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Chewers' 200 Best Video Games of the 90's - Page 5

post #201 of 315

#150 Age Of Empires (1998 - PC, Mac)

 

After Warcraft 3 this is the RTS I spent most of my time kicking ass at. There's a romance to playing those old civilizations which runs way beyond the simple and satisfying carnage of battle - even sending a peasant out fishing or farming seemed somehow personally satisfying. "Hey little guy, you like to fish right? Everybody likes to fish. Go fish." They seemed so happy in their work.

 

This is one of those games where the sounds are burned into my brain so hard I hear them on the wind still to this day.

 

post #202 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by A-Pathetic View Post

149. Rise of the Triad (1994) Apogee Games, PC

 

This was the first game that allowed you to John Woo with pistols


The actual cheat code to get dual pistols was something like "johnwoo". At the time I thought that was so cool.

 

 

151. Clock Tower (1996) for Playstation, known as Clock Tower 2 in Japan

 

A sequel to a fairly obscure SNES title, this was a unique point and click horror game. You controlled a female character and the aim was to try and solve a murder mystery and not get chopped up into little pieces by the homicidal madman known as The Scissorman (think Cropsy from The Burning mixed with a character from a creepy kid-scaring European nursery rhyme). The twist was, you couldn't really fight back with proper weapons, instead you had to find a way to escape or hide from him whenever he was on the attack. The game was nothing special to look at and frankly rather unsophisticated at times, but it did have a nice creepy giallo atmosphere thing going on, and was undeniably tense. There are so many slasher movie characters that could have used this model for video game adaptions. Just imagine a Michael Myers or Jason Voorhees game in the same style...

 

 

 

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post #203 of 315

#152

 

Micro Machines v3 (1997)

 

Simple - race tiny racers around house hold objects.  Addiction, very high.  Fast, top down racing. Also the first one I can recall that let you use two people per controller so everyone could have some form of multi-player


BUT

 

you had to be on the same level.  There was only one screen and if a racer dropped off the game restarted at that point.  So if you have three good gamers and one cack handed twat playing it was extraordinarily frustrating.

 

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Edited by Andy Bain - 3/26/12 at 12:00pm
post #204 of 315

Great list guys.   The 90's truly did kick ass.   Not sure if it belongs in the top 150 but another game I loved was.....

 

153.  Act Raiser (SNES)

 

Part God Game, part Action Platformer it was unlike many games that were out at the time.   I sunk so many hours into this, I don't want to say.   And the soundtrack was amazing....

 

 

154. Pilot Wings (SNES)

 

 

Basically a game to show off the Mode 7 graphics, it also has spot on physics and gives you a feeling of flying and free falling.   One of the best chill out games ever.

 

 

Man, the 90's WERE an awesome decade.   We're at 150 and I still have some titles that aren't on here yet.   Good ones.

post #205 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Bain View Post

2. Doom and Doom 2 (1993 and 1994)
Ah, many a uni day was lost to link up on this. My first introduction to multi-player.
And if on your own there was always nightmare mode (which was completely NOT a misnomer)
I don't think any other game had made me leap about in my chair like Doom. I can remember the level where you had one shot, it was a labyrinth and you were being chased by the Cyberdemon. OK, I was wasted but I screamed like a child when I took a wrong corner and came face to face with the bastard.
263


 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Bucho View Post

#102 Duke Nukem 3D (1998 - PC, Mac, Sega Saturn, Playstation, Nintendo 64, Mega Drive)

 

"Come get some."

 

The title was a lie - it wasn't true 3D - but it was so much dumb fun nobody cared. In fact, galavanting first around LA, then around Space, then around LA again, destroying bad guys while spouting Ahnuld-esque quips was so much fun it probably should have been illegal. Nevermind that its sequel became a punchline, the real deal was the real deal for us bloodthristy BFG-weilding perverts the world/solar system over.

 

 

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These two games were responsible for a lot of missing days and nights in my life during the '90s.  Nothing after these two really kept my interest and I ultimately gave up gaming after that, but man, I just loved playing them.

post #206 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by A-Pathetic View Post

149. Rise of the Triad (1994) Apogee Games, PC

 

Oh, I had the LAN parties with my friends.  We played Descent, Duke Nukem 3D, Heretic, Hexen, Mechwarrior 2, Command & Conquer, Warcraft, Quake...you name it.  But if I had a gun to my head and had to tell you which game we had the most fun with?  This is it.

 

My friends bought this game to try it out as a single player game.  This was the first game that allowed you to John Woo with pistols, and was the first game that I remember where you could wound your enemies and they would drop and beg for their lives.  All in all, though, I always thought the single player was ok at best.

 

Multiplayer?  It's hard to touch the multiplayer in this game.  Many weapons we take for granted now got kickstarted here.  For some reason the greatest weapon in this entire game (drunk missiles) hasn't been stolen by any other games.  Even though it should be stolen by all of them.  Limited ammo, it was a carpet bombing gun that you could kind of aim.  It was always fun.  Sometimes you'd eliminate every other player while they were busy fighting each other, sometimes it would blow you up because you stood too close to a wall.

 

One of the melee weapons was a baseball bat, which you could use to knock rockets back at people who shot them at you.

 

It had 3 separate power ups.  God mode (you would float with your hand in front of you with a chorus of angels accompanying you, and you shot seeking orbs that would immediately kill your enemies and shoot their "soul" straight up).  Dog mode (you became a Labrador Retriever and could run around faster with a bark that would blow people to bits).  Shroom mode (where you would hallucinate platforms and other players that actually weren't there).

 

So far ahead of it's time it's ridiculous.  It even would randomly praise a kill with "Ludicrous Gibs!" which is actually the origin of the term gibs in gaming as far as I know.



ahh, I thought shroom mode was so subversive :)

 

I distinctly remember bounding around in god mode, only for it to run out in the peak of a jump and then splatter to fuck as you landed in a jammy mess.  Good times :)

post #207 of 315

 

I'm loving just about every single FPS listed here. Most of them rank among my all time favorites. Extra props for acknowledging how completely ahead of its time Rise of the Triad was.

 

You've all neglected one incredibly crucial one though:

 

154. Blood: One Unit Whole (PC, 1997)

 

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Created using 3D Realm's amazing Build Engine (used most famously in the making of Duke Nukem 3D), Blood is arguably the greatest FPS made under that engine. Its also up there among the greatest first person shooters ever made PERIOD. I'm dead serious.

 

Sporting some of the most ingenious and intelligent level designs during an era of FPS design that was already a total renaissance of creative level structure, Blood is a game that is STILL mind blowing to this day. If anything, in the wake of the soul deadening glut of Private Ryan-wannabe “gritty military” first person shooters that are far more concerned with being “cinematic” and “immersive” and firing up sales charts by appealing specifically to dipshit jocks and college frat boys and not at all concerned with being challenging, fresh, or fun to play, playing a game like Blood NOW after living through more than a decade of that is almost like a religious rush of a reawakening to how spectacular the first person shooter used to be as a genre once upon a time (and still could be if developers would stop watering it the fuck down for “accessibility” to non-gamers).

 

Beyond the phenomenal level design (which I cannot STRESS enough how brilliant they are, to the point of utterly blowing away the vast overwhelming majority of first person shooters made even now in what is easily still the height of its overwhelming dominance over the gaming industry) there's also of course the hilarious and creative weapons at your disposal. Weapons range as diverse as a pitchfork, an aerosol flamethrower, a tommy gun, an Evil Dead II-esque sawed-off double barrel, sticks of dynamite, and even a fucking voodoo doll. Yes, a voodoo doll. And each and every one of these weapons has both a primary and secondary function or mode of fire. And can usually be dual wielded (if only briefly sadly).

 

The enemies too are a great deal of fun and are hardly just generic cannon fodder, ranging from insane robed, gun toting Satanic cultists who babel in tongues as they engage you in combat (and as they're blown away in increasingly brutal fashion), axe wielding Deadite-esque zombies whose severed heads can be kicked around like soccer balls (something which even plays a role in several of the game's many creative puzzles), gargoyle-like flying demons, morbidly obese undead butchers, and so on. Just as memorable as the enemies themselves is all the MANY diverse ways in which they die. From getting riddled with bullets, to getting squished or blown up into kibble, to being sent hurtling many dozens of feet through the air, and most memorably of all to being set on fire (watching a cultist run around lit up like a torch shrieking “HELP ME!!! IT BURNS!!! IT BUUUURNS!!! OH GOD!!!” is one of the singularly most dementedly awesome moments that gaming has to offer), killing things in this game is NEVER anything remotely approaching boring or monotonous.

 

In case it wasn't already readily apparent, this game is STEEPED as heavily as can be in 1980's B horror of the splatter comedy variety. Anyone who grew up on a steady diet of Sam Raimi, Peter Jackson, John Carpenter, and other seminal horror/action/gore/comedy greats of the 80's and early 90's will be right at home and in heaven here, as the references to those works are COUNTLESS and awesome, as is the palpable degree of love for those works that permeates from every pixel and marking firmly the immense influence they've very blatantly had on this game. The atmosphere alone in itself is permeated in and completely reeks of that era and brand of excessive, over the top horror, to say nothing of all the hidden secrets and easter eggs of which there's a never ending supply. Duke Nukem simply just stoke a few quips and catchphrases from Ash: this game lives and breathes not just the Evil Dead films, but all other splatstick horror films of the 80's and 90's like it. For any chewer who has never had the pleasure of playing this bad boy, let me make this abundantly clear here and now: this game is essentially every 80's horror fanboy's dream Evil Dead II game in the form of one of the all time greatest first person shooters ever made. 

 

And of course, there's the game's protagonist Caleb. I love Duke and his brand of action movie testosterone as much as the next person, but Caleb may just well be my pick for the most fun and awesome FPS protagonist out of all of them. Beyond the badassery of being an undertaker-esque hat and trenchcoat clad undead cowboy gunslinger from the old west, Caleb's wonderful raspy, gravely voice delivers some of the most gut bustingly fantastic comments and one liners that put Duke's entire repertoire to shame: few things are as satisfyingly kickass as mowing through hordes of demons and Satanists with a pair of tommy guns while the sinister-voiced Caleb merrily sings "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" from The Wizard of Oz.

 

But above and beyond all else, beyond all the B horror love and homages, it plays wonderfully, is full of variety, and is endlessly replayable simply for the sake of exploring and re-exploring the massive, labyrinth levels alone, never mind discovering all the multitude of new ways to kill shit.

 

Games like the Doom series, Duke Nukem 3D, Hexen and Heretic, Quake, Star Wars Dark Forces, Rise of the Triad, Shadow Warrior, Powerslave, and this help cement 90's DOS as being home to what are still to this day the greatest and most defining games of the entire FPS genre; still unchallenged and still unsurpassed, all the more so as the genre becomes increasingly and ever more thoroughly bogged down into increasingly linear, unimaginative, cutscene and quicktime event addled, challenge-free, cinematic non-games (cause yeah sorry to those who disagree, but fuck about 95% this genre post-Halo).


Edited by Jaquio - 3/26/12 at 1:45pm
post #208 of 315
155. F Zero

Another SNES launch title. At the time, one of the fastest racing games ever made. The sense of speed and the track design made this an instant classic.
post #209 of 315

156.  Cruisin' USA (1994)

 

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Super-cartoony, but it's my favorite driving-like-a-fucking-maniac arcade game.  It allows you to drive under Chicago's Lower Wacker Drive, the Santa Monica Freeway and through the Redwoods.  It also allows you to run through random deer which literally explode into bloody chunks which splat on your windshield.  That alone makes it the greatest game ever.  

post #210 of 315

157- Quake III Arena (PC 1999)

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Id software decides to just ditch the conventional single-player business and go for broke.
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My favorite multiplayer FPS of the 90's(along with Goldeneye). Played the hell out of this on my PC, still somehow having decent huge games on a 56k modem(with occasional dips into unplayable nonsense!). Other games have offered this type of fast and furious-style gameplay(Unreal Tournament), but I really think it was perfected with Arena. So many hours lost.
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post #211 of 315

158. DIE HARD TRILOGY  (1996)

 

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Not just one amazing game, but THREE!

post #212 of 315
159 - Dune 2 (1992) the first RTS game as I recall. This Amiga based, Westwood games RTS, pretty much set the stall out for every RTS that's followed since. From the three warring factions (Atredies, Harkonen, Ordos) each with their own special units and different styles of play, to the base building and resource harvesting, it's all there. Though going back to play it now is a slow experience, you can still appreciate how ahead of the curve his game was, given that 20 years on the genre hasn't really evolved that far since its release.

Westwood rereleased the game again as Dune 2000 but frankly it lacked something and felt like little more than a reskin of the original and a slight tweak to the game balance which killed it stone dead for me.


Dune_2_screenshot_attack_on_base.jpg
post #213 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexus-7 View Post

157- Quake III Arena (PC 1999)

250px-Quake3Title.jpg

Id software decides to just ditch the conventional single-player business and go for broke.
q3_screenshot_1s.jpg

My favorite multiplayer FPS of the 90's(along with Goldeneye). Played the hell out of this on my PC, still somehow having decent huge games on a 56k modem(with occasional dips into unplayable nonsense!). Other games have offered this type of fast and furious-style gameplay(Unreal Tournament), but I really think it was perfected with Arena. So many hours lost.
quake-3-screenshot.jpg
 


Quake 3 was from the 90s?  Jeebus.

 

post #214 of 315

#160 Unreal Tournament (1999)

 

This or Quake 3???  Both gave you the arena style FPS for single loners.  Both very playable, both modable up the wazoo.  I actually preferred the Unreal engine, but thought the gameplay was better in Q3.  In my last job we had LAN gaming setup.  Initially using UT, but then swopped for Q3 for playability.

 

Horses for courses though.

 

Unreal-Tournament-1999.jpg

 

"ooooh, that's gotta hurt"

 

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post #215 of 315

Have we already mentioned Pilotwings64, WaveRace64, and Blast Corps? Because those should definitely be includued.

post #216 of 315

#161 Vandal Hearts (1996)

 

Turn based RPG.  My mate had just been dumped by his long term girlfriend and was kipping on my couch.  We rented this from the video store to pass the time.  Then re-rented it, then re-rented it.  Very addictive.  The joy of watching your move smite the enemy, only to be completely owned because you've overlooked something obvious.

 

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post #217 of 315

#162 Parrapa the Rapper (1996)

 

This actually pains me because I was (and am) SO shit at it.  However the first game of this type that I can remember.  My mates got heavily into it but I was just shameful so sat and watched.  The fact that elements of this got incorporated into GTA S:A killed me.  I couldn't make my car dance for shit, and Carl was laughed off the dancefloor more than once.

 

This could also be responsible for Guitar Hero etc (which I also suck hard at).

 

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post #218 of 315

163- Dungeon Keeper (PC 1997)
 

Dungkeep.jpg

I must have played through the demo to this over 200 times before I finally actually purchased the game(in a two-pack with it's lesser sequel). That hadn't happened before with a demo, and hasn't happened since. After that, I played the full game an ungodly amount of times. So much fun. It was quite fun to smack your imps around to get to work faster, and a hell of a lot of fun to kill the ever living shit out of the "good" guys. It was a joy just to watch your monsters feed on chickens before the inevitable big rumble.

dungeon-keeper-long-play-bile-demon.jpg

Sadly I never played this against anyone online. I can only assume that it was pretty amazing.

 

post #219 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexus-7 View Post

163- Tony Hawk's Pro Skater (Playstation, N64, Dreamcast 1999)

 

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Single-handedly made skating in games fun again, and the Dreamcast version ran smooth as silk.

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already made it into the top 50 (#41)

 

So good it probably does deserve to be mentioned twice though :)

post #220 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Bain View Post


already made it into the top 50 (#41)

 

So good it probably does deserve to be mentioned twice though :)

Crap! I read the entire thread earlier and somehow missed it. I'll find another and edit my post, thanks!
 

 

post #221 of 315

Anyone else feel like Jaquio has just been lurking around for years, desperately waiting for someone to start this thread? :)

 

164. Super Mario RPG (1996)

 

medium_mariorpg.jpg    ss_smrpg_13.gif

 

One of my favorite RPG games of all-time. It's as good as the graphics on the SNES ever got, with vibrant and interesting characters and levels. The battle system isn't terribly unique, though it did introduce action commands that could enhance your attacks with a well-timed button push. The real appeal though was the way it mixed up the Mario formula, introducing new characters and letting you control them in a new and different way, while steal feeling unmistakably like a Mario game. Plus, it had a possessed doll who shot lasers from his fingers, and let you bash enemies with a frying pan. What more could you want?

post #222 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexus-7 View Post

163- Dungeon Keeper (PC 1997)
 

Dungkeep.jpg

I must have played through the demo to this over 200 times before I finally actually purchased the game(in a two-pack with it's lesser sequel). That hadn't happened before with a demo, and hasn't happened since. After that, I played the full game an ungodly amount of times. So much fun. It was quite fun to smack your imps around to get to work faster, and a hell of a lot of fun to kill the ever living shit out of the "good" guys. It was a joy just to watch your monsters feed on chickens before the inevitable big rumble.

dungeon-keeper-long-play-bile-demon.jpg

Sadly I never played this against anyone online. I can only assume that it was pretty amazing.

 


My flatmate used to play this no his PC in the living room, in his dressing gown, while eating a block of cheese.  My other memories are:

 

"Your minions are under attack", "oh for fucks sake..."

"Your minions are deserting", "FUCKING come back here you little shites!"

 

post #223 of 315

165. Sonic CD (Sega CD)

 

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Easily the best Sonic game of the 16 bit generation.  

post #224 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Bain View Post

"Your minions are deserting", "FUCKING come back here you little shites!"

 


They were quite the fickle bunch at times.

 

post #225 of 315

Seriously, Dungeon Keeper is one of the best games of its type, ever. The less said about the sequel the better.

 

post #226 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by SomethingClever View Post

Anyone else feel like Jaquio has just been lurking around for years, desperately waiting for someone to start this thread? :)


Eh. I've lurked this forum since its relative beginnings. Its more just my taking forever and ever to get over a bit of stage fright in posting within a community that I greatly respect, but that has always intimidated the ever loving fuck out of me.

 

I've got more action games, but I thought I'd break it up with some variety next:

 

 

166. Fire 'n Ice (NES, 1992 Japan, 1993 U.S.)

 

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Excellent brain teaser of a puzzle game. A sequel to Tecmo's great 1986 arcade title Solomon's Key, Fire 'n Ice follows a fairly similar enough formula to that game but with several key differences; notably the absence of the “door unlocking” mechanic that was central to Solomon's Key, the inability to jump or attack offensively in any way (which tremendously increases the difficulty of the puzzles and makes this game more of a straight up puzzle game as opposed to the puzzle-platformer that was Solomon's Key), and of course the addition of the “fire and ice” gimmick.

 

The premise here is simple: you play as a small elf-like wizard and you're job is to extinguish all the fires in each of the whopping 100 levels with your ice magic. Basically all you're able to do in this game (besides walking left and right of course) is climb up on blocks that are level to your character's height, and create or melt small blocks of ice one space in front of you, and kick said ice blocks to send them skidding across a surface until they hit something (and provided that there isn't another block immediately behind them when you do). Touch a flame, and you die. Get crushed under a falling block, and you die. Paint yourself into a corner, and curse yourself and your own stupidity before restarting a level. That's it. This may sound absurdly basic, but believe me: this game gets LUDICROUSLY difficult and the levels quickly become extreme brain busters of logistics and problem solving.

 

This is frankly speaking the single most ingenious puzzle game ever released for an 8 bit platform. This game for me takes the crown away from Tetris as the undisputed best puzzle game on the NES by a wide, wide margin. Its simplicity only adds to its complexity and addictiveness. Once you get past the first world (ten worlds total comprised of ten levels each) which is essentially prepping you for a basic array of the kinds of situations the game will throw at you, the game's difficulty level quickly and steeply slants stark upwards at the second world and only grows exponentially more sadistic from there. The sheer massive volume of levels and the depth of difficulty and complexity to the puzzles and the simple, addictive nature of the game only further adds to its replayability.

 

Without question this game marks yet another phenomenal classic game of the 90's that is sadly and unjustly buried in obscurity with time. By all means this belongs in anyone's NES library and among anyone's top 10 or at least 20 NES titles.

post #227 of 315

I was lucky enough to have a table-top version of Pengo in my bedroom for a coupla years. It never gets its due these days...

 

post #228 of 315

 

#167 The Last Ninja 2 (1990)

 

I was going to post this in the 70s/80s then found it was from 1990

 

The very last Speccy game I bought (after I'd upgraded to the 128K, thats right ONE HUNDRED and TWENTY EIGHT K, oh my..), and one of the best.  This was a quantum leap forward in Speccy games IMO.  3D, action adventure, puzzler.  I remember the joy of realising if I threw my ninja stars at the fan, it would break it, I could climb through and then this game world expanded exponentially.  It quite took my breath away.  Even now it doesn't look too shabby.

 

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post #229 of 315

 

168. Shinobi III: Return of the Ninja Master (Sega Genesis, 1993)

 

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I mentioned in my thus far one post in the “top 70's and 80's games” thread that the Shinobi franchise is for me the absolute best out of all of Sega's first party franchises (yep, even waaaaay more than Sonic), remaining consistently outstanding from one installment to the next (and we'll look the other way and pretend that Cyber Shinobi never happened). The original arcade Shinobi is and remains a very special game to me, as it's what got me hooked into gaming in the first place and acted as the blueprint by which nearly all my viewpoints on what makes an excellent action game have been based upon my whole life.

 

Shadow Dancer and Revenge of Shinobi were also pretty damned splendid; but this one right here? This one may just be the best (and still my favorite) out of the entire Shinobi franchise.

 

Taking the side scrolling, shuriken/kunai throwing Shinobi formula and smashing it upside the groin with a sledgehammer while injecting steroids, uppers, and crack-cocaine directly into its eyeballs, this game is a classic Shinobi game cranked well past 11, and far beyond any calculable number of digits into a numerical stratosphere that has yet to be charted by mathematicians. It adds SO much to Joe Musashi's (your character's) repertoire of moves from the previous games its mind boggling. You can run, double jump, wall jump, flip, dive kick, sweep kick, rain down a crescent arc of kunai, and use a wide array of special ninja arts that do anything from triple your jump height, send out columns of fire that destroy everything in sight, engulf you in a lightning shield that grants you temporary invincibility, or even self destruct, wiping out each and every single thing around you in an instant at the cost of one of your lives. And everything you do controls with flawless precision naturally.

 

The levels and setpieces encountered throughout are wonderful; how the hell could anyone pass up a game where you can play your ninja through one level navigating a mined river on a jet powered surf board that you could also use to smash enemies over the skull with (in a spectacular “fuck you” gesture to the Ninja Turtles and their comparatively anemic ninja-surfing shenanigans)? Or speed through chambara-like fields on horseback, letting other ninjas eat a facefull of galloping hooves as you go? There's a great level that actually starts out right from the getgo with you falling off a large, steep cliff to your death and you spend almost the whole level leaping up falling rocks and boulders trying to make it back up to the top: whereupon you then have to make your way through a large, sinister, mist shrouded maze of a feudal Japanese palace. And of course my favorite level by far, the bio weapons lab that eventually turns into a living, organic structure where the veiny, organ-like walls and floors throb and pulsate like some horrible creature's innards; a horrible creature that you eventually face as the level's boss. And everything's rendered in some of the most gorgeously drawn 2D sprite art that any of the 16 bit consoles had to offer.

 

You fight everything from enemy ninjas, tengu-like bird demons, Gundam-esque battle mechs armed with gigantic laser cannons, disgusting man-sized brains in jars that break free and hop around at you, and what is essentially Mechagodzilla (in a nod to and one upping of the Godzilla boss battle in Revenge of Shinobi). The whole game generally has the look and feel of those darker, gorier, grittier, more mature, adult-aimed anime films along the lines of Ninja Scroll and Wicked City that were big during the 80's and 90's, and basically comes across as the best possible playing representation of those in a side scrolling action game. And like any good violent, nasty Genesis title, the music is a wonderfully dark, pulse pounding techno affair that sounds greatly similar to Yuzo Koshiro's beloved Streets of Rage soundtrack. It fits this game like a glove.

 

There's not really much I can say about this game other than its among the most impeccably executed side-scrolling action titles of the 16 bit era with creative levels, a ton of moves, plenty of fair and balanced difficulty, spectacular and humongous bosses, and beautifully precise controls. It has a generally badass attitude, plenty of 16 bit violence, and a kind of edgy mean streak that made this, as far as ninja themed games of the early 90's went, the hardassed antidote to the more family friendly, pizza scarfing goofballs every other kid back then was obsessed with.

 

Generally speaking, I've always found that no self-respecting Genesis owner could say they had a quality Genesis library unless this game was proudly displayed front and center with the rest of the system's upper echelon games.  

post #230 of 315

169)  Legacy of Kain: Soul Reaver  (1999)

 

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This one really blew my young mind when it came out.  Great level design, great boss battles and the shifting and gliding mechanics really made it feel unique at the time.  Fantastic voice acting as well.

post #231 of 315

#170: G-Police (1997)

 

 

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gpolice_screen001.jpg

 

 

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So Psygnosis, you want to take the 'Space Sim Revisted' mechanics of Colony Wars and mix it with Blade Runner?

 

Who exactly do we have to fuck to make this be? 

 

post #232 of 315

171. Road Rash (1994), 3DO

 

Okay, I'm the resident Road Rash apologist I guess.  I'm guessing this will be the only 3DO selection to make the list, and it probably should be.  It's the reason I bought a 3DO, I know that much.  It was also worth it.

 

There had been previous versions of Road Rash (and I played the heck out of the many Genesis versions), but this is the perfect version.  Amazing soundtrack including a lot of early Soundgarden tunes, an easy concept that ramps up the difficulty level correctly.  You can start out by racing and not bothering with the fighting, but pretty soon you'll be careening down a highway snatching a chain out of a competitors hand and smacking him in the head with it.  By the time you feel like you're getting pretty good at the game it jumps you up to the Superbike level where you will be humbled for a while trying to learn how to play the game at mach speed.

 

It's fun though.  Simple concept, well executed.  It's sad that the franchise hasn't gotten it's next gen due.

post #233 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Bain View Post

 

#167 The Last Ninja 2 (1990)


Nice. Here's a great game, where the title was a joke response to The Last Ninja:

 

#172


The First Samurai (1991) on Amiga

 

As I remember this was one of the few Amiga action titles that could really hold its own on the technical side against the "blow you away" big guys like the Shadow of the Beast games and the Bitmap Bros. Amazing (for the time) graphics, with really cool sprites and scrolling effects. The sound and music was pretty awesome too. Top notch platform action game, just check out that intro.

 

 

post #234 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by A-Pathetic View Post

171. Road Rash (1994), 3DO

 

Okay, I'm the resident Road Rash apologist I guess.  I'm guessing this will be the only 3DO selection to make the list, and it probably should be.  It's the reason I bought a 3DO, I know that much.  It was also worth it.

 

There had been previous versions of Road Rash (and I played the heck out of the many Genesis versions), but this is the perfect version.  Amazing soundtrack including a lot of early Soundgarden tunes, an easy concept that ramps up the difficulty level correctly.  You can start out by racing and not bothering with the fighting, but pretty soon you'll be careening down a highway snatching a chain out of a competitors hand and smacking him in the head with it.  By the time you feel like you're getting pretty good at the game it jumps you up to the Superbike level where you will be humbled for a while trying to learn how to play the game at mach speed.

 

It's fun though.  Simple concept, well executed.  It's sad that the franchise hasn't gotten it's next gen due.


This was the game that introduced me to grunge. I am forever grateful.

 

FYI, EA *was* working on a next gen Road Rash. There was even a pre-vis demo that was floating around for a while that made it look like Burnout Revenge, but with melee combat. EA in its current state still need to jump on this.

 

post #235 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by A-Pathetic View Post

171. Road Rash (1994), 3DO

 

Okay, I'm the resident Road Rash apologist I guess.  I'm guessing this will be the only 3DO selection to make the list, and it probably should be.  It's the reason I bought a 3DO, I know that much.  It was also worth it.


 

Not at all. The 3DO as a console may have indeed been a spectacular train wreck of epic, clusterfucked, Ed Woodian proportions... but it DOES in fact have its tiny little share of cool gems. Road Rash is definitely among them. The Genesis Road Rash trilogy was also great and easily deserves to be here as well. And that's saying a lot coming from me, since I generally hate racing games with a passion. But Road Rash is a definite exception (as was F-Zero, which I'm glad someone brought up earlier).

 

And speaking of things that deserve to be on here:

 

 

173. Syndicate (PC, 1993)

 

xlQzB.jpg yXjmJ.gif

 

I can't believe we've made it this far and this hasn't been brought up yet. Cause its easily one of THE best PC games ever made, of ANY genre or decade.

 

Remember isometric tactical shooters? Remember games like Cannon Fodder (thinking back again to legitimately great games on the 3DO)? Well this sucker right here's probably the best of that sadly short lived little genre.

 

Syndicate may well also be one of the best Blade Runner-inspired cyberpunk themed games ever made. You play the role of an unseen (cause he or she is supposed to be you) scumbag corporate executive in a dystopian future where every sovereign nation in the world is ruled over not by governments or monarchies of any sort, but rather a series of highly corrupt corporations. These companies go to war with one another and maintain control over the masses by way of propaganda, relentless marketing and advertising... and when all that's not enough, by sending out brainwashed, drugged cyborg assassins to enforce their rule under the barrel of a gun.

 

As a corporate goon for one of these conglomerates (you even get to make up the name of your company and pick out its logo) you're in charge of sending out small platoons of these cyborg soldiers to do battle against other rival companies, upstart militias, rioting, rebellious citizens, and anything else that poses a threat to your company's iron grip on the nations it rules over. As you progress in the game and defeat other companies and their assassins, you get to claim their territories (marked on a map with your corporate logo).

 

You make money via setting taxes on all the conquered areas of the globe that your company controls. You can invest that money in a number of areas, including R&D in newer and better weaponry, improved cybernetic upgrades and better drugs and steroids for your assassins to keep their strength and reflexes superhumanly high, and so on. Set your taxes just high enough and you'll be rolling in enough dough to arm up, dope up. and cyber up your units into unstoppable, unfeeling slaughter machines. But set your taxes TOO high, and you'll inspire civil unrest amongst the people and will have to deal with more rioting and anti-corporate sentiment against your outfit (manifesting in your troops getting attacked en masse on the streets in broad daylight by most random citizens they come across, which can seriously fuck with some of your missions). You also have to be careful in managing the dosage of the drugs you feed to your troops. Give them too much, and they eventually build up a tolerance to them and they lose their effectiveness, forcing you to ease back on the dosage.

 

Coolest of all, you can also kidnap and brainwash any of random citizens you happen across or even police officers in your troops vicinity via a mind control device called a “Persuadertron”. Round up enough citizens within the influence of your Persuadertron, and have yourself a small army of mindless, obedient pawns and meat shields to back up your troops; they can even pick up guns and other weapons off of fallen enemies and use them. You can even (with enough finagling) capture and brainwash the cyber assassins of enemy corporations, and add them permanently among your controllable ranks.

 

This game also beat GTA to its own punch by several years featuring levels that are fully populated cities unto themselves with the citizens going about their daily lives of their own accord, reacting primarily to what your troops do and what the public image of your company is at that given point in time. There are even random police officers who will jump into the fray and join in on whatever firefight your troops happen to be engaged in. There are random futuristic cars that drive about, even stopping to obey traffic lights and signs and whatnot. They can be randomly jacked by your troops at any point to get them from place to place in the city quicker.

 

The combat in the game is bloody, brutal, and destructive, with most buildings, cars, bridges, and structures being completely destructible (provided you have powerful enough explosives and BFG-caliber hardware at your disposal; equipment which certainly doesn't come cheap). Few things are more satisfying than dispersing a mob of angry protesters or a wave of enemy cyber-soldiers by firing a missile at an overpass, and having both the bridge itself and the train or cars passing over it come plummeting onto the crowd below in a spectacular fiery wreck.

 

And in true GTA fashion, you can just as easily fuck about in the city causing random havoc for no particular reason rather than carry out missions. Don't feel like breaking up a protest riot against your company? Fuck it, brainwash a bunch of random slobs and start another riot of your own. Go around blowing up buildings, and lighting random bystanders on fire with flamethrowers if you feel so inclined. The amount of freedom this game lends you is all the more awe inspiring considering that this came out in 199-fucking-3. This game wasn't just before GTA, it was years before the goddamned original Playstation entirely. The NES was still around (albeit on its last legs) and the 16 bit era was still young and had its best years ahead of it, and during that time we had a game like this; what was basically a proto-sandbox game.

 

First person shooters and real time strategy games aside, this was easily among my most played to death games on PC in the early 90's. Past the deeply intelligent and richly rewarding gameplay, just the sheer (at the time) ballsy idea of not only finally playing as an out and out villain, but a whole evil empire setting out to subjugate the people and generally cause misery and destruction purely for the sake of self-serving greed rather than playing as some generic, altruistic do-gooder out to save the world or some damsel in distress (again bearing in mind that this was the early 90's and that was the standard mold of a vast majority of video games) along with the dark, cyberpunk aesthetic and harsh amounts of unflinching violence made this game a crack-like addiction of immense proportions for me.

 

This game was an absolute must-own for all PC gamers of the early 90's. If you didn't play it, you seriously missed out on something incredibly special. But you're in luck, since gog.com as of quite recently has begun selling a modern operating system compatible version for dirt-ass cheap (as the game had up till now been exclusively a DOS title).

 

This is for my money easily and without question the finest game Bullfrog Productions has ever produced, and still to this day the single best thing that Peter Molyneux has ever been involved with or had his name attached to. This shit makes Fable look like the milquetoast piece of lightweight crap that it is.

post #236 of 315

174) Shadowrun (1994, Genesis)

 

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While its SNES counterpart ended up being more mainstream, the Genesis version did a far better job of capturing the style and gameworld of FASA's rpg game; multiple classes, a fun and challenging hacking interface and an assload of quest and npc's made this a must get action rpg for the Genesis.

post #237 of 315

175) Phantasy Star IV (Genesis, 1995)

 

250px-Phantasy_Star_EotM_cover.jpg

 

The swan song of the series (as an rpg, I mean), but what a swan song it was! Fantastic gameplay, solid story and plenty of characters to meet and recruit made for an epic quest; plus, this is the game that ACTUALLY pulled off an "Aerith" twist years before Final Fantasy VII even existed.

post #238 of 315

176) D&D: Tower of Doom/Shadows over Mystara  (1993/1996/1999, Arcade/Saturn)

 

dungeon.png

 

Probably one of the best uses of the Dungeon and Dragons license, Capcom just worked its beat em up magic and added some RPG elements, resulting in two of the best cooperative arcade games ever made; if any arcade game screams "HD re-release on live/psn", its these two.

post #239 of 315

There have been a few games mentioned in here that I never played but remember for how hyped they were in GamePro Magazine, which I used to collect religiously. "Sunset Riders" and "Road Rash" were two examples. I never played "Road Rash" because I was a Super Nintendo guy, so I missed out on a lot of games that were exclusive to Sega Genesis and other systems.

 

I never got a chance to play "Sunset Riders" because it seemed to be rare for some reason, even when it was relatively new. I think it was probably always rare, as it's currently going for really high prices on E-bay. Anyone know what the deal is with that?

 

I think either GamePro or E.G.M once gave it this really impressive rating, like best game of the year or even decade (!). I don't remember what the rating was exactly but it sure got me curious. I wanted to play it badly and could never track it down. Now you guys are making me want to track it down to play it all over again. DAMN YOU ALL. tongue.gif

post #240 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaquio View Post


 

Not at all. The 3DO as a console may have indeed been a spectacular train wreck of epic, clusterfucked, Ed Woodian proportions... but it DOES in fact have its tiny little share of cool gems. Road Rash is definitely among them. The Genesis Road Rash trilogy was also great and easily deserves to be here as well. And that's saying a lot coming from me, since I generally hate racing games with a passion. But Road Rash is a definite exception (as was F-Zero, which I'm glad someone brought up earlier).

 

Nothing else from that system really deserves a spot here, but I still remember being red-faced with jealousy when Super Street Fighter Turbo and the only arcade-perfect Samurai Shodown port went to that system and nowhere else.

post #241 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryoken View Post

175) Phantasy Star IV (Genesis, 1995)

 

250px-Phantasy_Star_EotM_cover.jpg

 

The swan song of the series (as an rpg, I mean), but what a swan song it was! Fantastic gameplay, solid story and plenty of characters to meet and recruit made for an epic quest; plus, this is the game that ACTUALLY pulled off an "Aerith" twist years before Final Fantasy VII even existed.


 

PSIV was already mentioned several pages earlier. Also Phantasy Star II did the "Aerith twist" even years before this one did. 

 

Nonetheless, glad to see this game get so much love as its still my favorite JRPG ever.

post #242 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Justin Clark View Post

 

Nothing else from that system really deserves a spot here, but I still remember being red-faced with jealousy when Super Street Fighter Turbo and the only arcade-perfect Samurai Shodown port went to that system and nowhere else.


 

Actually I'd say Cannon Fodder (which I name dropped briefly in my Syndicate post) would certainly warrant a spot on here. So would Return Fire, another genuinely great game that originated on that system (and was only later on ported to other stuff like PS1). Its a terrible system definitely, but there are a tiny few actual gold nuggets to be found buried deep within the giant turd that is its library. 

 

As far as ports go, good calls on SSFIIT and Samurai Shodown there. SSFIIT wouldn't get another port outside of 3DO until 1999 or so with the Street Fighter Collection on PS1. Samurai Showdown of course was also on the Neo-Geo: but that's hardly fair to call that a "port" in the strictest sense of the word, since its basically just the arcade version itself. For whatever little its worth, the 3DO also had what is still shockingly to this day the single best port of Wolfenstein 3D of any platform there is. There are also very good ports of Primal Rage and Out of This World on it for those who might be inclined to care. Some might argue that The Horde could arguably go on here, but I'm not entirely sure if I would be one of those people since its been eons since I last played that. 

 

And with those few posts, I think we about rounded out everything on that system that was worth a crap. Anything else ranges from mildly okay-ish or a guilty pleasure at best, to just the absolute rock bottom of suck at worst. And 9 times out of 10, most games on it fall into the latter end of the spectrum.

post #243 of 315

I think the worst gaming system of the 90's has to be the CDi by Philips Electronics.   And they even had permission to use some of Nintendo's best licenses like Mario and Legend of Zelda.

post #244 of 315
Thread Starter 

I remember the Phillips CDi blowing minds because it was the first game system that used digital discs. With the exception of Space Ace & Dragon's Lair, the games ranged from unplayable to laughable.

post #245 of 315

177.  Bushido Blade (PS1)

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSMuLXCRzbcw2h9Y8p8K5Jg16M9hmvMXDCz76XQGAgchacbFVQV

 

No time limit.   No health bar.   Just strategy and a lot of luck.   This is one of those games where a duel can be over in 10 seconds or 10 minutes and I've had both kinds of fights.   It's possible to take out the opponent in one stab but there's also the option of wounding your opponent's arms and legs.   An incredibly deep fighting game but definitely not for everyone.

post #246 of 315

And the worst peripheral of all time?

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSjfDp18o3SUU0OJMnZK4ocNAT6SzxIN0LEWV8CldPd_BYIAAxn

 

Not sure why this concept keeps coming back gaming generation after gaming generation.   It's like 3D coming back every ten or twenty years in movies.


Edited by dynamotv - 3/27/12 at 1:41pm
post #247 of 315

 

178. The Outfoxies (Arcade, 1994)

 

1q2PM.jpg ZoIaI.jpg

 

Simultaneously one of the greatest and most obscure games of the 90's, this was a fabulous and way ahead of its time arcade game that deserves way more love than it'll probably ever get.

 

You pick one of seven freakishly weird professional assassins, and you have to outwit and kill the other six one by one in head to head combat. And when I say “freakishly weird” I'm not kidding: the playable assassins range from a crippled Chinese scientist in a high tech, futuristic, weapons-filled wheelchair, a pair of creepy Omen-like twin brother and sister children who move about the levels skipping while holding hands, and even a chimpanzee. No really, one of them is a chimpanzee. And not even an anthropomorphic one, just a plain old chimpanzee. Wearing a tuxedo and a top hat.

 

The gameplay is deceptively simple: chase your opponent all around one of 8 gigantic, free-roaming arenas, and kill them any way you can using any means available to you. And once again when I say “using any means” I mean exactly that; there are an ABSURD array of weapons and random items scattered about each level that you can use.

 

And oh my god the levels. You have an airship that if you break into the cockpit, you can actually commandeer control of it and steer the thing wildly in any direction you feel like (even doing flips and loops and nosedives) all in the name of knocking around your opponent who will surely be elsewhere in the bowels of the ship, and sending all the usable weapons and items skidding to and fro, hopefully someplace out of their reach. Another level is a boat lost in the middle of the sea and in the midst of a huge storm. Besides being able to knock your opponent overboard (and vice versa) the ship will periodically flood with water from the storm and submerge beneath the waves forcing the both of you to swim about.

 

There's an aquarium caught in a chain reaction of explosions that's rupturing all the tanks one by one and causing the whole building to slowly flood and setting loose a variety of deadly fish from piranha to sharks to electric eels. As more of the building is gradually destroyed around you, some rooms you were previously able to venture in become cut off and others that were formerly cut off can now be explored. There's a train level where besides moving from car to car, you can also venture outside and on the roof of the train where a helicopter will occasionally appear to drop down more weapons; remaining outside too long can be a problem as the train occasionally enters overpasses, smashing to a pulp anyone unlucky enough to still be tooling about on the roof of the train. And there's an office building with a water tower a chopper parked up on the roof that can be blown up, causing the entire roof to cave in on the building and flood it with water from the water tower and the chopper to crash and blow up in a huge wreck inside the building, with the wreckage even able to fall through several floors of the building causing you problems even when you venture down into the deeper levels to get away from the crash. And I didn't even get into the circus level with a whole fully functional trapeze setup.

 

And so on and so forth. I haven't even begun to scratch the surface of how insane the levels get. And you and your opponent can venture as far away from one another as you wish, with the screen allowing this by way of Samurai Shodown-esque zooming, so you're never chained to any particular spot. And virtually everything around you is totally destructible, from glass windows to railings and bits of floor and ceiling, pretty much all the levels will likely be absolutely trashed the longer the fights go on.

 

Beyond the levels, as said before, there are a near infinite amount of ways the two players can maim or kill one another. This has much to do with the fact that just about EVERY random, seemingly innocuous item laying around in the background can be picked up and made into a weapon. No really: ANY. THING. There's swords, rocket launchers, grenades, pistols, machine guns, flamethrowers, throwing knives, lion tamer whips; you can pick up crates and boxes, trash cans, chairs, and vases and hurl them at one another. There's even a dining hall where you can pick up plates of hot soup and throw them at the other player. You can use just about any random background object against the other player as a deathtrap, from knocking them into an electrical fuse box to shooting a gas main besides them and blowing them to bits, or causing a chandelier to fall on them. And of course when all else fails, you can just run up to one another and bash each other upside the face with your bare fists until one of you drops. If you ever wondered who would win in a no holds barred, knock down, drag out fistfight between two tiny blonde children and a chimp in a tux, this is the game you've been waiting for to answer that burning question.

 

The controls are great and the gameplay is fast paced, fun, and hectic at all times. This easily belongs in any list of the greatest, most fun competitive multiplayer games ever made. Winning is fifty percent skill and fifty percent luck, pending the items available to you and the turn of the situation at hand via random environmental hazards. A match can be over in as little as a second or take as long as many minutes (similar to the above cited Bushido Blade, another fantastic 90's classic that I'm glad someone mentioned).

 

Many people usually refer to the late 70's and early 80's as the golden age of the arcade, but for me it was the 90's without question. There were TONS of fantastic, innovative gems just like this coming out of the 90's arcade industry, usually hidden on the farthest fringes from mainstream gaming. The Outfoxies is but one of many great examples of this and a window into a surprisingly large world of quality gaming that for me further solidifies the 90's as the absolute best decade for video games.


Edited by Jaquio - 3/27/12 at 2:50pm
post #248 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynamotv View Post

177.  Bushido Blade (PS1)

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSMuLXCRzbcw2h9Y8p8K5Jg16M9hmvMXDCz76XQGAgchacbFVQV

 

No time limit.   No health bar.   Just strategy and a lot of luck.   This is one of those games where a duel can be over in 10 seconds or 10 minutes and I've had both kinds of fights.   It's possible to take out the opponent in one stab but there's also the option of wounding your opponent's arms and legs.   An incredibly deep fighting game but definitely not for everyone.


the almost diametric opposite to

 

#179 Soul Blade (1996)

 

Tekken with weapons basically.  Again battle through people to meet the big boss and get the uber weapon.  I may be thinking of a different game but I'm pretty sure you could use nunchucks in this one, and keep people in the air.  In fact, you got more damage if you hit them while they were in the air.  Also it featured a playable gimp character who had the most unusual strut around an arena I've ever seen.

 

souledge.png

 

 

 

post #249 of 315

180. Revolution X (Arcade)

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR0z5plwkcM-n75WroM-hrX_jMHcPTgiJVFfVddU2b64uJ_Cv-Q

 

Did you know Aerosmith had an arcade game in the 90's.   Did you know that it didn't suck?   This is essentially a reskinned version of the Terminator 2 arcade game that was out a few years earlier.   What makes it worthy of inclusion is the frantic pace, the cheesiness of the concept and the soundtrack.   I'm not ashamed to say I spent alot of money on this game.

post #250 of 315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naisu Baddi View Post

I never got a chance to play "Sunset Riders" because it seemed to be rare for some reason, even when it was relatively new. I think it was probably always rare, as it's currently going for really high prices on E-bay. Anyone know what the deal is with that?

 

 

It was so rare for me that I didn't even realize that there was a home console version of the game.  But it was a freaking blast to play in the arcades.

 

And I remember that Aerosmith game; I used to be so conflicted playing it because I fucking hate Aerosmith yet it was such a fun game to play.  Even the awful music couldn't ruin it.

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