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HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 Post-Release

post #1 of 346
Thread Starter 

Exceptional enough that I'm going back for tonight's screening as well.


Edited by The Dark Shape - 7/12/11 at 11:24am
post #2 of 346

Out of curiosity, what were your thoughts on 7.1?

post #3 of 346
Thread Starter 

I liked it quite a bit.  It certainly dragged at times, but I loved some of the character beats in it.  Out of the first seven, I'd rank 7.1 third behind POA and HBP.

post #4 of 346
Thread Starter 

On second viewing: it's the best of the movies.  Never say Yates can't hit a big moment.  A number of scenes improve upon the book.

 

I would highly recommend checking this out as a double feature with Part 1, as the first twenty or so minutes fit better as the middle of a giant film than they do as the kick-off to a new chapter.

post #5 of 346

Definitely enjoyed it. You can't say they didn't do the Battle of Hogwarts justice, as it's pretty much 60-70% of the film. Snape's part in the story is done justice, which was my ultimate concern.

post #6 of 346
Thread Starter 

I thought Snape's bits bettered the book.

post #7 of 346

Great to hear that it's fantastic.

 

I do have one concerning question, do we actually find out how Voldemort ended up going after the Potters in the first place?  If you know the books, then you know it wasn't in Half-Blood Prince.  I've doing a marathon of the films right now and everything lines up pretty damn well, except for the fact that we haven't been given the reason as to why Voldemort went after the Potters.

 

After Half-Blood Prince skipped that part, I figured it would be somewhere in Hallows Part 2, more specifically, the Prince's Tale.  That's really the only place to put it.

 

I just wanted to know if it's mentioned somewhere in the film.

 

 

post #8 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Swoosh View Post

Great to hear that it's fantastic.

 

I do have one concerning question, do we actually find out how Voldemort ended up going after the Potters in the first place?  If you know the books, then you know it wasn't in Half-Blood Prince.  I've doing a marathon of the films right now and everything lines up pretty damn well, except for the fact that we haven't been given the reason as to why Voldemort went after the Potters.

 

After Half-Blood Prince skipped that part, I figured it would be somewhere in Hallows Part 2, more specifically, the Prince's Tale.  That's really the only place to put it.

 

I just wanted to know if it's mentioned somewhere in the film.

 

 


Watch the Order of the Phoenix again.  It's all explained in the book, and if I remember the movie correctly, they do explain most of it there.

 

post #9 of 346

I just watched Phoenix this morning and they actually don't.  They skirt the issue in Azkaban and Phoenix but we actually haven't gotten the reason why Voldemort went after the Potters.  As a reader of the book, I know the answer but it's the film's/series job to gives us that.

 

To me, if it's answered in this film, the series is pretty much a flawless victory.

 

EDIT:  Having thought about it, Hagrid, in the first film in the pub, does give Harry a reason why Voldemort went after the Potters...it's just not the specific reason I'm looking for.

post #10 of 346

I haven't rewatched the film in a while so my memory of the film and book are probably all mixed up, but i thought that when they talked about the prophecy and the whole "neither can live while the other survives" thing that they covered it.

 

 

Either way, im really excited for this.

post #11 of 346
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Don Swoosh View Post


I do have one concerning question, do we actually find out how Voldemort ended up going after the Potters in the first place?

 


It doesn't go into heavy detail, but you do see the flashback of Snape saying Voldemort's heard the prophecy, Dumbledore saying it merely refers to a boy born in July, and Snape screaming that Voldemort believes it's Harry and will go after Lily.

 

The only thing that's not really explained is where Harry got the mirror shards (though they at least throw out that the mirror originally belonged to Sirius).

post #12 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dark Shape View Post

On second viewing: it's the best of the movies.  Never say Yates can't hit a big moment.  A number of scenes improve upon the book.

 

I would highly recommend checking this out as a double feature with Part 1, as the first twenty or so minutes fit better as the middle of a giant film than they do as the kick-off to a new chapter.



Holy crap this gets me even more super-excited!

post #13 of 346

Voldemort sucks and is evil. That's been well established, and is reason enough for most. I don't think most will care if they skipped over why the big baddie tried to kill Harry in the first place.

 

Anyway, I imagine they kept the scene at the end with Harry walking with his family's ghosts. Which is heartbreaking in the book. 

post #14 of 346
Thread Starter 

The only thing I can think of from the book that was excised was Dumbledore's backstory, and it still at least gets lip-service from Aberforth.

post #15 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Matchstick View Post

Voldemort sucks and is evil. That's been well established, and is reason enough for most. I don't think most will care if they skipped over why the big baddie tried to kill Harry in the first place.

 

Anyway, I imagine they kept the scene at the end with Harry walking with his family's ghosts. Which is heartbreaking in the book. 


They show it in the last trailer. It's heartbreaking THERE, let alone what it's gonna do in the film.

post #16 of 346

Does he walk with his mother alone for a bit, or am I remembering that wrong?

post #17 of 346

Only read the book once the night it came out, but I remember everybody (Mom, Dad, Sirius, etc) walking with him till he gets to Voldemort's clearing. I seem to remember him telling his mother directly that he was afraid, though.

post #18 of 346

For the first time ever, I may be bringing a travel-size pack of Kleenex with me to the theater Friday night.  

post #19 of 346

"It doesn't go into heavy detail, but you do see the flashback of Snape saying Voldemort's heard the prophecy, Dumbledore saying it merely refers to a boy born in July, and Snape screaming that Voldemort believes it's Harry and will go after Lily."

 

Thank you for clearing that up Shape.

 

Harry Potter Series = FLAWLESS VICTORY with this bit of information.

 

I'm going to LOVE this film....

 

 

post #20 of 346

Man, I had not read the books before and the Dumbledore, Snape and Dead scenes punched me hard. Loved those bits. I gotta say I rolled my eyes back when Snape was revealed to be the father, but Alan Rickman sells it so good that I did not care about those similarities. Or that Radcliffe goes Matrix Revolutions to kill Voldemort. Wonderful soundtrack, fine directing, fine acting.

 

Low points? I think as great as the spectacle looked, I never really felt thrilled. Actually I liked the gnome break-in and -out in the opening more action wise. While it looked great, I also didn't really feel the magicians attack on Hogwarts, especially all those fates of the side characters except Neville's. What bugged me even more is the fact that Hermione and Ron get shifted. They had so much better scenes in Hallows 1 and here they are only background characters that all of a sudden kiss.

 

And the epilogue. Radcliffe and Ron very convincing, Ginny kinda, but Hermione didn't seem to have aged a bit. And I did not like the epilogue idea at all. I would have preferred the three of them standing on the bridge as the final image.

 

A solid ending, but that is not the The Return of the King of Potter movies. It might be controversial, but I'd say they could have cut enough fat to make Hallows one better ~ 200 minutes flick.

post #21 of 346
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Myers View Post
I gotta say I rolled my eyes back when Snape was revealed to be the father


No, no, no, no, no.  He just loved Harry's mother.  That's all.

 

post #22 of 346
Quote:

Originally Posted by Chris Myers View Post

 

I gotta say I rolled my eyes back when Snape was revealed to be the father, but Alan Rickman sells it so good that I did not care about those similarities.


Yeah... what?  Are you fucking with us, or did you really take that away from the film?  Cause that would concern me.

post #23 of 346

Crap, you're right. I just read the summary. No idea why I got that wrong.

post #24 of 346
post #25 of 346

I have never been this nervous about seeing a movie in all my life.  Great review.

post #26 of 346

Alan Rickman finally gets a chance to do something, after all these years! The pensieve sequence detailing his secret past is the highlight of the film, it's wounded emotional centre. I loved it; a truly exceptional sequence which actually improved upon its source material having been given life by such a great British actor.

 

Also props to Radcliffe, who easily gives his best performance in the entire series, and Maggie Smith, who is finally given the opportunity to be a badass.

 

I've never taken to Fiennes' Voldemort, sadly, and his performance in this film is no exception. I don't care for his look or his performace, to be frank.

 

The biggest fumble, however, is Kloves' and Yates' bombastic adaptation of the final duel between Harry and Voldemort. The "Hollywood-ization" of the final battle is tonally off and contrary to the spirit of the book. In the book, there was beauty in the way that Harry offered Tom Riddle a chance for redemption and never once compromised his integrity by trying to cast a killing blow. The delicious irony in Voldemort's own curse rebounding (again!) was completely lost. I understand that Yates was going for something a little more action-packed, but everyone knows that really great final confrontations need not rely on pyrotechnics if they are grounded in suspense and genuine tension. The filmmakers ought to have trusted in Rowling's material a little bit more, I think.

 

Finally, I have the usual gripes of missing characters and moments: no Wormtail at all, no Buckbeak, no Grawp, no Kreacher...

post #27 of 346

I have but one question, then this thread is verboten for me till Friday morning.

 

Molly Weasley. The line. THE line. In or out?

post #28 of 346

It's in, but it comes out of nowhere and lacks context. It's okay for what it is, but you get the feeling it was included out of obligation more than anything else. The fact that Mrs Weasley takes the time to smile in victory after her son has just been murdered feels slightly off to me, too.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin Clark View Post

I have but one question, then this thread is verboten for me till Friday morning.

 

Molly Weasley. The line. THE line. In or out?



 

post #29 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sidzed2 View Post

The biggest fumble, however, is Kloves' and Yates' bombastic adaptation of the final duel between Harry and Voldemort. The "Hollywood-ization" of the final battle is tonally off and contrary to the spirit of the book. In the book, there was beauty in the way that Harry offered Tom Riddle a chance for redemption and never once compromised his integrity by trying to cast a killing blow. The delicious irony in Voldemort's own curse rebounding (again!) was completely lost. I understand that Yates was going for something a little more action-packed, but everyone knows that really great final confrontations need not rely on pyrotechnics if they are grounded in suspense and genuine tension. 

Well I never read the book but not casting a killing blow seems kind of bizarre really. I get that Harry isn't a murderer but there is a limit for even the most anti death penalty advocate when it comes to self defense. This guy has tried to kill you over and over and he isn't going to stop. There is a prophecy that says only one can live and haven't they been trying to collect the horcrux's this whole time to kill him? I haven't seen the movie yet so perhaps my mind will somehow be changed.

 

post #30 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sidzed2 View Post

Alan Rickman finally gets a chance to do something, after all these years! The pensieve sequence detailing his secret past is the highlight of the film, it's wounded emotional centre. I loved it; a truly exceptional sequence which actually improved upon its source material having been given life by such a great British actor.

 

Also props to Radcliffe, who easily gives his best performance in the entire series, and Maggie Smith, who is finally given the opportunity to be a badass.

 

I've never taken to Fiennes' Voldemort, sadly, and his performance in this film is no exception. I don't care for his look or his performace, to be frank.

 

The biggest fumble, however, is Kloves' and Yates' bombastic adaptation of the final duel between Harry and Voldemort. The "Hollywood-ization" of the final battle is tonally off and contrary to the spirit of the book. In the book, there was beauty in the way that Harry offered Tom Riddle a chance for redemption and never once compromised his integrity by trying to cast a killing blow. The delicious irony in Voldemort's own curse rebounding (again!) was completely lost. I understand that Yates was going for something a little more action-packed, but everyone knows that really great final confrontations need not rely on pyrotechnics if they are grounded in suspense and genuine tension. The filmmakers ought to have trusted in Rowling's material a little bit more, I think.

 

Finally, I have the usual gripes of missing characters and moments: no Wormtail at all, no Buckbeak, no Grawp, no Kreacher...


He doesn't really cast a killing blow here either though. I'm with you that it lost a beat from the book, but it doesn't really play out like a killing blow either. And the missing beat is sacrificed to make the scene a fully visual dramatic experience, which work in its own way.

 

And the rebounding irony is covered in the forrest, when V curses the boy who lives one last time and he lives yet again.

 

post #31 of 346

You're right in that the ending works on its own terms, its just that I think it loses something in the adaptation. I don't think it was a change for the better. Rowling's elegance could and should have been preserved, and I'm sure there was a way that the pyrotechnics could have been incorporated without compromising the elegance of the beat I feel is missing.

 

I also miss the image of Voldemort being struck by his own curse and collapsing like a pathetic ragdoll; that sad, pitiable image was one of Rowling's best: the Dark Lord lying in a crumpled heap, a look of surprise etched on his dead face, a jubilant crowd surrounding a victorious Harry, etc.

 

I don't know. What's there works, but to me it feels like it could have been better.
 

EDIT: I also think its a little funky that they messed with the 'mechanics' (read: contrivances) of the Elder Wand by making it so that the wand would only serve its true master once the final Horcrux, Nagini, was destroyed. I'll say it again, Rowling's version was cleaner and simpler. Neville kills Nagini, and then it is just Harry and Voldemort, both vulnerable, both mortal. And Voldemort fires a single curse which kills himself while Harry sticks with his classic self-defense spell. I think I'm just hung up on it now :(

Quote:
Originally Posted by Renn Brown View Post


He doesn't really cast a killing blow here either though. I'm with you that it lost a beat from the book, but it doesn't really play out like a killing blow either. And the missing beat is sacrificed to make the scene a fully visual dramatic experience, which work in its own way.

 

And the rebounding irony is covered in the forrest, when V curses the boy who lives one last time and he lives yet again.

 



 

post #32 of 346
Thread Starter 

Yeah, you're hung up on it.  Its a wonderful moment in the book (I strongly disagree with people who didn't like it there; the Harry/Voldemort duel was perfect on the page), but it wouldn't work on screen as the climax of twenty hours worth of film.

post #33 of 346

I'm delighted to hear that they stuck the landing.  Can't wait to see this!

post #34 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sidzed2 View Post

EDIT: I also think its a little funky that they messed with the 'mechanics' (read: contrivances) of the Elder Wand by making it so that the wand would only serve its true master once the final Horcrux, Nagini, was destroyed. I'll say it again, Rowling's version was cleaner and simpler. Neville kills Nagini, and then it is just Harry and Voldemort, both vulnerable, both mortal. And Voldemort fires a single curse which kills himself while Harry sticks with his classic self-defense spell. I think I'm just hung up on it now :(


 

 

I don't believe they retconned the Horcruxes into the wandlore at all. It was cleanly explained that the wand didn't serve him for the same reasons as in the book- it was ultimately Harry's wand. Perhaps I missed something, but it all worked how I remembered it working...
 

 

post #35 of 346

There are huge problems with the film, but at this point, it being for the faithful is okay. I don't think the splitting works, as both have terrible structure. On some level they didn't really convert it into a movie, which means you get new characters that are crucial to the plot in the midst of this one, and they don't really explain certain things all that well. The ending mostly just sorta happens because there's little sense of build, and the release part is very muted. Since Voldemort is a Hitler figure, this is really unfortunate. But they filmed the book, for better or worse. And on that level, I found it to be fairly effective and powerful.

post #36 of 346

Does the movie follow the book in explaining why Harry is the wand's master (because Draco de-wanded Dumbledore, and then Harry de-wanded Draco)?

 

post #37 of 346

Explicitly

post #38 of 346

Did I love it?  HELL YES.  Are there things that had me a bit miffed?  HELL YES.

 

I don't understand why they didn't explain Snape's falling out with Lily during the memory sequence.  The mudblood thing has never been addressed in the films, and I was pretty bummed that it wasn't there.  This film honestly makes Lily look like a bitch in that bit where James intentionally knocks Snape's books out of his hands, only for Lily to give James the goo-goo eyes right after.  WRONG.  Lily vigorously defended Snape from James because Snape was her best friend, which is part of why he deeply loved her.  It's not until Snape calls her a mudblood that she cuts all ties with him and gets with James, and the fact that Snape's own pride and beliefs cost him the love of his life was truly tragic in the books.  He went through all of this for a woman who vehemently disliked him, which makes him even more noble, and they didn't put that in.  WAY bummed about that.  Also, I felt like the post-Voldemort killshot stuff was very strange.  Harry kills Voldie, he walks back into the castle, and no one goes apeshit?  The guy just beat the baddest wizard on the planet, and there's no cheers?  No applause?  No "fuck yeah, way to go Harry!", no celebration, they just...sit there and give him small smiles?  It didn't quite feel right.  I guess they were trying to go for a low-key finale, and maybe people cheering after we've seen children being brutally killed (ouch, Lavender) may have been in poor taste, but it felt weird. 

 

Everything else was solid gold.  The ramp up to the battle was spectacular, the deaths hurt badly (though Lupin and Tonks will hurt book readers more), and they gave the fans some major league fanservice with the Luna/Neville hookup, which is not canon but was much rooted for among the fandom.  Speaking of hookups, that Ron/Hermione kiss?  Pretty weak.  You build this for eight films then pull the damn camera back for a wide shot mid-kiss?  Ha!  Never rooted for that couple so I don't give a fuck, but I heard some unhappy grumbling behind me.  The actors are all great, and Matthew Lewis as Neville pretty much steals the movie.  He's the one rallying the troops, dropping the funny one-liners, and beheading that fucking snake.  Emma and Rupert are in the background for the most part, and as much as I love Hermione, I didn't miss her when she wasn't onscreen.  It's all about Harry this time, and DanRad mostly delivers.  He still has a few issues emoting, but that scene where he sits on the stairs in Dumbledore's office as the realization of what he must do sinks in is some of his finest work.

 

Everyone let out a sigh of relief when "19 years later" flashed onscreen.  Guess there was a fear the epilogue would get cut?  It works fine, shorter than the book, but it's fine.  Emma only aged in her hands by the looks of things, but Dan actually looked good.

 

Overall, I enjoyed the hell out of it.  If I hadn't read the books and just seen the film, I'd probably be a bit more pleased with what I saw, but make no mistake: the movie kicks ass.

post #39 of 346

Ain't It Cool is weirdly down on this.

post #40 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by zak chase View Post

Does the movie follow the book in explaining why Harry is the wand's master (because Draco de-wanded Dumbledore, and then Harry de-wanded Draco)?

 



For those non-readers who have seen this. Why does that mechanism work when the wand in question wasn't used in the battles in question that supposedly  transfer ownership?

 

Also - the geography of the scene where Bellatrix gets blasted to shreds is TERRIBLE. There's a quick shot of Jenny getting immobilized then Mrs Weasley gets all mother bear and Bad Ass. Is that the basic gist of the sequence in the book or is there some history or something to do with the actual location of the fight that allows the very powerful and dangerous Bellatrix to be taken out by a character who's pretty much been a hausfrau up to that point?

 

The Voldemort death scene also seemed to be missing a beat or two. They spent a long time setting up the wand business, but what is it that actually starts that black rot on Voldemort's hand? Was it just the death of the snake?

 

Do the books clarify any of this?

 

3D was worth it for the effect on Mrs Norris' head. The post-conversion was a lot better than I expected, and interestingly stylised at certain points. Agreed with the review with the scene of Voldemort observing his attack on the Hogwarts bubble. Looked like an exploding planet. I hope they don't lose all the collected talent that evolved around these movies.

 

post #41 of 346

I'm sad and elated all at once. Here's to hoping Pottermore gives us enough scraps to keep the idea of both the books and movies being finished.

post #42 of 346


And it's over.

 

Short, sweet version is that it's satisfying as hell, with the overarching reservation for the film being that, for a franchise that has done so well with the side character moments, the breakneck pace of it means that many of the best moments, or at the very least characters who I wanted to see just a minute more kinda get shafted. In particular, I'm torn between Yates/Kloves' decision to play the aftermath of Harry killing Voldemort so understated being a nice touch (the filmed ending seems to place some heavy emphasis on Harry being just one kid doing what's right, but that every child at that school has the same power) and being completely lacking as a catharsis for the series. In particular, Molly Weasley's been Harry's ersatz mother this entire franchise, and she doesn't even get a hug at the end.

 

But what the film gets right, which is to say, everything that actually made it off the page, holy shit does it ever get right. The Prince's Tale is as heart-crushing as expected. The initial sweep of random death in the Great Hall is as well (and yeah, did NOT expect Yates to clip Lavender Brown). Voldemort's growing weakness, the Ron/Hermione kiss, the unexpectedly fucking HORRIFYING Voldemort abomination in Harry's afterlife scene, ALL THINGS NEVILLE, the 19 years later epilogue, and the milking of the Sorcerer's Stone callbacks/score for every worthwhile drop of emotion.

 

More later, but I'm confident in saying Yates nails the dismount, and this series can go on the books as the one most creatively successful film endeavors ever to see the light of day. It's been a grand 10 years. I can't wait to take a kid of my own on this journey.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nardo View Post





For those non-readers who have seen this. Why does that mechanism work when the wand in question wasn't used in the battles in question that supposedly  transfer ownership?

 

Also - the geography of the scene where Bellatrix gets blasted to shreds is TERRIBLE. There's a quick shot of Jenny getting immobilized then Mrs Weasley gets all mother bear and Bad Ass. Is that the basic gist of the sequence in the book or is there some history or something to do with the actual location of the fight that allows the very powerful and dangerous Bellatrix to be taken out by a character who's pretty much been a hausfrau up to that point?

 

The Voldemort death scene also seemed to be missing a beat or two. They spent a long time setting up the wand business, but what is it that actually starts that black rot on Voldemort's hand? Was it just the death of the snake?

 

Do the books clarify any of this?

 

3D was worth it for the effect on Mrs Norris' head. The post-conversion was a lot better than I expected, and interestingly stylised at certain points. Agreed with the review with the scene of Voldemort observing his attack on the Hogwarts bubble. Looked like an exploding planet. I hope they don't lose all the collected talent that evolved around these movies.

 



Molly Weasley's always had power. Bellatrix coming after Ginny just brings out the fury, is all. That moment's still fucking awesome on film, but there was indeed way more of a menacing build up there.

 

Also, it's Voldemort continuing to use the Elder Wand, and the Elder Wand not being meant for him that affects his arm.

post #43 of 346

A great, satisfying climax to a long and wonderful series. Having not read the books, things seemed so fast that I actually think this could have worked as three movies, but mmm...love Ralph Fiennes in this. Finally, some scene stealing and chewing. I loved how they made him...human. Like he was little more than a young, angry kid who got the keys to all of the cars in dad's garage. Loved the memory portion (had me on the verge; and was gladdened/saddened to see Dumbledore such a cunning, almost unfeeling bastard at times), and was thoroughly surprised when Snape bit it, especially the way he did. It just felt so...like battle, I guess. Here today, gone tomorrow.

 

So, after all that, Harry becomes...just a dude? How is he not the god damn President of Magic (do they have a thing?) or like, being carried on a litter or something? I do feel bad for his kid. There's never living up to your dad's story, and then there's never having the chance because your dad destroyed the truest evil the wizarding world has ever known.

post #44 of 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doc Happenin View Post

A great, satisfying climax to a long and wonderful series. Having not read the books, things seemed so fast that I actually think this could have worked as three movies, but mmm...love Ralph Fiennes in this. Finally, some scene stealing and chewing. I loved how they made him...human. Like he was little more than a young, angry kid who got the keys to all of the cars in dad's garage. Loved the memory portion (had me on the verge; and was gladdened/saddened to see Dumbledore such a cunning, almost unfeeling bastard at times), and was thoroughly surprised when Snape bit it, especially the way he did. It just felt so...like battle, I guess. Here today, gone tomorrow.

 

So, after all that, Harry becomes...just a dude? How is he not the god damn President of Magic (do they have a thing?) or like, being carried on a litter or something? I do feel bad for his kid. There's never living up to your dad's story, and then there's never having the chance because your dad destroyed the truest evil the wizarding world has ever known.


He ends up becoming an auror, which is appropriate enough. But being a regular dude is entirely the point: as he mentioned numerous times, he never wanted to be more than Just Harry and to have the family that was stolen from him.

post #45 of 346

Yeah, Harry was never a glory whore.  That's Ron's job.  All he ever wanted was to be a normal kid with a normal, tranquil family life, and that's just what he gets.

post #46 of 346

Awfully good, as good as these movies ever got (which is to say, B+ or so). Most of the big moments get landed (Snape, Gringotts, MAGIC WAR!). 

 

The only thing I wish was that the each and every death got handled perfectly. Some were spot on (Snape, again), but most of the others were oddly off. Voldemort was all right; I liked how isolated they were. But he turns to flying ash or something? Wish we'd seen Lupin and Tonks go - it seems to me that one of the advantages of adaptation is you can give those characters a proper cinematic send off. But that was how it was in the book, so I guess that's what they do. However, the Weasley twin death happen on camera (as it were) in the book, and it's one of the most affecting parts. Here it's viewed almost in the background after the fact, even after the series has gone out of it's way to build those characters up. It also robs Bellatrix's death of a little of it's gravitas (although that was not bad. Turning into a statue and exploding, decent).

 

I think my favorite moment in the whole thing was the 19 years later bit. How weird is that?

post #47 of 346

I thought the muted denouement was a good move.  Something more triumphant might have worked for a more conventional adventure, but it would've undercut some of the loss and exhaustion following such an epic battle.  And having it mostly just be Harry watching the others talking played to the particular strength of this series: the unprecedented continuity of cast and setting, as well as the slow, slow, build of the main apocalyptic threat means that we have truly lived in the wizarding world for so long that we completely understand what is at risk.  Whereas with something like Star Wars, our heroes are fighting to restore a fallen government that has only been described to us.  Or even LOTR, where we spend a fair amount of time in the Shire at the outset, by the end they have to keep name-checking it to remind us that its not all about saving Gondor, which where we spend most of the climax. 

 

But with Potter, we have 6 movies worth of relatively "good times" in the setting that the big battle is (marvelously) trashing, and dozens of ancillary characters that we have some degree of relationship with.  Seeing these familiar faces, battered but not broken, carries an emotional weight that wouldn't be possible with a bunch of nameless extras.   Harry has always been fighting for more than just his life, and the length and consistency of these films mean we've been able to invest in both the characters and the setting.

post #48 of 346

Visually amazing, but once the antipated midnight showing smell wears off, I think it will be in the middle of the series.  Two things that really still bug me the most...

 

(1)  The first act felt very rushed.  Probably because it's basically a rehash of the MoM break-in in Part I--a huge fault in the book--but other than the dragon escape and Voldermort surveying the damage, it didn't really work for me.  Not enough time to build tension, especially in the vault. 

 

Also, it feels like it all takes place within a day of Dobby dying...get home, apparate in, make the snatch, apparate to Hogwarts.  Yet when they arrive, Luna is already there.  Enemy of the state, held hostage for weeks, all the sudden back at a school run by Death Eaters.  A sentence or two of exposition would have helped here.

 

(2) Molly Weasly.  Of course it was going to be in there.  But in the book, it works like the flip side of Lily Potter--in the face of desperation, a mother's love for her child can be the greatest shield, but also the greatest weapon.  Here, it turns out she was secretly the greatest magical duelist in the Order, despite never going on any missions.  A single hurried shot from her want would have been a lot more effective, in character and thematically appropriate.

post #49 of 346

I think the term "rushed" isn't so fitting as "efficient".  We had a lot to do in a little time, but I never felt the story was rushed.  People have complained that some of the films took pauses for too long, and that some didn't seem to move fluidly.  This film is it--the finish to more than a decade's worth of storytelling.  We all know we're leading up to the final battle at Hogwarts and Harry vs. Voldemort.  I think the film did a good job at getting us to that point by straddling the line of action with character moments.

 

Personally, I loved it.  Considering I didn't start out a Potter fanatic, and I actually watched the first 2 movies before I started reading the books, it was a bit easier for me to separate the books from the films, so all the stuff they cut didn't bother me nearly as much as my wife, who has read all the books like 5-6 times (if not more).  A packed house last night at the midnight viewing, and lot's of tears and sniffles from the crowd as well.  I'll probably try to catch another showing this weekend or next week.  We actually watched Pt 1 at home, then immediately went to the theater to catch Pt 2, which was pretty cool.

post #50 of 346
I came away with mixed feelings. To give some context, I've read the first four books,. 've enjoyed the films I must admit getting a bit confused about the plot in the later episodes (Half blood prince especially). I actually quite liked a lot of Deathly Hallows Part I.

So for this film, I was totally with it for much of the first half. The heist was a nice little section and so was the reappearance at Hogwarts. Especially the stand off with Snape and Mcgonagal.

When Harry is running around looking for the Tiara it's ok, but I'm thinking 6 horcurxes are an awful lot of little doodads to have to destroy. Then Voldemort feels the horcrux destroyed and says "We'll have to keep you safe Nagini" and so I assume he's gonna take it to his fortress or some place like that... but he takes the snake to the Hogwarts boathouse. WTF!

Anyway, the battle is pretty awesome. I like a lot of how magical combat is realised. There's a lot of major kills but it all feels earned. In fact so much of this film works as revists old locations and characters in a grim light, but the build up to this situation feels appropriate.

The scenes with the memory well and the ghosts was good, but I was a bit confused. Someone mentioned earlier in the thread that Snape was Harry's dad. It makes sense now, but that wasn't clear in the cinema. I do feel this stuff would work much better for fans of the book.

When Harry heads to the clearing, the film somewhat fell apart for me. Hagrid appears somewhat unintroduced. Harry in heaven is ok, if still a little more confusing plot. Having another yet another horcrux introduced, but then it's resolved immediately (at least there is a cool gross foetus shot. Then Harry plays dead (WTF) and everyone believes it. I thought Mrs Malfoy might put a special fake out spell on him or something, but it wasn't clear.

At this point the cinema I was in turned on the film too. People started laughing during Voldemorts speeches in the courtyard (there were howls of laughter during the epilogue).

My big gripe with this film is how lame Voldemort seems. I thought Feinnes was awesome at the end of the Goblet of Fire, but since then he's always looked like he wanted to have a bit of a cry. In this film he is looking pathetic everytime a horcrux is destroyed or his wand fails him. Plus he's just stupid in the way he leaves his Snake out in dangerous places. The final fights with harry (choking him with cloth, flying through the air, wand fight) all seemed just a bit corny and silly to watch.

I've written a bunch already so I'll stop in a sec. This film had a lot of great stuff, especially from Harry and many of the bit players. I just think a few flaws and an overly confusing plot stop thisfrom becoming a great final film.
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