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Dragon Age III: Inquisition - Page 2

post #51 of 221

You know what? I hate civility.

 

You have cooties.

 

Stelios out.

post #52 of 221

Spoken like a true, weak greek philosopher, Stelios.

(I kid, i kid, i know you're a chiseled spartan)

post #53 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryoken View Post

Spoken like a true, weak greek philosopher, Stelios.

(I kid, i kid, i know you're a chiseled spartan)

 

A spartan? Me? Nah, they have fed me to the wolves as soon as they saw my big-ass melon head. "That baby has another baby in his head!" Even my mother can't deny I was an ugly baby.

post #54 of 221

This is going to go a long way towards determining how interested I am in Bioware's next project. Individual tastes will vary but Mass Effect 3 and Dragon Age 2 were clearly games trying to coast to an extent on the success of their predecessor, and I'm curious to see if Bioware can deliver the goods without EA holding a gun to their heads for a speedy turnaround.

post #55 of 221

Mass Effect 3 is an excellent game on its own.  Dragon Age II isn't.

post #56 of 221

I'd say pretty good, but either way yes, debatable story points aside Mass Effect 3 is a high quality game, because it's almost entirely Mass Effect 2 with a mixed batch of minor gameplay improvements and problems. The Assassin's Creed II sequels were pretty good as well, because "if it ain't broke, throw in some small upgrades and multiplayer," isn't a terribly hard path to success. What I'm wondering is whether this EA controlled Bioware still has the capability of blowing us away with a sequel, because as far as I'm concerned they're 0/2 in their last two attempts.

post #57 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelios View Post

 

A spartan? Me? Nah, they have fed me to the wolves as soon as they saw my big-ass melon head. "That baby has another baby in his head!" Even my mother can't deny I was an ugly baby.

I guess a big head would had prevented you from raising your shield up high enough.

Also, Wasnt the actual baby test being drenched in wine? i know some big headed folks who would had passed that one with high marks.

post #58 of 221

ME3 was a good game that showed signs of rush (most notably in the abundance of fetch quests and lack of enemy variety), but not to anywhere near the extent that DA2 did.  Notably, both imo featured "improved" graphics (don't know the technical specs, but I'm sure there is an increased number of pixels or whatever) that actually produced a worse looking game than its immediate predecessor.  

post #59 of 221

You think ME3 looks worse than 2?  I thought they were pretty comparable overall, but that faces and overall detail were a bit better in 3.  Liara and Vega in particular looked great.

post #60 of 221

The lens flare didn't do much for me, and the environments were not as varied or rendered in the same detail.  Also all the humans appeared to have unexplained second-degree burns on their hands/wrists.

 

Not terrible, but certainly not a step up from 2.

post #61 of 221

Miranda's model was a definite and horrible step backwards. They somehow managed to make a model based on Yvonne Strahovsky unattractive. Liara's didn't fare that well either.

post #62 of 221

Miranda's model is the same one as in ME2 without the Cerberus logo.  Same with Legion and Tali -- they're exactly the same character models.  Liara's the only one with a major upgrade (which is still pretty much her Lair of the Shadow Broker model).

post #63 of 221

Miranda's basic design was also never that good to begin with.

post #64 of 221

The notion that ME3's graphics are not a significant step forward from ME2 is baffling to me.

post #65 of 221

Shallow, monochomatic level design was a big culprit.  And harsher lighting maybe?  Much like the big cinematography brouha in the superhero threads recently, I feel like I don't really have the vocabulary to express what I mean in this area.  ME2 had richer colors and more distinctive character designs.  I think.

post #66 of 221
Thread Starter 

Kotaku:

 

"You Can Thank Women for Dragon Age III's Lack of Creepy Sex-Plot."

 

Evidently, the majority of the game's writing staff is comprised of women this time around.

post #67 of 221

I'm cool with that.

post #68 of 221
Stupid slut! Whore! Idiot chicks shouldn't be allowed near pens!

Sorry, I'm just trying to emulate how BioWare fans react to female writers.
post #69 of 221

What? If anything, the people that raised a stink about Dragon Age 2 will be happy for less relationship stuff and sex plots.

post #70 of 221

I doubt we're going to see less relationship stuff. We just lost some typically male game writer bullshit with a character.*

 

In fact I hope with a majority of female writers we actually see a lot more cute relationships like they did with Merrill! That's what I want more of.

 

*I.E. Rape.

post #71 of 221

I'd be fine with all of the relationship stuff taken out of Bioware games, altogether. Call me crazy, but I don't think they've added anything significant to the story lines of their games since Knights of the Old Republic.

 

And I'll tell you one thing, I got sick of rejecting the advances of my teammates in Dragon Age II, only to have the game punish me for it. Add the optional wartime romances if you must, but don't make them a factor in how well your team performs.

post #72 of 221

They don't add a lot of significance to the stories for the most part.

 

But I've never once given a shit about the central narratives in these games. Fun character interaction and cute romance moments? Sure! Intelligent sophisticated storytelling that's not haphazardly cobbled together from Hero's Journey cliches, Buffy reruns, and doorstop fantasy novels? Ehhhhhhhh......

post #73 of 221
The relationship stuff added immensely to the original Dragon Age, and was in fact one of the best stuff in the game for me, over several playthroughs with different characters. The weird high school shit with Lelianna and Morrigan. The incredible redemptive gay relationship with Zevran. The dwarf sex. Easily better than the Mass Effect equivalent.

I didn't play the second one enought to know or remember it, but I didn't mind it, that's for sure.

I hope it's as well integrated in the new one.
post #74 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by D.T. View Post

I'd be fine with all of the relationship stuff taken out of Bioware games, altogether. Call me crazy, but I don't think they've added anything significant to the story lines of their games since Knights of the Old Republic.

The FemShep/Liara relationship in Mass Effect 3 is downright touching if you've carried it over from the original game.

Maybe I played Dragon Age II differently than others, but I don't recall ever being punished for rejecting relationships.
post #75 of 221

The romance in Dragon Age 2 is really the only thing I absolutely love about it. They've got varied characters and some actual twists and turns to the relationships that I really enjoyed on a cute soap opera level.

 

 

I didn't give a shit about the plot, but I'm one of those few people who didn't give a shit about any of the major events in the first Dragon Age either. I mean putting me in a position where I'm supposed to care elves and dwarves? I'll almost refuse to engage on principle.

post #76 of 221
Quote:
The FemShep/Liara relationship in Mass Effect 3 is downright touching if you've carried it over from the original game.

 

It's pretty much my favorite part of the series.

 

 

 

Quote:
Maybe I played Dragon Age II differently than others, but I don't recall ever being punished for rejecting relationships.

 

 

You aren't at all.

post #77 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenOrtega View Post

I didn't give a shit about the plot, but I'm one of those few people who didn't give a shit about any of the major events in the first Dragon Age either. I mean putting me in a position where I'm supposed to care elves and dwarves? I'll almost refuse to engage on principle.

The plots are basically just framework to hang the characters on. Mass Effect is my favorite video game series, and I'm very interested in the goings-on of the Reapers, but not-so-much because of how awesome that storyline is as much as how much it affects the characters I love. The finales of ME2 and ME3, at least on first playthrough, were sort of terrifying for me because I didn't want to lose any of them.

I mean, Dragon Age? Wonderful game. Great characters (Morrigan, please be back in DA3...). But the Archdemon? The Darkspawn? Yeah, 'cause I haven't read some variation of this story twenty times in the last decade.
post #78 of 221

I have a hard time connecting with a lot of epic scaled storylines in general. Like as soon as giant armies and the fate of civilization comes into view it takes remarkable writing for me to be to care about what transpires.

 

 

Like I think a lot of the choices are really nifty in Dragon Age: Origins but I'm not one of those people really agonized over them. I think the kingsmoot is a fun sequence but I never stopped and thought "God! I really need to think carefully about the fate of fantasy-England's monarchy!" I just dicked around a few times and selected whatever amused me. And most of the major quests happened to go that way.*

 

 

 

 

Leliana wanting a pet on the other hand?! NUMBER ONE MISSION IN LIFE!

 

 

 

 

* To this day I don't think I've ever

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Not turned all the Dalish into werewolves.

post #79 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenOrtega View Post

You aren't at all.

 

But you are. They made character relationships and interactions as such that when you piss off a character and lose favor with them, or accept their advances and shower them with gifts, their effectiveness in combat goes up and down.

 

The only way to maximize the effectiveness of your party is to play a bisexual character who flirts with everyone around you.

post #80 of 221
(EDIT!)
post #81 of 221
Or just someone who knows how to let people down gently.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LaurenOrtega View Post

Leliana wanting a pet on the other hand?! NUMBER ONE MISSION IN LIFE!


* To this day I don't think I've ever Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Not turned all the Dalish into werewolves.

I generally play characters who are a little too 'nice' to inflict that on a population (I'm the guy who refuses to pick Destroy in Mass Effect 3 because I won't sacrifice EDI and the Geth), but I won't lie; the second I was unexpectedly given the chance to be king, Alistair went bye-bye.
post #82 of 221
Quote:

But you are. They made character relationships and interactions as such that when you piss off a character and lose favor with them, or accept their advances and shower them with gifts, their effectiveness in combat goes up and down.

 

The only way to maximize the effectiveness of your party is to play a bisexual character who flirts with everyone around you.

 

Seriously the game doesn't do that.

 

 

http://dragonage.wikia.com/wiki/Friendship_and_rivalry

 

 

Quote:
Both friendship and rivalry have rewards. Bonuses along the rivalry path are often combat related while those along the friendship path tend to benefit Hawke or the entire party. The objective of the system is for the PC to be consistent in his/her decisions and push every companion towards either friendship or rivalry.

 

 

If anything the fact that I can spend the game actively castigating half my party members for seemingly every single personality defect they have and still get bonuses is a flaw. Considering that in previous Bioware games I had to be very careful with how I managed my party unless I wanted to deal with having to murderize them at the least convenient moment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:
I generally play characters who are a little too 'nice' to inflict that on a population (I'm the guy who refuses to pick Destroy in Mass Effect 3 because I won't sacrifice EDI and the Geth), but I won't lie; the second I was unexpectedly given the chance to be king, Alistair went bye-bye.

 

 

I'm actually much nicer in Mass Effect as a general rule. But that's probably because I love the various races in Mass Effect and don't care much at all for (*sigh*) goddamn elves and dwarves.*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Qunari on the other hand are delightful and I'm still holding out hope that they make some awesome amazonian Tal-Vashoth available for romance.

post #83 of 221

I usually play through once as a nice guy and another time as a complete prick, just to see the differences.  I'm not so much concerned about the gameplay effects as I am with how the dialog choices affect the storylines.

 

It is erroneous to state that the choices that you make don't have an affect on the game, though.  In DA:O, you could actually have party members that you piss off turn on you or just plain leave the group.  You couldn't really do that in DA2, but you could make story decisions that caused companions to get killed, captured, or otherwise leave the game.

post #84 of 221

That is true party members will still leave at certain junctions.

post #85 of 221

After playing Mass Effect, I felt like I had played an awesome role-playing game.

After playing Mass Effect 2, I felt like I had watched a good interactive movie.

After playing Mass Effect 3, I felt like I had watched a so-so, and barely-interactive movie.

 

 

 

After playing Dragon Age: Origins, I felt like I had played an awesome role-playing game.

After playing Dragon Age II, I felt like I had watched a Troma (Toxic Avenger) movie.... I would have been better off reading a "choose your own adventure" book than playing this piece of shit. Anyone that worked on Dragon Age II should have a restraining order against them being within 500 feet of a gaming studio.

 

 

Seeing the pattern, there's no way I'm dropping $60+ on Dragon Age III. If I have a friend that buys it, I might consider playing his copy just to see how much more they dummed it down, and how hard they push their gay agenda.... but David Gaider 'aint gettin my money.

post #86 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by KapitanKaput View Post
but David Gaider 'aint gettin my money.

Oh yes he is.

post #87 of 221

He's gettin' ca$h and a$$.

post #88 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by KapitanKaput View Post

some words and stuffs........

 

and how hard they push their gay agenda.....

 

Huh?  I have played both Dragon Age games......did I miss something?  The only game I can ever remember trying to make me gay was ME2.  Gay for that lovable little "very model of a scientist salurian!!!!!!"  I miss Mordin.

 

So, anyway, in DA3 we get our own castle?  Nice!

post #89 of 221
Thread Starter 

It sure looks like BioWare is answering most of the fan-criticisms from Dragon Age II (not that I'm a hater of that game, or something) :

 

http://www.ign.com/articles/2013/08/31/the-beauty-and-brutality-of-dragon-age-inquisition

 

Quote:
You can play as a Qunari...
 

The horned antagonists of Dragon Age II can, if you opt in, play a vital role in the waging war between mages and the Chantry, the rise of the long out-of-order Inquisition, and the general rescuing of Thedas from enemies beyond the Fade. You can also play as a female qunari -- not only is this the first time we're able to play as the race itself, it's the first time we'll even see a lady of their kind. Women in previous Dragon Age games have taken heat from men in a familiar, misogynistic culture, which created opportunity for interesting character growth, story moments, and moments where empowered women could shine. As an oft-hated qunari, those situations could prove...unpredictable in all the right ways.

 

 

Exploring the open world...

 

Meandering through Thedas has a purpose. The team used a phrase I really like: "honest discovery." Dragon Age III won't force you into a cave to fetch a book. Ideally, you'd stumble upon an opening, go in blind, and see what you find inside. On the larger scale, the sprawling spaces serve a bigger-picture purpose. Capturing keeps allows you to turn your growing army into a militant brute, a commercial enterprise, and more. Branding your new little fortresses reminds me of Far Cry 3's captured control points -- your influence and infamy grows alongside your army, which you can use in various ways. Speaking of which...

 

 

The Agent system...
 

Recruiting followers and amassing a trusted force comes naturally to a good leader, which is what you'll become as the Inquisitor in Dragon Age. This goes beyond companions. Your Agents are specialized units that take care of dirty work off-screen -- think Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker or Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood -- to create new opportunities with serious gameplay ramifications. In a simple example, we're shown a valley absorbed by poisonous gas. Should specialists head into the toxin and cap their source, you're able to explore what lies within. This is a behind-the-scenes mechanic that means something in the grand scheme of the world you inhabit, and it brings the thriving open world to life.

 

 

The Frostbite 3 Engine
 

Dragon Age: Inquisition is gorgeous, and brings the sort of A-game visual splendor you want at the turn of a console generation. Its scenery is beautiful, its spaces are dense, and its destruction looks as great as you'd expect -- and not in a "medieval Battlefield" sort of way. Rocks crumble beneath go-getter dragons tumbling into a structure. Bridges collapse when cut or detonated, boats burn when ignited -- which can halt an enemies' escape or resources long-term -- and combat bowls can be carved through to upend the level design. It's more than a shiny coat of paint. Like most things in Inquisition, the new bits have meaningful consequence on the gameplay.

 

 

The new dialog wheel
 

Speaking of consequence, making tough calls has always been part of BioWare's legacy, but oftentimes the reaction to an action isn't quite what you expect. Selecting the "Shut up" option in Mass Effect, for example, may have led to an unexpected act of violence that didn't suit the character, or damaged something later on that you may not have expected. Now, when you highlight dialog, you'll see a text pop-up explaining what's likely to happen if you say or do something. This is optional, so if you'd rather not know that a village will certainly fall if you leave its under-attack inhabitants hanging, or you'd rather deal with it on your own terms, you can.

 

 

The combat
 

I loved the physicality of Dragon Age II's combat, but like many, especially PC players, I missed the almost-turn-based tactics level of stop-motion strategy from Origins' combat. That's back in Inquisition (on all platforms), so even console players can stop time, get a high-level view of the battlefield, and assign orders for each of their characters. You can assign move orders, spells, and attack patterns with quick grace, and jump right back into the fray for real-time slicing and dicing. A.I. states also let you assign behaviors to units, as usual, so you can send an aggressive character ahead of his or her teammates to take care of business while supporting them from afar. That, and the Z-targeting, reactive enemies, and vicious force of each strike really makes each fight look like a scary place to be.

 

With zoomed-out tactical combat for all consoles (finally) to boot. Might end up purchasing this for next-gen, but since I can carry over my game-save data from DA:O and DA II on Xbox 360, I'm leaning towards this option at the moment.

 

(Playable female Qunari? Sten says "hi.")

 

Also, one single besieged town in DA III takes up more area than the entire game of Dragon Age II.

 

John Walker's take on gameplay (and in-game keeps) from RockPaperShotgun:

 

Quote:

Keeps are rather important, as it happens. Whether they’re as important as an entire town of innocents is up to you, but they play a significant role in what precariously encroaches on strategic tactics. As you gain control of such places, you can choose what they’re for. You might set them up for military training, and give a real emphasis on that to how you play. Or you can set them up essentially as mines, rooting out sulfur, for alchemic mage business. Or they can rebuild stuff, like a shattered colossus apparently, which I’m told is good for morale.

 

It seems that how you tailor these will affect the type of approach you take to the game, although the complexities of this don’t yet seem quite clear. And getting into one seemed to offer a range of choices too, with apparently multiple ways to approach your conquest, some depending upon the unique talents of your crew. And when one of your crew appears to be DA2′s Cassandra Pentaghast, those can be some pretty unique talents.

 

And yes, you can relax back in your seat. The combat has its vital strategic elements back, too. I’ve waited a thousand words to tell you, just like BioWare waited about 30 minutes into their presentation before putting my mind at ease. The ridiculous choice to limit the paused combat and party commands from DA2 is history, and it’s all back as it should be here. But boy, did they push their luck with that.

 

Unlike...well...most, I never really lost faith in BioWare, so I was always going to pick this up, but it has to be said that one of the reasons BioWare has seemingly stepped up its game here is because of the competition of CDProjekt Red and other new faces.

 

This is looking extremely promising.

post #90 of 221
Thread Starter 

Ars Technica posted another good, hard look at the game, with material on more of the in-game features:

 

http://arstechnica.com/gaming/2013/08/dragon-age-inquisition-preview-shows-combat-and-consequences/

 

One section that caught my eye:

 

Quote:

A game of dilemmas

These are actually some of the less important choices that the creators are trying to make the focus of Inquisition. "What we're trying to bring back for Dragon Age: Inquisition is the concept of dilemma...when you're faced with a choice, it means you know what's going to happen, you understand the consequences, but the differences between those consequences make it hard to pick between those choices."

 

These kinds of choices are reserved for massive, epic-level events. You might have to decide whether to allow a king to die when his rival is offering you more power, for instance. "It's a place where people make bad decisions for good reasons. We don't have mustache-twirling villains…while you might not agree with the reasons someone does something, you should at least understand."

 

It all sounds a bit more advanced than the simple paragon/renegade type of dichotomy found in most BioWare games. The familiar wheel-shaped dialogue choice system has been modified this time around, as well, to provide a direct hint as to precisely what will happen if you choose a certain response. That change makes sure that "you never pick 'To heck with you!' and end up slaughtering the guy's entire village," for instance. While this feature can be turned off, even when it's on the creators stress that the game will only warn you about your direct actions, and not their potential unforeseen consequences.

 

And those consequences can be dire. Not only will decisions you make in Inquisition sometimes unlock new content and quests, but choosing certain options can actually cut off certain lines of content, making them inaccessible in the future. If you choose not to defend a keep that's under attack, for instance, you may come back to it later to find the stronghold burned to the ground, along with all the content it would have contained at that point.

 

The ways you project this kind of influence on the world will often be less explicit than it has been in previous Dragon Age games as well, the creators say. For instance, if you come across an abandoned boat controlled by the Inquisition's enemies, you're free to set it on fire (provided you have the appropriate potion or magic spell). But the game isn't going to just pop up with a prompt suggesting that you take up some beneficial pyromancy. "The idea of pressing A to do everything is something we're trying to avoid."

 

But can I convert people to the Qun if I play as a Qunari? THAT would be badass.

post #91 of 221
Presumably unlikely, I'd imagine a Qunari player is just playing the race and not a believer in their religion side of things else a female PC would make no sense in light of Sten's reactions to female players in DA:O. He was all 'women of the Qun can not/do not fight grrr' etc
post #92 of 221
I don't know, that sounds like exactly the sort of story thing they get off on at Bioware. I'll almost certainly be playing Qunari first.
post #93 of 221

I'll be perfectly honest, this is probably the game I'll finally go next-gen for.

post #94 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trav McGee View Post

I'll be perfectly honest, this is probably the game I'll finally go next-gen for.

 

Yeah, I'm kind of embarrassed to say it, but apparently Bioware could get away with charging me $600 for one of their games and I'd pay it.  Because there is literally no other game or service I'd want from a new console.

post #95 of 221

Bear in mind, the Qunari aren't a specific race.  It's firmly established in DA2 that elves and humans can be Qunari.  What they probably mean is that the player can be a Kossith, which is the race that you predominantly see in DA2.  There's even a mod to change Sten in DA:O so that he takes on the Kossith appearance.

 

But yeah, all over playing a Kossith.  Badass.

post #96 of 221

Someone managed to film 30 minutes of gameplay at a Finnish expo, and the video quality is actually merely not good instead of the expected eye-watering awful. (Audio's a bitch, though, of course.)

 

 

 

 

Think these guys played a lot of Skyrim last year? So, Skyrim with a 4-player party, DA:O's optional top-down paused group tactics, and permanent game world repercussions, is what this looks like.

 

I, uh... I really want this.

post #97 of 221

I still won't touch it with a ten foot pole until it's been out, people have finished it, and it's been declared legitimately good.

post #98 of 221

I loved DA:ORIGINS and AWAKENINGS, and I'm one of the few people that I know who actually liked DA2, so this was a first day purchase for me.  That video only reinforces my need for this game to get here NOW.

post #99 of 221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr Syn View Post
 

I found Dragon Age 2 to be okay, but I did pay bargain bin prices for it. And enjoy it. I would have been pissed had I gone in blind.

 

 

It shit itself by the final act, with the stupid blood mage reveals. The game was also short changed majorly by EA in the development schedule.

 

 

 

I wonder if Bioware can dig itself out of the hole it's dug after SW:TOR, ME3 and whatever it's doing to the corpse of Ultima? Or will it end up like...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Still, fantasy FRANCE here we come (the Dragon Age CGI Anime was pretty bad fyi)... I want to believe.

 

Bro that is sooo ture !!

 

EA is totally messing up all recent Bioware games...

 

..I remember when Bioware made Games like KOTOR and Mass Effect 2... now its all just milking some series. Same with Dragon age... they spent like 4 years developing DA and then 1 year for DA2.. says it all. :(

 

RIP Bioware

post #100 of 221

We're still pretending MASS EFFECT 3 wasn't an excellent game?  K.

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