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Beards! Capes! Flutes! It's the PROGRESSIVE ROCK Thread! - Page 4

post #151 of 189

R.I.P. Kevin Ayers

 

post #152 of 189
Why is this called "Prog Rock demo?" Because it turns into a naked carefully-non-infringing cover of "Roundabout" at 2:20, that's why! Right down to the organ solo...
post #153 of 189

*raises thread from the grave*

 

You know something? After mainlining quintessential 1970s YES works the last few days I can't believe how I have delved deeper into their stuff before now. CLOSER TO THE EDGE literally blew my fucking mind.  

 

I'll be checking out early Genesis and ELP later on but man this stuff is so addictive I can't get enough.

 

Any of you fine gents ever heard of the band Glass Hammer? They're a prog rock outfit out of Chattanooga, Tennessee who have been churning out some incredible stuff since 1993. If you love YES, ELP and others you will dig this stuff. 

 

 

Checked out a few tracks from them last night and they are absolutely essential for anyone in this thread.  Enjoy!

post #154 of 189
Yup. Yes may be better-remembered by the rest of the world for 90125 (which is still a damn great album,) but The Yes Album through Relayer (and I'll be that guy here and stick up for Tales from Topographic Oceans, while admitting that it's rather severely in need of an editor) was just this amazing high point that they never quite equaled again (although Drama comes pretty damn close.)

I'll have to give Glass Hammer a look. I initially thought it was the psychedelic proggy '70s group featuring awesome guitarist Phil Keaggy before he left for the Christian music scene in that brief, halcyon era where Christian music was actually good, but that was Glass Harp.
post #155 of 189

Relayer is definitely the last gasp of classic Yes which wouldn't show up again until the release of The Ladder in 1999.  Hopefully YES ft. Anderson Rabin Wakeman do some Canadian dates because they sound really damn good!

 

post #156 of 189
I really ought to dig a little more into ABWH and Ladder-era Yes - I was initially disappointed because it's not as jaw-dropping as the classic material, but I've kept "Homeworld" and Keystudio (a double album of the studio tracks from both Keys to Ascension albums) in my music folder anyway, and there's still a lot of good stuff there.
post #157 of 189

 

 

There you go. Enjoy!

post #158 of 189

ABWH has too much of that 80's plasticity on it for my tastes. The Ladder is an odd mix of the classic Yes sound with cheesy 90's pop, but I seem to remember was actually quite well written for what it was.

 

Fly From Here might actually be their best post-90215 album, just because there's a bit of intrigue to that one what with it being a semi-sequel to Drama, which used to be a bit of a one-off oddity in their catalogue.

 

I wouldn't say later Yes stuff is in any way essential though. King Crimson are the only long running prog band I'm aware of who managed to stay interesting their whole career. And maybe Rush for people who like Rush, but I don't particularly like Rush.

post #159 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul C View Post
 I don't particularly like Rush.

 

 

:mad:

post #160 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by commodorejohn View Post
 (and I'll be that guy here and stick up for Tales from Topographic Oceans, while admitting that it's rather severely in need of an editor)

 

I go through phases where I'm convinced that this is the best Yes album.  It's definitely not, but its consistently up there among my favorites, in all of its bloated glory.  

 

 

 

 

Anybody in here listen to Roger Waters' new track?  I'm really into it:

 

 

His voice sounds as old as ever, but there's a raw Animals-sounding energy to the music that I'm loving.  If you told me Gilmour was involved, I'd believe it based on the sound.  Roger's solo albums have been a mixed bag for me at best, but I'm really excited for this one.  Plus, it sounds like Trump has him all riled up, so I expect the lyrics to be laser focused and as biting as ever.

 

I've got tickets to see him in July.  Can't wait.   

post #161 of 189
Coming back to this thread, let's talk Starcastle. They were a kinda semi-obscure group in the later days of the original prog-rock wave - I think their only points of recognition were that A. they were one of the relatively few American prog-rock groups (at least from back in the glory days - there were more in the '90s prog revival and '00s progressive metal eras) and B. everyone, everywhere, everywhen gives them a lot of crap for sounding a whooole lot like Yes.

Which is fair, because they totally do (and despite bassist Gary Strater's protestations, I'm not really buying that they just happened to be doing the same things in 1976 that Yes were doing in 1971, especially when you compare his sound and technique to Chris Squire's) - like, if you charted an exact midpoint between The Yes Album and Fragile, you'd just about have Starcastle nailed. But not entirely - there's a bit more '60s sunshine pop and funky '70s guitar in their sound, plus a certain gentle spaciness that probably comes from not being able to afford a Mellotron and using Solina-style string synthesizers instead.

And ultimately, if they're a Yes clone...they're a fucking good Yes clone. I've been running through their debut album on pretty much a weekly basis for most of the year now:
post #162 of 189

Do you want nearly six hours of remastered RUSH bootlegs?  Of course you fucking do!

 

 

Crank it up and enjoy!

post #163 of 189

I can see why you like Starcastle. Wow. This is YES worship I can get behind!

post #164 of 189
Yeah - I'm honestly impressed by how well Gary Strater mimics Squire's bass tones while bringing his own stylistic touches to the equation.
post #165 of 189

It's really quite amazing stuff. Can you imagine seeing these open for Jethro Tull or RUSH back in the day? Damn! I was born too late!

post #166 of 189
Yeah, tell me about it!

Their later albums are also worth checking out - like a few other niche bands of the time (hey, Klaatu!) they had one (Real to Reel) where the label forced them into a popular mold they didn't really fit, but prior to that (and in their later-day comeback album, Song of Times) they had some pretty damn good stuff (though the first two albums are definitely the strongest.)
post #167 of 189

The one thing that blows my mind that even now progressive rock is still pretty much a niche and mostly ignored by the mainstream. Why is that exactly?

post #168 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headless Fett View Post
 

The one thing that blows my mind that even now progressive rock is still pretty much a niche and mostly ignored by the mainstream. Why is that exactly?

 

Because it's rarely commercial.  There usually isn't a simple melodic through-line to follow, and the length of the songs generally isn't conducive to regular radio airplay.

post #169 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post
 

 

Because it's rarely commercial.  There usually isn't a simple melodic through-line to follow, and the length of the songs generally isn't conducive to regular radio airplay.

 

This is very true. Some of the more popular YES or RUSH songs you hear on the classic rock station are the catchier, more radio friendly songs but the stuff they don't play is just so much better but that's commercial radio for you.

post #170 of 189
Well, I'll stick up for radio-friendly Yes or Rush (Pop Genesis can go take a long walk off a short pier, though.) Both groups managed to put out some really solid '80s AOR material while bringing over a surprising number of esoteric touches from their proggier days (it helps that '80s AOR was more open to that kind of thing anyway.) I'd even be willing to accept arguments that Rush was better in their Moving Pictures era (their classic-prog albums tend to have a side's worth of really great material backed by another side that's much more of a mixed bag, whereas Moving Pictures is solid throughout.) But yeah, if I had to choose only one or the other, it'd be the classic prog stuff every time, and it's definitely a shame that it doesn't get more love on the radio.
post #171 of 189

The title track off of ELP's Tarkus. Holy shit. I've never heard it before until now.

 

Wow.

 

That track must have absolutely killed live back in the day.

post #172 of 189
Oh hell yes. I bought that album in the thrift store for the cover - but I stayed for that piece. Incredible stuff.
post #173 of 189
Well now, I was quite happily spending my Sunday morning listening to Solti conducting Tannhauser (which is magnificent by the way) and idly browsing threads and now I'll have to give all that up to listen to a twenty minute prog rock track about some made up monster's life story conceived as a commentary on the destructive futility of war because I cannot read about something that batshit insane and not listen to it.

Hope you're all happy!

Tarkus...pressing play.
post #174 of 189
post #175 of 189

Here's an underrated prog favourite of mine:

 

 

The main tune is catchy enough but the instrumental section that starts three minutes in is sublime.

 

It was written and largely performed by one Eddie Jobson, I admit I didn't particularly know but was only a teenager at the time, and has an impressive CV that also includes Roxy Music, Crimson, Yes and Zappa at various points.

post #176 of 189

I still haven't quite recovered from the armadillo tank. 

post #177 of 189
Mm, I gotta dig into Curved Air some more. Phantasmagoria is a little aimlessly drifty for my tastes, but its good parts are really good, and I'd bet money that they were an unmentioned influence on the whole early-2000s Evanescence "goth-rock with lady singers" subgenre.
post #178 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post
 

I still haven't quite recovered from the armadillo tank. 

 

It's pretty incredible isn't it?

post #179 of 189

YES are coming to Vancouver in September and I'm hoping my prog loving best friend can go with me. We missed them the last time they were here but this tour should be really good with them playing one track from their first ten albums.

 

Anyone here seen these guys live? 


Edited by Headless Fett - 7/31/17 at 12:47pm
post #180 of 189
I almost went to see them in 2008 before Jon Anderson's health issues, been kicking myself ever since that I didn't. I'm curious how the newer lineups compare, as I'm so used to the classic lineup. I wasn't impressed with Benoit David's vocals on Fly From Here, but I haven't heard anything with the new guy.
post #181 of 189

I've seen recent footage on YouTube with the new lineup and it's pretty solid IMHO.  Jon Davison was also the singer with Glass Hammer for awhile before he joined YES full time in 2014. He's a got a good range and acquits himself well without being a Jon Anderson clone. Honestly, we're never getting the classic lineup ever again and getting to see classic epic prog music performed live is a rarity nowadays.

post #182 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headless Fett View Post
 

YES are coming to Vancouver in September and I'm hoping my prog loving best friend can go with me. We missed them the last time they were here but this tour should be really good with them playing one track from their first ten albums.

 

Anyone here seen these guys live? 

 

I saw Yes for their 'Talk' album (a highly underrated effort).  It was the '90125' lineup as far as the band goes, and everyone was very ON for the entire gig, with Chris Squire being especially playful in terms of chasing Anderson and Rabin around the stage.  A lot of laughter on stage.

 

GREAT show.

 

Yes is coming here in September.  It's the Rabin/Anderson/Wakeman version, and I'd have to think that it'd be a killer gig.

post #183 of 189

Awesome. It's so odd having two versions of YES out there touring but here we are.

 

Should be interesting which ten songs they select for this tour.

post #184 of 189

I wouldn't be surprised if it's all building up to a 2nion tour and album project.

post #185 of 189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post

 

Yes is coming here in September.  It's the Rabin/Anderson/Wakeman version, and I'd have to think that it'd be a killer gig.

 

This iteration is heading my way in September as well.  Going to try and make it, as I have yet to see Anderson live.  I caught the 'classic' lineup in '08, sans Anderson, with Benoit David filling in on vocals.  It was a solid show, and David is no slouch, but he's also not Anderson.

 

I'd like to get to see Rabin perform as well.  For the longest time, I was very dismissive of the Rabin era, but 90125 has become one of my favorites.  I'd say its a best case scenario for pop-prog (if that's even a thing). 

post #186 of 189
Yeah, I'm thinking of trying to catch them when they come out this way in September. We'll see what happens.
post #187 of 189
So I just got back from seeing the Anderson/Rabin/Wakeman branch of Yes in Stockton. God damn was that a good show. I was a little nervous at first that it might not live up to my expectations, but nope - the old fat guy lumbered up to the keyboards and the aging hobbit in a kooky suit took the stage and then the music started and holy shit they've still got it. Anderson in particular performs like he's trying to prove that his medical bout from 2008 hasn't slowed him down, and damned if he doesn't do just that. And as someone who's never investigated the Rabin-era live recordings, it was a pleasant surprise to hear how comfortably he integrates his playing with the classic material - it never felt like "the 90125 guy" doing those songs.

The setlist was a nice blend of classic, 90125-era, and latter-day material - I was a little disappointed that no variation of "The Fish" made it in, but they did perform "South Side of the Sky" for what Anderson claimed was the first time in about forty years. The playing was so energetic and the band members were clearly having such a blast - they even got me digging a track off of Big Generator, the only Yes record I own that I never, ever listen to, and the performance of "Awaken" was the first time that song has ever really clicked for me. Just an absolute blast.

So, yeah, you Chewers that have been mulling going to see them? Freakin' do it.
post #188 of 189

Three legendary men. Holy shit.

post #189 of 189

 

 

 

 

 

Been diving back into ELP as of late and this is quite the live album.  The performance of Tsrkus here will make your hairs stand on end.

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