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Hollywood Whitewashing

post #1 of 903
Thread Starter 
Apologies if there's already a thread about this.

So...we've got two big blockbuster movies coming out this summer, The Last Airbender and Prince of Persia, which are set in (fantastical versions of) various foreign cultures. And in both cases the characters have been cast, to all appearances, as a bunch of honkies.

Gene Luen Yang (author of the graphic novel American Born Chinese) has a little post/comic about Airbender, which makes it sound like they actually went out of their way to cast white people. Derek Kirk Kim, another Asian-American comics guy, has a more vitriolic post about this, pointing out that people would have cried foul about the presence of black people in LOTR, despite the fact that it's set in a fantasy world, but the just-as-obviously Asian characters of Avatar can apparently be swapped out for whiteys. But at least there it IS a fantasy world; Prince of Persia is clearly supposed to be our ancient middle east, and yet, again, it's all lily-white.

I expect there to be more cultural commentary on this soon, though to be honest I'm kind of surprised I haven't read more articles, etc. on this subject. It's deeply worrying to me, needless to say, and the excuses you can drag out for something like this are getting pretty thin. We're already getting them: "Hollywood's not racist, they only care about money!" being the most common. Which is pretty stupid, for obvious reasons.

What bugs me is that it may be true that casting an Asian or Middle Eastern person in the lead might have cost the movie some money...maybe...but studios are always making stupid decisions that will clearly hurt their movies' performance anyway, so why not do something socially productive? I mean, is it my imagination, or have we actively devolved in the last decade when it comes to racial depictions?
post #2 of 903
This is a symptom of a larger problem: You can count the well known actors of Asian descent in America on one hand. A ton of well-known white actors, a lot of well-known black actors, a fair amount of well-known latino actors, but actors of Asian descent that America knows about? Jackie Chan. Maybe Kal Penn.

ETA: Though, having just looked at the Avatar cast listing for the first time, there aren't any name actors at all to speak of, so that doesn't apply there.
post #3 of 903
In addition to AIRBENDER's screwiness, I was recently bothered to the casting of The Rock in Planet 51 as a typical blonde white astronaut. Nice that he got the easy VO work, but couldn't the artists have designed the character to be more representative of Dwayne's ethnicity? I suppose the 50s style of the aliens' world required a more period-appropriate "whitebread" human, but it still rubbed me the wrong way. Course, I haven't watched the flick yet. Just going on gut reaction here.

And since it's animation voice work, this may all be silly. Dustin Hoffman did play a Chinese Red Panda after all. What do I know?

Is it important for animated characters to be voiced by ethnic-accurate actors? What about animals? Should Madagascar and the Lion King have been voiced by an all black cast?
post #4 of 903
Other than the names I don't really think that Prince Of Persia is supposed to take place in anything resembling our actual history. Just from the map in the beginning you could tell that either this is a fantasy version of Earth almost as much as Middle Earth or that this movie was made by uneducated savages.

But as for whitewashing, it's neither surprising nor a new development. Even as early as ancient Greece characters in plays that were of obvious foreign origin were presented as out and out Greeks in name, appearance and behavior. Popular culture will always present products though the lens of the dominant culture. And right now the US and the west in general are white dominated.
post #5 of 903
Casting the same white people for every role instead of going after actors of different races is definitely annoying. And boring.

Racism is a part of this, but I think money plays a larger part.
You're only going to see this change when Hollywood's white native american/white asian/white hispanic/white indian/etc movies start losing big money.
post #6 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelios View Post
Other than the names I don't really think that Prince Of Persia is supposed to take place in anything resembling our actual history. Just from the map in the beginning you could tell that either this is a fantasy version of Earth almost as much as Middle Earth or that this movie was made by uneducated savages.
I shake my head that Jake faked an English accent to play a Persian. WTF

I still wanted Naveen Andrews in the part. Mostly because he's awesome (and more than a bit more race-appropriate) I might have seen it in the theaters instead of waiting for DVD.
post #7 of 903
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wadew1 View Post
Racism is a part of this, but I think money plays a larger part.
But as I say, this is handwaving away the fact that they're literally exploiting people's racism. If there was a sudden resurgence of interest in blackface, would Hollywood be justified in making a big-budget Steppin Fetchit movie "because it's just about money"? Spike Lee was right!!

It seems like as recently as a decade ago Hollywood movies were aware of their impact on society and made an effort, however clumsily, to use it for good. Which of course got them shrieked at by The Usual Suspects for having a Liberal PC agenda. Now it seems like a cavalcade of capitulation.
post #8 of 903
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DARKMITE8 View Post
I still wanted Naveen Andrews in the part. Mostly because he's awesome (and more than a bit more race-appropriate) I might have seen it in the theaters instead of waiting for DVD.
Naveen Andrews is of Indian descent, not Middle Eastern. Does that make him more appropriate for the role? I'm honestly asking. Obviously he just wrapped up playing an Iraqi for six years. Does that have a whiff of racism to it as well, or is it plausible for him to be playing an Iraqi or Persian? (I've known a few Iranians, and they don't look much like Andrews. They ARE lighter-skinned, though not Jake Gylenhaal-light. But the middle east is a bit of a melting pot, racially, so maybe it's not so strange.)

Oded Fehr is probably still waiting by the phone.
post #9 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Prankster View Post
Gene Luen Yang (author of the graphic novel American Born Chinese) has a little post/comic about Airbender, which makes it sound like they actually went out of their way to cast white people.
The casting sheet that was ultimately used, and he referenced, was real was it not? Though the original information from Paramount evidently didn't specify.

The truth was less blatant than portrayed, but he's not completely wrong.
post #10 of 903
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DARKMITE8 View Post
And since it's animation voice work, this may all be silly. Dustin Hoffman did play a Chinese Red Panda after all. What do I know?
This is an interesting point, since to me having different voices play different ethnicities is a little more acceptable. Kung Fu Panda and Disney's Mulan both had a voice cast made of a mix of Asians and other races, white people included (So did the Avatar: the Last Airbender cartoon, for that matter). I think the important thing is the "optics"--the characters in Mulan *look* Chinese, the characters in Avatar *look* Asian and Inuit (more or less--there's some arguments to be made about the tendency of anime characters to look white, but anyone who knows anything about the genre should know to read them as Asian). Kung Fu Panda features animals, but because they exist in a clearly Asian culture and have Asian names you tend to read them as Asian, at least I think so.
post #11 of 903
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by neoolong View Post
The casting sheet that was ultimately used, and he referenced, was real was it not? Though the original information from Paramount evidently didn't specify.

The truth was less blatant than portrayed, but he's not completely wrong.
I didn't mean to make it sound like I thought he was wrong. Poor phrasing on my part. I just wanted to make it clear that I couldn't vouch for whether that was a real casting sheet.
post #12 of 903
Thread Starter 
By the way, it's kind of hilarious to see all the manboy fanboys rushing in to defend the movie by saying that the original cartoon was "culturally ambiguous". How dumb do you have to be to think that?
post #13 of 903
The recent outrage over A BLACK (Idris Elba) being cast in Thor was pretty pathetic.
But he's supposed to be a White God!!!!!!!!!!
post #14 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by wadew1 View Post
The recent outrage over A BLACK (Idris Elba) being cast in Thor was pretty pathetic.
But he's supposed to be a White God!!!!!!!!!!
Was he really cast as Thor?

And isn't that example the same as the examples that started this thread? Thor is a Norse God. Norwegian. Which is as white as white can be. To cast Ving Rhames as Kingpin doesn't matter because the character's cultural background isn't significant at all. But I'd assume that with a character like Thor his background would be VERY significant, especially if you have to include his origin. Of course, if I'm wrong, I'm sure someone out there can correct me about the Marvel character's origins.
post #15 of 903
No, he was cast as Heimdall.

Edit: And they're actually from another dimension in the comics.
post #16 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Prankster View Post
Naveen Andrews is of Indian descent, not Middle Eastern. Does that make him more appropriate for the role? I'm honestly asking. Obviously he just wrapped up playing an Iraqi for six years. Does that have a whiff of racism to it as well, or is it plausible for him to be playing an Iraqi or Persian? (I've known a few Iranians, and they don't look much like Andrews. They ARE lighter-skinned, though not Jake Gylenhaal-light. But the middle east is a bit of a melting pot, racially, so maybe it's not so strange.)

Oded Fehr is probably still waiting by the phone.
I guess I just projected his miscasting as an Iraqi into an acceptable miscasting as a Persian. Race aside, he still would have been a better choice than Jake. I don't see how JG would be an audience magnet at all.
post #17 of 903
I agree with DARKMITE and Prankster's points about voice acting; aside from the fact that the voice acting in both Avatar: The Last Airbender (which, incidentally, is one of my favorite shows of all time) and Kung Fu Panda is superb, the characters do indeed "look" right.

As far as live-action Airbender goes, I'll say this: Noah Ringer looks suitably exotic as Aang, so I'm not as bothered by his casting as I am for, say, Katara and Sokka. Hopefully everybody's performances will be good enough to overcome the racism... but I doubt it, especially since the original voice actors are irrevocably linked to these characters in my mind.
post #18 of 903
Naveen Andrews* should be a huge star. So should Oded Fehr.And on the other hand, so should Patrick Wilson and Billy Crudup, both of whom would be big -- if Hollywood were still willing to take risks and make movies for adults. I don't really see Andrews top-lining Transformers 4 Now With Smellovision, but he was great in Planet Terror (and also Bride & Prejudice, the Indian take on Jane Austen that's way more enjoyable than it should be), and it's only because nobody wants to gamble on an R-rated action or thriller flick that these guys aren't breaking through. I think race plays a part, sure, but it's also because Hollywood isn't interested in finding the "next Tom Cruise," because they know that stars are expendable.

Or not.

*And not to nitpick and as a Princess Kate-like question, but if India is part of Asia, doesn't that make him Asian, too?
post #19 of 903
It's okay though, like Jackson Rathbone said, he just needs a tan and a haircut, and he'll be all set. Look totally like an Inuit.

The bits of dialog in the trailers do not inspire me with much hope.

Wasn't Jesse McCartney originally in talks to play Zuko?
post #20 of 903
What's also ironic is that The Last Airbender is being written and directed by a non-Caucasian director, who admittedly doesn't have enough clout as he once did, but is still one of the more powerful 'people of color' (ugh) in Hollywood.
post #21 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by RathBandu View Post
Naveen Andrews* should be a huge star. So should Oded Fehr.And on the other hand, so should Patrick Wilson and Billy Crudup, both of whom would be big -- if Hollywood were still willing to take risks and make movies for adults. I don't really see Andrews top-lining Transformers 4 Now With Smellovision, but he was great in Planet Terror (and also Bride & Prejudice, the Indian take on Jane Austen that's way more enjoyable than it should be), and it's only because nobody wants to gamble on an R-rated action or thriller flick that these guys aren't breaking through. I think race plays a part, sure, but it's also because Hollywood isn't interested in finding the "next Tom Cruise," because they know that stars are expendable.

Or not.
Ironically, the current movie star is black.

Quote:
*And not to nitpick and as a Princess Kate-like question, but if India is part of Asia, doesn't that make him Asian, too?
I think we should use the term Celestials to refer to those from East Asia.
post #22 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Ripoll View Post
Was he really cast as Thor?

And isn't that example the same as the examples that started this thread? Thor is a Norse God. Norwegian. Which is as white as white can be. To cast Ving Rhames as Kingpin doesn't matter because the character's cultural background isn't significant at all. But I'd assume that with a character like Thor his background would be VERY significant, especially if you have to include his origin. Of course, if I'm wrong, I'm sure someone out there can correct me about the Marvel character's origins.
In the comics, Thor and his buddies live on a world named Asgard in another dimension. They were worshipped by Norsemen at one point, but they aren't actually Norwegian.
post #23 of 903
post #24 of 903
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Spider View Post
I agree with DARKMITE and Prankster's points about voice acting; aside from the fact that the voice acting in both Avatar: The Last Airbender (which, incidentally, is one of my favorite shows of all time) and Kung Fu Panda is superb, the characters do indeed "look" right.

As far as live-action Airbender goes, I'll say this: Noah Ringer looks suitably exotic as Aang, so I'm not as bothered by his casting as I am for, say, Katara and Sokka. Hopefully everybody's performances will be good enough to overcome the racism... but I doubt it, especially since the original voice actors are irrevocably linked to these characters in my mind.
Fun fact: Katara is voiced by a young Mae Whitman, i.e. ...Her?
post #25 of 903
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wadew1 View Post
In the comics, Thor and his buddies live on a world named Asgard in another dimension. They were worshipped by Norsemen at one point, but they aren't actually Norwegian.
Kirby's version of Thor is zany enough that you can have a black guy in there, I think. It's not like it's a faithful adaptation of the Norse myths. And The Fourth World, which was in some ways Kirby's do-over of Thor, had a couple of black "gods".

By the same token, I don't think anyone would have cared if one of the "nations" of Airbender was white. Hell, you can make a decent argument for Aang being white in the cartoon, even though that's likely not what was intended. (I think he was meant to be racially ambiguous, but ultimately Asian--the Air people are essentially Tibetan Buddhist, aren't they?)

But literally turning everyone white (except the bad guys--oy) is pretty insulting. I mean, look at those guys, it's like they found the whitest people they could possibly find to play Inuits. And it's not like they're big stars--would it have killed them to cast, say, Q'orianka Kilcher as Katara?
post #26 of 903
Personally, I'm more offended by shit like casting Ben Kingsley as Gandhi in Gandhi than casting Gylenhaal as a videogame Aladdin knockoff. The former kind of directly fucks up the entire point of the narrative and has consequence. The latter is getting a hunky guy who basically has no qualms imitating the videogame's voice actor, i.e. getting a person who is fap fodder to fat housewives and teenage girls and inoffensive to male nerds.
post #27 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuchulain View Post
Personally, I'm more offended by shit like casting Ben Kingsley as Gandhi in Gandhi than casting Gylenhaal as a videogame Aladdin knockoff. The former kind of directly fucks up the entire point of the narrative and has consequence. The latter is getting a hunky guy who basically has no qualms imitating the videogame's voice actor, i.e. getting a person who is fap fodder to fat housewives and teenage girls and inoffensive to male nerds.
Ben Kinglsey is half Indian and was born Krishna Pandit Bhanji. You can resume enjoying Gandhi again.
post #28 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Prankster View Post
Fun fact: Katara is voiced by a young Mae Whitman, i.e. ...Her?
Believe me, I'm already aware of that fact as I'm a huge voice actor geek. More amusing to me (I, uh, haven't seen Arrested Development) is the fact that Whitman is playing Roxy Richter in Scott Pilgrim, which will undoubtedly be hilarious. Especially once you compare her to Katara.

Also, nice to find another Avatar fan on these boards, Prankster.
post #29 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Augustine View Post
Ben Kinglsey is half Indian and was born Krishna Pandit Bhanji. You can resume enjoying Gandhi again.
He's a quarter Indian and had to have makeup caked on him to physically resemble the guy. To me, that's like casting me in a film version of Native American events, slathering me in red paint, and saying, "It's okay, his grandparents had sex with people who looked like that once."
post #30 of 903
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Spider View Post
Believe me, I'm already aware of that fact as I'm a huge voice actor geek. More amusing to me (I, uh, haven't seen Arrested Development) is the fact that Whitman is playing Roxy Richter in Scott Pilgrim, which will undoubtedly be hilarious. Especially once you compare her to Katara.

Also, nice to find another Avatar fan on these boards, Prankster.
I've only just discovered the series, and I've only seen the first season. But yes, it's very well done.

I'm sure Whitman will be cool as Roxy, but I think Egg is going to be her signature role for some time.
post #31 of 903
It' s sort of disingenious to bring up a twenty eight year old movie as something to be "more outraged" about, tho, Cuchulain.

I think Kirby's Asgard is "scandinavian" just as POP's Persia is "middle eastern", i.e. they may be alternate dimensions/magic kingdoms/whatever but they're also pretty obvious references to actual cultures that have existed so yeah, Thor is supposed to look Norse much as the main character in a Prince Of Persia game is supposed to look Persian. Mind you I don't think we'd be having this discussion if POP just happened to feature one white guy amongst the supporting characters.
post #32 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielRoffle View Post
It' s sort of disingenious to bring up a twenty eight year old movie as something to be "more outraged" about, tho, Cuchulain.
One is the only major American motion picture made about one of the most important figures of the 20th century and one of the most successful campaigners for nonviolent resistance in human history. The other is an adaptation of a fucking videogame that is based entirely on a Westerner's idea of what the Orient is like. I think being more outraged over fucked up ethnic casting in the former is justified.
post #33 of 903
post #34 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Prankster View Post
I've only just discovered the series, and I've only seen the first season. But yes, it's very well done.

I'm sure Whitman will be cool as Roxy, but I think Egg is going to be her signature role for some time.
Trust me, it gets even better from there.
post #35 of 903
It's possible that casting Naveen Andrews as a Persian makes as much sense as casting most Middle Easterners. Iran has always been the odd duck of the Middle East, so if one is going to put Persia in a large, Pan-Arabian setting, I guess anything goes from the Bay of Bengal to the Straights of Gibraltar. To be honest Jake Gyllenhaal looks about as Persian as Sam Worthington looks Greek.
post #36 of 903
Thread Starter 
I do realize that classical Persia was pretty multicultural, or at least, it could be portrayed that way; the Middle East was the hub of the world during the middle ages, and pretty much everyone passed through there. So you could argue that Gylenhaal (or Andrews) could belong there as much as Oded Fehr. But it does seem like a bit of a stretch.

So here's a question: Antonio Bandaras as an Arab in The 13th Warrior. Racist?
post #37 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainZahn View Post
"There are enough minority actors and actresses for marginal or sinister characters – but Hollywood continues to insist it is difficult or impossible to find talented Asian American actors for positive, substantial roles."

True.
post #38 of 903
Quote:
So here's a question: Antonio Bandaras as an Arab in The 13th Warrior. Racist?
You might even make the argument it was less racist than casting him in Mask of Zorro, even though there was a big to-do about how he was the first Spanish-speaking Zorro in film. But the thing is, in Warrior, he played an Arab, and a lot of Iberians have Arab ancestry. However, in Zorro, he played a Mexican peasant, who would possibly have Mesoamerican ancestry (I think both the child actor and the guy who played his brother did)
post #39 of 903
So what we have learned in the last few days in the Movie Miscellany forum: Hollywood is still terribly sexist and racist and unless you're a young-to-middle aged white male their films aren't really geared towards you. At all.

...and the year is 20 fucking 10.

While I essentially knew this, having it pointed out depresses me more than the fact we don't have hovercars and jetpacks yet or that technology hasn't advanced to rely solely on the use of sprockets.
post #40 of 903
I remember when seeing the trailer for Memoirs of a Geisha, my immediate reaction was, "What, we all look the same to you!?" But do I get all huffy about Russell Crowe playing a Spaniard? Or a Spanish actor playing a Mexican hero?

I remember a screening of Starsky & Hutch (who even remembers this movie ever came out? hahaha) where they were interrogating an old Korean man. Of course, the guy wasn't Korean at all, but was actually a Chinese actor who I've seen in Hollywood movies here and there for years. Like James Hong, he's a go-to guy for old Asian men. And his Korean dialogue was indecipherable to me. But really, who else would care? For an insignificant role like that, I'm sure casting directors just look for someone professional who can be relied on to get the job done. I guess they couldn't get Randall Duk Kim? Though I've never actually heard him speak any Korean.

Where am I going with this? I dunno. Just thoughts I've had in regards to the topic of the portrayal of Asians/Asian-Americans in Hollywood.

EDIT: The huge amount of contrast between the two versions of Aang give me a nice hearty laugh. Who is this kid, Christian Bale?! Actually, his expression makes me imagine an adolescent Paul Sorvino.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post
post #41 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainZahn View Post
I don't have a problem with Anthony Quinn as Auda Abu Tayi. From everything that I've read about the production, arabs who knew the real man were pleased with Quinn and said he was the spitting image of the character he was portraying. Also, the same film features Omar Sharif in a huge role as the hero's best friend
post #42 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
I remember when seeing the trailer for Memoirs of a Geisha, my immediate reaction was, "What, we all look the same to you!?" But do I get all huffy about Russell Crowe playing a Spaniard? Or a Spanish actor playing a Mexican hero?
As bad as it may sound, I think it should be whether the actor can somewhat pass.

Are the differences between Chinese, Japanese, and Korean absolute? It can be hard to differentiate at times, so I don't necessarily mind casting a Chinese actress for a Japanese character. It's also less than distinct in something like Prince of Persia I suppose, if Persia is a melting pot of ethnicities.

It's easier to cry racism when it's casting a white actor when it is a distinctly non-white role. The Kingpin isn't tied to his race, but I wouldn't want to see the Black Panther played by a white guy.
post #43 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by neoolong View Post
Are the differences between Chinese, Japanese, and Korean absolute?
Sort of, yeah. While popular culture does its damnedest to convince us all white European males look like Ray Fiennes and all Asian males look like either Chow Yun Fat or Ken Watanabe, it's really easy to tell different ethnicities in the same general group apart. Koreans have richer complexions, wider faces, and taller frames relative to the group (when they aren't being starved by the government in North Korea). Japanese people, by contrast, are the gingers of Asia, i.e. they're paler and shorter than the group and have narrower features.
post #44 of 903
Yeah, I'm no expert on Asians but I'm always able to tell the difference between those three groups. Once Vietnamese get involved, however, all bets are off. And don't even get me started on those sneaky Thai!
post #45 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by neoolong View Post
As bad as it may sound, I think it should be whether the actor can somewhat pass.

Are the differences between Chinese, Japanese, and Korean absolute? It can be hard to differentiate at times, so I don't necessarily mind casting a Chinese actress for a Japanese character. It's also less than distinct in something like Prince of Persia I suppose, if Persia is a melting pot of ethnicities.

It's easier to cry racism when it's casting a white actor when it is a distinctly non-white role. The Kingpin isn't tied to his race, but I wouldn't want to see the Black Panther played by a white guy.
To be fair, alot of Chinese had a huge problem with it. They felt that for a famous Chinese actress to play a positive Japanese character in a film about WW2 was an act of treachery. The Japanese have never really dealt, as a society, with their war crimes, and the other countries in the region resent it greatly. Those politics help inform the reaction to the pan asian casting aesthetic in MOAG
post #46 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuchulain View Post
Sort of, yeah. While popular culture does its damnedest to convince us all white European males look like Ray Fiennes and all Asian males look like either Chow Yun Fat or Ken Watanabe, it's really easy to tell different ethnicities in the same general group apart. Koreans have richer complexions, wider faces, and taller frames relative to the group (when they aren't being starved by the government in North Korea). Japanese people, by contrast, are the gingers of Asia, i.e. they're paler and shorter than the group and have narrower features.
Yeah, not always. Especially if you're pulling from Asian-Americans. It can be very easy to tell, but it can get incredibly blurred as well. Can you ace the test on this site?

And Kate, the politics of casting Chinese in Memoirs of a Geisha is a red herring.
post #47 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by neoolong View Post
As bad as it may sound, I think it should be whether the actor can somewhat pass.

Are the differences between Chinese, Japanese, and Korean absolute? It can be hard to differentiate at times, so I don't necessarily mind casting a Chinese actress for a Japanese character.
Certainly. As is the case for lots of things, it's not a binary issue. Certain casting decisions will get a bigger rise out of a certain demographic than others. Degrees...

I'm generally good at telling different Asians apart. But there are always exceptions and I can be fooled by them. If that site you linked is what I think it is (I haven't clicked on it yet), it's the same site I tried out a long time ago that I didn't score too well on.

I generally don't get as emotional as I should (about anything really). My thoughts on the matter are really just that. Thoughts and annoyances. I do have certain Asian friends who could really give a shit about it though. To make a horrible generalization, I believe one strong reason that Asians still have to put up with such portrayals in the media may be because enough of us simply don't put up a loud enough fuss about it. After all... we are ALL OF US meek and reserved. We can barely see through our slits of our eyes, fer cryin' out loud!!!

In my experience, the Asian friends I've tried to have this discussion about don't really seem to care much about it. One Vietnamese friend of mine doesn't really care about the casting as long as the movie is as good as the series. Maybe I should make more friends who are into Asian/Asian-American studies...
post #48 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by neoolong View Post

And Kate, the politics of casting Chinese in Memoirs of a Geisha is a red herring.

Oh..
post #49 of 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
I generally don't get as emotional as I should (about anything really). My thoughts on the matter are really just that. Thoughts and annoyances. I do have certain Asian friends who could really give a shit about it though. To make a horrible generalization, I believe one strong reason that Asians still have to put up with such portrayals in the media may be because enough of us simply don't put up a loud enough fuss about it. After all... we are ALL OF US meek and reserved. We can barely see through our slits of our eyes, fer cryin' out loud!!!
That's why I fuck the white women. It's my way of sticking it to the, well, not the Man per se...

It's a big issue, and it does sort of tie into the lack of a pool of Asian actors. Stuff is rarely as blatant as the casting for Last Airbender was. But, in the end, I don't think the racebending uproar is really going to affect that movie.

Now, if Quick Kick isn't in the sequel to GI Joe...
post #50 of 903
NA had interesting casting. "RAIN" is Korean, other characters were Chinese and Japanese
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