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The Cabin in the Woods - Post Release - Page 3

post #101 of 974

SPOILER

 

SPOILER

 

SPOILER

 

 

 

I'm also dying to know everyone's favorite "instrument of death." Mine was the clown, just because he looked uber- bizarre in a sea of bizarre.

post #102 of 974

I'm a staunch member of Team Unicorn and Team Merman.

post #103 of 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin Macken View Post

Saw this after work today, absolutely fantastic.  I loved it.   I knew a fair amount of spoilers going in, but was still taken aback by just how nuts the third act was.

 

I do have one minor quibble though, and I'll admit it's nitpicking, but...

 

 

 

Spoilers!

 

 

 

 

Was everyone else just expecting something semi-Lovecraftian to rise out at the end?  I knew it ended with a giant handing emerging from below, I had just assumed it would be vaguely Cthulhu looking, or in some way monstrous.   Was it just some giant human-like deity?  Or just some random giant dude?   I want fucking tentacles, damn it!



I was a bit disappointed by the giant hand rising up as well.  Everything else about the Ancient Ones was so darn Lovecraftian that seeing the hand of what could have just been a rejected shot from Wrath of the Titans was a bit of a letdown.  Small nitpick, though, and someone is probably going to say that the more humanoid hand of the un-appeased Ancient One was deliberately meant to look that way - AUDIENCE IDENTIFICATION.

 

Anyway, I really liked this, but I have to admit that it lost me at parts when it wandered into connecting the horror with the sci-fi of the "showrunners".  Some of the cabin bits so drag a little, especially near the middle, and even though I know the technical specifics aren't the point, the whole structure of the organization (at least its American wing) and Ancient Ones was a bit confusing, as well as the creation of the monsters.  I know, I know, it's not out of the realm of implausibility that they could realistically stage those creatures, but then we see a giant snake at the end and a killer clown?  How does that work?  The Ancient Ones seem to have adherents, like the guy at the gas station, so do some people know about the stakes besides the immediate members of the organization?  When one of the characters talked about staging the sex to entertain the audience, I wasn't quite certain what he meant - corporate?  Do some people pay to see what's happening? This is get-it-right-or-Apocalypse, so who's being entertained by having to contrive a topless reveal?  I agree with Gabe in that sense that some of it doesn't hold up, but hell - I could very well be missing the point.  I'll certainly be rewatching this one day soon.

post #104 of 974

I also thought that there were some tonal issues, which a commentator from Badass Digest notes more than I could:  he actually read the script a while back and thinks that its darker undertones are too undercooked in the final product.

 

 

 

Quote:

Secondly, and related to the first point -- I felt the downstairs world was played too comic.  This is the "real" world of the movie, and when I read the script, while this stuff was funny, there was an underlying feeling of stomach turning dread at what they were doing.  That was missing for me in the movie.  The sets were too big, too bright, and felt too much like "sets," for one.  I also think both Jenkins and Acker (who I adore) were miscast.  They are both so naturally sweet and likeable, and while I got a thrill out of seeing them curse, their lines/scenes read a lot darker on the page.  I remember how disturbed I was reading about the hair dye slowly "dumbing" the blonde -- that's a really creepy thing, but in the movie I wasn't bothered by it... Acker made even this likeable.  Another example -- in the script the speakerphone scene walked this amazing line where the stuff Mordecai was saying was really creepy and scary, but then Whedon undercuts it with the great speakerphone business.  In the movie, the creepy stuff was just kind of blah... the scene was all about the comic beats, rather than a delicious mix. 

 

 

post #105 of 974

Richard Jenkins is not a fan of chipper Japanese girls.

post #106 of 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by DamnDirtyApe View Post

SPOILER

 

SPOILER

 

SPOILER

 

 

 

I'm also dying to know everyone's favorite "instrument of death." Mine was the clown, just because he looked uber- bizarre in a sea of bizarre.

 

Trio of disemboweling scarecrows for me.
 

 

post #107 of 974

Merman. I want to see Cabin in the Woods: Merman Redux. SO bad.

 

Trio of scarecrows is a close second. Followed by the dismemberment goblins.

post #108 of 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by DamnDirtyApe View Post

SPOILER

 

SPOILER

 

SPOILER

 

 

 

I'm also dying to know everyone's favorite "instrument of death." Mine was the clown, just because he looked uber- bizarre in a sea of bizarre.

.

Something about the clown really bothered me, and I'm not someone who has a problem with clowns. His malicious glee as he moved toward the terrified girl was extremely dark and she fully sold the terror of realizing she was about to die by being gutted in the most nightmarish scenario possible.

Also really loved the Cenobite knockoffs and that eery quiet moment the final girl had with him while still encased.
post #109 of 974

Something I noticed during the film:  the girl zombie who offs Sigourney at the end is played by the kid from Silent Hill, Jodelle Ferland.  Thought that was pretty neat.

post #110 of 974

I was a big fan of this movie. I'm pretty sure I had a huge smile on my face the entire time.  Saw an early screening so my theater was mostly empty but the people who were there loved it. Kind of geeked out when I saw Andrew from Buffy.

 

 

 

I only caught brief glimpses of it but I would like to see more of the Kill-Bot.

post #111 of 974

Eh, I feel you guys oversold this a bit. I enjoyed it (the "I learned it from you!" drug ad callback was awesome, but I was the only one in the theater who got it) but could never fully get invested in it, and I thought the mythology leaps went a bit too far (I thought Perseus killed Chronos?).

 

I liked that they reversed horror movie conventions and made the hop-head the hero.

 

And I'm glad dude finally got to see his merman.


Edited by Shaun H - 4/13/12 at 9:29pm
post #112 of 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Draco Senior View Post

I also thought that there were some tonal issues, which a commentator from Badass Digest notes more than I could:  he actually read the script a while back and thinks that its darker undertones are too undercooked in the final product.

 


I disagree with his reading of the script.  I read a draft right before filming started, and the final product is pretty much exactly as it read, right down to the giant hand.  I don't know where this 'darker tone' stuff comes from.

 

post #113 of 974

That's fine.  I just thought it was an interesting comment from someone who felt that the tone of the script was unevenly translated.

 

I can see what he means with the "speakerphone" moment.  I liked it in the film, but I could see how someone would have liked it to walk the line in-between straight-up comedy (which it was) and and a more serious ominousness.

post #114 of 974

Just saw this tonight. I managed to remain relatively spoiler-free, and I'm really glad I did. Absolutely loved it. I expected the balance of humor and horror to be great (as it was), but I wasn't expecting the balls-to-the-wall awesomeness of the third act. So, so good.

 

Also, can we get Fran Kranz some consistent work? That guy needs to be on my TV more often, he's great.

post #115 of 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Draco Senior View Post

That's fine.  I just thought it was an interesting comment from someone who felt that the tone of the script was unevenly translated.

 

I can see what he means with the "speakerphone" moment.  I liked it in the film, but I could see how someone would have liked it to walk the line in-between straight-up comedy (which it was) and and a more serious ominousness.


I prefer the film's version, if only because the joke in the script (which I loved) was a little too textbook Whedon.  "OminousominousominousJOKE!!!!"  I knew the punchline well before it actually hit.  Playing up their uncomfortableness with 'the Harbinger' was funny in itself; you weren't expecting a big gag as much.

post #116 of 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabe T View Post

Not that it's a failing of the movie, but it is bizarre that the rules are different in Japan. They girls defeat the ghost, and the Ancient Ones are totally cool with losing that one, but one virgin lives in America and its all over? Plus, she makes it to the sacrificial chamber, and after a stray werewolf attack, their contingency plan is a 60 year old woman?


I thought they made this clear: all the rituals going on across the world are for redundancy's sake. They only need ONE ritual to go well to stave off Cthulhu. That's why everything was riding on Dana and Marty once Japan failed--remember, right at the beginning they talk about how those were the only two scenarios still in play, everyone else had failed (i.e., defeated their monsters).

 

And Sigourney wasn't the contingency plan, things had gone completely to hell at that point. She was trying the hail-mary pass of convincing them to lay down their lives for the sake of the human race (and it almost worked!)

 

Amazing movie. I can sort of see where Gabe is coming from in terms of intellectual detachment, but I'm an intellectually detached guy, so it didn't bug me (plus, as mentioned, the detachment-vs-visceral fear thing is part of the movie's point). (Though I think they would have benefited more if they'd dropped any sense of levity once the monsters got loose, since that's supposed to be the ultimate "try being detached NOW, motherfucker" scenario.)

 

Also, while it's possible I don't really understand your point, Gabe, I think the crucial thing is that the monsters were supposed to carry baggage with them. Yes, Pinhead is more than just a boogeyman, but the movie can't cover the ground it does while filling in all the nuances of every single monster. That's exactly WHY they used obvious analogs of characters like Pinhead and Pennywise and so on. It's shorthand.

 

post #117 of 974

Speaking of contingency plans, it was surprisingly easy for them to get into the secret base, all things considered.

 

I wonder if it's happened before, the "puppets" eventually coming into direct contact with the "puppeteers"?

post #118 of 974

The best horror movie since Reagan was in office. Well worth the delay. Incredibly happy I managed to dodge all the spoilers, especially Sigourney Weaver's reveal at the end.

post #119 of 974

I accidentally spoiled that cameo for myself, but it was still very effective and the audible gasps in my theater were satisfying.  Nothing like having Sigourney show up for some expository dialogue and then get an axe to the head.

 

Although given her less no-nonsense persona, it would have been interesting to see Jaime Lee Curtis do it.

post #120 of 974

Just finished seeing this with a pretty damn good and receptive crowd. The Japanese school girls, zombie hand, and Unicorn all killed. This was a fantastic movie. I guess nobody else sees that Goddard and Whedon are basically saying its time for some new and fresh horror ideas and creators over the same old stuff, this quote from the other side of the internet sums it up nicely.

 

  It could be read that the film, while critical of the audience, is, in a way, on its side. The ending states that it wants to "give someone else a shot", implying that the all the lovely, cliched horror elements that the audience eats up--and by proxy their creators--need to be wiped away(literally, by the "horror audience-as-ancient Gods") so that the new and creative can take over. 

post #121 of 974

Saw this today and loved it. Taking some other friends tomorrow to see it and they'll love it too. I just have to echo what everyone is saying here about how amazing it was. The whole last 20 minutes I had a huge smile on my face. I just hope I can keep the hyperbole im check so I don't turn anyone off seeing it. Some people I know get like that, the jerks.

 

Unfortunately I was spoiled in the trailer too about Fran Kranz not getting killed so early, but it only hurt it a little. The only thing that kinda bothered me a bit was the motorcyle jump. If they hadn't earlier showed that the barrier was there it would have floored me. Still, I suppose the effect was that we (the audience) knew it was coming? That's the only reason I would think they'd do it that way, but honestly it didn't feel like we were in on it. If he would have miraculously made it across only to be killed another way, or pretty much anything else happened I would have liked it a little more. But this is the only minor gripe I have in this amazing film.

 

I can't wait to see it again!

post #122 of 974

Even if they hadn't shown the force field in effect earlier, you just know his jump is not going to end successfully.  I was already saying "See ya later, Thor" in my head, bracing for the inevitable.  The way the movie plays up this brave act, with the look on the guy's face and his assurances that he will come back, makes it clear that there's going to be a rug-pulled-out "Ha, thought he was getting out, eh?" pay off.

 

Though I think the barrier reveal so early was deliberately placed to answer some questions about why they didn't try to escape in certain ways.

post #123 of 974

I agree with you Draco, I just thought the reveal of the force field would have been cooler if that's how we discovered it.

 

Yeah, no way was he making it out of there.

post #124 of 974

I have a question and it's the only thing that stuck out for me:

 

Did different regions of the world have different rules? Either that or I need help trying to figure out which of the Japanese Schoolgirls was the 'athlete'

 

Gabe made the interesting point about what constitutes as scary, but there seemed to be a limitless amount of scenarios that weren't just "Teens chased by zombies"

 

What I mean to say is, I actually find it feasible that there may be an underground bunker in Britain that houses, say, a sociopathic teenager who is unleashed on a single mother.

 

But I agree that that isn't as fun as OMFGAGIANTSNAKE!

 

post #125 of 974

I've seen this a few times, and I read the script twice, so I want to point out deleted scenes for the sake of it.

 

The first is a small bit where Jenkins tells the guard that he has to get them all coffee.  The guard assures him he was briefed that he would say that, in which point Jenkins slouches.  It's a small, quick funny bit and I have no idea why they cut it.

 

The most heavily cut scene is Truth Or Dare.  Initially, they start with Dana asking Marty, and Marty picks their made up third option, which is essentially "Reality check".  She warns him that he's "in a womb of reefer" and he's wasting his potential.  Marty says some funny stuff, and we go directly into the wolf/moose kiss.  It's a shame this bit was cut because Marty is funny, and it would explain the world of reefer line.  Oh, and one more funny gag was the blonde girl pretends to drop something and bends over for the wolf's benefit.  They drag out that flirtation a bit more which was fun.

 

Finally the last cut I could think of was when Jenkins blows the tunnel.  In the script it cuts back to him so he can dress down the Demolitions guys.  It's not a super important beat, but I felt like it was a nice wipe the sweat off the brow diffusion of the build up of tension of the last scene. 

 

That's literally it.  Mostly very small beats were cut, and very little was missed.  Other than that stuff I still ADORE this movie.  The Merman gag, the creepy "score" reaction, unicorn maulings, that epic fucking elevator money shot and the completely absurd over the top after math of the lobby.  Man, they REALLY took the last act all the way in this.  My only complaint with the movie was that some of the army of monsters looked a little too CGI, specifically giant snake.  They tend to stick out more than it should which is a bummer.  Considering that's my biggest problem with this flick, that's absolutely nothing.

post #126 of 974

Considering some of the imagery they referenced, having the snake move all Harryhausen-style would have been neat.

post #127 of 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post

the motorbike scene would have got me if the earlier bird scene hadn't been in there. Merman kill was telegraphed big time,

I guess it's a fine line between "telegraphed" and good setup and payoff, but for me the merman was the latter. Without establishing it earlier there's no (or much less of a) great moment in the last act. Plus how often does cinema give us Chekov's Merman?

I feel roughly the same about the bike jump, but I think one way versus the other changes how the scene fundamentally is meant to play. If it hadn't been setup it would've been a shock, but as it is it undercuts the seriousness of the lead up to it and makes the whole scene even more of a punchline. Clearly that was a deliberate choice, and one that worked for me, but I guess that comes down to personal taste. I think for me CABIN plays just a little more as a comedy and a movie about horror movies (in the most gleeful, satisfying way possible) than as a horror movie itself so I am fine with the ratio of fun/laughs to scariness/shock being what it is.

Though, having said that, I did find parts of it to be a little creepy and disturbing without being totally undercut by the humor - the diary in the cellar had some fucked up shit in it, the Harbinger's talk was ominous even if it did come right up against the speakerphone jokes, ditto the various hints at the Ancient Ones. And the ending is dark in a fun "fuck it" kind of way, but still dark.

Just to be completely clear, I fucking loved this with all of my horror-geek heart.
post #128 of 974

BTW, did any body else see on the monitor the guy who was being killed via zombie barfing into his mouth over and over and drowning him while he gurgled in horror?  Maybe the most disturbing kill in the entire movie.

 

I would have sacrificed five kids to be able to direct this movie.

post #129 of 974

I noticed that on my second viewing.  

 

And LAUGHED.

 

It just kept on coming and coming and coming...

post #130 of 974


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by HunterTarantino View Post

Incredibly happy I managed to dodge all the spoilers, especially Sigourney Weaver's reveal at the end.


So I was reading this thread to gauge if I should see this or not...yes I'm going to see it. I guess it's my own damn fault for being spoiled. ha ha But after reading what Hunter typed, I'm making it a mission to see this.

post #131 of 974

Oh and one more change from the script.  The Director is just plain Jane G man in a suit.  Argueably Sigourney is always a trade up.  See Paul.

post #132 of 974
It should have been Dieter Laser.
post #133 of 974

It should have been Sam Raimi.

post #134 of 974

Saw this twice in a row tonight, with a big goofy grin on my face. Not bad for a film that makes a really provocative statement about free will.

post #135 of 974

This marks the first successful experiment in movie blindness. ZERO spoilers for this one, besides Whedon being involved, and a few deliberately no-detail reviews.

 

And man was that worth it. Not just a perfect deconstruction of horror as a genre, but, as Devin said, the ultimate reminder of why we all need the genre, even when it's gone to shit.

 

I also dont see how anyone can say Whedon and Goddard are calling for the genre to start from scratch. You have CG werewolves and snakes occupying the same space as The Strangers and ersatz-xenomorphs and Pazuzu-possessed little girls. Theyre saying it's ALL worthwhile, because it fulfills the same need, even when we dont always "get our Merman story", so to speak*. Where Scream just tore the genre apart, this is examining why every piece goes where it goes.

 

If I wasn't making The Raid my mission for today, I think I'd be going back for round 2 already.

 

Also, to answer DamnDirtyApe, Team Cenobites, hands down. Especially loved that the music box playing was supposed to entice the kids into playing with the sphere, and how well the score aped Christopher Young both times it appeared.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Draco Senior View Post

Something I noticed during the film:  the girl zombie who offs Sigourney at the end is played by the kid from Silent Hill, Jodelle Ferland.  Thought that was pretty neat.

 

They go one further and show Teethface Ballerina doing Alessa's "dancing in a rain of blood" thing on a monitor in the background, too. Except as a ballet. I wanted to go upstairs and hug the projector.

 

 

 

*That said, yeah, I was hoping for sweet Lovecraftian terror to rise out of that pit too.

post #136 of 974
Loved it. Did it remind anyone else of Carpenter's Prince of Darkness, in terms of how high concept it was? I got the same vibes watching this eventual end of the world horror as Carpenter's classic, just a lot more humor this time.
post #137 of 974

  This movie was so much fun that it gave me a husband bulge. My only complaint is showing Marty in the elevator in the trailer. I knew he wasn't dead. It was still great when him and his bong show up to save the day. I wasn't surprised that weed made him immune. Metalocalypse did something like that once.

 

  I thought the motorcycle jump was great.  The set up is what made it work.. The heroic music and the I'll come back to save you dialog when we all know what is going to happen. That he keep hitting the force field on the way down made it funnier. The speaker phone went over big time with the audience I saw it with.

 

  Am I the only one who was creeped out by the making out with the wolf scene? The way it was shoot and scored gave me the vibe the wolf would bite her.. I read an interview with Whedon about Cabin in the Woods where he said horror isn't just about killing people. That scene was what he was talking about.

 

   To the dude five seats to the left of me, when I want a commentary track, I'll buy the DVD.

 

  Cabin in the Woods is so outstanding, I forgive Joss Whedon for the Buffy Season Eight comic.

post #138 of 974

So... NO ONE saw what Tom Lenk intern wrote on his board? I can't just casually see the movie again, people; the closest theater showing it is an hour away. Pleeeeeease heeeeeeeelp meeeeee.

post #139 of 974

I don't know what he wrote, but I was happy to see him in the movie, cause hey its Andrew!

 

Idea for a prequel that will never happen. Set it in the 50's with aliens, giant ants and a Beast From 20,000 Fathoms like monster for the finale.


Edited by Chaz - 4/14/12 at 8:43am
post #140 of 974

Nice!  And maybe it's not a cabin this time, but a more time-appropriate Nuclear Fallout Shelter in the Woods that the cast is lured into.  Jenkins and Whitford are the lowly interns in this timeline, who maybe save the day and get promotions by the end... 

 

Ah, Cabin in the Woods...  You know a movie is pretty great when it starts inspiring wonky fan fiction one day after it's released.  :)

post #141 of 974

Quote:

Originally Posted by Charlie Foxtrot View PostLoved it. Did it remind anyone else of Carpenter's Prince of Darkness, in terms of how high concept it was? I got the same vibes watching this eventual end of the world horror as Carpenter's classic,  just a lot more humor this time.


Yep, on the way home my friends and I compared Cabin with Carpenter's Apocalypse Trilogy and even Darabont's The Mist, which enlivened the horror genre for me in much of the same way Cabin has.  Would love to hear John's thoughts on the flick. Maybe it'd inspire him to get back in the game again.  I never did see The Ward but it felt a little "been there done that" going by the trailer.  Does it get a thumbs-up from my fellow Carpenter fans in the room here?

 

And now some hopefully-fun SPOILERY questions regarding the world of CABIN.  Not complaints, mind you.  Just random things/imagination food that I'm wondering about...

 

The chamber at the end.  The one with the blood-filled wall etchings.  It's like a missile silo, a long vertical tube at the bottom of which The Ancients seem to be hanging out.  Is that platform Sigourney and our heroes are talking and fighting on there for a reason?  At first I thought "Well, maybe it's acting as a cork to keep the Ancients down there."  But it seemed that the Ancients could break through anytime they wanted if they so chose to violate the Pact.  Do the bloody wall etchings have a caretaker?  Someone to make sure the Ancients know things are going as planned?  Sounds like an intern's job to me...    

 

If Hemsworth thought he had a cousin who bought the cabin but didn't really have a cousin, how did the Company make him think he had a cousin?  A hired impersonator or actor like the Harbinger?  A gas that makes you imagine family members?  Just how long have these kids been on the Company's radar, anyway?  

 

The Company Men (Jenkins and Whitmore) make a lot of references to "Guys Downstairs."  (The Ancients)  But when the Red Danger Phone rings, I remember someone saying "It's the guys Upstairs."  Did I hear this wrong, maybe?  And if I didn't hear it wrong, who are the "Guys Upstairs?"  

 

I wonder who originated The Pact with the Ancients and how the monsters are decided upon and conjured/created.  And what could the Ancients gain from making a Pact with humankind anyway?  The blood in the wall etchings?  Respect from or fear from what little of Humankind actually knows that the Ancients exist?  (I never understood this about sacrifices made to appease the gods of endtimes.  Apologies for my ignorance regarding rituals.)  If they just took over, they'd get all the blood/respect/fear they want.  Until they killed everybody, I guess.  Maybe that's why there's a Pact.  To ensure future blood/respect/fear for the Ancients.  And lastly, Ancients making pacts with humans...  Isn't that a little like people making a pact with ants?  Has there been a film or novel in which a world is entirely populated by gods like the Ancients with no humans?  (Maybe these were all fully explained and I just missed the info all while having so much fun watching the film.)   

 

Sorry to go on and on there...  I've always been a fan of the nuts and bolts of world-building in narrative. 

 

 

post #142 of 974

I thought the ancient ones might be fallen angels (guys downstairs (hell)) and the guy upstairs would be angels.  I remember the gas attendant saying "been here since the war" - maybe war between the angels in heaven and his name was Mordecai which is a biblical name right?

I thought it was odd that he said "you know which war!" when it wasn't obvious at all. 

 

post #143 of 974

I thought it was perfectly obvious.  The Civil War.

post #144 of 974

I don't think I have ever went from enjoying a movie so much to just absolutely hating it so fast.  Once they got in the elevator and were treated to a rogues gallery of Sci-Fi Channel movie of the week baddies, my excitement started to wane.  Once they were trapped in a room, surrounded by guys with machine guns, and there was a convenient purge all the baddies button, they lost me.  I wanted the movie to win me back over, but once Weaver showed up in the cheap secret celebrity cameo gimmick and tried to explain the characters and rules of horror movies that was more entertaining when Scream did it, not only was I completely done but was pissed.  I was pissed that a movie that I was really into totally fell apart so utterly completely in the third act.  Then I come in here and everyone totally loved it.  I feel like I was smoking pot that made me immune to whatever it was that convinced everyone that this was one of the greatest horror movies in years.  And since I am the only one who didn't like it I will probably be called a hater and you know, there's always going to be one of those guys.

post #145 of 974

Loved it.  And while I can see Devin's point, I sort of found myself agreeing with Nordling's take, that the mass audience are the Dark Gods, demanding their sacrifices in the familiar, comforting ways, expressing their anger by lashing out at anything that doesn't fit their preconceived notions.  I think both interpretations are there and valid, but I think Hadley's yearning for a merman speaks to wanting to see something different.

 

I recognized Weaver's voice before she appeared on-screen, but there were some good gasps of surprise from my audience when she showed up in the flesh.

 

Did anybody catch what was written on the signs the intern was holding up during the massacre?  Couldn't make it out.

post #146 of 974
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dalyn View Post

Once they got in the elevator and were treated to a rogues gallery of Sci-Fi Channel movie of the week baddies, my excitement started to wane.  Once they were trapped in a room, surrounded by guys with machine guns, and there was a convenient purge all the baddies button, they lost me. 


That's when they totally won me over.

post #147 of 974

I see the logic of getting a former scream queen for the role, but Weaver's voice has an authority to it that made her great for the role.

post #148 of 974

It is kind of hilarious that she's playing EXACTLY the same role, and is used in EXACTLY the same way, as in "Paul". Not TCITW's fault, since it was made first, but it might have worked better if they'd gotten Jaimie Lee Curtis, who's more associated with horror anyway. Not knocking Sigourney, of course, she was great.

post #149 of 974

Yeah, Jamie Lee Curtis would've been fun for exactly the reason Prankster stated.  PAUL kinda took the wind out of that appearance.  Nobody's fault, but that's how it worked out.

 

No wait.  It's Sigorney Weaver's fault for taking two roles that were essentially the same thing!!!

post #150 of 974

Here is Rex Reed's review. He must I've seen a different movie than me, because I don't remember any vampires in the movie.

http://www.observer.com/2012/04/cabin-in-the-woods-rex-reed-richard-jenkins-bradley-whitford/

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