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Beards! Capes! Flutes! It's the PROGRESSIVE ROCK Thread! - Page 3

post #101 of 189

The prog track currently getting the most spins in my apartment is this one from Steve Howe's first solo album, Beginnings. Dig that sax hook:

 

post #102 of 189

I am SO buying this:

 

Can to release Lost Tapes box set spanning 68-77.

 

 

Apparently, these aren't outtakes but rather songs for unreleased film soundtracks as well as songs that never saw a proper release.  They've just been sitting in a cabinet for 30-40 years!

post #103 of 189

Arguably my favorite Prog band: O.S.I.

 

 

 

post #104 of 189

Because I've been listening to their latest album, I've fallen deep into the mars volta. The second half of Frances the Mute is all over the place but the first half is just pure epic prog rock bliss.

 

 

Omar Rodriguez is one of the most electrifying guitar players currently existing.

post #105 of 189

 

 

One of the champions of two odd things that sound great together.

post #106 of 189
Thread Starter 

Yep, Sacred Songs is one of those "Holy shit! This exists?! I thought I'd dreamt that!" albums.

 

Exposure_Daryl-Fripp.jpg  Daryl-Hall-Robert-Fripp-Sacred-Songs-delantera-.jpg

 

Daryl Hall & Robert Fripp "The Farther Away I Am" Recorded 1977 / Released 1980 (Click to show)

 

post #107 of 189

Although I think I slightly prefer the versions on Fripp's EXPOSURE (which is an underrated album, the best version of which is the one with the most Daryl Hall vocals)

post #108 of 189
Nobody who looks as much like an insurance agent as Robert Fripp should be able to rock as hard as he does. It is a mystery.
post #109 of 189
Thread Starter 

I always pegged Robert Fripp as secretly being a Ditko Spiderman villain named "The Owl".

post #110 of 189

I like early 70's hippie Robert Fripp best of all. Mostly because he looks nerder than every single member of Rush combined.

post #111 of 189
Thread Starter 

KC69aa.JPG

...and he could rock the fur like nobody's business.

 

Robert Fripp+Effects.jpg

I've always liked Fripp's paired down Starless look. I have a closet full of button-down black tees & denim flares.

post #112 of 189

Ahhh Fripp with the Mellotron.

 

All guitarists should learn that as a second instrument.

post #113 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenOrtega View Post

Ahhh Fripp with the Mellotron.

All guitarists should learn that as a second instrument.
Hell yes. When are they gonna start making reproduction Mellotrons, anyway?

I don't care what anybody says, I like Islands. Nothing at all like normal King Crimson, but taken on its own I like it.
post #114 of 189

Quote:

Originally Posted by commodorejohn View Post
I don't care what anybody says, I like Islands. Nothing at all like normal King Crimson, but taken on its own I like it.


Islands is the King Crimson bastard album.  Even when discussing some of the 'lesser' Crimson albums, I always hear "well maybe its not great, but at least it isn't Islands".  I hated it initially, but I've warmed up to it considerably and I respect its place within their discography.

post #115 of 189
post #116 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanW View Post

Because I've been listening to their latest album, I've fallen deep into the mars volta. The second half of Frances the Mute is all over the place but the first half is just pure epic prog rock bliss.

 



My perpetual annoyance with that album is that the best track on the album is buried between 8 minutes of CD player/iPod breaking white noise.:

 

post #117 of 189

 

Van Der Graaf Generator, biches!

 

Lead singer Peter Hammill collaborating with Fripp

post #118 of 189

Van Der Graaf Generator is an AMAZING band, I mean just one of those great cult bands.

post #119 of 189

Another new Rush song has just been released, and it sounds fucking great. Can't wait for the new album:

 

 

 

 

post #120 of 189
Geddy Lee really is one of rock's more underappreciated bassists. He's not quite Chris Squire, but he's still pretty damn great.
post #121 of 189

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by commodorejohn View Post

Geddy Lee really is one of rock's more underappreciated bassists. He's not quite Chris Squire, but he's still pretty damn great.

 

I don't know how you can call him "underappreciated" when he's a consensus top 5 guy. 

 

I personally think that Peart and Lee get so many (well-deserved) accolades that Leifson's stellar guitar work is actually the underappreciated/unrecognized part of the Rush sound. 

 

post #122 of 189
Is he? I haven't heard him all that acclaimed, but then I'm generally kind of out of the loop so take everything I say with a grain of salt.

In any case, I will agree that Lifeson is hella awesome as well.
post #123 of 189
Yeah, he's pretty legendary. Lifeson is definitely the underdog of the band - I'm especially fond of his playing on their late 70s/early 80s albums.
post #124 of 189

Tribute to the early-mid 90's Swedish prog invasion:

 

 

post #125 of 189

Edit: broken/double post.


Edited by spaceloaf - 6/21/12 at 9:41am
post #126 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chavez View Post

 

 

I don't know how you can call him "underappreciated" when he's a consensus top 5 guy. 

 

I personally think that Peart and Lee get so many (well-deserved) accolades that Leifson's stellar guitar work is actually the underappreciated/unrecognized part of the Rush sound. 

 

 

One thing I've found about Rush in general is that fellow musicians appreciate them much more than the average music listener.  So in a sense, you could say they aren't under-appreciated because pretty much every modern Prog band cites them as an influence.  But at the same time, a large part of the general public doesn't recognize them at all (as opposed to say Pink Floyd).  I guess it's all relative.

 

Anyway, my contribution to the thread is Storm Corrosion (Steven Wilson + Mikael Åkerfeldt collaboration).  So far, I'm digging it much more than Heritage (which I thought was pretty poor actually) and possibly on the same level as Grace for Drowning.

 

post #127 of 189

I know Jethro Tull was mentioned on page 2, but that's not NEARLY enough. Is anyone beardier, capier or flutier than Mr. Ian Anderson? And oh my god that beret:

 

post #128 of 189

I came across the Emerson Lake and Palmer LP Works over the weekend and listened to it. Fanfare For the Common Man is such an epic piece of prog-rock,  I grew up listening to it, they were great musicians but someone really should've told Greg Lake he had no business writing pop songs, Pirates is a fucking awful song, I'm amazed it didn't end their career.

 

 

The opening to Food For Your Soul is so great, like the soundtrack to a seventies action film that exists only in my mind.

 

post #129 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanW View Post

I came across the Emerson Lake and Palmer LP Works over the weekend and listened to it. Fanfare For the Common Man is such an epic piece of prog-rock, I grew up listening to it, they were great musicians but someone really should've told Greg Lake he had no business writing pop songs, Pirates is a fucking awful song, I'm amazed it didn't end their career.
Fuck you, "Pirates" kicks ass. It's a song about pirates and wenches and plunder and shit, what more do you want? (Also, "Fanfare" is good stuff, but I don't think it quite measures up to their version of "Hoedown" for wacky Copland covers.)

You're right about Lake and pop, though. Funny thing is, it seems like the less he's trying to stick to pop territory, the better he is at sweet little love songs. "From the Beginning" is kinda funky and pretty solid, "Still... You Turn Me On" is dark and weird but quite nice; both are a hell of a lot better than the poppy numbers on Works. Go figure that one out...
post #130 of 189

I am shocked, SHOCKED that the recent AV Club primer on prog has not been linked yet. Here ya go.

 

Thanks to this thread (and that article), I've had this song in my head for the last week. Bill Bruford was a drumming god:

 

post #131 of 189

Have only had the chance to give the new Rush a couple of spins, but it's great. Easily their best album in a long time. Lee's bass tone on this thing could have mountains pogo-ing.

post #132 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

I am shocked, SHOCKED that the recent AV Club primer on prog has not been linked yet. Here ya go.

 

 

Quote:
None of prog’s luminaries hit lower lows—nor as often—as Emerson, Lake & Palmer. The band barely hit its stride before the wheels started coming off; although popular at the time and still widely regarded by many, 1972’s Trilogy and 1973’s Brain Salad Surgery epitomize everything lousy about ’70s prog: the overcooked concepts, the neoclassical flounce, the supercilious self-seriousness. It’s rock played with nose upturned and pinkie held aloft.

 

Boo this man. Boo him!

post #133 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by PMR View Post

Quote:
None of prog’s luminaries hit lower lows—nor as often—as Emerson, Lake although popular at the time and still widely regarded by many, 1972’s Trilogy and 1973’s Brain Salad Surgery epitomize everything lousy about ’70s prog: the overcooked concepts, the neoclassical flounce, the supercilious self-seriousness. It’s rock played with nose upturned and pinkie held aloft.
Boo this man. Boo him!
Gladly booed. Way to parrot the same old tired line that's been slapped at ELP since idiot punk fans were looking for a favorite target. Must've saved a lot of time by not actually listening to the albums named. (How the hell you can set out to critique poncey too-classical pomp in prog and wind up on Keith "I am going to be the Copland of rock" Emerson instead of Rick fuckin' Wakeman is beyond me.)
post #134 of 189

To be fair, he goes on to mention Wakeman's Journey to the Centre of the Earth as another album worthy of hate (and it is).

 

And, goddamn, Wikipedia says it sold 14 million worldwide!

post #135 of 189
Thread Starter 

Yeah, but Wiki never says which world.

post #136 of 189

I finally popped my King Crimson cherry. I listened to 'In the court of the crimson king', it feels like they took a Moody Blues record and made it a shitload more interesting. The interplay between Fripp, Lake and Giles is incredible on tracks like 21st Century Schizoid Man. Epitaph is a thoroughly haunting song, it's a shame this line-up didn't last beyond the first album, it would've been interesting to see where they were headed.

post #137 of 189
Yeah, it's something special alright. I kind of agree about the lineup, but then on the other hand, the neat thing about King Crimson is that they change so often, you never know what you're gonna get. Every album from In the Court to Red sounds radically different than every other album, and they're all special.
post #138 of 189

Court is very good and everything, but for me it's when Bruford and co joined that they really came alive. It's not often pointed out how much Larks Tongues In Aspic predicts the later Post-Rock scene, not to mention math rock/metal.

post #139 of 189

Fripp, Belew, Bruford, Levin.  Its amazing that the universe was able to contain the four of these guys on the same stage.  

post #140 of 189

Can I be honest in really not like Emerson Lake and Palmer at all?

 

 

Prog tends to appeal to me when it's either a natural extension of some of the more musically confident psychedelic bands(Yes, Moody Blues. Pink Floyd) or when it's an offshoot of the avant-garde(Henry Cow, Magma) or a strong combination of the two.(King Crimson, the Krautrock groups, Soft Machine) The heay-duty "We're going to rock out all classical like" tends to appeal to me a lot less.

 

I mean Yes has all of these long drawn out songs, but due to folks like Jon Anderson and Steve Howe you can still hear echos of The Hollies in there. And King Crimson might riff on Holst, but that's in addition to taking on everything from Indonesian folk sounds to dance music.

 

Hearing Emerson Lake and Palmer just sounds like a bunch of talented musicians who can't create songs that aren't boring.

post #141 of 189

Yeah, all those unfair stereotypes people use to dismiss prog as a whole are on the money when it comes to ELP. Their first album isn't so bad, but after that it's all just too much pompous wankery.

post #142 of 189
I respect your honesty, but man, I have to feel sorry for anybody who is bored by "Tarkus." :/
post #143 of 189
Thread Starter 

I'm bored by ELP, in general.

post #144 of 189

True story: though I was somewhat familiar with The Nice, I hadn't heard of the formation of ELP until I saw that they would be doing what I believe was their first U.S. show-- and while I didn't know them from Adam, I was all over the support act: Delaney and Bonnie and Friends with special guest Bo Diddley (!).

 

So, Bo cancels the night of the show, and since my folks had already dropped me off, there was no point in taking the offered refund and hanging around all night, so I went in. I liked Delaney and Bonnie well enough, and figured the headliner was probably some blues/jam band I'd never heard of.

 

To say I was not prepared for Keith Emerson attacking his organ with knives, or the giant armadillo projected behind the stage, would be an understatement.

post #145 of 189

I think it also bares mentioning that I discovered a lot of prog bands either through my interest in Psychedelic music or through a link to punk or glam rock. It's why King Crimson with it's constant experimentation and Yes with it's warm sounds(I'm fundamentally of the belief that Steve Howe with his love of country and Jimmy Bryant is the MVP of the band) holds a lot of appeal to me, while bands that skirt just on virtuoso playing just come across as forgettable.

 

 

It's the same reason most of Progressive Metal or the bands that emerged post-70's also tend to bore me.

post #146 of 189
See, I've just never bought into the idea that ELP only has virtuoso playing to offer - I think their songwriting is often quite strong (less so towards the end of their initial run, and not flawless, but there's still some damn good stuff in there.) Maybe it's just that I grew up steeped in classical music (thanks to my dad,) but ELP is to early twentieth-century classical what oldschool rock-'n'-roll was to Delta blues - pick up the basic ideas and add more showmanship and flair, inject pure energy, and voila, it's Emerson, Lake & Palmer. Hell, half of their songs quote or flat-out cover classical composers, and the First and Third Impression sections of "Karn Evil 9" might as well be titled "to Aaron Copland, love, Keith Emerson." So I guess if you're the kind of person who really can't stand classical music, I can understand why you'd be bored by it, but if that's the case I have to feel even more sorry for you...
post #147 of 189

I like classical music, but if I wanted to listen to Aaron Copland I'd listen to him and not a group of guys who think playing Fanfare for the Common Man on keyboards is amazing. It reminds me of Yngwie Malmsteen who can sure imitate the fuck out of Paganini but doesn't have an ounce of spontaneity in his body.

post #148 of 189

I did once prank a few of my mom's friends by playing Emerson's Piano Concerto (on the record player-- I'm not much of a pianist) and asking them to place it. I got a Prokofiev, a Bartok (WTF?), and two guesses that it was a film score. Always had a soft spot for "Nutrocker," though.

post #149 of 189

So, yeah. The new Can Lost Tapes boxset is pretty great.

 

I haven't listened to the whole thing yet but the packaging is fan-fucking-tastic: basically it comes in a full size 1/4 inch tape reel box.  

They really give people an incentive to buy the physical product instead of mp3s.

post #150 of 189

I must have this!

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