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Kickstarter Video Game Catch-All

post #1 of 69
Thread Starter 

Discuss the Kickstarter video game projects that tickle your fancy!


Edited by Barry Woodward - 3/3/14 at 11:28am
post #2 of 69

The Banner Saga looks proper lush... definitely going to chip on on that one. The other new ones I'm not so sure about, though the Jane Jenson one is an interesting concept. I do wonder if we reaching saturation point with these kickstarter projects.

post #3 of 69

Wasteland 2 hit 2.1 million with ten days remaining. That means Chris Avellone is now on board. And that my pants are starting to feel pretty tight.

post #4 of 69

The Dead Linger

Sandswept Studios

 

It's almost as if they want to make the zombie apocalypse survival game I've always dreamed about.

post #5 of 69
FTL beta code came in the mail and I installed that in a flash. A decent little game of wandering space, battling pirates, and upgrading your ships. I love the tactical feeling of the battles so far. Focusing on shooting down their shield generators and either going for the quick engine kill or being an evil bastard and knocking out their oxygen supply. I made it near the end of the star map, but thought I could be some kind of space badass and got into a fight with a turret and died so close to the finish line. Like Space Pirates And Zombies this scratches that space exploration and combat itch, but is more tactical in its own way than being an arcade shooter that SPAZ was.
post #6 of 69
Anyone here get a look at the OUYA?

292


It's an android based console that will solely run downloadable games. Billed as completely hackable and rootable without voiding the warranty and also friendly for independent developers. It looks interesting and has already beaten Double Fine Adventure's record for the most funded kickstarter project.

It states that it will use the NVIDIA Tegra 3 chips and I looked up NVIDIA's video on youtube to get an idea of what this console will be capable:

post #7 of 69

I don't understand why I would ever want this thing next to my 360.  How does this box offer me something I can't get from Xbox Live Arcade, the Playstation Store or places like Steam or GoG?  I love the idea of a new console filling a niche, but I don't understand the point of this.

post #8 of 69

Cell phone app/game pricing in HD on your TV in a very cheap console. It could be amazing.

It could also fail miserably due to tech upgrades.

post #9 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexus-7 View Post

Cell phone app/game pricing in HD on your TV in a very cheap console. It could be amazing.


It could also fail miserably due to tech upgrades.

I don't know, the fact that they are encouraging the hacking of this thing, they might just release info on how to build hardware upgrades and even kits. So I don't see upgrades being that major of a hurdle.
post #10 of 69

I think the idea is that delevoping games on your standard consoles (Wii, Xbox 360, PS3) is so expensive because of the prices each of those companies charge for their SDKs and whatever licensing/fees that go along with that. The little developers don't get to try their hand much except on small phone apps. If things work the way this company hopes they do, there will be a new wave of game developers jumping at the chance to cheaply develop games on a console, potentially raising the quality of gaming all over significantly. It will be interesting to see. At $100, the price is right to give it a shot.

post #11 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim K View Post


I don't know, the fact that they are encouraging the hacking of this thing, they might just release info on how to build hardware upgrades and even kits. So I don't see upgrades being that major of a hurdle.

 

Tegra 3 (its chipset) is SoC (systen on chip, meaning everything on a single chip). These are always non upgradable.

post #12 of 69

Hackers can probably make it a bit faster by overclocking it or something, and since it's not a phone/tablet battery life won't be an issue, but still I see that as a big downside.

Worst case scenario(if it gets released), this becomes a sweet emulator machine you can use on your TV. For 99 bucks that's not bad, and avoids the fuss and muss of modding a console or running cables from your PC to TV.

post #13 of 69
The Broken Sword guys have just put up a Roger Rabbit-esque Kickstarter for a new entry into the series. The animation is top notch. Check it out.




Too bad they couldn't find a way to lower the cheesiness of the interactions. Does the Broken Sword series always ham it up in the games?

Anyway it looks interesting and considering that it's the morning of day 1 and they're already at $65,000 of their $400,000 goal, I'd say they have a good chance at making it.

Any opinions on the Broken Sword series? I'm just getting into an adventure game kick right now and might grab the Broken Sword: Director's Cut off of Steam. Hell the trilogy itself is only $10 total.
post #14 of 69

The Broken Sword series is good fun but forgettable. Easily worth ten bucks for the trilogy though.

post #15 of 69

If there's one kickstarter project that I hope gets funded, it's "the other brothers." At this point it doesn't look too good for them...but I hope they make it. it's a retro 8 bit platformer but with today's technology. Gameplay looks fun and the graphics look great! The developers also seem very passionate about their work. check it out.

post #16 of 69
The latest update for Wasteland 2 has a soundtrack sample. Holy fuck am I glad I put money towards this.
post #17 of 69

How about an old-school 1st person RPG from Brenda Brathwaite (of the Wizardry series) and Tom Hall (of Doom and Anachronox)?

 

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/lootdrop/an-old-school-rpg-by-brenda-brathwaite-and-tom-hal?ref=live

post #18 of 69

Pier Solar, the acclaimed homebrew Sega Genesis RPG from a few years back, now has a Kickstarter for an HD remake. Planned support for PC, Mac, Linux, Xbox 360, and..... Sega Dreamcast for some reason. Whatever, here's the link:

 

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/573261866/pier-solar-hd-an-rpg-for-xbox360-pc-mac-linux-and

post #19 of 69

 

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1461411552/elite-dangerous


Edited by Graham - 11/11/12 at 9:38am
post #20 of 69

Yay!!

 

(from the BBC)

Elite video game reboot hits funding target

Elite artwork

An ambitious plan to update classic space trading game Elite has hit its funding target.

The game first appeared on the BBC Micro in 1984 but one of the game's original creators wanted to make a modern PC version.

David Braben sought £1.25m via crowd-sourcing site Kickstarter to fund the 21st century update.

A last minute surge of pledges helped it reach its goal about 48 hours before Friday's funding deadline.

Funding squeeze

Elite: Dangerous debuted on Kickstarter on 5 November and set itself 60 days to raise £1.25m. In November, Mr Braben said Elite was a game he had wanted to come back to for a "long, long time".

Although some early work on the multiplayer title had been done at Mr Braben's game studio Frontier Developments, but needed the cash to turn the code into a finished playable product. If the game did not hit its funding target then development work would stop.

Getting the cash via Kickstarter was preferable to using an established publisher because it gave Frontier and those who backed it total control over how the final game would turn out, said Mr Braben,

The finished game, he said, would keep the central trading, travel and spaceship combat elements of the original but add far better graphics, physics and feature a much larger chunk of the universe for people to play in.

Fund tracking site Kicktraq showed that after an initial surge the number of people backing the project tailed off dramatically. On its second day on Kickstarter raised more than £271,000. However, soon after pledge totals rarely got over £10,000.

A surge of pledges came forward in the closing few days of Elite's fund-raising drive thanks to an appearance on social news site Reddit by Mr Braben and with the help of comedian Dara O Briain who urged his 1.2 million Twitter followers to back it.

_63890985_63890984.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
David Braben talks to Rory Cellan-Jones about 'kickstarting' Elite last November
 
 

"It is really great to have exceeded the goal already," Mr Braben told the BBC. "I was delighted and touched by how many people really want this game to be made, and it was doubly good that it happened on my birthday!"

He said the Elite team were now pushing to reach "stretch" goals which would produce a Mac version of the game and add more ships to the game.

"It was an ambitious target but that is so that it was set at a realistic level to be able to make the game," he said adding that watching the total pledges get close to the target made for a "tense time".

post #21 of 69

Dreamfall Chapters: The Longest Journey. The long-awaited third game in the Longest Journey series, Ragnar Tornquist and the core team behind Dreamfall are in on this. Couldn't throw my money at the screen fast enough.

 

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/redthread/dreamfall-chapters-the-longest-journey?ref=category

post #22 of 69

First look at gameplay for Wasteland 2 (starts about 2:45 in):

 

http://vimeo.com/59292662

post #23 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Woodward View Post

Discuss the Kickstarter video game projects that tickle your fancy!

 

The Banner Saga

Stoic

The Banner Saga.jpg

 

The Banner Saga is a role-playing game merged with turn-based strategy, wrapped into an adventure mini-series about vikings.

Travel through stunning landscapes straight out of an animated film. Battle painstakingly hand-animated foes in strategic, turn-based combat harkening back to the classic "Tactics" days of gaming. Make decisions with consequences in conversations with people you'll truly care about.

And throughout the whole thing record the history of your people on your banner where it will be remembered, because soon there might not be anything left.

The Banner Saga is a mature game aimed at gamers who appreciate art, story and strategy.

 

So, this was released on Steam this week without much fanfare. It's free-to-play, so I'm gonna grab it and give it a shot.

post #24 of 69

Colour me intrigued...wish I had the time or disc-space to download it; yet look forward to your comments/ review.

post #25 of 69

It's a gorgeous game, with plenty of strategic depth, but it's PvP only, sadly.

post #26 of 69

Ok this hasn't gone up yet, will be up at 6am PST today, but I had to put it here anyway: Brian Fargo and Inxile have another Kickstarter lined up and it's a big one. How about a spiritual successor to Planescape: Torment?

 

Here's the website for those interested- https://torment.inxile-entertainment.com/

 

Once again, the Kickstarter will be up in a few hours, but for now you can go to the website and check out the forum.

post #27 of 69

I predict the internet is about to give them all its money.

post #28 of 69
For those who were wondering just what the heck is going on, when they're already dipped into the Kickstarter thing for Wasteland 2, here is their explanation in an email they sent out today:
Quote:
If your reaction to the news about Torment was more like, “inXile, you greedy bastards, why would you launch a Kickstarter before Wasteland 2 is even done!”, then keep reading; we are addressing that point in this update…

To those outside the industry, it might seem odd to launch another Kickstarter before Wasteland 2 is done. We understand that it raises some questions, and we want our Wasteland 2 backers to understand the decision and to have access to all the information that has led us down this path. The goal of this update is not to convince you to back Torment; the goal of this update is to answer one simple question. Why now?

One of the keys to success for a small game company is being able to create continuity within the development team. It takes a long time to get a team put together, and it takes an even longer time for a team to settle in to new working relationships, a new engine, new systems, and a new asset creation pipeline. A team’s knowledge and experience grows a lot during a development cycle, and all of that knowledge gained is lost if we let the team break up when a project ships. To address that issue we have developed a very simple strategy that has already worked for us on dozens of titles in the last 25 years. Here is a quick explanation of our development team-structure philosophy:

inXile, with all of our internal employees and outside contractors, consists of enough people to be considered about the size of a team and a half. This is by design. We always want a small and efficient team (the “half team”) to design both our product and our product development plan. This is called pre-production. It is the most important time in a project’s life cycle. This is the time when we want to make sure we slow down and get it right. During this phase we don't need all the engineers and 3D Artists on the project, it is mostly concept art, design and dialog writing. When this process is completed and we are ready to roll into full production we want to have a large team of people ready to make the game. If the planning was done well during the pre-production phase we can be very efficient during production and leave ourselves with plenty of time to iterate and make amazing games. If there is no pre-production done, and the full team is trying to create the design and development plan as they go, months, if not years, are wasted. Having a full team try to start a project when the pre-production has not been completed is like stacking up a giant pile of money and lighting it on fire. This same philosophy served us quite well at Interplay in creating some of the best RPGs of all time.

The “half team” in our team and a half model consists of writers and artists as well as designers and a producer. They are the ones that define the game design, write the dialog, define the combat, the UI, the missions, and even parts of the level design. We spent about 6 months working on this pre-production for Wasteland 2 and we would like to spend even longer doing it on Torment. For inXile, this “half team” that did the pre-production for Wasteland is done, their work on Wasteland 2 is completely finished. We want to get this group into pre-production on Torment to keep them working together on a project we are all passionate about.

Currently, Wasteland 2 is in full production with a team of 15+ people cranking away on it. This is the full team that consists of engineers, scripters, character modelers, environment artists, and animators. This team is implementing the plan created during the Wasteland 2 pre-production cycle. When this full team rolls off of Wasteland 2 at the end of the year, they will need something else to do. Having a complete pre-production plan at that time allows us to roll the entire team onto a finely honed game design. Team continuity is maintained, and efficient production can begin. In a traditional publisher model, now is the time in the project life cycle where we would start to try and sign the next big contract. The best tool we have to get that done is to go back to our new publisher, you, and explain that now is the best time to start the next project.

Our “half team” is ready to start the pre-production for Torment now. They need about 8 months to get this pre-production work done. In an amazing coincidence, in about 8 months I will have a full team that is ready to take that pre-production plan and create a game. The alternative, starting pre-production on Torment after Wasteland 2 is done, increases the cost of Torment production greatly and requires us to reduce our headcount during the process.

Staggering projects like we are doing with Wasteland 2 and Torment is the best tool a single-team company like inXile has to be successful. It has the triple value of making us more efficient, giving us a better game design and making sure we keep our design and art talent working with us.

To make everything as clear as we can regarding the Torment Kickstarter and what it means for Wasteland 2, I will attempt to answer some other questions you might have:

• We do want to be abundantly clear that no Wasteland money is to be spent developing Torment. No Torment money is being spent on Wasteland 2. That said, lots of tools, plug-ins and pipeline processes that have taken man months to create will be shared between the projects if we can keep team continuity.

• The pre-production of Torment is not going to hinder the development of Wasteland in any way. As explained above, they are different teams during the pre-production.
We hope this update helps to explain the logic of why we are launching this Kickstarter now. Based on our experience we know that now is the time to get Torment rolling. We also hope that we can count on your support for Torment, and if not your support, at least your understanding. This system has always served us well so we think it makes sense to try and re-create it with you.

Good enough of an explanation for me to dip in a couple of bucks towards the project. Thing is already amassing a decent warchest.
post #29 of 69

So Lord British decided to get in on this Kickstarter craze with an Ultima successor. Not quite doing the amazing numbers Torment is, but I guess it's a case of who he is and what he's making.

post #30 of 69

Yes please.  I've been asking for this for years and years.

post #31 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooper View Post

 

Here's the website for those interested- https://torment.inxile-entertainment.com/

 

 

Yeah I urge people here to back this project. Torment is really one of the undisputed masterpieces of video games history.

About the new project, a few points.

 

Cons:

- It won't be an official sequel

- This means Annah won't reappear (I know everybody and their mother had a crush on Annah back then... still)

- I seriously doubt the stars will align again so splendidly

 

Pros:

- Practically all the original team is in, and they seem very excited

- It's worth a shot

- At the very least a solid game will come out of it

- It's another little push to steer the industry "back" on the right track

- What the hell

post #32 of 69
So Im now the proud backer of three successful Kickstarters, one modest success in Maia and two mega successes in Shadowrun Returns and Torment. Im very happy with those choices. Ill also getting a copy of Wasteland 2 as part of the Torment backer reward level I selected. This also makes me very happy.

I kinda fucking love that Kickstarter exists really.
post #33 of 69
DP apologies.
post #34 of 69

Did anyone on here buy the Ouya off of Kickstarter? I did but I think I was one of the later backers so I'm probably towards the bottom of a looong list to receive mine in the mail. Just curious if anyone here had received theirs yet or even gotten the pre-shipment notification? They seem to be having some logistic issues getting the units sent out to people.

post #35 of 69
I honestly dont get what demographic the Ouya is targeted at. Certainly not me, I know that much.
post #36 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Rain Dog View Post

I honestly dont get what demographic the Ouya is targeted at. Certainly not me, I know that much.
Google fans - the ones who think they're freetards, but have no problem putting all their stock in this one company because its motto is "don't be evil" so that must mean it can't, right?
post #37 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Rain Dog View Post

I honestly dont get what demographic the Ouya is targeted at. Certainly not me, I know that much.

I got mine as much for my 5 year old as for me. But I do like the idea of being able to play some of these phone app type games on a big TV instead of the small screen. It will really only be a big success if the ease to develop games is what they claim it will be, because the big advantage will be if the thousands of little game developers out there that get discouraged by how hard it is to get a game developed and distributed really start churning out solid content. They'll certainly be limited by the hardware, but I'm one of those people that can still sit down and play the original Zelda for hours, so that really won't bother me if the games are fun.

post #38 of 69
Thread Starter 

Shadowrun Returns developers are waffling on their DRM-free promise:

 

http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2013/04/10/hmmm-shadowrun-wont-be-entirely-drm-free-after-all/

post #39 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim K View Post

Anyone here get a look at the OUYA?

292


It's an android based console that will solely run downloadable games. Billed as completely hackable and rootable without voiding the warranty and also friendly for independent developers. It looks interesting and has already beaten Double Fine Adventure's record for the most funded kickstarter project.

It states that it will use the NVIDIA Tegra 3 chips and I looked up NVIDIA's video on youtube to get an idea of what this console will be capable:


I just got this delivered today. I knew that is was coming, but had kind of forgot about it so it was a welcome surprised. The system itself is smaller than I expected, it is almost something I could see Roku releasing. I haven't turned it on yet, because the Wifi at my Mom's place is on the exact opposite side of the house from where the Tv is and impossible to get a signal without a repeater or a stronger antenna.

I checked out the controller. It looks approximately like the mockup they provided above, but in a satin finish instead of a high gloss and there is no semicircle indentation in the space just above the D pad and right analog stick.

I'm not sure what to make of it, it has good heft and the silver parts of the controller have a coolness of touch that make it feel like it is thinly plated with some type of metal. The feel of it in my hands is very reminiscent of the Dreamcast's controller. The D pad and analog sticks feel responsive and as well made as at any first party console controllers I've owned, not cheap at all. The trigger and the buttons on the other hand do have a rattle to them and feel inferior to the major console brands. The A button sometimes sticks and stays down when I push it in, but quickly pops back up if I press it again, none of the other buttons have this issue. Putting in batteries also was a little weird, both of the left and right silver colored front plates in the picture above come off and there is a compartment for a single AA battery in each handle, I guess this was done so that the weight would be evenly distributed, but I see no reason why they couldn't have made the battery ports on the back as the back of the controller is entirely unused space and left plain.

I will update this when I get to experience the touch aspects of the gamepad and somehow get an internet connection to this system.
post #40 of 69
I was bored so I took some photos with my Phone.


Here is the controller next to PS3 controller to give a sense of scale.





Here is the rather strange way they designed the battery compartments.





The four triggers, I tried to make this as visible as possible but gloss black doesn't give much detail at night even with a flash.





The back of the controller, out of focus, but there really isn't much to see.





Here is the Ouya console next to a PS3 controller, again to give a sense of scale.





And these are all the connections at the back of the tiny box, I was rather surprised to see that there was no slot for an SD card because I thought I remembered that they wanted to put one in for game storage. Still there are two USB ports which maybe can be connected to a hard drive or SD card reader.


post #41 of 69

The Curse of Monkey Island background artist is struggling to fund a prequel to his graphic adventure game A Vampyre Story.  Check out the pitch video:

 

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/876324751/a-vampyre-story-year-one

post #42 of 69

The Curse of Monkey Island background artist is struggling to fund a prequel to his graphic adventure game A Vampyre Story.  Check out the pitch video:

 

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/876324751/a-vampyre-story-year-one

post #43 of 69
Quote:
A Note from Tim

Hello, Backers of Adventure!

Those of you who have been following along in the documentary know about the design vs. money tension we’ve had on this project since the early days. Even though we received much more money from our Kickstarter than we, or anybody anticipated, that didn’t stop me from getting excited and designing a game so big that it would need even more money.

I think I just have an idea in my head about how big an adventure game should be, so it’s hard for me to design one that’s much smaller than Grim Fandango or Full Throttle. There’s just a certain amount of scope needed to create a complex puzzle space and to develop a real story. At least with my brain, there is.

So we have been looking for ways to improve our project’s efficiency while reducing scope where we could along the way. All while looking for additional funds from bundle revenue, ports, etc. But when we finished the final in-depth schedule recently it was clear that these opportunistic methods weren’t going to be enough.

We looked into what it would take to finish just first half of our game—Act 1. And the numbers showed it coming in July of next year. Not this July, but July 2014. For just the first half. The full game was looking like 2015! My jaw hit the floor.

This was a huge wake-up call for all of us. If this were true, we weren’t going to have to cut the game in half, we were going to have to cut it down by 75%! What would be left? How would we even cut it down that far? Just polish up the rooms we had and ship those? Reboot the art style with a dramatically simpler look? Remove the Boy or Girl from the story? Yikes! Sad faces all around.

Would we, instead, try to find more money? You guys have been been very generous in the tip jar (thanks!) but this is a larger sum of money we were talking about. Asking a publisher for the money was out of the question because it would violate the spirit of the Kickstarter, and also, publishers. Going back to Kickstarter for it seemed wrong. Clearly, any overages were going to have to be paid by Double Fine, with our own money from the sales of our other games. That actually makes a lot of sense and we feel good about it. We have been making more money since we began self-publishing our games, but unfortunately it still would not be enough.

Then we had a strange idea. What if we made some modest cuts in order to finish the first half of the game by January instead of July, and then released that finished, polished half of the game on Steam Early Access? Backers would still have the option of not looking at it, of course, but those who were sick of waiting wouldn’t have to wait any more. They could play the first half of the game in January!

We were always planning to release the beta on Steam, but in addition to that we now have Steam Early Access, which is a new opportunity that actually lets you charge money for pre-release content. That means we could actually sell this early access version of the game to the public at large, and use that money to fund the remaining game development. The second part of the game would come in a free update a few months down the road, closer to April-May.

So, everybody gets to play the game sooner, and we don’t have to cut the game down drastically. Backers still get the whole game this way—nobody has to pay again for the second half.
And whatever date we start selling the early release, backers still have exclusive beta access before that, as promised in the Kickstarter.

I want to point out that Broken Age’s schedule changes have nothing to do with the team working slowly. They have been kicking ass and the game looks, plays, and sounds amazing. It’s just taking a while because I designed too much game, as I pretty much always do. But we’re pulling it in, and the good news is that the game’s design is now 100% done, so most of the unknowns are now gone and it’s not going to get any bigger.

With this shipping solution I think we’re balancing the size of the game and the realities of funding it pretty well. We are still working out the details and exact dates, but we’d love to hear your thoughts. This project has always been something we go through together and the ultimate solution needs to be something we all feel good about.

In the meantime, I’m hoping you are enjoying the documentary and like the progress you’re seeing on Broken Age. I’m really exciting about how it’s coming together, I can’t wait for you to see more of it, and I feel good about finally having a solid plan on how to ship it!
Thanks for reading,
Tim

I know a couple of talented people over a DF but still, jebus...when they launched the kickstarter did they not have something as simple as a design document to plan things out on what they could accomplish with their targeted funds? This kind of stuff doesn't happen with experienced executive producers reigning things in when vision gets out of control. I'm not mad at all, it just stands out a lot given their long experience in the industry making games.

Telltale has done decently making their stuff episodic so it's not that big of a deal that they're segmenting the game, and there are plenty of other devs doing early access stuff to continue getting development money. If they're really hard up for money they can always release a 42 card Psychonauts set on steam.

Crossing my fingers Star Citizen is better managed.
post #44 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by mongycore View Post


I know a couple of talented people over a DF but still, jebus...when they launched the kickstarter did they not have something as simple as a design document to plan things out on what they could accomplish with their targeted funds?

Based on the first episode of the DFA documentary where it was just Tim and Ron Gilbert spitballing, they did not. It was just Point and Click Adventure Game+ Licensed Engine+ Small Team+ Six Months or so development time = $400,000 (probably). When they got 3 million 'licensed engine, small team, and 6 months' got thrown out. The biggest takeaway from the documentary so far is that Schafer desperately needs somebody in the company with the authority to tell him 'No.' But at the same time, Broken Age looks like it's turned into Double Fine's biggest game since Brutal Legend, and the most personal project for Schafer since Psychonauts, and it'll either break them completely, or set them for self-publishing forever, so it's hard to blame them for pulling out all the stops the way they have to try and make the best game they possibly can.

post #45 of 69
I haven't had time to watch the documentary things...took me longer just to get around to sitting through Indie Game Movie, but I'll check them out at some point down the road. Sounds like a bad case of lottery winner syndrome. "Oh man, I hope I win this thing so I can pay off my loans and maybe buy a new toaster.....Wooo, fuck yeah, where are all the hookers and blow we're making Avatar 2 in 4D!"
post #46 of 69

Except instead of hookers and blow it sounds like they want to make a better, more ambitious game. Fine by me!

post #47 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul C View Post

Except instead of hookers and blow it sounds like they want to make a better, more ambitious game. Double Fine by me!

FTFY.

Key word there being Want. Wanting to do something and being able to afford doing something are two completely different things. All could have been avoided with good management.

I still look forward to the game. Backed it on the promise of a new fangled adventure title from DF, so as long as they can finish it awesome - just hate to see these guys ruin themselves financially because of feature creep. Backed the crap out of the InXile stuff too. In the span of time from then and now I've been a lot more selective of Kickstarter backing, reading thoroughly the pitches, watching concept videos or demo's, not just blindly writing a blank cheque based on good intentions.

This is all new territory and it'll be interesting to see how the various projects ultimately turn out. FTL is great. I'm hoping to hell Shadowrun is great. If anything this serves as a wake up call to newer devs to plan things out, work off a good design doc, and meet their targeted goals without going in the red.
post #48 of 69

The next twelve months will be essential for Kickstarters public perception, the campaigns that made its name are all finally readying to drop. Broken Age, Wasteland 2, Shadowrun, Project Eternity, Tides of Numenera. If they're shit, Kickstarters done.

post #49 of 69

Kickstarter for large scale video game funding will be done. There are still plenty of smaller games that have already been successful off of Kickstarter, and probably will continue to be. And hardware stuff hasn't had a genuine miss yet. Ouya has made it to market (though it's probably not going to be a success), and Oculus Rift devkits have shipped and there are prototypes for the HD consumer version.

 

And there are tons of art and film projects that have happened and will continue to happen thanks to Kickstarter.

post #50 of 69

Given how reliant these things are on public goodwill, Double Fine tinkering with their original promises like this is playing with fire a little, but online crowd funding is past the point where a few duds will kill it. Next time someone has a concept that captures the public imagination, people aren't going to stay away in droves because of something some other company did or didn't do.

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