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Lincoln Post Release

post #1 of 65
Thread Starter 

So, I'm not sure how I'll feel about this movie in a couple of days, a couple of months, or some years down the line, but goddamn, my impression after seeing it tonight is that it's handily the best film this year, the best performance of Daniel Day-Lewis's career, and Spielberg's best movie in a couple decades or so, possibly one of his top five. It's not flawless; the ending is pretty great, but it might have been a tiny bit greater if it ended five minutes earlier, and one of my favorite actors alive, Michael Stuhlbarg, delivers a pretty unconvincing performance. But other than that, holy shit did I love this movie.

 

There's two things this movie has on its mind, and it pulls both of them off utterly. The first is to present Lincoln as both the great man and as a down-to-earth actual human being, which they nail. The degree of difficulty in Day-Lewis's work is staggering, but they got the right guy. And I think the key is that Kushner and Spielberg had decided that his humanism was the very core of his greatness. Watching him make the decision to prolong the war to get the vote through was the scene that clinched it for me, but his big scene with Tommy Lee Jones, the stuff with his family (Sally Field really pulls it off too, and I hate her usually), the excellent scene with Gloria Reuben on the steps, and his all-cards-on-the-table night before the vote meeting are all just master class. But most of all he captures the humanist genius that drove Lincoln. This is a heroic characterization on the level of Atticus Finch.

 

The second thing this movie is all about is presenting the American democratic process, in all its weaknesses, shady deals, and biases, as a great and virtuous thing. It might have a lot to do with the post-election buzz, but to me this seemed like the biggest love letter to government and congress I've ever seen. Despite being riveting and consistently very funny (all credit to a great, nomination-worthy James Spader performance), the whole movie is ultimately ennobling and made me feel downright proud of the checks and balances. 

 

What's more amazing is that it's so unlike Spielberg in its execution. Well, that's not quite right, it's got his pacing, camera placements, and his ability to entertain an audience in spades, but there are practically no obvious Spielberg flourishes. The stuff you didn't like in Amistad is gone, from the obvious emotional cues to the amber glow of importance to the forced 'movie' moments. OK, there's still a John Williams score that is a bit on the nose, but its relatively restrained. In fact, the whole movie is quite restrained for Spielberg, but this, of course, makes it all the more effective. The great Tommy Lee Jones stuff comes the closest to traditional crowd pleaser Spielbergery, but it's all so entertainingly performed that it's entirely welcome.

 

And the cast! Everyone is in this, and they're all great (save Stuhlbarg, I'm afraid). I was very pleased to see a huge role for Breaking Bad's David Costabile, and he knocks it out of the park. James Spader and Tommy Lee Jones are as killer as you've heard. I could truly go on and on about this ensemble, and this movie. I'm an easy mark for Spielberg, Kushner, Day-Lewis, and also American history, so I expect I'll be on the extreme end of reactions here. Suffice to say I loved it. Best time I've had in the theater since Inglourious Basterds.

post #2 of 65
So happy to hear the great wom on this. I just hope it won't dissappoint me as War Horse did after that also received some pretty great wom. Daniel Day-Lewis is by far my favorite actor and I want to see him do great in a great Spielberg movie.
post #3 of 65
Thread Starter 

Don't worry about War Horse. I liked it okay, but this is on a different level.

post #4 of 65

One of my main issues is that it should have ended five minutes earlier.  They had a scene that would have been the perfect way to end the story they were telling of Lincoln; the assassination/deathbed material didn't quite work as well.

post #5 of 65

I enjoyed this one. DDL was fantastic as usual. It amazes me as to how easy he makes acting look.

 

As mentioned above, James Spader was a highlight. I didn't know that he was in this and he stole most of the scenes that he was in.

 

I don't have much to say really other then this helped to wash the bad taste of Flight out of my mouth.

post #6 of 65

Evidently Lincoln is doing well in theaters despite historical evidence to the contrary.

post #7 of 65
 

This is the first Spielberg film in what feels like forever that isn't drenched in that overwhelmingly glowy Janusz Kaminski sheen.  I can't describe how refreshing it is.  I'm also in the camp with those who think the movie should have ended just a tad earlier (the consensus is that it Jones' final scene would have been perfect, yes?).  The deathbed stuff didn't really work for me either and the image of Lincoln orating over the flickering flame felt really schmaltzy, but whatever.

 

Minor nitpicks aside, Lincoln is wonderful.  In the running for best of the year and a whole bunch of well deserved Oscar gold.  Completely blown away by Daniel Day Lewis as usual, but its the supporting players that really make this sing.  The trio of Spader, Hawkes, and Nelson are my favorites, but the list of great supporting performances is seemingly endless.  Even the score felt spot on.  A couple cues here and there did feel on the nose, but for the most part Williams seems to back way off and the most rousing parts of the movie have no music behind them at all.     

post #8 of 65

DDL was incredible.  I have to confess I'm not a huge fan of his, having found his performance in There Will Be Blood a little overwrought.  

 

But I'm astonished at how he created such a convincing portrait of Lincoln.  I thought I was actually watching Lincoln--the awkward gate and posture alone was hugely convincing.  At times, DDL really sold what it must have been like to have the weight of the Union on your shoulders.  He made you empathize with Lincoln and the monumentality of his task.

 

I agree that we didn't need to see Lincoln die, but, in fairness, it was presented in a clever and unexpected way. 

post #9 of 65

I thought this was fantastic.  Solid work across the board, with an absolutely stellar central performance by Daniel Day Lewis.

 

Annoyingly, I live in a deep red state, so every derogatory or dismissive comment about Democrats was met with chuckles and snorts from half the audience, who were seemingly oblivious to the fact that the parties have essentially switched places ideologically since the late 1800s.

post #10 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Draco Senior View Post

One of my main issues is that it should have ended five minutes earlier.  They had a scene that would have been the perfect way to end the story they were telling of Lincoln; the assassination/deathbed material didn't quite work as well.

 

This. Los Beardes Maginifico had a very, very strong ending...then he & Kushner pulled a Munich and soured it with a tuneless, emotionally hollow, & clumsy 5 minute "thing".

It should've faded out, then shown tit;e cards about the assassination, then faded back in for his inaugural speech.

 

I just came back from this and if DDL doesn't get that Best Actor Oscar, the Academy needs to pack it in.

 

Also, it's pretty cool to see comeback kid Jackie Earle Haley hold his own in a Spielberg movie with the world's greatest living actor.

post #11 of 65

Favorite moment: Bruce McGill's reaction to Lincoln getting ready to tell another humorous story. 

 

I love the movie and DDL's performance as Lincoln, but I was surprised at how many funny lines they gave him.

post #12 of 65
I agree on the endings. It gets a little ROTKish, and it should have ended with the sounds of cannons and bells at the window. The extra material is unnecessary (although I love the final sequence of Lincoln giving the Second Inaugural - one of the finest speeches in recorded human history), and doesn't match the tone of the film. It feels like a reminder.

But the great strength of the film is its focus on a specific period of time, and how it observes Lincoln through that moment. The performance is simply above superlatives or hyperbole. Just an embodiment of a mythic historical figure. It was smart to narrow the gaze and not try a whole bite at the Lincoln apple. Too much material that way...this felt more intinmate and immediate.

I hope it gets some extra attention at Oscar time. I'd like to get a few more movies like this.
post #13 of 65
Thread Starter 

I wouldn't have ended it with TLJ's last scene, but rather with Lincoln going to the theater and saying 'I know it's time to go, but I'd much rather stay'. 

 

But that said, I certainly didn't think the ending was bad, like Private Ryan. I choked up pretty good. I think I might have to check this out again, despite the cost of tickets and all the other movies I wanna see.

post #14 of 65

In a perfect world the Best Supporting Actor list next year will all be guys from this movie.  Hey, if fucking MODERN FAMILY can do that....

 

Fucking stellar movie.  DDL was just uncanny.  It did feel a tiny bit stagebound, but otherwise I thought the movie was a near masterpiece.  

 

I'm totally stealing Tommy Lee Jones'   "IT OPENS!"   

post #15 of 65

Isn't this in wide release now?  I'm surprised there aren't more posts.  Thought this was great.  Stellar performances across the board, but it would all fall apart if DDL wasn't as magnificent as he is.  They somehow create a Lincoln that  lives up to the legend while simultaneously humanizing him.  Kind of amazing. 

 

Yes, there were probably three different scenes they could have used to end the film earlier, but it's a minor problem for such an immensely enjoyable movie.

post #16 of 65

The image of Thaddeus (Tommy Lee Jones) in bed with his wife at the end is easily my favorite moment of the film. Been thinking about it all weekend.

 

"Read it to me again, my love"

 

So sweet. THAT, right there, is the "American Promise".

post #17 of 65

I had forgotten movies could simultaneously be this good and this entertaining. 

 

DDL was so engaging in this I just wanted to listen to him talk and share in his wisdom. He came across as both a simple man and as an awe-inspiring figure.

post #18 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Decade View Post

The image of Thaddeus (Tommy Lee Jones) in bed with his wife at the end is easily my favorite moment of the film. Been thinking about it all weekend.

 

"Read it to me again, my love"

 

So sweet. THAT, right there, is the "American Promise".

 

Its a great moment, second in my mind only to Spader angrily muttering and kicking leaves at the pissed off representative who is reloading his pistol to take another shot at him.  I still can't get over how funny this movie was in places.  

post #19 of 65

I teared up.  My god, the cast on this film. 

 

I teared up early in the film when I saw Strathairn's tear of frustration at trying to work with Lincoln's decisions.  He JUST CARES SO MUCH.

 

And then the face on Breaking Gale's face when the 13th Amendment passes... oh god...

 

This film is all about the faces.  The story is all over them.

post #20 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post

I wouldn't have ended it with TLJ's last scene, but rather with Lincoln going to the theater and saying 'I know it's time to go, but I'd much rather stay'. 

 

This. I was about to get up when he walked off, because you couldn't get a more perfect ending than that. Just the look on his servant's face, like it was the last time they were going to see each other (something we as an audience member of course knew).

 

Given the election, I know we've been talking about 'horseraces' and how the media wants to sell a race when it's obvious who's going to win, so I'll be very disappointed and annoyed if the media thinks anyone, ANYONE, even has a shot at any major best actor award. Sorry, sometimes the choice is just so damn obvious. DDL gives the performance of a lifetime. Of several lifetimes I imagine.

 

TLJ is great though. Never has compromising on your beliefs felt more triumphant than when he changed his tune slightly in the congress. His explanation afterwards to that guy (name I forget) was equal parts heartbreaking and heartwarming. Fuck man, this cast.

post #21 of 65
A second watch, in the heart of Dixie (Charleston), was as potent as the first. I was incorrect to say the film should have ended with the bells and cannons. Fr some reason I had forgotten the placement of the Stevens scene with his wife, and the equally potent scenes of Lincoln meeting with the Reb ambassadors (and the totally critical to the film discussion of democracy that ends that) and Lincoln in Petersburg. The film needs the Petersburg scene to convey the import of Lincoln's decision to delay meeting the Richmond contingent...while it may not have made a difference, he intentionally chose the Amendment opportunity over possibly ending the conflict sooner. Certainly the right decision, but not one without cost. It was important to show that Lincoln was ever mindful of the ramifications of his decisions. He carried them with him always. So that scene mattered as well.

Anyways, a truly great film.
post #22 of 65

So does anyone know what's the release date for here in merry ol' England? 

post #23 of 65

February I think. Balls.
 

post #24 of 65
Damn. Might as well wait a couple of weeks for the US blu-ray or dvd, which will probably come out in March. Cheaper than the cinema.
post #25 of 65

25th January 2013, according to filmdates.co.uk

post #26 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Decade View Post

The image of Thaddeus (Tommy Lee Jones) in bed with his wife at the end is easily my favorite moment of the film. Been thinking about it all weekend.

 

"Read it to me again, my love"

 

So sweet. THAT, right there, is the "American Promise".

 

Equally effective is Thaddeus going into the chamber on the day of the vote at such an early hour that the room hasn't even been fully prepped yet, and there waiting for everyone else to arrive.  What a great way to show how important the cause was to him, that he would be the first to arrive.

 

Tommy Lee Jones really is excellent in this.  

post #27 of 65

He truly is.  That last close-up of his serene face?  Magic.

 

For someone who is generally ignorant about history, his final scene played like a huge reveal for me (which Spielberg clearly intended to a certain extent).  So very moving.

post #28 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

He truly is.  That last close-up of his serene face?  Magic.

 

For someone who is generally ignorant about history, his final scene played like a huge reveal for me (which Spielberg clearly intended to a certain extent).  So very moving.

 

Stevens is a really interesting historical figure. He's on the record publicly for saying things like "Whether or not a man welcomes a negro into his own home is a matter of personal taste," which of course (as the the film portrays) was the work of him playing politics in order to take strives towards racial equality. His relationship with Lydia Hamilton Smith was fairly well known around Washington and it lasted twenty three years, pretty much making them a common law married couple. Several people referred to her "Mrs. Stevens" on the street. Before he died, he chose to be buried in the only cemetery that accepted people of any race. 

I thought Smith's absence in the movie was particularly glaring but then at the end when I realized where he was going, I broke into a huge smile. Jones was excellent in the movie and I especially liked how even though the Radical Republicans were right in the context of history, they need to sell out their ideals somewhat in order to advance progress. It's frustrating work, being a politician, but you can find reward in that frustration.

I loved this movie thoroughly. It fucking flew by and I didn't think of checking my watch once. All the performances are excellent and the writing is top notch; structure and dialogue. Spielberg knows just how to handle the story to get you invested. This is a masterpiece, I think.


Edited by Parker - 11/24/12 at 10:42am
post #29 of 65
Thread Starter 
This might be the movie that makes the final argument that Spielberg's latter day adult movies are as impressive and essential as his super crowd pleasers. Beyond the greatness of the film itself, I'm pretty excited about its place in Spielberg's career. It's like seeing a veteran QB come back and win another Super Bowl ring.
post #30 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post


I loved this movie thoroughly. It fucking flew buy and I didn't think of checking my watch once. All the performances are excellent and the writing is top notch; structure and dialogue. Spielberg knows just how to handle the story to get you invested. This is a masterpiece, I think.

As long as it's a watch and not your cell phone.  I need an Alamo Drafthous near me stat.

 

But I agree.  One of the few 2+ hour movies that doesn't come close to feeling it.

 

The House of Rep's reaction to the idea of women voting had my theater laughing.  Would love to bring the real Rep Wood(Lee Pace) to the future to see what America looks like now-his head ight explode.  I think he'd be a frontrunner for 2016 for the Repbs.  The insults were so much better back in the day.  I wish our Reps were more poetic about it.

 

As for acting noms-DDL/Jones/Field are locks.  Spader may get in but that's about it.  Hawkes vs DDL should be an interesting choice in best actor category.

 

Have a feeling Les Mis will beat out Lincoln.  Academy loves a musical.

post #31 of 65

You wanna get your blood boiling?

 

Listen to the Slashfilmcast review of Lincoln.

 

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA... the guest critic starts to kinda lose his mind by the negative reaction the hosts had to the film.

post #32 of 65
Thread Starter 
That's David Chen, right? Pass.
post #33 of 65

Well Adam Quigley also hated it, and he's one of the better podcast reviewers.  I haven't seen the movie, but they both seem to think it's a typical biopic, which nobody else does.

post #34 of 65

One of the best films I have no desire to ever watch again. Great work all around. Oddly enough, I felt Gordon-Levitt was a weak link. But he was the only one, and certainly not terrible.

Give Day-Lewis all the Oscars, ever. Same with Jones and... well, this is the coolest/sleaziest/overweight Spader has ever been. I've never thought much of him(other than Secretary which Nooj reminded me of).

post #35 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluelouboyle View Post

Well Adam Quigley also hated it, and he's one of the better podcast reviewers.  I haven't seen the movie, but they both seem to think it's a typical biopic, which nobody else does.

 

One of the most pleasant surprises of this film is that it ISN'T a typical biopic. Loved the approach of showing the man's character in a compressed, one month period.

post #36 of 65

A typical biopic? Sorry to say, but dumbasses. Ray is a typical biopic, Walk the Line is a typical biopic. Cradle to grave shit where our heroes remember some goddamn valuable lesson they learned when they were wee youths, overcoming some bullshit psychological adversity to make it to the top. This is A number 1 grade character work, little shmaltz required.

 

Jesus Christ, 2012 has turned out to be a banner year for movies, hasn't it?

post #37 of 65

DDL and Tommy Lee just fucking killed it. Should it have ended with him walking down the hallway...sure. But does it ruin the film that we had those extra scenes...no.

 

Loved Spader kicking leaves at the guy trying to shoot him, I'm still cracking up.

post #38 of 65

It's an accomplished film from an acting perspective in particular, but it felt conspicuously dry in pure drama and narrative verve (unlike even say, Amistad, where I found any number of individual scenes like the slaveship revolt, the dumping of the chained slaves, "Give us Free!", etc. more powerful than virtually everything in Lincoln), probably a consequence of Kushner feeling the need to be a stickler to the historical record, whose procedural intricacies are only so interesting as cinematic fodder (in my opinion).  I found much of the attempted humor eye-rollingly trite as well (though Lincoln's storytelling is an exception). 

post #39 of 65

Whiny Liberal Whines About Lincoln in a Ridiculous Tangent

 

Going to get quasi-political: but god dammit, liberals. This is why we can't have nice things. We get this excellent film about a great president; a human president, that focuses on one month out of 96 months and suddenly, hold the presses, Lincoln was a lawyer who worked closely with capitalists!!?!?! Holy fuck, what does this have to do with the wheeling and dealing to get the 13th amendment passed? Talk about spectacularly missing the forest for the trees. Fascinating article and blah blah blah, but can we talk about what is found in the text and not what was "conveniently" left out because it wasn't for a moment relevant to the story?

post #40 of 65

I remember how Tarantino said the best compliment he got about Basterds was from Spielberg. He told him it was one of the best cast movies EVER.

 

"Lincoln" is up there. Amazing ensemble.

 

As much as it's being warmly recieved now, I think it will grow even further in estimation in the future, and looked back as one of El Spielbergo's greatest achievements. 

post #41 of 65

I really enjoyed this film and was surprised to do so, despite the positive buzz that led me to cough up the ticket price. I agree with the above poster who said that it probably should have ended with the silhouette shot of Lincoln walking to his carriage, maybe with the inaugural speech playing over it. It would have been emotionally affecting but somewhat abrupt to end with the bells and cannons, while ending on Stevens' face would have been a strange move for a movie that's not really about him. I think it was important to show Lincoln touring the battlefield, looking far older than even at the beginning of the movie. I was expecting and dreading having to see Lincoln get shot, so I was a bit puzzled when the final theater scene was decidedly not Our American Cousin, but thought that it was a fairly effective little scene. That said, yeesh, the deathbed scene and the candle-fade shot were a bit much.

I went into this without having read any of the casting news, etc., because I was expecting a pretty typical biopic. I knew Daniel Day-Lewis and Sally Field were in it, but that's about it. So every time somebody would show up, it was a nice little surprise, even if it occasionally took me out of the movie. I thought I wasn't going to get into the film at first when Sally Field was in full on I AM ACTING mode at the beginning, but man, the other performances just sucked me in. Day-Lewis is an uncanny Lincoln, managing to sound like Lincoln's sounded like in my head for years (since reading about his high, reedy voice), managing to look almost exactly like the man (the numerous profile shots in the film are not accidental, I think), but he never crosses into caricature. He's always immensely human: awkward, long-winded, loving but a little confused by his eldest son. I think my favorite little bit with him is when he gets on his knees to stoke a fire, and looks exactly like a gangly man with a lot on his mind crawling around on the floor in a very un-Presidential way. Thaddeus Stevens is usually cast into the role of villain or at least antagonist in media or certain histories, having him essentially take the reigns as protagonist for the middle portion of the film was an interesting choice. I enjoyed how David Costabile, known for playing wormy assholes or new age dorks, was a force for good (still slightly wormy), while handsome and funny Lee Pace was essentially the villain of the film. I thought Gordon-Levitt was just kind of there for most of the movie, but the scene where he confronts his father after having seen the mass limb-burial was great, and not only because Day-Lewis is amazing. Finally, the scene with the congressman trying to shoot Spader's character had my entire theater (admittedly about 8 people) in stitches.

post #42 of 65

I'm honestly not sure how best to gather my thoughts on this movie, other than to say I liked it very, very much. It's huge. Frankly, I had an easier time talking about Cloud Atlas after seeing it, and this is infinitely more straightforward. I think the problem I'm having is that Lincoln is anchored much more by reality in that everything that happens on-screen directly tethers to events that really happened and people who actually existed. A film like Holy Motors can make me feel dumb by virtue of being so impenetrably surreal; a film like Lincoln can make me feel dumb because it just reminds me how ignorant I am of the details of my own country's history. In short, it's hard to talk about because I want to watch my steps talking about it.

 

That said, there are really two major things that should strike any of us coming out of Lincoln: the film's message about politics, and its portrait of its titular figure. There are so many elements for us to pick up on and mull over which indirectly make a comparison to the politics of one hundred and fifty (thereabouts) years ago, and so many ways in which our government has changed and also stayed the same. (I think the latter cluster of elements serve as the key to links made between Lincoln and Obama, though I think many of those are mostly false equivalencies.) The wheeling, dealing, and urgent need for compromise? That's always been around, in addition to the inefficient and yet reliable set of rules by which our government functions. If you want to get something done, something that has great meaning to you, you have to be willing to give and compromise in order to do so.

 

I do wonder what a film like this could mean to a society in which "compromise" has almost become a dirty word. One could walk away from Lincoln having received its central message as, "you know, that Lincoln guy compromised, and he still managed to fucking end slavery". The broader point being made is that Lincoln believed so adamantly that slavery needed to end that he was willing to do anything in order to achieve that goal-- including not just compromising but also lying to his own staff.

 

Which ties into the way that Lincoln treats, uh, Lincoln. In two words I would call that treatment "even-handed"; my big concern from watching the first trailer is that the film would go way over the edge into realms of inflated veneration. Yes, Lincoln was a great president, but he was also a man with his own foibles. Spielberg isn't interested in wading through the worst of the man, but he's also not particularly keen on lionizing him, so we're left with a depiction of one of the country's greatest leaders that shows his best qualities-- his passion, his compassion, his intelligence and insight, his charisma, his humor, his warmth-- along with some of his worst. He's a great man, but still just a man, one prone to the same problems as any other man, whether he's neglecting one of his sons or engaging in ferocious verbal duels with his wife. Clearly, Lincoln is more in favor of Honest Abe than not, but this isn't some sloppy celebration of his character. It's much more genuine than that.

 

Also there were some good performances. That Daniel Day-Lewis guy can act. If he keeps acting like that, someday maybe he'll win an Oscar.

 

...

 

Okay, yeah, you can't talk about Lincoln without praising DDL, who may well be a shapeshifter. The guy is impeccable. Apart from the fact that the make-up team busted their asses making him look just like Lincoln, Day-Lewis brings a perfectly measured hand to every gesture, every glance, every step he takes, every word he speaks that could fool even the most aware of persons into believing that he is Lincoln. It's an amazing transformation, and an amazing performance; Day-Lewis captures the man's humanist core and all of his struggles as a leader and as a husband and father beautifully.

 

And he also has the luxury of having some of Hollywood's acting royalty (and some of the best actors whose names most people probably don't even know) in his corner. I LOVED Field, and I loved every moment she shared with Day-Lewis; I loved Spader's hilarious performance as Bilbo; I loved how much humanity Strathairn injected into his portrayal of Seward; and I loved Jones' amazing portrayal of Stevens, a performance which comes just shy of matching DDL's in terms of sheer excellence. And I'm only scratching the surface, because literally every role, no matter how small, no matter how minor, is handled wonderfully by each performer. It would just take me forever to write out each name-- Goggins, Costabile, Hawkes, Nelson, Haley, McRobbie, McGill, Oyelowo, Gordon-Levitt, Pace, Stuhlbarg, Merkerson-- but they all deserve a lot of praise. Loved this.

post #43 of 65

ALSO: I left out any mention of Spielberg. Maybe that means he just did his job very, very well, but as much as this might not be so obviously "Spielberg" in the ways Arjen Rudd outlines, there's nevertheless little room to doubt that this is a Spielberg picture. It's very, very restrained, very reigned-in, very earnest-- and yet it still finds time to be cheeky, as in the scene where Mr. Bilbo curses and kicks leaves at an armed and hostile politician. I can't think of a whole lot of filmmakers working at Spielberg's level who can make a straightforward film about Lincoln and the 13th amendment and yet still find time for something that beautifully outrageous.

post #44 of 65

The opening was a bit clunky, and some of the monologues just barely escape the feel of a high school educational video, but the ensemble cast really pulls it off. David Costabile should get a nomination for his reaction to the amendment passing alone.

 

Spielberg needs to learn how to end his movies.

post #45 of 65

Honestly, I don't know how you don't end this on Lincoln walking out to the theater.  Hell, you can put your candle-dissolve-to-inaugural-address bit there if you're dead set on it. 

 

But it's small potatoes overall.  The big potatoes being that ridiculous cast.  I want James Spader and John Hawkes to play buddy henchmen in every movie made next year, regardless of period or genre.  

post #46 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post

Honestly, I don't know how you don't end this on Lincoln walking out to the theater.  Hell, you can put your candle-dissolve-to-inaugural-address bit there if you're dead set on it.

 

This is more or less my feeling, and the final five minutes/ten minutes of the film are-- for me-- its only weak points. That ending feels kind of like a sledgehammer, and while the rest of the picture isn't super-duper subtle it also doesn't play like a giant reverential overture. I'd prefer the quieter ending of Lincoln heading to the theater; it would have felt less blunt.

Quote:

 

But it's small potatoes overall.  The big potatoes being that ridiculous cast.  I want James Spader and John Hawkes to play buddy henchmen in every movie made next year, regardless of period or genre.

 

So long as the setting allows them to have insanely awesome mustaches.

post #47 of 65
Thread Starter 

Those Spader/Hawkes/Nelson characters are like the greatest unwritten Mark Twain novel ever. I love them.

post #48 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post

Those Spader/Hawkes/Nelson characters are like the greatest unwritten Mark Twain novel ever. I love them.

 

I would give my right arm for a LONE GUNMEN-esque spinoff movie with these three guys.  

post #49 of 65

Just got back. One of the best films I've seen all year (bear in mind I haven't seen CHUD favorites like Beasts of the Southern Wild or Looper yet, I will get on that soon enough).

 

I will have to collect my thoughts a bit, but for now I'll say this: if Daniel Day-Lewis doesn't win Best Actor, and Tommy Lee Jones is not at least NOMINATED for Best Supporting, I will fucking riot. Who's with me?!

post #50 of 65

I would bet my life that Day Lewis wins.  As he should.

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