or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Japan tragedy - Page 3

post #101 of 177
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan View Post



That can work against them as much as for them though. Perception is everything and at the moment, perception of nuclear power is especially bad because of this disaster in Japan. Even before this disaster, I don't think a new nuclear plant had been built in the US for decades, possibly not since Three Mile Island or even before.

 

 

I think definitive judgment works against them more.  But i think the dearth of no new nuclear power plants are because the taxpayers have to insure these plants, they're money losers, many more recent projects were never completed, and the designs themselves are too flawed to inspire confidence in financial backers. 
 

 

post #102 of 177
post #103 of 177

 

I love it, 2 pounds of Plutonium will kill every person on the planet, God of death indeed, and there are worse things coming out of the reactors.

post #104 of 177
I'm watching TV over dinner at my father's house last night. The news is dominated by the Windsor family. He says to me, "you never hear about that Farkushima reactor over there in China anymore." I stare at my chili dog and I think about the photos I've seen of the depleted uranium babies in Fallujah.
post #105 of 177
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reasor View Post

I'm watching TV over dinner at my father's house last night. The news is dominated by the Windsor family. He says to me, "you never hear about that Farkushima reactor over there in China anymore." I stare at my chili dog and I think about the photos I've seen of the depleted uranium babies in Fallujah.


The govt and the media are captured by the nuclear industry.  It's really up to us to force the issue.  I mean, even though your dad got the details wrong, at least he knows it happened.  I've talked to a lot of people who couldn't even say that.

post #106 of 177
post #107 of 177
post #108 of 177

Oh, finally good news!

 

/whole lotta sarcasm

post #109 of 177
post #110 of 177

 

http://www.fairewinds.com/updates

 

Reactor 1 has had a is not only having a full of meltdown, but is having an ongoing uncontrollable nuclear reaction. They have given up on reactor 1. It cooling pool is dry

 

Reactor 2 has uncontrollable water leaks. Over 200 ton of radiative water is escaping daily from all four.

 

Reactor 3 is not only leaking but is exposed to air, and is mostly in meltdown. The cooling pool has had a nuclear detonation in it, and is totally destroyed. Peaces of fuel rods have been found miles away.

 

 

Reactor 4 was shut down, but it fuel pool if had a hydrogen explosion, and it cooling pool is dry.

 

 

Reactor 5 and 6 are miles away and were not as badly damaged, but who known how badly.

 

 

 

Fuck the feudal government and the Obama administration for covering up the levels of contamination that has reached the USA.

post #111 of 177

Always trust the media..

 

Always trust corporations..

 

And always trust your government..

post #112 of 177

 

Reactor building 4 is collapsing, to the point were the lean is visible to the eye.

post #113 of 177

20 terabecquerels of radioactive materials flowed out to Pacific

 

Kyodo
May 22, 2011

Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Saturday that 250 tons of water tainted with about 20 terabecquerels of radioactive substances leaked into the Pacific Ocean from a pit near the seawater intake for the No. 3 reactor at the troubled Fukushima No. 1 plant earlier this month.

While the figure is far lower than the 4,700 terabecquerels released near the No. 2 reactor in April, it is still about 100 times the permissible level, according to Tepco.

 

At the time, the water was registering 9.8 terabecquerels of cesium-137, 9.3 terabecquerels of cesium-134 and 0.85 terabecquerels of iodine-131.

The leak is believed to have started at around 2 a.m. May 10 and was stopped at 7 p.m. May 11, Tepco said. The amount of water that escaped in that 41-hour period totaled 250 tons, it said.

The leakage of tainted water raised the concentration of radioactive substances in the port of the power plant but did not significantly change the level beyond it, the utility said.

The leak was reported to the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency.

post #114 of 177
post #115 of 177
Greenpeace warns of radioactive sea life off Japan

Environmental activist group Greenpeace warned Thursday that marine life it tested more than 20 kilometres (12 miles) off Japan's stricken Fukushima nuclear plant showed radiation above legal limits.

 

The anti-nuclear group, which conducted the coastal and offshore tests this month, criticised Japanese authorities for their "continued inadequate response to the Fukushima nuclear crisis" sparked by the March 11 quake and tsunami.

 

Greenpeace said it detected seaweed radiation levels 50 times higher than official limits, which it charged raised "serious concerns about continued long-term risks to people and the environment from contaminated seawater".

 

It also said that tests, which it said were independently verified by French and Belgian laboratories, showed above-legal levels of radioactive iodine-131 and caesium-137 in several species of fish and shellfish.

 

"Our data show that significant amounts of contamination continue to spread over great distances from the Fukushima nuclear plant," said Jan Vande Putte, a Greenpeace radiation expert, at a Tokyo press conference.

 

Japan has said ocean currents and tides are rapidly diluting contaminants from the tsunami-hit atomic plant, and Fukushima prefecture told AFP on Thursday that no fishing is going on at the moment in its waters.

 

"We have exercised self-restraint as (prefectural) safety tests have not been conducted yet," said a Fukushima official. "We will make a decision after confirming the results of the tests, which will take place shortly."

 

The official added: "People do not bother fishing now. If you caught fish or other marine products in waters near the plant, they wouldn't sell."

Japan's fisheries agency, and neighbouring prefectures, have been checking marine products at different spots, and the government has prohibited fishermen from catching some species found to have elevated radiation levels.

post #116 of 177

If anything this nightmare seems to be breeding an entire new young generation of anti-nuclear activists in Japan - many of which no doubt have grandparents who were just as committed against nuclear energy and the horrors that can come with it in their own youth.

post #117 of 177

Fukushima: French research institute finds high radioactivity

  •              

NHK
June 1, 2011

 

A French independent radioactivity watchdog has found radiation in Fukushima Prefecture 60 times higher than the annual reference level for ordinary people recommended by an international commission.

 

Bruno Chareyron, director of the research institute CRIIRAD, briefed reporters in Tokyo on Wednesday on the results of its survey of the air in Fukushima Prefecture.

The measurements and calculations found an annualized amount of 60 millisieverts at a farm in Iitate Village in the prefecture.

 

The level is 60 times higher than the annual limit for ordinary people, except for radiation workers, of 1 millisievert, recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection.
The researchers also found high radiation levels in Fukushima City. At some places in the city, the levels of radioactivity were 7 to 9 millisieverts a year.

 

Chareyron urged Japan to increase the number of monitoring spots so that it can provide the public with detailed information on the negative effects of the radiation caused by the troubled Fukushima Daiichi plant.

 

The one-week survey from May 24th was conducted in cooperation with a Japanese nongovernmental organization.

==================================================================

=========================================

 

http://english.ruvr.ru/2011/05/30/51015593.html

Fukushima’s operators at loss but don’t show it

The operating company of the Fukushima-1 nuclear power plant, “Tokyo Electric Power”, will not be able to liquidate all the consequences of the catastrophe by the end of this year. This was revealed by the company’s high-ranking representative who preferred to remain unnamed.

 

Earlier, the company announced that it planned to stop the largest leakages of radiation by July and to lower the temperature in the three reactors which suffered most down to 99º Celsius in another half a year. This would have allowed bringing them into the state of so-called “cold stop”.

 

Meanwhile, the task turned out to be more difficult than it had seemed at first. It turned out that in all these tree reactors, the nuclear fuel had melted because of lack of refrigeration. It burnt through the reactors’ body frames and damaged their outer shells. This means that the system is no longer leak-tight – if one tries to put them out with water, it will pour out. 

 

In an interview to the Voice of Russia, an expert in nuclear and radiation security Maxim Shingarkin commented on the situation in Fukushima:

 

“In fact, this statement came with a big delay. The operating company deliberately concealed this information. The explanation is simple – the company is afraid that any checking by competent experts would reveal its inability to save the situation. Only recently, foreign experts founded a consultative body for the clean-up of the accident’s consequences. Moreover, the company is concealing the information about the amount of pollution of the environment.”

 

However, “Tokyo Electric Power” still pretends that it knows quite well how to clean-up after the accident. It plans to build water-purifying units at the Fukushima plant, which will cost $ 650 mln. But the cost can turn out to be even higher, because the water has been infected with radiation several times and may need a more complicated purifying. 

 

Moreover, this system of circulation may not withstand the summer typhoons. The roofs of three energy blocks were destroyed by explosions on March 11. The operating company suggests covering the holes in the roofs with some special polyethylene web, but the plant’s administrators doubt that this will be effective. Besides, summer showers can erode the ground, which, in its turn, can increase the onslaught of water into the plant’s lower premises. Showers have already increased the level of the water in one of the reactors by 20 cm.

 

In the other power blocks, the situation is also disturbing. About 85 tons of radioactive water have already accumulated there, and it is pouring out of the territory of the power plant. Not all the area around the plant has yet been covered with special synthetic resin which stops the spreading of radioactive dust.

 

630 monitoring stations in Russia’s Far East, situated both on land and on ships, are intensively watching the radiation situation. Fortunately, they haven’t yet revealed any increase of radiation which can be dangerous for people. The stations have already switched back to the normal mode of work, checking the radiation level once in 24 hours, not twice as they had done recently.

 

Still, it seems that the world has not yet recovered from the shock caused by the Japanese tragedy. Recently, Germany’s government decided to stop exploiting all the country’s nuclear power plants by 2022. This is still the first country to take such a decision.

post #118 of 177

They lie and lie and lie and lie then tell the truth and lie.

 

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/asiapcf/06/06/japan.nuclear.meltdown/index.html

 

3 nuclear reactors melted down after quake, Japan confirms

By the CNN Wire Staff
June 6, 2011 -- Updated 1530 GMT (2330 HKT)
 

Tokyo (CNN) -- Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant experienced full meltdowns at three reactors in the wake of an earthquake and tsunami in March, the country's Nuclear Emergency Response Headquarters said Monday.

 

The nuclear group's new evaluation, released Monday, goes further than previous statements in describing the extent of the damage caused by an earthquake and tsunami on March 11.

The announcement will not change plans for how to stabilize the Fukushima Daiichi plant, the agency said.

 

Reactors 1, 2 and 3 experienced a full meltdown, it said.

 

The plant's owner, Tokyo Electric Power Co., admitted last month that nuclear fuel rods in reactors 2 and 3 probably melted during the first week of the nuclear crisis.

 

It had already said fuel rods at the heart of reactor No. 1 melted almost completely in the first 16 hours after the disaster struck. The remnants of that core are now sitting in the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel at the heart of the unit and that vessel is now believed to be leaking.

A "major part" of the fuel rods in reactor No. 2 may have melted and fallen to the bottom of the pressure vessel 101 hours after the earthquake and tsunami that crippled the plant, Tokyo Electric said May 24.

 

The same thing happened within the first 60 hours at reactor No. 3, the company said, in what it called its worst-case scenario analysis, saying the fuel would be sitting at the bottom of the pressure vessel in each reactor building.

 

But Tokyo Electric at the same time released a second possible scenario for reactors 2 and 3, one that estimated a full meltdown did not occur. In that scenario, the company estimated the fuel rods may have broken but may not have completely melted.

 

Temperature data showed the two reactors had cooled substantially in the more than two months since the incident, Tokyo Electric said in May.

The earthquake and tsunami knocked out cooling systems at Fukushima Daiichi, causing the three operating reactors to overheat. That compounded a natural disaster by spewing radioactive material into the atmosphere.

 

Tokyo Electric avoided using the term "meltdown," and says it was keeping the remnants of the core cool. But U.S. experts interviewed by CNN after the company's announcement in May said that while it may have been containing the situation, the damage had already been done.

 

"On the basis of what they showed, if there's not fuel left in the core, I don't know what it is other than a complete meltdown," said Gary Was, a University of Michigan nuclear engineering professor and CNN consultant. And given the damage reported at the other units, "It's hard to imagine the scenarios can differ that much for those reactors."

 

A massive hydrogen explosion -- a symptom of the reactor's overheating -- blew the roof off the No. 1 unit the day after the earthquake, and another hydrogen blast ripped apart the No. 3 reactor building two days later. A suspected hydrogen detonation within the No. 2 reactor is believed to have damaged that unit on March 15.

 

CNN's Yoko Wakatsuki and Kyung Lah contributed to this report.

post #119 of 177

 

The cooling pools are scarier then the rectors in my opinion.

post #120 of 177
Thread Starter 

Yeah, so not only is Fukushima still a nightmare, there's the whole flooded power plant in Nebraska thing to deal with now.  So, yeah, nuclear power defenders: GO!

post #121 of 177

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/japan/8722400/Fukushima-caesium-leaks-equal-168-Hiroshimas.html

 

Fukushima caesium leaks 'equal 168 Hiroshimas'

Japan's government estimates the amount of radioactive caesium-137 released by the Fukushima nuclear disaster so far is equal to that of 168 Hiroshima bombs.

Fukushima caesium leaks 'equal 168 Hiroshimas'
 
Image 1 of 2
Officials in protective gear check for signs of radiation on children who are from the evacuation area near the Fukushima nuclear plant  Photo: REUTERS
 

Government nuclear experts, however, said the World War II bomb blast and the accidental reactor meltdowns at Fukushima, which has seen ongoing radiation leaks but no deaths so far, were beyond comparison.

The amount of caesium-137 released since the three reactors were crippled by the March 11 quake and tsunami has been estimated at 15,000 tera becquerels, the Tokyo Shimbun reported, quoting a government calculation.

That compares with the 89 tera becquerels released by "Little Boy", the uranium bomb the United States dropped on the western Japanese city in the final days of World War II, the report said.

The estimate was submitted by Prime Minister Naoto Kan's cabinet to a lower house committee on promotion of technology and innovation, the daily said.

The government, however, argued that the comparison was not valid.


While the Hiroshima bomb claimed most of its victims in the intense heatwave of a mid-air nuclear explosion and the highly radioactive fallout from its mushroom cloud, no such nuclear explosions hit Fukushima.

There, the radiation has seeped from molten fuel inside reactors damaged by hydrogen explosions.

"An atomic bomb is designed to enable mass-killing and mass-destruction by causing blast waves and heat rays and releasing neutron radiation," the Tokyo Shimbun daily quoted a government official as saying. "It is not rational to make a simple comparison only based on the amount of isotopes released."

Government officials were not immediately available to confirm the report.

The blinding blast of the Hiroshima bomb and its fallout killed some 140,000 people, either instantly or in the days and weeks that followed as high radiation or horrific burns took their toll.

At Fukushima, Japan declared a 20-kilometre (12 mile) evacuation and no-go zone around the plant after the March 11 quake and tsunami triggered the world's worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl 25 years ago.

A recent government survey showed that some areas within the 20-kilometre zone are contaminated with radiation equivalent to more than 500 millisieverts per year – 25 times more than the government's annual limit.

post #122 of 177
Thread Starter 

The US corporate news has been completely quiet, which in itself is scary. 

 

Quote:

Confirmed: Fukushima disaster contaminated ocean with 50 million times normal radiation, leaks still ongoing

(NaturalNews) Things are suddenly heating up again with Fukushima. As we reported yesterday, the southern wall of Fukushima reactor #4 apparently collapsed over the past few days, calling into question the structural integrity of the remainder of the containment building (http://www.naturalnews.com/034387_F...).

The mainstream media has said absolutely nothing about this development, continuing its pattern of downplaying news involving Fukushima, radiation or the flawed structure of nuclear power plants. This is hardly surprising, given that many of the largest media outlets (such as NBC and MSNBC) are owned by corporations such as General Electric, the designer of many of the world's nuclear power plants. (http://www.freepress.net/ownership/...)

Photos of the failed structure have emerged on Enenews.com, where a report explains that a once-intact wall is now essentially "missing" and that further degradation of the structure could lead to mass evacuations in Japan (http://enenews.com/report-confirmed...). As this report is still not confirmed by other sources, we continue to take this with a sense of caution here at NaturalNews. We will continue to monitor the situation and report any relevant developments.

 

50 million times higher radiation levels

What has hit the mainstream media, however, is a report entitled Impacts of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants on Marine Radioactivity, authored by Ken Buesseler, Michio Aoyama, and Masao Fukasawa (http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021...).

This report, published in Environmental Science & Technology, reveals that levels of radioactive cesium reached 50 million times normal levels in the ocean water off the coast of the Fukushima Dai-ichi facility. Even more concerning, the abstract of this paper concludes, "...the concentrations through the end of July remain higher than expected implying continued releases from the reactors or other contaminated sources, such as groundwater or coastal sediments."

This, of course, contradicts mainstream media reports which for the most part stated that the radiation was "contained" and was not leaking directly into the environment. Only the alternative press has covered the real story on Fukushima, which has now become the worst radiological accident in the history of human civilization.

 

 

post #123 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by yt View Post

The US corporate news has been completely quiet, which in itself is scary. 

 

 



I'd done some extensive reading about Chernobyl in the months before the Japan Earthquake, and by mid afternoon on March 11th it was utterly clear to me that this would be a nuclear disaster of historic proportions. Things were downplayed for weeks, but slowly the news started to come out that yup, everything I'd feared had happened just as I feared it would. I'm no scientist. Not even an amateur expert. Just someone who read some articles on wikipedia, but I still knew enough to know that everything Tepco said was a lie, and that this was by virtually any definition a worse case scenario

 

This radiation in the sea? It's basically the end of Japanese fishing off their coasts. Certain particles can last for billions of years, and they accumulate up the food chain. They never disappear. This will get worse and worse until two or three years from now the bomb drops in the press that, yup, no more sushi for these folks. You get one cesium particle in your gut, just one speck, and it can sit there irritating your insides till you get cancer. The happy talk about how exposure is relatively "low" is just total BS when it comes to the substances we're talking about

 

I said it on GUY.COM at the time, and I really hate to be so bleak, but the grim truth is that Japan is fucked, perhaps forever. The only thing left to do is to spare ourselves from the same fate, and get our nuclear house in order.. of course the rich will pay handsomely to keep the public in the dark to the terrible world ending danger they face.. because when one of these plants goes wrong in the US, the rich can just move to an ARCOLOGY with filtered air and water, while the rest of us are eaten up with cancer

post #124 of 177

Holy shit.

post #125 of 177
Thread Starter 

On twitter, I asked Joe Cirincione, who is part of the Ploughshares Fund, if anything would work other than entombing it as they did with Chernobyl, and he was not too optimistic. 

 

This is the "clean" energy lobbyists are pushing so hard in this country and around the world. 

post #126 of 177
Dammit -- not even one Godzilla joke?!

128

This nuclear stuff must be serious! I'm gonna keep an eye on my thorium toothbrush ...
post #127 of 177
post #128 of 177
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunwukong View Post

Dammit -- not even one Godzilla joke?!
128
This nuclear stuff must be serious! I'm gonna keep an eye on my thorium toothbrush ...


It's a natural, I'll admit.  But it's just so sad and horrible.

 

post #129 of 177

Quote:

Originally Posted by yt View Post


It's a natural, I'll admit.  But it's just so sad and horrible.

 


It's ironic, but it's also to horrific for me to joke about.

 

What I find most unsettling is that I've always thought of Japan as the most prepared country ever, when it comes to natural disasters.  Then this.  Tens of thousands dead, and a nation that will be struggling with radiation poisoning for generations.

 

post #130 of 177
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrBananaGrabber View Post

It's ironic, but it's also to horrific for me to joke about.

 

What I find most unsettling is that I've always thought of Japan as the most prepared country ever, when it comes to natural disasters.  Then this.  Tens of thousands dead, and a nation that will be struggling with radiation poisoning for generations.

 


What's scary is that it should be a wake up call to all of us in the world.  Japan sustained very little damage and death from the earthquake itself due to their preparation, but even their sea walls and all other protections against tsunamis, entire towns were wiped out.  It's the sluggish, insufficient response to the nuclear disaster that worries me the most because that's what we're looking at, or worse, if it happens here.

 

post #131 of 177


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by yt View Post


What's scary is that it should be a wake up call to all of us in the world.  Japan sustained very little damage and death from the earthquake itself due to their preparation, but even their sea walls and all other protections against tsunamis, entire towns were wiped out.  It's the sluggish, insufficient response to the nuclear disaster that worries me the most because that's what we're looking at, or worse, if it happens here.

 



Exactly.  It was the same sort of assumption crumbled: that Japan had dealt with nuclear disasters in the past, and would be on top of things.

 

But instead, it's a history of accidents and corporations suppression: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_power_in_Japan#Other_accidents.

post #132 of 177


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by yt View Post




What's scary is that it should be a wake up call to all of us in the world.  Japan sustained very little damage and death from the earthquake itself due to their preparation, but even their sea walls and all other protections against tsunamis, entire towns were wiped out.  It's the sluggish, insufficient response to the nuclear disaster that worries me the most because that's what we're looking at, or worse, if it happens here.

 



 

YT, it's not that the reponse was slow or insufficient, it's that with the Tsunami, there was no way to get well trained first responders or equipment into the area. Without electricity or roads, the fate of the plant became a matter of physics within just a few hours

 

This is why you cannot just build these things and hope for the best. What if there is a plague? A solar flare? Any one of a number of not unrealistic scenarios would mean that no matter our best efforts, we couldn't save these plants if something goes wrong... And one mistake can last for a billion years

 

On a long enough timeline, more TSUNAMI level disasters *will* occur in areas home to nuclear power

 

That is the danger the duped public won't face. You can have all the safety drills and photo ops you want to let yourself thing you've got all the angles covered, but scenarios do occur that are beyond the human race's ability to manage - and what then?

 

 

PS and of course all that assumes that the corporations running these plants for profit would always spend what it took to ensure the utmost levels of safety and preparedness, an absurd notion

post #133 of 177
Thread Starter 

A friend in Japan was desperate for international news because it was impossible to learn the truth from internal news sources.  And even here in California, there's very little information about how much, if any, radiation has found its way here, either through the air or sea.  It's scary, especially with kids.

post #134 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by yt View Post

A friend in Japan was desperate for international news because it was impossible to learn the truth from internal news sources.  And even here in California, there's very little information about how much, if any, radiation has found its way here, either through the air or sea.  It's scary, especially with kids.


Apologies if I'm repeating myself on this thread but I highly recommend the book "Dogs and Demons"  by Alex Kerr. There were a few pages about the dubious practices of the Japanese nuclear industry both in day to day running of the nuclear industry and how they handle accidents afterwards. What is especially scary is that this book was released in 2001 and it seems not enough (if anything) had changed when this happened 10 years later.

 

Believe it or not, one of the (possibly) good things to come out of this disaster is that it might have finally forced them to shut down the Hamaoka nuclear plant for good, which people have been trying to do since before it was built in the 1970s.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamaoka_Nuclear_Power_Plant

 

Some of the key points:

 

"Hamaoka is built directly over the subduction zone near the junction of two tectonic plates, and a major Tokai earthquake is said to be overdue. The possibility of such a shallow magnitude 8.0 earthquake in the Tokai region was pointed out by Kiyoo Mogi in 1969, 7 months before permission to construct the Hamaoka plant was sought, and by the Coordinating Committee for Earthquake Prediction (CCEP) in 1970, prior to the permission being granted on December 10, 1970."

 

"On 6 May, 2011, Prime Minister Naoto Kan requested the plant be shut down as an earthquake of magnitude 8.0 or higher is estimated 87% likely to hit the area within the next 30 years."

 

It's located about 200 km south west of Tokyo. What, if anything were they thinking?

 

 

post #135 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan View Post

 

It's located about 200 km south west of Tokyo. What, if anything were they thinking?

 

 


1313419537_jpy.jpg

post #136 of 177

Depressing news:  There are strong indications that Fukusima is in for another major earthquake: 

 

http://www.solid-earth.net/3/43/2012/se-3-43-2012.pdf

 

Also, one of the thermometers in the damaged core has been rising:

 

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20120213p2g00m0dm084000c.html

 

TEPCO says it's a faulty sensor, but TEPCO has said lots of stuff.

 

 

post #137 of 177

Frontline is tackling the Fukushima accident on it's anniversary....

 

Quote:

Inside Japan’s Nuclear Meltdown

 

In the desperate hours and days after the Fukushima nuclear disaster, the fate of thousands of Japanese citizens fell into the hands of a small corps of engineers, firemen and soldiers who risked their lives to prevent the Daiichi nuclear complex from complete meltdown. Now, one year later, FRONTLINE presents their story, with rare footage from inside the plant and eyewitness testimony, in Inside Japan’s Nuclear Meltdown, airing Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2012, at 10 P.M. ET on PBS (check local listings).

 

There is also an interview with the director of the episode on Fresh Air/NPR (that's how I found out about the Frontline episode)

 

One Year Later, 'Inside Japan's Nuclear Meltdown'

 

 

I just finished listening to the interview....reality is truly scarier than anything fiction can come up with.

post #138 of 177

I would like to know how they define " complete meltdown?" Fukushima sound pretty complete to me.

 

post #139 of 177
post #140 of 177
Thread Starter 

All right, well, the NY Times is covering it so maybe the US media will stop censoring this scary, urgent story:

 

Quote:

Concerns Grow About Spent Fuel Rods at Damaged Nuclear Plant in Japan

 

TOKYO — What passes for normal at the Fukushima Daiichi plant today would have caused shudders among even the most sanguine of experts before an earthquake and tsunami set off the world’s second most serious nuclear crisis after Chernobyl.

 

Fourteen months after the accident, a pool brimming with used fuel rods and filled with vast quantities of radioactive cesium still sits on the top floor of a heavily damaged building, covered only with plastic.

 

The public’s fears about the pool have grown in recent months as some scientists warned that it has the most potential for setting off a new catastrophe now that the three nuclear reactors that suffered meltdowns are in a more stable state. The worries picked up new traction last month, when a United States senator expressed similar concerns during a trip to Japan and after the utility company that operates the plant announced that the soonest it could begin emptying the pool was late 2013, dashing hopes for earlier action.

 

The operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co., or Tepco, has tried to assuage the fears, recently issuing a seven-page report, complete with diagrams and photographs, that details reinforcement work carried out last summer at the building that houses the pool at Reactor No. 4, and emphasizes its safety. And some outside experts say that the fuel in the pool is now so old that it cannot generate enough heat to start the kind of accident that would let radioactive material escape.

....

 

Senator Ron Wyden, a Democrat whose state, Oregon, could lie in the path of any new radioactive plumes and who has studied nuclear waste issues, is among those pushing for faster action. After his recent visit to the ravaged plant, Senator Wyden said the pool at No. 4 poses “an extraordinary and continuing risk” and the retrieval of spent fuel “should be a priority given the possibility of further earthquakes.”

 

The rest is here.

post #141 of 177

Radioactive tuna shows up on California coast.

 

Time to carry a geiger counter on your trips to the grocery store.

post #142 of 177
post #143 of 177
Thread Starter 

As a resident of the west coast, I'm more than a little freaked out.  Not only is bluefin tuna contaminated, there are radioactive readings on the seaweed here in So. Cal,   I don't understand why they didn't encase that whole plant in concrete a la Chernobyl.

 

There is also tsunami debris on its way here -- meaning everything that was in people's garages and all the industrial warehouses in the tsunami-affected area.

post #144 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by yt View Post

As a resident of the west coast, I'm more than a little freaked out.  Not only is bluefin tuna contaminated, there are radioactive readings on the seaweed here in So. Cal,   I don't understand why they didn't encase that whole plant in concrete a la Chernobyl.

 

There is also tsunami debris on its way here -- meaning everything that was in people's garages and all the industrial warehouses in the tsunami-affected area.

 

Make that several thousand tons of tsunami debris. The Pacific is basically a toilet at this point.

post #145 of 177
The ongoing crisis in Japan is one of my top global environmental security concerns. I don't understand why more people are not concerned about this issue, but on the bright side might the blue fin tuna be saved from extinction if they become too radioactive to eat?
post #146 of 177
post #147 of 177

How can 3 NUCLEAR REACTOR CORES go missing?! That boggles the mind.

 

I'd add to that article that there is a massive mass of debris slowly drifting across the Pacific ocean, bound to hit California. As if we didn't have enough problems with the Hipsters....

post #148 of 177
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cylon Baby View Post
 

How can 3 NUCLEAR REACTOR CORES go missing?! That boggles the mind.

 

I'd add to that article that there is a massive mass of debris slowly drifting across the Pacific ocean, bound to hit California. As if we didn't have enough problems with the Hipsters....


They melt through the earth and the area is too toxic for anyone to investigate further. :(

post #149 of 177

 

Lets all go watch China Syndrome!  

 

I doubt we will ever know the extent of the disaster:

 

http://www.cringely.com/2013/10/07/abe-fiddles-fukushima-leaks/

post #150 of 177
Thread Starter 

This unfolding nightmare is so scary, it's hard for me to even read about it.  Each time I go back to it, I always do so hoping to be reassured and I never am.  There was brief light when Tepco announced that they would finally invite international help, but nothing better than the ice wall idea and now moving the spent rods seems to have come of it.  It feels like apocalyptic s****. 

 

And even if somehow the operation is saved, the radiation plume is also terrifying.  I was talking to an oceanographer a few weeks ago who told me some alarming things about sea life around Japan.  There are all the obligatory Godzilla jokes and all that, but what it could do to the ocean's food web is equally apocalyptic. 

 

I pray that by some miracle this disaster is not going to turn out as badly as it feels it is.  And I can't believe the world hasn't turned off nuclear power forever, other than Germany.  I guess denial is a powerful thing. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Political Discourse