgotten to preload Frozen Han.

Oh, FUCK. ME.

I faltered. I stammered. I looked in either direction for escape or distraction. I seriously considered pulling the fire alarm, or feigning a bathroom emergency that required me to abscond with the freezing unit. Instead, I did what every great performer does: I tried to play it off. I ran my mouth a bit, explaining what I was going to do, while subtly attempting to palm the orange-colored Frozen Han, secure it to the platform, lower it, spin the rod, and raise it back up to prep the vacant side of the platform.

And then ****** (name withheld because FUCK YOU) said: “Hey, what’s that in your hand?”

Just like that, I was caught.

Everyone was looking. A murmur rippled through the room.

“It’s, uh, just…”

All eyes were on me, drilling holes.

I sighed. I looked at Mrs. Sklencar. Her face was deadly serious, but in the corners of her mouth: a smile.

So I told the truth.

“I ran out of batteries because my sister needed them for her finger,” I said, holding Frozen Han aloft. “But here, look: I froze this one this morning.”

THE END.

* Vader’s Star Destroyer was one of the few exceptions. I desperately wanted it, got it, and hated it. Even the meditation chamber was weird by virtue of the fact that, at the push of a button, it became a radioactive, red-lit, alarm-blaring hazard zone.

** Not really, but I’m still Facebook friends with some of these people.
post #4102 of 4311
LOL
post #4103 of 4311
That was glorious.
post #4104 of 4311

I read that in Jean Shepherd's voice, and giggled through the whole thing.

post #4105 of 4311

Man I loved Bespin World as a kid.  I think I still have a few of the miniatures somewhere, with about half their paint rubbed off from being handled so much.  Had a couple of the Hoth sets too....but not the big HQ with the REAL WORKING ION CANNON THAT ACTUALLY SHOOTS IMPERIAL SHIPS IN ORBIT.

post #4106 of 4311

Wonderful story Myers - anyone who was a lying little shit when they were younger can identify.

 

I had a few of the die-cast vehicles but never understood the love for the Micro sets - just seemed like cheap second place knockoffs when compared to the 3.45" toys, plus you couldn't articulate the figures.

 

That being said though, I did ask for and receive the worst SW toy ever...

 

post #4107 of 4311

Just last year, I finally completed my Micro Collection collection. Death Star, Bespin, Hoth, and the ridiculously rare Falcon. Now what do I do with my life?

post #4108 of 4311

HA! Fantastic story there Erik.

 

And it reminded me that I had this particular Micro Machines set that folds up into a Vader head as a kid. 

 

 

Mine sadly didn't actually freeze Han though but the circular window DID break as it did in the movie. (And yes, I did eventually lose the plastic window pieces).

Oh, and the Slave 1 landing pad broke off. 

post #4109 of 4311

I had that one! You twisted the ring around Carbo-Han two raise and lower him into the freezing pit. And that black box with the orange cable was spring-loaded to knock Luke out of the window.

 

Toys were cooler when I was a kid.

post #4110 of 4311
I'm reading "Cujo" and Stephen King makes about 10,000 Star Wars references in it. He describes an action figure called "Bespin Warrior," and I have no idea who that is. The guards in blue uniforms? Boba Fett? I dunno. Any ideas?
post #4111 of 4311

I didn't have that one, but I did the Boba Fett Bespin one, along with R2 (Jabba's Palace), Jabba (Special Edition Mos Eisley), 3PO (classic Mos Eisley), Luke (Hoth), and Chewie (Endor). Good times.

post #4112 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

I'm reading "Cujo" and Stephen King makes about 10,000 Star Wars references in it. He describes an action figure called "Bespin Warrior," and I have no idea who that is. The guards in blue uniforms? Boba Fett? I dunno. Any ideas?
Yep, the guards in blue uniforms.
post #4113 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Codename View Post
 

HA! Fantastic story there Erik.

 

And it reminded me that I had this particular Micro Machines set that folds up into a Vader head as a kid. 

 

 

Mine sadly didn't actually freeze Han though but the circular window DID break as it did in the movie. (And yes, I did eventually lose the plastic window pieces).

Oh, and the Slave 1 landing pad broke off. 

 

I had a shit tonne of these:

 

The Death Star

Hoth

Endor

C3PO/Mos Eisley Cantina

Jabba/Mos Eisley

Luke's binoculars/Yavin Base

Vader's saber/Death Star Trench

Death Star/Tattooine and Death Star interior

Yoda/Dagobah

Vader/Cloud City

R2D2/Jabba's Palace

Emperor's Royal Guard/Death Star II

 

..and almost all of the the little add-on three ship packs. I was into them instead of the 3.75 figures because it was the only way to properly match the scale of the films - I had about five tiny X-wings because they appeared in so many of the sets.

 

You can see a real change in the toy-making ethos over the (depressed sigh of realisation) twenty years since the mid-90s lines. I saw some of The Force Awakens Micro Machines for sale recently, and was pretty irritated on behalf of the current generation of young Star Wars fans - where the old ones came with a spaceship and six characters, the new ones come with a spaceship and a character. 

 

 

An Imperial shuttle, Luke, Vader, two Royal Guards, Moff Jerjerrod, and the Emperor?! And a vista of the Battle of Endor behind the throne that you can change? AND an exploding main reactor?! Holy FUCK! 

 

 

A stormtrooper and a Millennium Falcon? What the fuck kind of adventures is a kid meant to imagine happening with just that? 

 

I've absolutely no illusions about toy companies back in those days wanting to wring every last penny from kids, but at least they seemed to think 'We need to include enough that the product is fun by itself'. 


Edited by RexBanner - 5/16/17 at 3:51pm
post #4114 of 4311

So, as we all know, Star Wars turned 40 today.

 

I'm not going to talk about the movies. Instead, I'm going to talk about four offshoot products from the movies - a soundtrack, two books, and a museum exhibition.

 

OK, so my first SW memory is of seeing Return of the Jedi at a sleepover on VHS, what must've been the fall or winter before the special editions (because we watched it with MST3K: The Movie, also on VHS). The funny thing is, I have much, much stronger memories of seeing the latter than the former. In fact, the only two "memories" I have of seeing ROTJ that night are incorrect, because I came away thinking Lando's last name was "Casaldrin" and thinking there was a shot where Bib Fortuna fell into the Sarlaac pit. In my defense, it was very, very late and I was dropping off when we watched it.

 

The first things that really, really resonated were the soundtracks. After the Special Editions came out, my parents got me the re-released scores - the nice 2-CD sets that they made look all fancy with all the tracks, including previously unreleased music, in actual film order. And I just could not stop listening to them. I literally wore out the second disc of the ESB soundtrack, because that featured my favorite track (still is - The Rebel Fleet/End Title, for my money the best track in any film score). More the films, it was the scores that first fired my imagination - so lush, romantic, adventurous, grand, emotional - you didn't need visuals with them. It was a complete story on its own.

 

The next year - 1998 - we went on a trip to Washington DC, where a very special exhibition was on display at the National Air and Space Museum. It was called Star Wars: The Magic of Myth. For the first time, props, costumes, miniatures, you name it - all were on display for the public to see. I can still very clearly picture walking through, seeing the various ship models, the costumes and creatures from Jabba's Palace, and really consciously realizing for the first time that movies are [I]made[/I]. That people no different from you or me put these things together. And that sparked something.

 

My parents got me two books from that exhibition. The first - based on the exhibit - was also called Star Wars: The Magic of Myth. It used the items on display to map out, in simplified form, Joseph Campbell's Hero's Journey. I've since come to believe that there are aspects of Campbellianism that are kinda bullshit, but at that impressionable age (and especially given a very early love of mythology), this absolutely set my mind on fire. I started to become interested in philosophy, psychology, storytelling - I sought out Dante's Divine Comedy (as that was often referenced in there), for instance. It made me think about how these films aren't just fun escapism - there's a deeper, more powerful root to it, especially if it's something that resonates so widely.

 

The other book was Star Wars: The Annotated Screenplays. This book walks you through all the big changes that the three OT scripts went through - it was Rinzler before there was Rinzler, in SW-fan parlance. But seeing the step-by-step process of how Lucas and his collaborators slowly came to that story blew my mind. It opened up storytelling not as some grand inspiration from the sky, but as a process. And it made me think that I could do it too.

 

So happy 40th, Star Wars, from just one of the kids you taught to dream.

post #4115 of 4311

I don't have any great Star Wars stories to tell. In retrospect I find it kind of funny though that when I get getting into the movies as a kid I thought they were made in the 50's or something. I remember being quite surprised when I found out the trilogy was only about ten years old at that point. But now they actually are almost as old as 50's movies were back then.

post #4116 of 4311
I had the pleasure of attending a birthday gathering last night. My friend Bryan shares his birthday with Star Wars - and also a twin sister. You can't make that shit up.

If you'd told me 20 years ago that one day I'd give a grown-ass man a six pack of IPA with some SW trading cards tucked into the front and that he'd be just as jazzed about the latter than the former, I'm not sure I would have believed you.
post #4117 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightning Slim View Post

I had the pleasure of attending a birthday gathering last night. My friend Bryan shares his birthday with Star Wars - and also a twin sister. You can't make that shit up.

 

Holy shit, my dad's birthday was yesterday!

 

http://inception.davepedu.com/

post #4118 of 4311
They've just announced an EPISODE IX casting call for "hundreds of extras" about an hour from where I live.
post #4119 of 4311

You're in Arizona, right? I'ma need a link.

post #4120 of 4311

Arizona, eh? They filmed the Sarlaac pit in Yuma, rather than going back to Tunisia. Hmmm...

 

 

Rey has returned to her home planet

of Jakku in order to rescue her friend,

Finn, from the clutches of the vile gangster,

Pegg the blobfish. 

 

Little does Rey know that the evil FIRST

ORDER has secretly begun construction

on a new...

post #4121 of 4311

Hold my beer, I'm gonna fix TFA.

 

Very beginning. We're with Poe Nicholas Cage, he goes into a tent, who does he find? Not a slumming and criminally underused Max von Sydow, but Lando Calrissian! They jaw about how Lando's been looking for Luke and now he's found a clue about where the guy ended up, Kylo Ren arrives, everyone gets fucked, Lando and Kylo exchange words, Kylo gets pissed off, he turns to one of his men and says "Kill him."

 

Lando's executed, blaster to the back of the head, end of story. Camera pans to the guy who did it. It's the Stormtrooper with the bloody handprint. He takes off his helmet. Isn't that the guy from all the trailers? Oh yes, our hero is the guy who shot Lando Calrissian in cold blood.

 

Bam.

post #4122 of 4311

I was thinking about TFA today, and how amazing the film's pitch is - 'After Luke Skywalker vanishes, an emboldened resurgent Empire attacks the Republic. A defector and a desert trash scavenger try to find him'. 

 

I like TFA fine, but it's pretty depressing how many cool, new things you could do with that premise. None of the previous Star Wars films have been straight up quests, but it's a plot that fits that universe like a glove. 

 

Finn and Rey meet up, they get the map, they decide to look for Luke themselves - say their sector is controlled by the First Order, and they've no way of contacting the Republic - and they end up being intercepted Han and Chewie, who are also scouring that unexplored part of the galaxy for Luke. The First Order begins to get wise to it, and there's a race against time before its Star Destroyers glass the surface of the planet Luke's on OR access the ancient Jedi secrets there. En route, Finn learns to be more confident and Rey learns to open up to others and trust the Force.

 

I'm increasingly worried that Luke's chosen to exile himself, which will be hard to justify. 

post #4123 of 4311
what a shoddy movie!
post #4124 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Codename View Post
 

HA! Fantastic story there Erik.

 

And it reminded me that I had this particular Micro Machines set that folds up into a Vader head as a kid. 

 

 

Mine sadly didn't actually freeze Han though but the circular window DID break as it did in the movie. (And yes, I did eventually lose the plastic window pieces).

Oh, and the Slave 1 landing pad broke off. 


That thing is awesome.  If a close friend of mine had one of those, I'd definitely be tempted to steal it.  

post #4125 of 4311

post #4126 of 4311

 

As someone who grew up as the prequels were coming out, and who loves them for what they are - while knowing that they're nowhere near as good as the originals, it's very cool to see that EA's marketing the game so heavily around prequel elements. So much of Disney's initial 'don't-mention-the-war' attitude about those films was ignorant of the fact that most Star Wars fans under thirty like those movies fine. 

 

Hopefully - with Rogue One having opened the door - there'll be more aliens, ship designs, and planets from them cropping up here and there going forward.

 

 

Fingers crossed for that Star Wars: Nute Gunray - Origins film.... 

post #4127 of 4311

AW YEA ROGER ROGER!

post #4128 of 4311

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO.  Such time wasted on such dumb.

 

Focus your efforts on OT and the future SCREW the unhappy 10 year olds!

post #4129 of 4311

JW Rinzler, the legendary archivist who did the amazing MAKING OF STAR WARS books for the original six films and whose MAKING OF TFA was cancelled under mysterious circumstances, has begun a blog called THE RISE AND FALL OF STAR WARS, about his time at LFL from 2001 to 2015.

 

http://www.jwrinzler.com/blog/the-rise-and-fall-of-star-wars-blog-1

post #4130 of 4311

oh hooooooo!!!!!

post #4131 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dent6084 View Post
 

JW Rinzler, the legendary archivist who did the amazing MAKING OF STAR WARS books for the original six films and whose MAKING OF TFA was cancelled under mysterious circumstances, has begun a blog called THE RISE AND FALL OF STAR WARS, about his time at LFL from 2001 to 2015.

 

http://www.jwrinzler.com/blog/the-rise-and-fall-of-star-wars-blog-1


I'm intrigued, but I'd have to imagine that the truly juicy stories would be under NDA protection.

post #4132 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post
 


I'm intrigued, but I'd have to imagine that the truly juicy stories would be under NDA protection.


I assume so, but I suspect there will probably a lot of fascinating stuff from the 2001-2012 period in particular.

 

Interesting that LFL could have gone to either Sony or Comcast instead of Disney. Very pleased that it didn't go to the former - though I'm sure nooj would have been delighted in the Amazing Spider-Man-ing of SW.

post #4133 of 4311

oh of course (to both the NDA and amazing spider-man.... hahahaha can you imagine what current SONY would be trying to do with it???)

 

we won't be hearing the GOOD STUFF for a good long while

 

I mean, it's not as if Rinzler's forwakens book was gonna be ANYTHING close to his books on the original trilogy.  It'd be more like the one he did for SITH.  Thin.

post #4134 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

oh of course (to both the NDA and amazing spider-man.... hahahaha can you imagine what current SONY would be trying to do with it???)

 

we won't be hearing the GOOD STUFF for a good long while

 

I mean, it's not as if Rinzler's forwakens book was gonna be ANYTHING close to his books on the original trilogy.  It'd be more like the one he did for SITH.  Thin.

 

Was the screenwriting development section like this?

 

"And George sat down with a legal pad for about a day, retired to his hammock with an orange juice and a splash of rum, and proclaimed he had a script." 

post #4135 of 4311

Sony would have rebooted the franchise twice by now.

post #4136 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

oh of course (to both the NDA and amazing spider-man.... hahahaha can you imagine what current SONY would be trying to do with it???)

 

we won't be hearing the GOOD STUFF for a good long while

 

I mean, it's not as if Rinzler's forwakens book was gonna be ANYTHING close to his books on the original trilogy.  It'd be more like the one he did for SITH.  Thin.

 

I had the Revenge of the Sith book - it's very candid about how the film is made, dumb/weirder ideas that were cut from the script, how much of it was made up on the hoof etc. It's a shit tonne better than 95% of behind the scenes books - but just not as big as the OT ones. 

post #4137 of 4311

oh!

 

I actually have it on my bookshelf, but never got to reading it!  I just meant that it looked thin compared to the ones for the original trilogy.

 

Well now I gotta finally read it!

post #4138 of 4311

I really love Revenge of the Sith: it's a very imaginative, totally stuffed mess of a film, with hundreds of amazing bits and slightly fewer rubbish bits (often within the same frame). But the story's great (even if the script isn't), the score's beautiful, the actors all look the part - and, I'll die on this hill, turn in largely good performances, the Emperor is a delight, and it's full of ideas. 

 

The book made me appreciate how close a call it was though. Lucas had - but to his credit, dropped - several pretty garbage ideas. 

 

  • Young Han Solo was going to be on Kasshyyk, being raised by Chewbacca's family and, at one point, running an errand for Yoda personally, sneaking off to scout the droid armies.

 

  • Palpatine was going to egg Anakin on to kill Dooku by telling him that, moments before, Tyrannus had been boasting about how he had arranged for the Tusken Raiders to kill Shmi. 

 

  • Palpatine and Anakin had this GHASTLY exchange -  

 

Quote:

DARTH SIDIOUS-- "I have waited all these years for you to fulfill your destiny... I arranged for your conception. I used the power of the Force to will the midichlorians to start the cell divisions that created you."

ANAKIN-- "I don't believe you."

DARTH SIDIOUS-- "Ahhh, but you know it's true. When you clear your mind, you will sense the truth. you could almost think of me as your father."

ANAKIN-- "That's impossible!"

DARTH SIDIOUS-- "Nevertheless, you must decide."

 

  • The Jedi originally came to arrest Palpatine while Anakin was with him. Anakin, conflicted, hung back and watched the fight, only getting involved at the end as per the finished film. I have no idea how they would have staged this without Anakin looking like the world's biggest sucker (and he ultimately does accept a bill of goods). 

Edited by RexBanner - 6/22/17 at 11:27am
post #4139 of 4311

I'm still not sure exactly how the two main lightsaber fights in RotS played out in filming only to be recut in editing, as both Obi-Wan and Palpatine end up holding Anakin's lightsaber in close-ups with the blade on Palpatine's recoloured to purple. They're such quick cuts that you barely notice them, but they're there. I have a feeling the lightsaber battles and the lead up to them were constantly in flux.

 

Anyway, RotS is still an awfully shit movie whichever way you look at it.

 

TPM > RotS > AotC.

post #4140 of 4311
Quote:

Originally Posted by RexBanner View Post

 

  • Palpatine was going to egg Anakin on to kill Dooku by telling him that, moments before, Tyrannus had been boasting about how he had arranged for the Tusken Raiders to kill Shmi. 

 

 

I'm happier with what we got.

 

"Dewit!" 

post #4141 of 4311

The second Rinzler piece is up - and though it's directly not about LFL, it definitely makes me want to read the guy's autobiography - what a batshit insane childhood. That Hunter S. Thompson anecdote is particularly great.

post #4142 of 4311
Third piece is up.

These are surprisingly shorter and less in-depth than I was expecting/hoping.
post #4143 of 4311

I'm used to his amazing books too, but it is just a blog, and one with a pretty quick output. We're probably not going to get a 'The Making of Return of the Jedi'-sized look into the Disney sell and making of The Force Awakens, unfortunately. 

post #4144 of 4311

Not right away, at least. Jedi was 35 years ago and some of those background details take a while to come up.

post #4145 of 4311

Catching up on the Rinzler blog, and I see this little snippet:

 

Quote:
 He’d considered Comcast briefly.

 

Holy mother of god I probably would have broken down and weeped openly if that had happened.

post #4146 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post
 

Catching up on the Rinzler blog, and I see this little snippet:

 

 

Holy mother of god I probably would have broken down and weeped openly if that had happened.


Right?  I definitely fish-eyed when I read that.

post #4147 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post
 

Not right away, at least. Jedi was 35 years ago and some of those background details take a while to come up.


Yeah, and the stories he's telling about living in SF/LA as a parallel narrative to Lucas are pretty interesting, IMO.

 

The period I'm most interested in, actually, is between ROTS and the Disney sale - you have all these SW possibilities that don't come to fruition for various reasons (Underworld, a Lucas-directed Episode VII, Detours, etc.), TCW is really the only SW product that's sustaining the brand. In terms of BTS stories, it feels like there's some stuff to be told there.

post #4148 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dent6084 View Post
 


Yeah, and the stories he's telling about living in SF/LA as a parallel narrative to Lucas are pretty interesting, IMO.

 

The period I'm most interested in, actually, is between ROTS and the Disney sale - you have all these SW possibilities that don't come to fruition for various reasons (Underworld, a Lucas-directed Episode VII, Detours, etc.), TCW is really the only SW product that's sustaining the brand. In terms of BTS stories, it feels like there's some stuff to be told there.

 

I like to think it's because, bar a Lucas-led Episode VII*, Lucas realised that they're not great ideas. Underworld always sounded like an ill-judged grimdark (a term I despise, but I think it applies here) to Star Wars, and a live-action series would feel like a poor substitute for films (I'm still opposed to live action TV Star Wars, for reasons I'd struggle to articulate); what they made of Detours wasn't funny, and the whole concept seemed to me an extended 'Darth Vader breakdancing at Disney World' style mockery of itself. 

 

*As far as I'm concerned, In a perfect world, Lucas and Kasdan would have written Episode VII with Abrams, Brad Bird, Gareth Edwards, Rian Johnson, or whomever, directing it. 


Edited by RexBanner - 6/27/17 at 1:50pm
post #4149 of 4311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dent6084 View Post
 


Yeah, and the stories he's telling about living in SF/LA as a parallel narrative to Lucas are pretty interesting, IMO.

 

The period I'm most interested in, actually, is between ROTS and the Disney sale - you have all these SW possibilities that don't come to fruition for various reasons (Underworld, a Lucas-directed Episode VII, Detours, etc.), TCW is really the only SW product that's sustaining the brand. In terms of BTS stories, it feels like there's some stuff to be told there.


The Clone Wars, The Force Unleashed, and Star Wars: The Old Republic were pretty much the only big/semi-big things that got off the ground in that timespan, yeah.

post #4150 of 4311

The Lucas Museum has gotten the official greenlight from the LA City Council:

 

http://variety.com/2017/biz/news/george-lucas-museum-of-narrative-art-los-angeles-approval-1202479463/

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