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post #101 of 172

I have high hopes for Pak's Turok. I actually think the alternate history angle they're going for is pretty cool, but we'll see how it pans out. I do have a lot of fondness for the Valiant version, as well.

post #102 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KaylaisMagic View Post

Also just started reading Milligan and Allred's run of X-Force that lead into X-Statix. It's really good, love the pop culture satire of it. Makes me think of springing for that X-Statix omnibus though its really expensive. But want to read through this series honestly most enjoyable superhero comic since I read Nextwave.

 

I can't get enough of Allreds art. I can't wait to get around to his X Force and X Statix, I've heard they're amazing.

 

Also Locke And Key, to whomever was surprised by them, they've actually been lavished with praised, and had the mark of any talked about comic, a failed TV pilot, that is supposedly not bad for a pilot. I have yet to read it myself, but have heard nothing but great things. 

post #103 of 172
Been loving Rover Red Charlie by Garth Ennis. Terrific six-issue series about three canine friends trying to survive as the human world ends.
post #104 of 172

Just finished Ender's Game, which I'd never read before.  Much better than I initially thought it would be.  Onto Shovel Ready by Adam Sternberg.  Off to a good start.  As a lifelong resident, I'm enjoying his depiction NYC a few decades after a dirty bomb went toff in Times Square.  Good stuff.

post #105 of 172

I'm currently reading EAST OF WEST. It has a strange setting (future America/retconned apocalyptic event/sci fi and fantasy blend) and a stranger premise (Death is searching for his lost son), but it's extremely well-written and full of intrigue.

 

post #106 of 172

I'm currently making my way through volume 6 of the JUDGE DREDD COLLECTED CASE FILES.  I decided not to stick with TUROK after all.  I'm looking forward to finishing up SERENITY: LEAVES ON THE WIND at the end of next month.  Hopefully, it will lead to more comic adventures for my beloved crew of outlaws.

post #107 of 172

So I read Bendis's Daredevil run, as I'm kind of a massive fan of the character and his look, his power set, all of it.  I love a handicapped hero, I love that the handicapped hero is the big Marvel heartbreaker, I love the idea of a totally human guy who's senses and balance are enhanced, not his strength.  Daredevil in Prison was a fantastic concept...

 

But it's such a darrrrrrrk run.  So when I started readings Waid's Daredevil I was much happier. It's light, fun and entertaining as hell.  I haven't had this much fun reading Daredevil since Born Again. 

post #108 of 172

Reading Joe Casey's Sex.

 

Fuck me.

 

Why can't we get this shit made into a movie?

post #109 of 172

Picked this up the other day.  Great read.

 

http://www.avclub.com/article/lewis-clark-discover-american-horrors-brilliant-ma-210589

 

Quote:

 

As a former writer on TV shows like Being Human and Reaper, Chris Dingess is no stranger to high concepts. For his first comic-book project, Manifest Destiny, he takes an unconventional approach to the horror genre by rooting his story in American history, specifically the Western expedition of Captain Meriwether Lewis and Second Lieutenant William Clark. As the two men lead a crew of soldiers and convicts across the American frontier, they discover an environment filled with deadly creatures like plant zombies, buffalo centaurs, and man-eating frogs, learning that the majesty of their country hides a mysterious ecosystem filled with danger.

 

Manifest Destiny combines the revisionist history of Sleepy Hollow with the ensemble-based survival horror of The Walking Dead, a premise that has proven immensely engaging over the past year thanks to Dingess’ balance of visceral terror, emotional drama, and dark comedy. The other, absolutely essential part of the equation for this book’s success is the art team of Matthew Roberts and colorist Owen Gieni, who bring a magnificent sense of scope to the story with their sprawling landscapes while still capturing all the nuances of the script in its more intimate moments.

post #110 of 172
Looks fun. Anybody read Max Brooks' Vampires VS Zombies comic?
post #111 of 172

Haven't caught that yet.  But I did find this interesting - Alan Moor is going to write a short run for Garth Ennis' creation, Crossed.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/sep/18/alan-moore-takes-cult-horror-comic-crossed-future

post #112 of 172

Also been catching up on BPRD.  What a great run.  I was down on this for a while with the omnipresent Nazis and a story that seemed to be spinning its wheels.  Now it seems that the earth is inevitably headed down the tubes and there isn't much the BPRD can do about it, and Hellboy is nowhere in sight. The book has a wonderful melancholic quality at times.  

post #113 of 172

Alan Moore's long-ass interview on the Crossed +100 six-issue:

 

http://www.bleedingcool.com/2014/09/alan-moore-reveals-the-future-in-crossed-100-what-would-we-look-like-through-their-eyes/

Quote:

HMS: When you first approached Crossed, before you necessarily decided to write something of your own, what about it struck you as being “real” or significant in some way?

 

AM: Well, I’m ashamed and embarrassed to admit that the first time I started reading Crossed I got maybe 1/3 of the way in and I had to put it down. I just thought, “This is too horrific, it’s too brutal, I’m an old man, don’t do this to me. This is just really upsetting”. And I spoke to Garth [Ennis] and Garth was accepting that it was a point of view, he also said it was a pity that I hadn’t persevered with it because they’d put all of the most deliberately upsetting stuff up front to get respect, if you will. And then they were exploring the different issues afterward. By that time, I was convinced in my admiration for Garth’s work. I think that he is one of the finest writers in the medium. So I went back and read it again without my squeamish revulsion, and I found that actually it was one of the most profoundly moral pieces that I’d read.


 

Quote:

HMS: How did you come up with the “future” of Crossed and extrapolate what things would be like 100 years after the outbreak?

 

AM:  To start with, it would make a huge impact if all human industry were to stop dead in 2008. I’ve tried to think all this through. I’ve tried to come up with an estimate of around 7 billion people on the planet, and I followed Garth’s estimate in one of his “Fatal Englishman” stories, where he outlined the numbers that had been infected and the numbers that had survived, and extrapolated that across the planet. There would be a massive depopulation and a lot people would just be killed. The majority of survivors would be infected and there would be just tiny groups of uninfected human beings, however, given time, those trends would start to reverse.

 

The main thing is that the Crossed are extraordinarily stupid. And do not have any survival instincts. Humans do have survival instincts, and those who have survived might have done so because they’ve gotten to a place of relative safety, somewhere that can be defended, somewhere that was isolated enough not to be a problem. They would have presumably gotten better at surviving if they’ve managed to survive. The Crossed, on the other hand, would start dying off in extraordinary numbers. Mind you, there are extraordinary numbers of them, so that wouldn’t be as much of a consolation for the human survivors for a considerable time. But the first bad winter would kill an awful lot of the Crossed who hadn’t already died from starvation, stupidity, or their own colleagues.

 

And although, of course, there will be a huge disincentive for human beings to breed and reproduce, in those first say 10 years following 2008, this will gradually be reduced because the Crossed actually can’t reproduce. Any species faces logical hurdles in its advancement. Regarding our own species, for example, as Freeman Dyson has suggested, any species like ours faces as a first hurdle the “Uranium 92 Hurdle” or 93. It’s when we realize the immense amount of energy that is in that isotope that we develop nuclear power and we develop the capacity to destroy ourselves. Then that is the first hurdle that we overcome. Then there is the eco-hurdle. Where our industry might tip the balance and make our planet unlivable. We still have that one to overcome. Well, we still have both of them to overcome, to be absolutely honest.

 

TBH I pass on Crossed unless Ennis is writing it - he's the only writer who seems to take these dark stories to deeper places - but obviously I'll give this a go.

post #114 of 172
I'm reading two different comic series at the moment. The first is Brubaker's The Fade Out, which feels like the James Ellroy novel we never got. The second is Warren Ellis' Vargr, his James Bond arc, which, so far, is doing a much better job of making Bond feel contemporary than any of the recent Bond films have done.
post #115 of 172
I'm on #4 trade of BATWOMAN, it was cancelled two years ago but holy shit this is the best material I've seen come out of DC in over a decade. The artwork alone is worth it but the writing and character work sets a high bar within the new 52. A height I don't see them reaching soon.

I've also picked up issue #1 of Dan Slott's new SILVER SURFER. His work on the 2014 book was my favorite exploration of he character.

I'm also re-reading PREACHER, although I've discovered I'm missing three issues, which means I should probably just buy the trade that has those issues.

I just bought the BATMAN/JUDGE DREDD collection and I'm looking forward to chewing through that. I've read one of the stories featured years ago and loved it (All I remember is terrific Simon Bisley artwork, and Judge Death teaming with Scarecrow)
post #116 of 172

Working my way through Transmetropolitan.

 

Hot damn, Year of the Bastard is remarkably prescient.

post #117 of 172

After the very, very sad news today that Darwyn Cooke is in palliative care for aggressive cancer, I'm going to be rereading and recommending his work left and right:

First and foremost, The New Frontier is an absolute must-read.  It's a genuinely towering work, the optimistic answer to dark deconstructions like Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns.  The opening chapter about The Losers legitimately took my breath away when I first read it, as did the subplot about John Henry.  Cooke's art is stunningly beautiful, and it's chock-full of perfect character beats ("There's the door, spaceman." is justly iconic).  If the tone Cooke struck here - full of wonder and humor and humanity emerging triumphant even among the worst of circumstances - were the tone of the DCCU instead of Miller's grit, the DCCU would be the best franchise out there.

 

Second:  Darwyn Cooke was only on The Spirit proper for 12 issues (in addition to a fun crossover with Batman), but it's the most vital that character has felt since Eisner.  Cooke's love of noir and sly sense of humor give the storytelling a wonderful sense of energy.  It's clear that Cooke is having an absolute blast working in this universe, and that feeling pervades the entire run.  As always with Cooke, the art is tremendous, and this is just a pure joy to read, and well-worth seeking out if you haven't read it.

 

Third: Cooke is maybe the definitive Catwoman artist (his run with Brubaker is one for the record books), but the best Catwoman story he wrote - Selina's Big Score - never even features Selina in costume.  But it's a wonderful character study nonetheless, really digging into what makes Selina more than just a femme fatale.  And, as a nod to where his career would take him, there's a terrific major character named "Stark".

 

So, yeah, it feels weird to adapt Donald Westlake aka Richard Stark's Parker novels to comics, but Cooke brings all of his talent to the table here.  Featuring some of the finest visual storytelling of his career, Cooke's work was justly acclaimed and, if not for The New Frontier, this would arguably be his magnum opus.

 

So that's where to start with Darwyn Cooke.  And wouldn't ya know it, Comixology is doing a sale on him right now (though his Parker stuff, being IDW, is not available through them).  If you haven't read his work, pick it up.  If not, it's good time for a reread.  I know that's what I'll be doing.

post #118 of 172
Cooke's Parker graphic novels are awesome.
post #119 of 172

His take on Rocketeer was predictably delightful as well.

 

post #120 of 172
Hit a local comic book festival yesterday and a few comic book stores and of course Cooke and his body of work was the topic of conversation. Cooke hadn't lived in Toronto for years - he hung his porkpie hat on the east coast and Florida - but he always turned up in his hometown. I remember ten years ago eavesdropping on a conversation he was having with someone in a bar; he was talking about how he had four or five years in the business before it got over him. Glad he was wrong.
post #121 of 172
Finshing off Transmetropolitan

I'm starting to think Warren Ellis wrote 2016..

post #122 of 172
Alan Moore week chez Bain

The Ballad of Halo Jones followed by the Saga of the Swamp Thing.
post #123 of 172

Ever read Miracleman? That went back into print recently. It completely blew me away when I read it, I think it's my favorite work by Moore now.

 

For less appreciated Moore, Top 10 is great fun with spectacular art, and Promethea is a fantastic meta-mythic journey. Promethea reminds me of Moore if he got temporarily brain-jacked by Grant Morrison.

post #124 of 172
I just read Promethea about a week ago. It felt exceptionally experimental for Moore and really paid off. He has a way with bending your mind like no storyteller ever

His run on Saga of the Swamp thing is probably my favorite comic run of all time. It satisfies me on numerous levels. It's got the weekly suspense schlock of its ilk like VAULT and CRYPT, while also having this amazing existential mediation. Real beauty.

Shoutout to my boy, Nukeface.

I really, truly love Miracleman. High up in my all-time, Swamp Thing just gets me where it counts because I'm such a horror nut.
post #125 of 172
They have MiracleMan and Promethea at the library (Wellington Central Library has a spectacular collection) as well as heaps of other Moore stuff.

I read Top 10 ages ago and loved it. The subplot about the cat and mouse war escalating in one of the detectives apartments blew me away (especially the resolution).
post #126 of 172
Halo Jones is fantastic. It's like reading the evolution of Alan Moore. The growth and development of maturity of writing between book one and book three is astounding.
post #127 of 172

Seconding the love for Moore's Swamp Thing. Even when it veers into who's-minding-the-store wackiness with the Pogo riff it's fascinating.

post #128 of 172
Just finished vol2. The Arcane stuff was next level yuk. Loved the Pogo story. Marvellous stuff.
post #129 of 172

I only have Swamp Thang volumes 1 and 3, that is a major hole in my Moore collection. I need to get the other volumes post-haste.

 

The book store near me had 3 for cheap, but no Vol.2. I like the episodic stuff well enough, but I want to see more of the weird Green-verse stuff.

post #130 of 172
There's loads more Green-trippiness. I think in four or five he travels to Gotham. And he encounters Batman. You get to see pre-Killing Joke Batman from Moore. And of course Moore explores the contrast of Swamp Thing in a giant, urban jungle.
post #131 of 172
The Gotham stuff was great. I loved Batman ticking off the list of others "guilty" of Abby's "crime"

But this page was my favourite of the whole five volumes.

post #132 of 172

This weeks Library picks

 

Alan Moore DC Universe stories

Promethea Vol1

Judge Dredd Year 1

New Judge Dredd volume 1

post #133 of 172


I feel so behind. I had no idea that any of those things existed, nor did I realize how bad I wanted them in my life until just now!

post #134 of 172
Promethea and the Dredds were fantastic (especially Judge Dredd Yr 1).

Bit disappointed by the DC one though.

This weeks library selection:

Preacher Vol 2 & 3. Ellis' Injection and James Bond Vargr.
Judge Dredd Mega City 2 and new Dredd vols 3-5.
post #135 of 172
Have to say, I'm really starting to quite like the IDW limited Dredd stories. Took a while to get into them but very entertaining.

Ellis' Vargr really was quite spectacular. Bond to the nth degree. And Injection is one of the most beautifully illustrated books. I have yet to find a Warren Ellis book I've not enjoyed.

Preacher is a lot different than I remembered.

This weeks library selection:

Garth Ennis: Judge Dredd stories
Ellis: Two-Step & Black Summer
post #136 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Bain View Post

Have to say, I'm really starting to quite like the IDW limited Dredd stories. Took a while to get into them but very entertaining.

 

 

I also have become fond of the IDW Dredd stuff.  It took me a while but the love and understanding of Dredd shines through.  Mega-City Two was written by Douglas Wolk, who ran the sublime Dredd Reckoning website.  It's quite a bit different from the 2000 AD Dredd but well worth reading.

 

I'm sorry to say that I wasn't crazy about Ennis' work on Dredd.  I think he would do a better job on it now but as a younger writer he didn't mix the funny with the serious as he is currently capable of doing like no one else.  I think Karl Urban wrote the intro on the reissue, so that's cool.

post #137 of 172

Dredd, of course, is filled with colourful and amazing characters...one of the more appealing recent ones is Dirty Frank, a former Wally Squad member whose physical appearance is based on Alan Moore (and whose behaviour and speaking patterns is based on Tony Adams and other self-aggrandizing athletes).

 

post #138 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subotai View Post
 

 

I also have become fond of the IDW Dredd stuff.  It took me a while but the love and understanding of Dredd shines through.  Mega-City Two was written by Douglas Wolk, who ran the sublime Dredd Reckoning website.  It's quite a bit different from the 2000 AD Dredd but well worth reading.

 

I'm sorry to say that I wasn't crazy about Ennis' work on Dredd.  I think he would do a better job on it now but as a younger writer he didn't mix the funny with the serious as he is currently capable of doing like no one else.  I think Karl Urban wrote the intro on the reissue, so that's cool.

 

Yeah, it was a bit hit or miss.  I did like the "Spud Gun" though ("set to chips")

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Subotai View Post
 

Dredd, of course, is filled with colourful and amazing characters...one of the more appealing recent ones is Dirty Frank, a former Wally Squad member whose physical appearance is based on Alan Moore (and whose behaviour and speaking patterns is based on Tony Adams and other self-aggrandizing athletes).

 

 

I have to say, Trifecta is one of my all time favourites.  All the Dirty Frank stuff, and the Simping Detective.  And it all ties together beautifully at the end.

 

I'm currently saving up for this (which they don't have in the library), which is the Daily Star short form version (book is $110 hence saving).  I used to have them when they were gathered in shitty paperback form in the late 80's.  Distillation of some great Dredd stories (he covers the Apocalypse War in 6 panels which is a feat in itself).

 

post #139 of 172
Thought I'd drop it in here that Doug Liman (EDGE OF TOMORROW) has been officially announced as director of the JUSTICE LEAGUE DARK film, titled DARK JUSTICE.

Deadman, Zatanna, and Ol' Swampie are all getting a big budget flick, from a solid director.
post #140 of 172

two step was good, but quite light.  Black Summer was a bit too on the nose.  I didn't dislike it, but it's my least favourite Ellis so far.

 

Picked up Desolation Jones which I absolutely loved.  Great Noir through Ellis vague scifi.

 

Also read League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Century.  Very much appreciated the inclusion of Jack Carter in 1969.  Not sure how I feel about the main references in 2009 (although the appearance of Malcolm Tucker, especially the dialogue was great - as was the J3 and J6  Bond references).  Can't quite tell if Moore is having a go at the source, or the general lack of variety.

post #141 of 172
That Tucker dialogue. Pretty much nailed it.



Read Ellis' Ocean as well. With a bit of rejigging that would make a great Dr Who 2 parter. Want Ellis to script a Who, now.
post #142 of 172
Ellis is currently doing great work with James Bond, rejuvenating a character who once again seemed in danger of fading into irrelevance.

Vargr was a brisk, exciting, and smart introduction. So far, Eidolon is even better.
post #143 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

Ellis is currently doing great work with James Bond, rejuvenating a character who once again seemed in danger of fading into irrelevance.

Vargr was a brisk, exciting, and smart introduction. So far, Eidolon is even better.

 Good to hear.  I loved Vargr.

post #144 of 172

This week:

 

Preacher vols 4 - 9

League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol 2 and The Black Dossier

post #145 of 172
As a lifelong War of the Worlds fanatic I am absolutely loving LoEG vol 2.

First pic of a fighting machine is beautiful.

post #146 of 172

Been reading the classic Nixon Agnosites. Everyone knows Tom Wolfe and Hunter Thompson from The New Journalists, but Gary Wills was on par with them. 

 

Here he tracks the 1968 Campaign and aftermath, pointing out (among many other things) that while the Democratic Convention in Chicago got all the attention as an Apocalyptic event, it was the GOP convention in Miami where 3 people got killed (no one died in Chicago), and that is likely due to the facts that 1) Journalists got the shit beat of them at Chicago and 2) Blacks were the majority of protesters, and victims, in Miami. 

 

There's lots more of course; Wills spent some time with Nixon and other politicians of that time, and offers some great character studies. The later half of the book bogs down as Wills tries to inject Deep Thoughts On The American Experiment, but the first half is straight up Journalism of a high caliber. 

 

Wills subsequently became a Stereotype of the self consciously contrarian Academic Intellectual (he stopped going out into the world and now just deconstructs speeches and texts), but back in the day he was truly an Original. 

post #147 of 172

I recently cleared out my podcast list and looked for some worthy replacements.  I had no idea that there was a 2000 AD podcast, and a pretty damn good one!  The 2000 AD Thrill-Cast.  Well-written and produced, made by people with no moral axe to grind but love and understand Dredd and the other 2000 AD creations deeply.

 

The guests include not only those you would expect, like John Wagner and Pat Mills and other writers and artists, but hard-core 2000 AD/Dredd fans like director Ben Wheatley.

 

Highly recommended - for 2000 AD fans.

 

http://2000adthrillcast.podomatic.com/

post #148 of 172
post #149 of 172
This week:

Decided to go down the Hellblazer path, so got the first 3 vols out.

Ellis' Orbiter

Nemo - Heart of Ice
post #150 of 172

Tomasi's Superman has quietly turned into one of the biggest highlights of DC Rebirth, and this week's issue - Escape from Dinosaur Island - was an incredibly lovely tribute to Darwyn Cooke and The New Frontier. Worth checking out, including for the Doug Mahnke artwork.

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