CHUD.com Community › Forums › SPECIFIC FILMS › The Franchises › The Harry Potter Series.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Harry Potter Series. - Page 5

post #201 of 524

I'm introducing these films to someone whose never seen them before.

 

Jesus is Sorcerer's Stone stiff. The film is actually kind of horrible. I'm not sure if it's because I know how good the film gets, but everything in that first film feels off. I hate Columbus' direction, particularly the really stagey opening flashback, almost as much as I hate his Victorian fascination. Just feels odd to see these characters all dressed up like they're in the 19th Century. The kids are OK but Columbus sort of lets them be too surprised and shocked at things. There's this consistent sense of wonderment in the film which is downright exhausting after a while. I also kind of hate John Williams score, feels like it's working overtime to make up for Columbus' lack of direction. Even the adult actors feel a little lost.

post #202 of 524

I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we've seen how much more effortless and graceful the filmmaking in the series has become.

 

Yeah, Columbus' films feel REALLY flat in comparison.  They also come across 'old' as if it was an elaborate TV production. 

 

What did you think back when you first saw it?

post #203 of 524

I was 15 when I last saw it, and I HATE 15 year old Spike. At the time I was just impressed by seeing the characters from the books on screen. I think the first film suffers from being caught between two worlds. When the film was in production Goblet of Fire was getting released and it sort of represents the 'shit just got real' moment of the Potter books. As such the film feels like it's trying to be the boys own adventure of the first book whilst also straining to fit in the mythos of the series which really wasn't all that important to the first book. 

post #204 of 524

Didn't know the first film was being made when the 4th book got released.  Interesting.

 

It was actually only after the 3rd movie (my favorite, I think) that I decided to try reading the books.  It makes sense that my more nitpicky beefs with the adaptations started right with the 4th movie.  Hahahaha.

 

My recollection of the first film is that it's pretty much a xerox adaptation of the book.  I don't recall any particular mythos that felt tacked on.  But I haven't seen the film in a while.

post #205 of 524

The one thing I really appreciated about the first movie is Harry feels more proactive. I remember being dissapointed in the book that he basically accidentally stumbles onto the way to defeat Voldemort-backwards-head. In the movie, he notices that he's hurt Voldemort, and then takes the initiative and attacks. In the book it all happens very quickly and coincidentally.

post #206 of 524

Finished Half Blood Prince yesterday. 2nd Watch. At one point I would have had both Yates movies at the top of the list, but aside from a few fun moments his version of Half Blood Prince feels oddly static. It's nowhere near as inert as the Columbus movies and the kids are great, but it feels like nothing really happens in the film and it's the only movie where I really, really, miss the excised material. I think Yates overall style is still great and I think Draco Malfoy and Slughorn are both far better served by the film than the bool, but I just wish Yates had brought a little of the fun and pep of Phoenix to the film. It's also bizarre that the film inserts an action sequence into the movie halfway through and then completely downplays an action sequence from the book (the Death Eater vs. Order fight in Hogwarts).

 

I guess it's for pacing, because if the attack on the Weasley's doesn't happen then the doesn't actually have a set piece for about two hours. I do really like the kids. I love Radcliffe and his chance to go broad when he's using the charm potion. He's essentially Coked Up 80s Guy Harry Potter and he's fantastic.

 

I've actually raised Goblet of Fire in my estimation. I think the structure of the book really helps, but there's a really great sense of pace and energy to the whole thing. I think a few character beats feel a little off, but it feels the most self contained and cinematic of all the Potter films. As much as I love Yates Order of the Phoenix and it's constant montages it sort of doesn't feel quite as 'cinematic' as either Goblet or Azkaban largely because it starts off right away and takes a while to establish a tone. But then the montages are so much fun and the final battle is still the best thing in the films to me.

 

By the by, I noticed that Chamber of Secrets is kind of littered with dutch angles. A technique that Columbus never seemed to use. I wonder if Branagh was passing him notes.

post #207 of 524

So Warner Brothers says that were 167million in the red on "The Order of the Phoenix"

http://www.boingboing.net/2011/06/27/hollywoodonomics-how.html

 

harry-potter-net-profits.jpeg

post #208 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spike Marshall View Post

Finished Half Blood Prince yesterday. 2nd Watch. At one point I would have had both Yates movies at the top of the list, but aside from a few fun moments his version of Half Blood Prince feels oddly static. It's nowhere near as inert as the Columbus movies and the kids are great, but it feels like nothing really happens in the film and it's the only movie where I really, really, miss the excised material. I think Yates overall style is still great and I think Draco Malfoy and Slughorn are both far better served by the film than the bool, but I just wish Yates had brought a little of the fun and pep of Phoenix to the film. It's also bizarre that the film inserts an action sequence into the movie halfway through and then completely downplays an action sequence from the book (the Death Eater vs. Order fight in Hogwarts).

 

I guess it's for pacing, because if the attack on the Weasley's doesn't happen then the doesn't actually have a set piece for about two hours. I do really like the kids. I love Radcliffe and his chance to go broad when he's using the charm potion. He's essentially Coked Up 80s Guy Harry Potter and he's fantastic.

 

I've actually raised Goblet of Fire in my estimation. I think the structure of the book really helps, but there's a really great sense of pace and energy to the whole thing. I think a few character beats feel a little off, but it feels the most self contained and cinematic of all the Potter films. As much as I love Yates Order of the Phoenix and it's constant montages it sort of doesn't feel quite as 'cinematic' as either Goblet or Azkaban largely because it starts off right away and takes a while to establish a tone. But then the montages are so much fun and the final battle is still the best thing in the films to me.

 

By the by, I noticed that Chamber of Secrets is kind of littered with dutch angles. A technique that Columbus never seemed to use. I wonder if Branagh was passing him notes.

 

The attack is definitely pointless, and inserted entirely for pacing purposes.  One assumes the final battle was  downplayed because they want the battle of Hogwarts in the final film to be a singular and epic thing within the series.  To that end, it makes sense. 

 

Harry on the luck potion seemed most to me like someone on mushrooms, because he's all goofy positivity without the frantic edge of a coke high.  Ron's dose of love potion also is a fairly accurate take on an ecstasy trip.

 

I find it kind of funny that this children's fantasy flick has some more authentic druggy acting than Hollywood usually manages for more adult fare.  There's even that scene of them walking back in the snow where Emma Watson is playing it visibly drunk that passes totally without comment, not to mention the rather ham-handed bit in Phoenix (I think?) where the kids are sitting around burning incense of something and getting all giggly.  Yates definitely seemed like he was having fun being a little subversive on the substance abuse score with his flicks. 

post #209 of 524


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post

 

The attack is definitely pointless, and inserted entirely for pacing purposes.  One assumes the final battle was  downplayed because they want the battle of Hogwarts in the final film to be a singular and epic thing within the series.  To that end, it makes sense.  

I'm positive I read somewhere that that's exactly what Kloves and Yates had in mind. In fact, I always quite liked the idea of the Death Eaters performing a "Drive-by-Shooting". I think playing it a bit more lowkey made the scene creepier and a bit more dangerous.

 

Regarding the Burning of the Burrow, it worked but it it didn't go nearly far enough. It made no tactical sense to attack the Weasley's and make no attempt at Harry. Bellatrix leads him into the fields then disappears. Odd.

 

And most egregious is the fact that Lupin and Greyback are thrust into a battle, and we DON'T get a werewolf fight. I was amazed they didn't take advantage of that. 


Edited by Mike's Pants - 6/28/11 at 1:03am
post #210 of 524

Perhaps a weird reason to bump the thread, but I'm going through this series with Rifftrax commentaries.  (I by no means hate these films - I just wanted to see what the Rifftrax guys did with them.  I had listened to the one for SORCERER'S STONE back when it came out in like 2007, but never followed up, and I see that they got around to doing all eight.)  There was a huge sale on the Blu-ray collection, so I figured what the heck.

 

My relationship with Harry Potter is relatively casual.  I've read none of the books, but caught each movie theatrically. I haven't had the opportunity to watch the films one after the other to see how they function as a saga, so I'm looking forward to that.  On an individual basis, I thought it would be fun to see if my opinion has dramatically changed on any of them.  My memory is that the strongest ones were AZKABAN, GOBLET and PRINCE.

 

SORCERER'S STONE is pretty much as I remembered it: painfully simpering and entirely too long.  There's plenty to enjoy, particularly with the casting, production design, and score, but the "cutesy" moments are just too much, and every attempt at gravitas falls flat on its face.  The climactic game of Wizard's Chess where Ron justifies "sacrificing himself" makes me cringe just thinking about it.  But the world-building is excellent even if the story at hand doesn't have nearly as much intrigue as the characters' facial expressions insist.  And hey, remember when John Cleese was in these movies?

 

Favorite Rifftrax line:

 

John Hurt: It seems like only yesterday that your parents were here buying their first wands.

Bill Corbett: I assume they're parking the car.  Always full of life, those two.

 

For some reason I have an incredibly clear memory of the ubiquitous TV spots for this movie.  Malfoy saying "Have it your way then" before throwing the transparent ball is forever burned into my brain.  (And Mike Nelson's "Brought to you by Burger King" was the perfect riff for that moment.)

post #211 of 524
Barreling forward with CHAMBER OF SECRETS. A definite improvement over SORCERER'S STONE while very obviously made by the exact same creative team. Some of the emphatic Recap The Plot dialogue handed to the kids in the first movie made them outright insufferable at times, and it feels like there's less of that this go round while some higher stakes are offered. Branagh and Isaacs are pretty fantastic, scenery-chewing additions, and it's quite enjoyable to watch the peripheral kids - not just the main three - mature from the sidelines.

Downside: Like STONE, this movie feels every bit as long as it is, and it never met an exposition scene it couldn't bloat to the point of torture. The face-off with Riddle is particularly bad. At no point is the audience allowed to do the math themselves. There are lines in this movie that are so insulting, it's like screenplay descriptors got turned into dialog on production due to a clerical error:

"Your bird may have blinded the basilisk, but it can STILL HEAR YOUUU!"
"Dobby! So this is your master! The family you serve is the Malfoys!1111ELEVEN"

(Despite the sense that everything is underlined and explained twice, there are nineteen deleted scenes on the disc!)

You know, even though one of the biggest pleasures of this series is seeing various directors give their spin on the source material, and even though replacing Columbus gave the series a much-needed shot in the arm, and even though there was no practical way for Columbus to helm all of the movies himself, I'm still curious about the alternate universe where that's what happened, mostly in terms of stylistic continuity. I'm sure it wouldn't have been worth the trade-off, but still -- how would Columbus have tackled the later material?

As for the Rifftrax, the guys really get a lot of mileage out of the fact that this is a universe of sorcerers who celebrate Christian holidays. Cue the satanist jokes. And the constant wheezing imitations of Richard Harris would seem in worse taste if they weren't so accurate.
post #212 of 524

I can't remember if I mentioned this before...

 

...but when I went to see Sorcerer's Stone in concert, there was an edit of pure nothing that really stood out to me

 

It's when Percy Weasly gives the new kids a tour of Hogwarts and leads them to their sleeping quarters.  They're in the Gryffindor common area and Percy points out that boys go one way and girls the other.  And then he adds that their luggage has already been delivered to their rooms.

 

Then we cut to a close-up of Radcliffe... just kinda listening?  No expression on his face.

 

And then we cut to a transition to the next day or something.  Williams' score making everything sound wonderfully whimsical!  YOUR LUGGAGE HAS ALREADY BEEN DELIVERED!

 

: l

 

It feels like something out of THE ROOM... but invisible.

post #213 of 524

What a very specific thing to focus on. 

post #214 of 524
The fluctuation of Harry's reactions to the uncanny in the first movie is hilarious. There's a point around like the 30 minute mark where Hagrid collects a small sack from the Gringotts bank vault, and Columbus cuts to a vaudevillian reaction shot of Radcliffe looking like it's the most peculiar thing in the world while the Williams score goes to eleven. This is in the context of Harry being hit from all sides by life-changing supernatural occurrences. "Wait, now he's suddenly confused?" was the Mike Nelson comment.

Oh yeah, my other favorite Rifftrax line:

Uncle Vernon: He'll not be going.
Hagrid: Oh, and I suppose a great muggle like yourself is going to stop him, are ya.
Harry: Muggle?
Hagrid: Non-magic folk.
Kevin Murphy (as Hagrid): You see, Harry, when a group of people is different, it helps to come up with a funny-sounding word, or "slur", to describe them.
post #215 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeman View Post

What a very specific thing to focus on. 


mmm hmm

you can say that again

tell me about it

you don't have to tell me twice
post #216 of 524

Do you have it on 4K 3D though for maximum cringe?

post #217 of 524
I actually don't have any potter movies on physical media!

I DID buy all the movies on bleurae for my nieces though.
post #218 of 524

You're such a sweet Uncle!

SWEET UNCLE NOOJ! Not the creepy uncle at all.

post #219 of 524

Radcliffe isn't exactly a good actor in the first (or even second movie). He doesn't really find a personality until Prisoner of Azkaban, when he gets to be pissed off and kick stuff. 

 

In Sorcerer's Stone and Chamber of Secrets, he's just meant to smile, look surprised and say, "Wicked" a lot. He's limited, but Columbus utilizes him well, treating Harry as more of an observer that gets to witness the plot around him. 

 

He's a little more active in the books, but Harry doesn't really come of his own until Azkaban (when he, at a very early age, is able to summon a Patronus) and Goblet of Fire when he has to learn a bunch of new stuff to win the Tri-Wizard Tournament (something the movie kind of skips over, rather just handing him solutions). 

 

It's actually a really nice progression, in terms of character and actor. By the time he's leading Dumbledore's Army in Order of the Phoenix, you start to realize both Harry and Radcliffe have really blossomed and it's been earned. 

 

But wooh boy, those first two movies sure are stagey. They come across as made-for-TV Disney Channel movies at times. But the charm of the actors, especially the kids, really shines through. And now years later you just kind of accept them as part of the greater whole that Yates comes to dominate.

post #220 of 524

Radcliffe most definitely grows as an actor through the series, but I never found that he was really equal to the heavier material.  I remember his big "HE WAS THEIR FRIEND!" moment in AZKABAN to be a massive groaner, and there's a scene between him and Broadbent in PRINCE that's like watching a stick insect go up against Tyson in a boxing match.

 

A big problem is that even in their "maturity" these movies absolutely reject subtlety, which makes even the better dramatic beats feel force-fed.  The pesky business of "this is an emotional moment because the soundtrack insists upon it" by no means comes to an end with Columbus's departure.

post #221 of 524

Oh sure. Even by Deathly Hallows, Radcliffe is still mostly silently reacting to events around him. Although his "luck" drunkenness in Half-Blood Prince is pretty funny. 

post #222 of 524

I'm in the middle of watching this as well (meaning my wife decided to watch these again)...The first two are broad, LONG children's movies. I still think Columbus and the production crew did a pretty great job for laying the foundation of the movie franchise, and I wish Richard Harris hadn't kicked the bucket. However, Azkaban is where everything goes up a notch.

 

I like Goblet of Fire reasonably well, although I always found it weird that the director cast himself as Pattinson's dad so he could have a big showy scene wailing over his son's dead body.

 

My wife accidentally skipped Order of the Phoenix and put on Half-Blood Prince instead. It's probably bad that I didn't notice this at all, save for the weird green color tint of the movie, which I guess was meant to invoke "seriousness."

 

Ultimately, it's kinda like Marvel...I've seen all of these movies, some multiple times, and they were fine in the moment. However, if you put a gun to my head and asked me to recite the plots of these movies, I'd remember maybe 30% of it.

post #223 of 524

God, Goblet of Fire. I liked it a lot upon first viewing, but over the years I've soured on how every single actor is YELLING ALL OF THEIR LINES.

 

Order of the Phoenix is actually my favorite. I'm a big fan of Voldemort and Dumbledore's duel, and Harry and Voldemort's mindmeld. Harry overcoming Voldemort's control is actually much more satisfying than anything in Deathly Hallows. Harry at that point has already won the moral victory, it's just a matter of physically defeating Voldemort in the next two stories.

post #224 of 524

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post
 

Although his "luck" drunkenness in Half-Blood Prince is pretty funny. 

 

With the first two films fresh in my mind, to me the standout so far is Grint, who comes off as having the most natural comedy chops.  There's a lot of a broad comedy in the Columbus movies, which seem to be going for an almost Capra-esque vibe.  It's kind of amazing how much of HOME ALONE Columbus brings to HARRY POTTER. The John Williams factor is a huge part of that as well.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

I like Goblet of Fire reasonably well, although I always found it weird that the director cast himself as Pattinson's dad so he could have a big showy scene wailing over his son's dead body.

 

Wait, that's not actually true, right?

post #225 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post
 

God, Goblet of Fire. I liked it a lot upon first viewing, but over the years I've soured on how every single actor is YELLING ALL OF THEIR LINES.

 

Order of the Phoenix is actually my favorite. I'm a big fan of Voldemort and Dumbledore's duel, and Harry and Voldemort's mindmeld. Harry overcoming Voldemort's control is actually much more satisfying than anything in Deathly Hallows. Harry at that point has already won the moral victory, it's just a matter of physically defeating Voldemort in the next two stories.

^^^ Don't remember any of that, and I've probably seen it 3 times. These movies fade away as soon as they're over for me. It makes me feel like the Memento guy!

 

post #226 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post
 

Quote:

 

With the first two films fresh in my mind, to me the standout so far is Grint, who comes off as having the most natural comedy chops.  There's a lot of a broad comedy in the Columbus movies, which seem to be going for an almost Capra-esque vibe.  It's kind of amazing how much of HOME ALONE Columbus brings to HARRY POTTER. The John Williams factor is a huge part of that as well.

 

 

Wait, that's not actually true, right?

Jeff Rawle is Amos Diggory. Mike Newell directed Goblet of Fire.

post #227 of 524

I remember Goblet being my favorite book because of the fun gimmicky nature of the tourney and the big expansion of the world building.  It's also the first movie that had to cut a pretty significant amount of stuff.

post #228 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post
 

Quote:

 

With the first two films fresh in my mind, to me the standout so far is Grint, who comes off as having the most natural comedy chops.  There's a lot of a broad comedy in the Columbus movies, which seem to be going for an almost Capra-esque vibe.  It's kind of amazing how much of HOME ALONE Columbus brings to HARRY POTTER. The John Williams factor is a huge part of that as well.

I'd like to come back to this, because I find Ron, and Grint's portrayal of him, to be pretty fascinating. He seems like a smart if unimpressive kid in Sorcerer's Stone. After all, he's an ace at Wizard's Chess, and works as a kind of exposition infodump for Harry and the audience, so he at least is pretty knowledgeable.

 

But in Chamber of Secrets they lean HARD into him being kind of cowardly. This is in the text (his fear of spiders), but Grint must've been instructed to play this up to maximum comic effect. Everything is bug eyes and affected gulping. 

 

He also gets a bit of an edge for a kid's film, because he's the one allowed to say, "Bloody hell!"

 

This cowardliness continues into Azkaban, to the point where he gets sidelined altogether in the third act. But in Goblet of Fire there's this sudden shift. Ron becomes this resentful, envious asshole. This is in the books, but it becomes Grint's default setting through the rest of the series. Resents Harry for being the Chosen One; resents Harry for being with his sister (this is a bigger deal in the book); and resents Harry and Hermione out of jealousy.

 

Again, all in the text but Grint plays it with a kind of sweaty desperation that makes you think middle-aged Ron will probably be a heavy drinker and slap Hermione at some point (with her retaliating, of course; Hermione's no one's abused wife). 

 

it might be because at some point around Half-Blood Prince Grint's body type changed and his shoulders got REALLY BROAD. I don't know. But there's a multifaceted element to him and his evolution that seems almost unintentional. 

post #229 of 524

Ron is endlessly panicky and often foolish but he is not a coward.  Draco illustrates that distinction.  When the rubber hits the road, Ron generally steps up, whether it be his cringy Braveheart speech during Wizard's Chess, stealing a flying car to rescue Harry from the Dursleys, reflexively trying to curse Draco when he insults Hermoine, etc.  He's reduced to blubbering impotence during the Aragog scene, but for good reason.  It's only a deus ex that saves him and Harry from being devoured.

post #230 of 524
I showed the first scene from Order of the Phoenix to a friend as an example of how to show a shift in power between two characters and an effective example of when you can get away with "breaking the 180."
post #231 of 524
Tonight was PRISONER OF AZKABAN, which has an outrageous number of fade to blacks in it. Good movie, though - pretty much an upping of the film-making ante in every way. CHAMBER OF SECRETS felt so rigidly slavish to STONE's template that Cuarón blowing things up a bit is quite welcome. It doesn't hurt either that John Williams does such good work here that it's almost like he had something to prove. He really kissed off from this franchise with a mic drop.

It's a well-photographed movie, too, although I've grown to resent the draining of the rainbow as some aesthetic shorthand for maturity of content. HARRY POTTER doesn't stand alone in this; the LORD OF THE RINGS and PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN trilogies also got more monochrome as they went on, and nowadays dire and drab has become almost a default grading choice for epics...and just about everything else. It might surprise some of the jokers in the DI suite that even in the actual apocalypse our eyes are still going to be able to resolve the full color spectrum.

I definitely get why many name this their favorite installment, and I might end up concurring by the end of the re-watch. My main complaint about this movie remains that histrionics get confused for good acting in some of Radcliffe's most important scenes. His growling about how he's going to kill Black is as bad as any muggingly comic moment from the first two movies. In general though, all of the young actors grow really nicely into their roles in this film where they're asked to bring an elevated game.

General observation about this universe: I like how magic in the wizarding world is incredibly specific and powerful versus incredibly nonexistent depending on the needs of the story and/or what looks neat. In the same scene that Malfoy passes Harry a note with an animated GIF on it, Snape is using a slide projector for his lecture. Not to get ahead of myself, but is HALF-BLOOD PRINCE the one where characters who we've seen warp through time and space stare helplessly as the Weasley homestead is set afire?

Oh, and I sure hope Sam Raimi got a royalty check for the belligerent book with teeth.

Favorite Rifftrax line:

Dumbledore: Arresto momentum.
Mike Nelson: Dumbledore's curious habit of rising to his feet and mispronouncing his favorite Jason Bateman sitcom.
post #232 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post
 

God, Goblet of Fire. I liked it a lot upon first viewing, but over the years I've soured on how every single actor is YELLING ALL OF THEIR LINES.

 

Order of the Phoenix is actually my favorite. I'm a big fan of Voldemort and Dumbledore's duel, and Harry and Voldemort's mindmeld. Harry overcoming Voldemort's control is actually much more satisfying than anything in Deathly Hallows. Harry at that point has already won the moral victory, it's just a matter of physically defeating Voldemort in the next two stories.

Went back and rewatched Order of the Phoenix tonight, and even with my limited memory I think it's definitely the best movie. Everything great about this franchise (movies, not books, which I haven't read) are at their best in this one.

post #233 of 524

Phoenix has the best climax.  For all the fireworks Deathly Hallows brings to the table, the final confrontation with Voldemort can't match the simple potency of Harry expressing pity for the Mr. Evil Overlord.

post #234 of 524
that scene would be nice if not for the goofy cutaways to fiennes making wonderfully goofy "GYAH!!!" poses within Harry's mind
post #235 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

that scene would be nice if not for the goofy cutaways to fiennes making wonderfully goofy "GYAH!!!" poses within Harry's mind


I know the exact specific frame that you're talking about.  It's one tiny little shot, and it ruins a very emotional moment by being so, very silly. 

 

post #236 of 524
I was also not a fan of the way so many of the movies ended with a bunch of kids walking to trains or waving goodbye.

I like the goofy ending of Azkaban because it deviates from that and ends on a moment of pure joy for Harry.

I remember being so annoyed by the ending of Goblet with everyone waving goodbye to GOOD FRIENDS like it was any other year.

Order of the Phoenix also ends with them walking to the train talking about what they've learned like some after school special.

I like the final moment of Half Blood Prince though because it's a quiet moment of three friends making a somber determination to leave school.
post #237 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

that scene would be nice if not for the goofy cutaways to fiennes making wonderfully goofy "GYAH!!!" poses within Harry's mind

 

Greatest moment of the entire saga.

post #238 of 524

I think my non-ironic favorite moment of the series might be the scene with Warwick Davis at the beginning of the last movie where he - in what I assume is his nineteenth role in a Harry Potter installment - negotiates for the Sword of Gryffindor.

 

Hey, since Disney just bought the snot out of Fox, can we get WILLOW 2 already?  Or even just re-issue the Blu-ray of the original, which was in print for like a week?

post #239 of 524
Tonight Dumbledore angrily shoved me against a wall because I cast my name into dat GOBLET OF FIYAH.

I really like this one. I recall that when it came out it stirred up quite a bit of controversy for book readers because they apparently cut out gobs of the source material in the adaptation, but as a clueless moviegoer I found it to be quite satisfying. It's one of the few sequels in this series that feels like a complete adventure movie in and of itself.

It also feels like the last Harry Potter that retains some semblance of the original template, where there's some self-contained school mystery relating to the identity/loyalty of the Defense Against the Dark Arts teacher. Yes, I know, there's still a key revelation about Snape ahead of us, but the series gets way more serialized after GOBLET, and not always in a good way. The Tri-Wizard Tournament is a nice hook and just feels overall like one of the better A-plots. By contrast, anyone who claims they gave a good fuck about Nicolas Flamel or the stone in the first movie would blow up a lie detector.

This one is a little bit more of an action movie, but it doesn't go so far off the reservation that it eschews the whimsy and character moments that actually make the movies worth watching. So it strikes a nice balance, I thought. Not to mention the killer intro scene for the series antagonist that I’m not sure was ever lived up to.

I forgot to give the many great supporting players in AZKABAN their due, so let me quickly say that Gleason is really great (and apparently stepping in for a Ray Winstone that wanted more money?), while Tennant is kind of a non-entity due to a lack of meaty material. The jury is out on whether Oldman was less recognizable in his cameo here, or in Ridley Scott’s Hannibal.

Best Rifftrax lines (aside from referring to the creepy attic flashback footage as “outtakes from the Are You Afraid of the Dark intro"):

Harry: You’re a right foul git, you know that?
Ron: Is that so? Anything else?
Harry: Yeah! Stay away from me.
Bill Corbett: All right, see you in the room we share.

*Harry has been in the enchanted hedge maze for two seconds*
Kevin Murphy: He’s already passed three Starbucks and a Cold Stone Creamery.
post #240 of 524
I can never warm to goblet because everyone is so goddamned agitated
post #241 of 524
So the little French girl simply would have been left to drown in the second task if not for Harry, right? That's just the price of being a champion's sister.
post #242 of 524
post #243 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post

So the little French girl simply would have been left to drown in the second task if not for Harry, right? That's just the price of being a champion's sister.

nope!

never any steaks!
post #244 of 524
post #245 of 524

Little touches I like that were added by the filmmakers to show a natural friendship between the characters and make them appear more like kids, not from the books:

 

The Gryffindor boys eat candy that makes steam come out of their ears and Ron roar like a lion in Azkaban

Ron and Hermione accidentally hold hands for two seconds in Azkaban

Harry and Ron stand up on a wall, up above a scurrying hallway of students, giggling to themselves in Goblet of Fire

Little touches at the school dance in Goblet, like the crowd being so into the rock band

Hermione appearing to be pretty drunk on butter beer, leaning on Harry and Ron for support, in Half-Blood Prince

The dance between Harry and Hermione in Deathly Hallows

post #246 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

nope!

never any steaks!

 

How does the book explain it?  The movie does somewhat imply that the hostages got recruited for the task, but then why was Fleur so grateful to Harry and Ron for "saving" her sister if she wasn't actually in danger?

 

Face it: Dumbledore's a homicidal maniac.

post #247 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post
 

 

How does the book explain it?  The movie does somewhat imply that the hostages got recruited for the task, but then why was Fleur so grateful to Harry and Ron for "saving" her sister if she wasn't actually in danger?

 

Same reason Harry saves her: The contestants don't know they're safe..

post #248 of 524

I would just love to know how that conversation went.  It amuses me that in AZKABAN the staff puts their foot down about how you need a parent's signature on your permission slip to spend the afternoon on a simple field trip to a nearby village, yet hours before this lake challenge you get pulled aside and told:

 

"Yo!  We need you to be the objective in next task because you're a friend of Champion X.  No big deal, we're just gonna petrify you and put you under a lake for hours surrounded by dozens of trident-wielding mermaids with bad attitudes and presumably minds of their own.  Trust us!"

 

Also, these movies are confusing the heck out of me about whether loss of limb is a big deal or not in this world:

 

Harry Potter: Has his arm bone successfully regrown in the infirmary after Branagh turns it gelatinous by accident.

Wormtail: Gets a new Terminator hand at the wave of a wand after he chops his off.

Mad-Eye Moody: Has the same prosthetic leg any non-magical mook would have to settle for after an amputation.

post #249 of 524
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post
 

Little touches I like that were added by the filmmakers to show a natural friendship between the characters and make them appear more like kids, not from the books:

 

Harry and Ron stand up on a wall, up above a scurrying hallway of students, giggling to themselves in Goblet of Fire

 

 

I remember this shot so clearly without having seen the movie in years.  Grint and Radcliffe look so perfectly like doofy sophomores thinking they're king shits just because they aren't freshmen anymore.  Given how much the productions would mirror that middle/high school progression, I always wondered if it was picked up between official takes.  

post #250 of 524

The original post-release thread for GOBLET OF FIRE is an enjoyable read.  A lot of spirited discussion about whether GOBLET or AZKABAN is the best installment (thus far).  Also some talk about how an Asian girl with a Scottish accent may be the film's most supernatural flourish.  Seems about right.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Franchises
CHUD.com Community › Forums › SPECIFIC FILMS › The Franchises › The Harry Potter Series.