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Hollywood Whitewashing - Page 40

post #1951 of 2259
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

yea michaelC

 

shhh grown ups are talking

post #1952 of 2259
yea michaelC
post #1953 of 2259

post #1954 of 2259

yea

post #1955 of 2259
Can't stop, won't stop

m7.gif?w=780

^me grabbing nooj
post #1956 of 2259

I can think of a few other older actors who fit into the same category as Leo: Denzel, Meryl Streep, and latter-day Tom Hanks. All of them tend to avoid "blockbuster" work, but tend to still have solid grosses for the "adult dramas" they produce (excepting a miss here or there). I don't know if I can think of anyone younger than Leo, though, that would fit into that category. Maaaybe Jennifer Lawrence, considering the entirely mediocre "Joy" just made $100 million worldwide, but she has tended to stick to some combination of blockbuster vehicles and David O. Russell Oscar plays. I suppose Passengers could better establish what her drawing power is, even if she has Chris Pratt to help. 

 

Chris Pratt could be someone who could get to that point, entirely by accident. It seems like he might just star in enough things that people like in a small enough time frame that people might start going "hey, I like that guy" and going to see movies for him. He isn't there yet, though, and he hasn't really been asked to open a movie outside of a franchise (Guardians, Jurassic World) or without a major co-star (Magnificent 7, Passengers) yet. 

post #1957 of 2259

Pratt has putting-a-human-face-on-big-budget-spectacle locked down. The question is whether he can also hit with, say, a mid-budget comedy or if he'll be stuck at larger-than-life.

post #1958 of 2259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raynis View Post

Nothing has drawn BO like his 97-98 career.

Proof positive.

This is a business first and foremost until the people with the money are the artists. The financiers are in it to make more money. And you don't do that by making a 13-century Persian poetry drama headlined by Parsa Pirouzfar. You gotta get a name and face that will sucker the hoi polloi's meat into the seats. Because making something genuinely sensational requires too much effort to bother. So they just smoke-and-mirror those fartsmellers with dreamboats.

 

Titanic is a unique situation. 

 

Did Harrison Ford starring movies equal the take of Star War? Doen't mean he isn't a star.

post #1959 of 2259

Ford didn't attain Superstar until Raiders proved he could lead a picture on his own.

post #1960 of 2259
Witness then got him an Oscar nomination and led to his adult action drama period.
post #1961 of 2259
Gender/race swapped Rocketeer for upcoming remake. Interesting. I refuse to see remakes though out of principle unless a brilliant filmmaker with a different spin is involved.
post #1962 of 2259
I'm all for more movies involving jetpacks, but yeah, I find it hard to see how they're going to deliver a better Rocketeer than the one we already got.

Anyway, got a link to go with that? My curiousity is piqued, if not my desire to actually see the result.
post #1963 of 2259
Leo just won an Oscar. They may increase his chances of being a draw now.
post #1964 of 2259

LEO IS GONNA BE ROCKETEER???

post #1965 of 2259

No, he's going to reprise Howard Hughes. Obviously.

post #1966 of 2259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambler View Post

Gender/race swapped Rocketeer for upcoming remake. Interesting. I refuse to see remakes though out of principle unless a brilliant filmmaker with a different spin is involved.

 

Article I read mentioned it as actually being a sequel (rebootquel? whatever) taking place 6 years after the original. I have to admit, it's an interesting take, and I'm VERY curious to see how they plan to portray a black female protagonist in a movie set during the 50's. 

 

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/rocketeer-disney-movie-reboot-works-915037

 

I'll admit, the only part that might bug me a little is this bit:

 

Quote:
 Set six years after the original Rocketeer and after Secord has vanished while fighting the Nazis, an unlikely new hero emerges...

 

If it's used to set up a small passing of the torch cameo, it's all well and good. Otherwise, dang, that's some stone-cold hand waving of the original's happy ending. 

post #1967 of 2259

I'm waiting to see who's going to direct it before I get excited but I do think that's a great concept. Being a sequel does a LOT to make me feel better about it.

post #1968 of 2259
How does everybody feel about The Last Samurai Matt Damon teaching the Chinese how to build a Great Wall?
post #1969 of 2259

I'm mostly more weirded out by the fact it's a Zhang Yimou film.

 

It just feels so generic from the trailer.

post #1970 of 2259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightning Slim View Post

How does everybody feel about The Last Samurai Matt Damon teaching the Chinese how to build a Great Wall?

 

You mean Matt Damon, Master of Mars, Space Pirate, Potato Farmer, Assassin, Informant, Angel of God, Tsunami Surfer, Zoo Owner, Liberace Look a Like, the Beef, Southie Cop Double Agent can't build a wall?

 

I kid. That trailer is really bland.

post #1971 of 2259

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/07/29/matt-damon-whitewashes-chinese-history-in-the-great-wall.html

 

 

Quote:
 Negative reactions to The Great Wall’s premise should, one hopes, send a message to studio gatekeepers who’ve also felt unexpected blowback for the whitewashing of Asian characters elsewhere. “It’s proof that filmmakers from Asia—and appealing to that elusive ‘Chinese market’—isn’t the appropriate counterargument for the lack of Asian-Americanrepresentation in Hollywood,” said Chow. “The fact that Chinese studios and filmmakers are partnering on this project doesn’t make it okay. Just as the blessing of Ghost in the Shell’s Japanese creators and publishers doesn’t excuse Scarlett Johansson’s casting.”
post #1972 of 2259
He also played a Martian, which is bullshit.
post #1973 of 2259

feh, FIND ME A MARTIAN ACTOR!!!

 

then we'll talk

post #1974 of 2259
There's tons of them waiting tables.
post #1975 of 2259

Tell'em to get in line.

 

PATIENCE

 

POSITIVE VIBES

post #1976 of 2259
I hear patience and positivity can cure anything! Count me in!
post #1977 of 2259

I have taught you well, younglings. 

post #1978 of 2259

...not even the younglings survived... (perhaps if they'd complied!)

 

...who?

 

...who could have done this???

 

tumblr_lyicibKUnE1qm4heyo1_500.gif

 

plUr2WC.gif 

post #1979 of 2259

Please... no judgements until the full Empire reports come in. 

post #1980 of 2259

very well

 

(files oodles of paperwork to see the security holo-recordings)

post #1981 of 2259
The Coruscant Times: Jedi Knight Cuts Down Unarmed Younglings, Again!
post #1982 of 2259

The director of The Great Wall, who is Chinese, responds:

 

Quote:
In many ways The Great Wall is the opposite of what is being suggested. For the first time, a film deeply rooted in Chinese culture, with one of the largest Chinese casts ever assembled, is being made at tent pole scale for a world audience. I believe that is a trend that should be embraced by our industry. Our film is not about the construction of the Great Wall. Matt Damon is not playing a role that was originally conceived for a Chinese actor. The arrival of his character in our story is an important plot point. There are five major heroes in our story and he is one of them — the other four are all Chinese. The collective struggle and sacrifice of these heroes are the emotional heart of our film. As the director of over 20 Chinese language films and the Beijing Olympics, I have not and will not cast a film in a way that was untrue to my artistic vision. I hope when everyone sees the film and is armed with the facts they will agree.

 

It makes sense that Damon would figure front and center in the marketing to the American audience. Of course, we don't know if all five heroes get equal screen time; we don't know if Damon's role is more supporting or lead. And we don't know if the importance of Damon's character to the plot justifies or makes organic the presence of a white European in the film. 

 

The 12 year old in me LOVES the premise of the film as promised in the trailer (the Great Wall keeps out MONSTAHS!), so I'm hoping this isn't another 47 Ronin (and I mean that both in terms of casting/characters and quality).

post #1983 of 2259

Yeah, I never assumed that Damon was playing someone that would've been played by a Chinese actor.  This isn't specifically whitewashing in terms of the project, since it was designed with attracting a white star to begin with (I assume).

 

But yeah, hopefully he is merely a part of the ensemble as opposed to playing into white savior tropes.

post #1984 of 2259

Damon's whiteness may be incidental though to just the fact that he is a known movie star. That seems to be why they wanted him. 

post #1985 of 2259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnotaur3 View Post
 

Damon's whiteness may be incidental though to just the fact that he is a known movie star. That seems to be why they wanted him. 

Yeah.

post #1986 of 2259

Jesus Christ, it's Jason Bourne!

post #1987 of 2259
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

Yeah, I never assumed that Damon was playing someone that would've been played by a Chinese actor.  This isn't specifically whitewashing in terms of the project, since it was designed with attracting a white star to begin with (I assume).

But yeah, hopefully he is merely a part of the ensemble as opposed to playing into white savior tropes.
Zwicking
post #1988 of 2259

post #1989 of 2259

Good video! Apparently I'm out of Rep, so I'm just going to kiss your avatar instead, Nooj.

 

*mwah*

post #1990 of 2259
honored
post #1991 of 2259

I was wondering when we'd push hard enough to get this topic further into the VO industry!

 

https://www.buzzfeed.com/susancheng/kubo-and-the-two-strings

 

Quote:
 

It’s a big stride in terms of Japanese representation in American film, even if the movie is set in a fantastical version of Japan dreamed up by Laika, the Portland-based studio behind Coraline and ParaNorman. Yet despite the effort to tell an original story in an industry saturated with reboots and franchises, Kubo and the Two Strings — for all of its attention to cultural details — features a lily-white lead voice cast.

The plucky young maestro Kubo is voiced by Irish actor Art Parkinson (Rickon Stark onGame of Thrones). Kubo’s companions include a no-nonsense monkey and goofy beetle brought to life by Charlize Theron and Matthew McConaughey, respectively. Rooney Mara provided the sinister voice to a pair of terrifying masked twins, and Ralph Fiennes took on the role of the ominous archvillain, the Moon King. The only prominent Japanese actors performing in the film are George Takei and Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa, both of whom play villagers. 

“Every decision we make, there is a well-considered logic to it,” Travis Knight, CEO of Laika Animation, told BuzzFeed News in a phone interview, responding to people’s objections to the main cast of Kubo and the Two Strings. Knight, who made his directorial debut with this film, explained that although the studio looks “all over the place” for voiceover artists, and while he does take an actor’s race into account when casting, it is not his primary consideration for Laika’s projects.

...

Major animated motion pictures used to employ relatively unknown voiceover artists 20 years ago, but that is no longer the case today, according to Ilana Martin, a celebrity vocal coach. She acknowledged that animated movies now require a high caliber of voice acting — and celebrity: These days, “quality” is equal to fame, or rather, familiarity.

“Due to the fact that [animated] characters feel more lifelike than they used to feel, the voices have to sound more familiar and nuanced than they used to sound,” she told BuzzFeed News in a phone interview. Unlike Mickey Mouse’s high-pitched mouse squeak, for example, characters now “have to feel like they’re part of your family,” which is one reason celebrities have taken over the world of cartoon voice acting. “The family that we know sonically [are] … people like Chris Rock, Scarlett Johansson.”

Since filmmakers — consciously or not — tend to hire “familiar” talent for animated projects, the trend means lesser-known, less-experienced actors are at a disadvantage. Thus, just as it is with live-action films, Asian-American actors have a more difficult time landing roles in animated projects.

According to Linda Lamontagne, the casting director behind shows like BoJack Horsemanand Family Guy and films like The Nut Job and Angry Birds, “If Asians had more opportunity, they could probably be better at their craft and more desirable if they worked more. … Delivery, voice, comedic timing — that’s usually what wins in the shows that I work on,” she told BuzzFeed News in a phone interview.

Those are the reasons cited for why white actors often portray characters of color on shows like Avatar: The Last AirbenderThe Simpsons, and The Cleveland Show. Lamontagne, who is half Taiwanese, noted that she’s made a concerted effort to cast more actors of color, especially Asian-Americans. For characters of color, Lamontagne first auditions “minority” actors, and for undefined characters, she practices colorblind casting. Most recently, she cast Ken Jeong in BoJack Horseman and Ali Wong in Angry Birds. But she runs into a frequent problem. “It’s the person who has done a lot more who can deliver … Usually the more famous person has worked a lot more,” she said, further explaining the Catch-22. It also doesn’t help that big talent agencies represent few Asian-Americans, she said.

...

 

“I fully believe that representation and inclusion matters … and that’s why on all of our films, we’ve featured diverse casts, and that actually is true for Kubo as well,” he said. “We have actors from all over the world with all manner of life experiences, including a number of terrific actors of Japanese ancestry” — a challenging feat in a business that prefers “the same story” and “the same characters being portrayed over and over again.”

“We made a commitment to making diverse stories with diverse characters brought to life by diverse artists,” Knight said. “I can appreciate that someone isn’t happy with any specific decision that we make, but … we honestly were trying to do what we thought was the best interest in this movie, to bring this film to life in the best way.”

post #1992 of 2259

Also, speaking of Rooney Mara and KUBO... who already went through a bit of the whitewashing controversy when she was cast as Tiger Lily in PAN...

 

...a friend of mine posted this on the FakeBlock:

 

Quote:
 “I really hate, hate, hate that I am on that side of the whitewashing conversation,” [Rooney Mara] went on. “I really do. I don’t ever want to be on that side of it again."

 

ehehehehe

tumblr_nz7jm0fVvM1up42jgo3_500.gif

 

I assume this was a cool project she accepted well before anything about PAN had kicked in (since animated films take forever and usually record the vocal track before animating).  I just find the irony kinda funny.

post #1993 of 2259

http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2016/10/how-the-west-was-lost/502850/

 

Quote:
 

Cowboy culture refers to a style of ranchingintroduced in North America by Spanish colonists in the 16th century—a time when most ranch owners were Spanish and many ranch hands were Native. None of the first cowboys were (non-Hispanic) white. And while historians don’t know exact figures, by the late 19th century roughly one in three cowboys (known as vaqueros) was Mexican. The recognizable cowboy fashions, technologies, and lexicon—hats, bandanas, spurs, stirrups, lariat, lasso—are all Latino inventions.

 

White Americans wouldn’t be exposed to, and subsequently incorporate, cowboy culture into their ranching practices until 200 years after its inception, once westward expansion brought Anglo-colonists and African slaves into the area in the early 1800s. At that time, cowboys did the kind of hard labor that wealthy white Americans would often force others to do, meaning many were black slaves. Around this same time, the frontier was also populated by roughly 20,000 Chinese immigrants who contributed significantly to the development of the West, including the construction of the first Transcontinental Railroad. In other words, people of color were not only present at the inception of the Wild West—but they were also its primary architects. And yet, even today, black cowboys are fighting for recognition.

 

Most historians and cowfolk of color agree that Hollywood is responsible for popularizing the falsehood of the all-white Wild West. Filmmakers built a genre that hinged on racial conflict and then, in defiance of that fact, filled the silver screen with only white protagonists. While whitewashing remains a modern problem, it has a long history in American film: In the very first Hollywood movie, 1910’s In Old Californiawhite actors played non-white roles.

 

...

 

 

By the time Westerns gained wider prominence with movie audiences in the 1950s, the ubiquity of the genre’s all-white protagonists had helped fully obscure the reality of race on the American frontier. Crucial to this effort were directors like Cecil B. DeMille (The Squaw Man, Rose of the Rancho, The Trail of Lonesome Pine, The Buccaneers) and John Ford (My Darling Clementine, Fort Apache, The Searchers). Non-white characters were usually antagonists with names like “Mexican Henchman” or “Facetious Redskin.” When filmmakers weren’t misrepresenting other races (whether intentionally or not), they were often ignoring them entirely: Ford’s 1924 opus The Iron Horse manages to tell the story of the country’s first transcontinental railroad without Chinese actors, save a few who were background extras.

 

Over the next few decades Hollywood would occasionally cast a black cowboy to appear alongside otherwise all-white casts in Westerns such as Lonesome Dove(1989) or Unforgiven (1992). In a 1993 Chicago Tribune article about Beckwourth, the writer commended the aforementioned films for their palatable diversity while criticizing 1993’s Posse for being “too politically correct” with its all-black cast (which, historically, would have been more plausible). Both before and following the Civil War, many black men fled to the frontier for a cowboys’s life of freedom. The broad notion of “freedom” stitched into the seams of the Western canon has far more cultural significance than the genre has ever truly acknowledged.

post #1994 of 2259
Very interesting article, but "cowfolk of color" made me giggle.
post #1995 of 2259
sounds like a 90s show for toddlers
post #1996 of 2259

I'm all for setting the record straight but lassos and stirrups being Latino inventions is demonstrably false. Lassos have been around since before the word Latin even existed. And stirrups have been used by Asian riders for millennia. This may seem pedantic but as a history fan having endured the whole "Black Athena" nonsense this kind of "appropriation for a good cause" rubs me the wrong way. 

post #1997 of 2259
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelios View Post

I'm all for setting the record straight but lassos and stirrups being Latino inventions is demonstrably false. Lassos have been around since before the word Latin even existed. And stirrups have been used by Asian riders for millennia. This may seem pedantic but as a history fan having endured the whole "Black Athena" nonsense this kind of "appropriation for a good cause" rubs me the wrong way.
Yeah. Credit ought to be given where due, certainly, and particularly when it's something that has generally been overlooked or forgotten, but this kind of thing is just bonkers.
post #1998 of 2259

aw yea

oh boy oh boy

 

http://blog.angryasianman.com/2016/10/an-open-letter-to-creators-of-disneys.html

 

Quote:
 A white merchant's business brings him to the heart of a legendary Asian conflict -- he unwittingly helps save the day while winning the heart of the Asian female. Am I describing the plotline of the Netflix series Marco Polo? No. I'm describing the spec script that Disney bought for its live-action feature film, The Legend of Mulan, which is projected for release in 2018.

As an Asian American person in the industry, I am furious after reading this script. I am writing this letter anonymously so all the fans anticipating this remake will know how problematic it is in its current form. We must urge the creators of Disney's live-action Mulan to reconsider the story before the film goes into production.

The 1998 Disney animated classic focused on Mulan's transition from being a young girl failing to fit the mold of a perfect daughter and wife to a heroine whose brave acts ultimately save ancient China. Her determination allows her to rise above the gender expectations of her culture and become the one who brings "honor to us all." Hers is essentially an Asian American tale because it fused Asian characters and culture with a coming-of-age hero's journey that resonated with American audiences. 

So why does the script for the live-action remake feature a white male lead?
post #1999 of 2259

Wow. Everything about that is really gross.

post #2000 of 2259
But...but Disney put all those people of color in JJ-Wars just to show how diverse they are!
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