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Top Ten Films of the 1970's

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 

After seeing the top ten of the 2000's thread I thought it would be interesting to see what everyone's personal 10 favorite films from the 1970's are. 

 

1.American Graffiti 

2.Over the Edge

3.Annie Hall

4.Mean Streets

5.Shampoo

6.The Long Goodbye

7.Five Easy Pieces

8.Rolling Thunder

9.Nashville

10.The Last Picture Show

 

Honorable mention:Two Lane Blacktop, Pretty Maids All In a Row, Smile, Assault on Precinct 13, Straight Time, Play It Again, Sam, Dawn of the Dead, The Bad News Bears, What's Up Doc, Klute.

post #2 of 51
Good choices, but I would add GODFATHER 2, SEPRICO, FRENCH CONNECTION 1 & 2, THE CONVERSATION, STAR WARS and THE RIGHT STUFF - which I know is '83, but it feels like a 70s movie and marks the end of that era.
post #3 of 51

From the top of my head/likely forgetting lots:

 

1. Jaws

2. The Man Who Would be King

3. Annie Hall

4. The Godfather

5. Animal House

6. Aguirre: The Wrath of God

7. Alien

8. Monty Python and the Holy Grail

9. The Godfather Part II

10. Slap Shot

 

Also: Love and Death, Caddyshack, The Wicker Man, Star Wars

post #4 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post

From the top of my head/likely forgetting lots:

 

1. Jaws

2. The Man Who Would be King

3. Annie Hall

4. The Godfather

5. Animal House

6. Aguirre: The Wrath of God

7. Alien

8. Monty Python and the Holy Grail

9. The Godfather Part II

10. Slap Shot

 

Also: Love and Death, Caddyshack, The Wicker Man, Star Wars

 

Phenomenal list, Arjen.  Always good to see another fan of THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING.

post #5 of 51

My list:

 

1. VANISHING POINT

2. THE GODFATHER, Part 2

3. THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING

4. JEREMIAH JOHNSON

5. JAWS

6. THE OUTLAW JOSEY WALES

7. ALIEN

8. THE GODFATHER

9. STAR WARS

10. THE FRENCH CONNECTION

post #6 of 51

It's impossible to just name 10 from this decade, but these were the first that I thought of. In no particular order:

 

 

1. Nashville
2. Barry Lyndon
3. The Last Picture Show
4. Godfather 1 & 2
5. Annie Hall
6. Taxi Driver
7. Apocalypse Now
8. The Exorcist
9. Paper Moon
10. Stroszek
 
I could include dozens as honorable mention, but a special shout-out to A Woman Under The Influence, which I saw for the first time recently and can't stop thinking about.
post #7 of 51

Posting one of these off the top of my head is usually folly, but what the hell ...

 

1. Jaws

2. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

3. A Clockwork Orange

4. The Exorcist

5. Star Wars

6. All the President's Men

7. Dawn of the Dead

8. Superman: The Movie

9. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

10. Five Easy Pieces

 

Honorable "No Shit I Love These Movies" Mention: Godfather and Godfather II, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Alien, Halloween, Chinatown, The Muppet Movie, Caddyshack.

post #8 of 51

1. THE FRENCH CONNECTION 

2. FINGERS 

3. THE DRIVER

4. GANJA AND HESS

5. McCABE AND MRS. MILLER

6. APOCALYPSE NOW

7. DAYS OF HEAVEN

8. OPENING NIGHT 

9. MIKEY AND NICKY

10. NOSFERATU, PHANTOM DER NACHT

 

Honorable Mention: THE PASSENGER, TWO-LANE BLACKTOP, NADA, THE KILLING OF A CHINESE BOOKIE, THE LAST PICTURE SHOW, TEN DAYS' WONDER, FREEBIE & THE BEAN, SAINT JACK, DAWN OF THE DEAD, SORCERER

post #9 of 51

Probably:

 

The Conversation

Straw Dogs

The Godfathers

Taxi Driver

Nashville

Badlands

Don't Look Now

Aguirre: The Wrath of God

Jaws

Holy Grail... or maybe Blazing Saddles.  Or... shit... Young Frankenstein!

 

No, Holy Grail.  I guess.

 

 

Doesn't this thread just make you wanna hold a draft?

post #10 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bailey View Post

Doesn't this thread just make you wanna hold a draft?

 

Considering I missed that draft, YES.

post #11 of 51

This will all come down to personal taste but here we go anyway...

1. Apocalypse Now
2. Star Wars
3. The Man Who Fell To Earth
4. Blazing Saddles
5. The Godfather 1 & 2
6. Jeremiah Johnson

7. The Duellists

8. McCabe & Mrs Miller

9. Taxi Driver

10. Alien

 

Hon. mentions: Harold & Maude, Being There, Shamp...uh...just everything by Hal Ashby.

post #12 of 51

I made two separate lists about the '70s - 'Best' and 'Favourites'. My choices for 'best" were ones I thought were of the highest objective quality and most artistically impressive. Also ones that resonated with both myself and the public, or in other words, ones that were popular with general audiences that I felt equally enthusiastic about (something that doesn't happen very often).

 

'Favourites' were the ones that just made me happiest and hit me most personally because I found them so beautifully made, moving, and/or just plain entertaining by my sensibilities that I had more fun watching them than any others. This list is a hybrid of the two...so I could make one that's personal, but also reflect where I tend to agree with general audiences.

 

1. "Halloween" (1978)

2."The Godfather" (1972)

3. "Alien" (1979)

4. "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" (1975)

5. "The Man Who Would Be King" (1975)

6. "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" (1971)

7. "Kramer vs. Kramer" (1979)

8. "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three" (1974)

9. "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" (1978)

10. "Lupin III: The Castle of Cagliostro" (1979)
 
Honorable Mention: "Network" (1976), "Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia" (1974)
post #13 of 51
Jaws
Alien
Dawn of the Dead
Martin
Willy Wonka
Legend of Hell House
Prophecy
Phase IV
Invasion of the Body Snachers
Airplane

and my pick for 80s film still wearing its bell bottoms

First Blood
post #14 of 51

A top 10 for the 70s?  That's a tall order.  There were so many classics.

 

No particular order:

 

Alien

Taxi Driver

Apocalypse Now

Jaws

All The President's Men

Halloween

Star Wars

The Exorcist

The Godfather

Close Encounters Of The Third Kind

post #15 of 51

#1 Apocalypse Now

post #16 of 51

I wonder what decade would have the most varied selection of favorites?  I feel like we're overlapping here every bit as much as we would in the 80's or 90's, when this is ostensibly the deepest decade out there.

post #17 of 51
I think they would all overlap quite a bit.
post #18 of 51
In no order, since it changes constantly, but these generally stay the same top 10:

Jaws
Alien
Apocalypse Now
Godfather 2
The Man Who Would Be King
Young Frankenstein
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Star Wars
Dawn of the Dead
Superman

70s movies I have a deep love for, but aren't really going to be classified "best" of much.

Smokey and the Bandit
Death Race 2000
The Kentucky Fried Movie
The Phantom TollBooth
Phase IV

Fave Bond:
Man with the Golden Gun (this is definately #11, but its just not quite enough to displace anything in my top 10)
And #12 would be Live and Let Die, my perennial runner up to Golden Gun.
Edited by Andy Bain - 12/1/12 at 11:18am
post #19 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malmordo View Post

1. THE FRENCH CONNECTION 

2. FINGERS 

3. THE DRIVER

4. GANJA AND HESS

5. McCABE AND MRS. MILLER

6. APOCALYPSE NOW

7. DAYS OF HEAVEN

8. OPENING NIGHT 

9. MIKEY AND NICKY

10. NOSFERATU, PHANTOM DER NACHT

 

Honorable Mention: THE PASSENGER, TWO-LANE BLACKTOP, NADA, THE KILLING OF A CHINESE BOOKIE, THE LAST PICTURE SHOW, TEN DAYS' WONDER, FREEBIE & THE BEAN, SAINT JACK, DAWN OF THE DEAD, SORCERER

 

I love that you mentioned Fingers and The Killing of a Chinese Bookie.

post #20 of 51

Off the top of my head:

 

Blazing Saddles

Smokey and the Bandit

The Outlaw Josey Wales

Star Wars

The Godfather

High Plains Drifter

The Longest Yard

Kentucky Fried Movie

Jeremiah Johnson

The Cowboys

post #21 of 51

Love that so many people are mentioning "Jeremiah Johnson". Always felt that was underrated as hell, and the script is pure Milius greatness.

post #22 of 51

My Top 10:

 

1. THE PARALLAX VIEW

2 WHITE LIGHTNING

3. THE SPOOK WHO SAT BY THE DOOR

4. SORCERER

5. THE GAMBLER

6. BAD NEWS BEARS

7. BLUE COLLAR

8. MEAN STREETS

9. DIRTY HARRY

10 INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS

 

Honorable Mention: PAPILLON, THE GREAT NORTHFIELD MINNESOTA RAID, MR. MAJESTYK, FREEBIE & THE BEAN, SHAMPOO, THE DRIVER, TRUCK TURNER

post #23 of 51

Oooh yeah, good call. THE GAMBLER is amazing.

post #24 of 51

My Top 10 could very easily consist solely of James Caan + Burt Reynolds movies.

 

I hated to leave off Milius' BIG WEDNESDAY. Wonderful film.

post #25 of 51

ZARDOZ.

post #26 of 51
Zardoz.

Damn.
post #27 of 51

Only ten?  Impossible.

 

1.      Star Wars (1977)

 

Duh.  The one that started it all, the reason Hollywood goes for the big “event movie” every summer.  The story is not original, the acting is not exactly great, and the directing is simply okay.  Then why will it always be a classic?  Because it was the first fairy tale that belonged to the new generation.  It wasn’t passed down to us.  It was ours.

 

2.      The Godfather, Part I (1972)

This very well might be the best American film ever.  Francis Ford Coppola takes an overblown novel of an American dynasty and transforms it into a powerful meditation on family, honor and corruption.  Yup, he hits all the classic themes.

 

3.      Monty Python & the Holy Grail (1975)

How can you not bust a gut laughing at just about every scene in this movie?  The duel with the Black Knight, the French soldiers in the castle, the narrator/historian who gets killed… the Python boys are sheer freaking geniuses!

 

4.      Chinatown (1974)

Jack Nicholson reinvigorates the hard-boiled private eye genre with this, simply one of the best screenplays ever written.  Roman Polanski’s atmospheric landscape of pre-WWII L.A. is gorgeous.  The ending might seem a bit dated now, but at the time it was one of the most shocking and horrific things imaginable.  Incest… icky!

 

5.      The Godfather, Part II (1974)

The story, acting and directing didn’t slump with the second installment.  It maintained the first’s superior quality in all forms.  It might’ve even topped Part I in several scenes.  Starting in the first installment and continuing through this one to Part III (1990), Al Pacino crafts what is probably the best character arc in American cinema history.  Add that to De Niro’s appearance in this as young Vito Corleone and you have an instant classic.

 

6.      The Exorcist (1973)

I still think The Shining (1980) might be scarier, but this movie sure gives you the chills.  Linda Blair, as a possessed little girl, trips me out.  But Ellen Burstyn as her suffering mother puts in a tremendous performance.  It took her until Requiem For a Dream (2000) to be that good again.

 

7.      Jaws (1975)

It’s the age-old Man vs. Nature theme.  Except this time it’s done by Spielberg.  Notable not only for its great “less is more” direction, but also for its all-time classic, chill-inducing theme.  And the great “comparing scars” scene. And Roy Scheider.  Well, and for everything else.

 

8.      Alien (1979)

Aliens (1986) is a damn good action movie.  But the original was most definitely horror/thriller with a science fiction twist.  An entire deep-space crew of humans are sliced and diced by one little baby alien.  By the time it is full-grown, only Sigourney Weaver is still alive to do anything about it.  And does she.  Panties and all.

 

9.      Annie Hall (1977)

Woody Allen’s best work.  In this, he manages to encapsulate everything wrong with being a single New Yorker.  He’s a nebbishy commitment-phobe with an intense fear of rejection. Diane Keaton (in the performance of her career) considers herself an independent and a free spirit, and yet is desperately looking for someone to share her life with.  Genius wit and dialogue coupled with great performances.  Christopher Walken’s cameo as Keaton’s brother is hysterical.

 

10.   Young Frankentstein (1974)

Mel Brooks’s hysterical take on the classic gothic horror tale.  Peter Boyle as the monster and Gene Wilder as the mad doctor.  By the time Madeline Kahn shows up as the Bride, you have to pause the movie to stop laughing. 

 

11.   All the President’s Men (1976)

True story of reporters Woodward & Bernstein and how their investigations opened up the Watergate scandal.  Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman work very well together, but the real thrill is watching the tale of how two scrappy reporters brought down a corrupt presidency with nothing more than tenacity and a typewriter.

 

12.   Nashville (1975)

Robert Altman’s masterpiece.  Also, as far as I know, the first example in American cinema of sound dialogue being edited in a cross cut pattern similar to the visuals.  The concept definitely worked, and is still ripped off to this day.  Even more impressive, the majority of the story was improvised, showing Altman and his editing staff to be solid gold.

 

13.   Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)

A simply beautiful fantasy about the possibility of alien life in our galaxy.  Spielberg  tells the tale of Roy Neary (Richard Dreyfuss), an average man who has a “close encounter” that changes his life forever.  Even if he has to abandon his wife and children to do it; how very 70’s.

 

14.   The Deer Hunter (1978)

Extremely character-driven and features no stereotypical action sequences.  De Niro and Walken, as two old friends from a tiny Pennsylvania town (remarkably similar to the Saigon village where they are held as POW’s) are brilliant together.  And the Russian Roulette scene… a classic!

 

15.   Taxi Driver (1976)

De Niro aiming a gun at his own image in a mirror asking “You talking to me?  Are YOU talking to ME?” is certainly one of the best scenes of the seventies, if not the last several decades.  Add to that the story of a lonely Vietnam veteran suffering from insomnia, which eventually leads to extreme paranoia, which eventually leads to complete, violent mental breakdown, and you’ve got Scorsese’s best film.

 

16.   The French Connection (1971)

Gene Hackman’s Popeye Doyle is a drunken racist cop, a brilliant contrast to his nemesis, a dignified and gentlemanly French heroin smuggler.  Their cat and mouse game culminates in one of the best car chases ever filmed.  Also one of the best following sequences ever filmed.

 

17.   Badlands (1973)

Based upon the true story of mass-murderer Charles Starkweather and his girlfriend in the 1950’s Midwest, Martin Sheen does a tremendously good understated job of portraying the main character.  The film depicts his brutal acts along a chaotic road trip simply as is, there is no moral judgment.  Terrence Malick directs with an artist’s sensibilities, the film is beautiful.

 

18.   Enter the Dragon (1973)

Two words: Bruce fucking Lee.  Plot?  Who cares (even though there actually was one)!  Acting abilities?  Whatever (although he actually had them)!  The minute the first fight scene starts and Lee emits that now famous high-pitched wail, you know you’re in for some fun.

 

19.   The Conversation (1974)

Amazingly good with Gene Hackman as a lonesome, loathsome surveillance expert with a moral dilemma after realizing a couple he is ordered to tape will most likely be murdered.  Should he warn them, thereby blowing his cover and exposing his superiors?  A gripping (though slightly long) thriller from Coppola with a classic final shot.

 

20.   American Graffiti (1973)

Though “cruising” was quite a few years before my time (my friends and I were more prone to hanging out in malls), this beautiful little film about four teens in the summer of 1962 is a joy to watch.  Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard, Cindy Williams and Harrison Ford round out the great ensemble cast with fresh, poignant dialogue and very believable characters.

 

21.   The Jerk (1979)

Steve Martin manages to make Navin Johnson the most impressively moronic character ever created (at the time).  Adopted at birth by a black family in the south, upon adulthood Navin realizes he is different.  “You mean I’m gonna STAY this color?”  After that, it’s one heck of a road trip to riches.

 

22.   Mean Streets (1973)

Harvey Keitel is the stereotypical kid from Little Italy who longs for a simple life.  He collects for his uncle to make ends meet so he can save up to buy a local bar.  But the woman he loves has a cousin, De Niro’s Johnny Boy, who has other plans for him.  As the movie progresses, the claustrophobic “mean streets” of New York offer Charlie (Keitel) no more choices.  Ultra-violent and impressive early work from Scorsese.

 

23.   Shaft (1971)

Richard Roundtree, as Shaft, introduced “blaxpoitation” films to general (white) audiences nationwide.  For once, a black actor is recognized as the hero figure.  For that alone, it makes the list.  Besides, how bad-ass is this guy?  He’s Shaft for chrissakes!

 

24.   Superman (1978)

The scene where Superman rescues Lois from a fall off the Daily Planet roof is still awesome:  “You’ve got me… who’s got you?”  Christopher Reeve brings an all-American dignity to the famous character.  The only worthy sequel is Part II (1980), if only because General Zod is such a bad-ass limey bastard.

 

25.   The Muppet Movie (1979)

How could I be a little kid when this came out and not put this on the list?  It’s the freaking first Muppets movie!  Besides, it has cameos from just about every well-known actor in the entirety of the seventies.  And, whether you’re a kid or a grown-up, it’s still funny.

post #28 of 51
Chinatown and Enter the Dragon.

How the hell did I forget those?
post #29 of 51

Chinatown! Dammit. Well, we were told to forget about it...

 

Other conspicuously missing titles from this page so far:

 

Deliverance

 

Phantom Of The Paradise

 

Time After Time

 

Last Tango In Paris

 

Get Carter

post #30 of 51
Thread Starter 

A few more I left off but could fill an alternate top 10

 

Carrie

Race With The Devil

Last Embrace

Real Life

The Candidate

Blume in Love

Slither

The Outfit

Sisters

Who'll Stop the Rain

post #31 of 51

Oh yeah and that one movie...what's it called?

The muthafuckin' Sting

post #32 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Decade View Post

Oh yeah and that one movie...what's it called?

The muthafuckin' Sting

 

Shit!  Shaft just go bumped right the fuck off my list!

post #33 of 51
A Boy and His Dog

The Andromeda Strain

Empire of the Ants (it's bad, I know)
post #34 of 51

Damn, EMPEROR OF THE NORTH POLE.

post #35 of 51

OFFS


Just gone through my DVD collection and there are so many more that would make an alternate one for me (depending on mood)

 

The Poseidon Adventure

The Return of the Pink Panther

Sleuth

Westworld

The Donald Sutherland starring Invasion of the Body Snatchers

The Warriors

SIlent Running

Logan's Run

Network

Life of Brian

post #36 of 51

Jesus...can't believe I forgot THE STING and HAROLD AND MAUDE in my top ten.  Must re-evaluate...

post #37 of 51

In no order, trying to cover the largest amount of bases, yadda yadda yadda.

 

Taxi Driver

 

Boring as it is to cite this, I still can't get enough of this film. It's the sleepy, hazy atmosphere of it that gets me more than anything else, I think - it's quite intoxicating, for such a nasty movie. That and Scorsese's batshit cameo.

 

Milano Calibro 9

 

My favourite movie from the 70's italian cop & robber genre (which is one of my favourite genres ever), there is so much to love here - the stoic protagonist, Mario Adorf as the best portrayal of an unhinged id onscreen since Elli Wallach, those fucking interiors. But what it comes back to most for me is that amazing opening scene, the carnage and Luis Bacalov's gorgeous classical score getting periodically interuupted by Osanna's Prog Rock noise. It's over-the-top, sure, but there's something really affecting in it for me, to do with the collapse of a great civilization and 70's disillusionment and a very italian form of cynicism.

 

Two-Lane Blacktop

 

The ultimate road movie. So unique and unnerving.

 

Confederção

 

Portuguese sci-fi movie about a post-dictatorship Portugal divvied up between russians and americans. There is literally no way any of you will ever be able to see this but, ya know, gotta reprezent.

 

Silent Running

 

Speaking of sci-fi. This movie strikes me as so gusty and beautiful...the clunky parts (those robots!) can't really be separated from the great parts, it all adds up to the same sort of magical, strange vibe. And as far as anti-establishment 70's protagonists go, you can't really get more gutsy than an ecological warrior who commits straight-up murder in the movie's begining and who is nevertheless treated entirely sympathetically.

 

Solaris

 

Less emotionally affecting than its source book, but still such an acheivement. Get yr weed on, but don't smoke too much, beware that running time!

 

Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid

 

The story of a man who wants to be caught being chased by a man who doesn't want to catch him. My favourite Peckinpah.

 

Aguirre: Der Zorn Gottes

 

Still the high point for both Herzog's man vs nature theme and Kinski's "I am fucking insane" theme. There's something so thrilling about those drops of water getting on the camera.

 

Alex In Wonderland

 

The best summing up of what the 60's were about and one of the best movies about directing. Counter-cultural star Donald Sutherland stars.

 

The Long Goodbye

 

Hooray for Hollywood.

post #38 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Milano Calibro 9

 

My favourite movie from the 70's italian cop & robber genre (which is one of my favourite genres ever), there is so much to love here - the stoic protagonist, Mario Adorf as the best portrayal of an unhinged id onscreen since Elli Wallach, those fucking interiors. But what it comes back to most for me is that amazing opening scene, the carnage and Luis Bacalov's gorgeous classical score getting periodically interuupted by Osanna's Prog Rock noise. It's over-the-top, sure, but there's something really affecting in it for me, to do with the collapse of a great civilization and 70's disillusionment and a very italian form of cynicism.

 

 

This and Di Leo's Mr Scarface should have been on my list. Both have the best opening scenes of crime films ever.

post #39 of 51

1) Star Wars
2) Jaws
3) Close Encounters of the Third Kind
4) Dog Day Afternoon
5) Alien
6) Apocalypse Now
7) Get Carter
8) THX 1138
9) A Clockwork Orange
10) Aguirre, The Wrath of God

post #40 of 51

Alternate top10, since everyone's doing it:

 

Chinatown

Harlan County, U.S.A.

The Friends Of Eddie Coyle

The Yakuza

Get Carter

The Taking Of Pelham 123

Barry Lyndon

Mean Streets

W.R. - Mysteries Of The Organism

The Duellists

post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielRoffle View Post

The Yakuza

 

 

Oh HELL yes.  Great, underrated and underseen film.

post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post

 

Oh HELL yes.  Great, underrated and underseen film.

 

It got some shine when the Robert Mitchum Signature Collection came out, but not half as much as it should've. Mitchum and yakuzas, how can you go wrong?

post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielRoffle View Post

 

It got some shine when the Robert Mitchum Signature Collection came out, but not half as much as it should've. Mitchum and yakuzas, how can you go wrong?

 

And Mitchum is fucking amazing in this film.  Damn, I know what I want to watch tonight...

post #44 of 51

Man, I'm going to end up leaving so many great films out of this list it's ridiculous:

 

Chinatown - Best script ever. Best ending ever. Best LA movie ever. Perfection.

 

Taxi Driver - Other best script ever written. Scorsesse's masterpeice (first of them). Deniro's best performance. Best New York Movie ever.

 

Network - Also other best script ever written. Satire as prophetic and sharp as it gets. Fantastic performances throughout. New York baby.

 

Manhattan - Other best New York movie ever. Annie Hall is great, but I'll take Manhattan if only because of the black-and-white photography and Gershwin score. Just an aesthetic feast. Plus Allen at the top of his game as a writer/director/star. One of my favorite last lines/shots.

 

The Warriors - New York in the 70's ruled. Just the best possible setting for a movie. This funhouse mirror version is so cool in it's ability to perfectly distill silly/gritty into something awesome. Perfect economy of storytelling, and whole swaths of emotion covered in small moments. Part of Walter Hill's amazing run of great films into the next decade. Can you dig it?

 

Eraserhead - Not generally thought of as being part of the larger 70's film movement, but still as important a film and announcement of an artist as that decade saw. Just pure, terrifying art.

 

Alien - Speaking of nightmare juice. First and still best. The sense of scope and cosmic horror is tangible. Also, seemed to bridge the gap to the 80's in terms of blue-collar, punky aesthetics.

 

The Long Goodbye - Not Altman's BEST, but my personal favorite of his. Cool, funny, shambolic adaptation of Carver. An ending that, dark as it is, makes you say 'Fuck Yeah!'. Love Elliot Gould in this role.

 

Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid - Peckinpah's second greatest film. Such a great, poetic meditation on violence, manhood, loyalty and morality. James Cobourn'sr best performance. I never get tired of this film.

 

Godfather 1/ Apocalypse Now - Always a toss up for me as to which I consider Coppala's best film. No explanation needed.

 

Special mention: I just saw Killer of Sheep for the first time the other day, and the only reason I'm not putting it up with these others is because I've only seen it once. But goddamn, that is a great film and amongst the very, very best of that decade.

post #45 of 51

Aww shit, THE FURY.

post #46 of 51

What do you think Altman's greatest movie is, Z? Between Long Goodbye and California Split, I'm starting to suspect that I only really "get" Altman when Elliot Gould is around...

post #47 of 51

Well, I should say that I haven't seen all of his films, but I've seen almost all of the 'big' ones. In that regard, I'd have to go with Nashville in terms his greatest. I think a solid case can be made Short Cuts as well. Obviously, M*A*S*H* is his most iconic. And 3 Women is a strong contender as well, I'd say. The Player also deserves consideration.

 

I love all of those flicks, but The Long Goodbye is the one I like watching the most, so I feel ya.

post #48 of 51

REVISED AFTER SOME CAREFUL THOUGHT:

1. Apocalypse Now
2. Star Wars
3. The Man Who Fell To Earth
4. Blazing Saddles
5. The Godfather 1 & 2
6. Jeremiah Johnson

7. The Duellists

8. Addio Zio Tom

9. Harold & Maude

10. Taxi Driver

post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

Aww shit, THE FURY.


I have tried so many times to finish that one. It defeats me every time.
post #50 of 51

In alphabetical order:

 

APOCALYPSE NOW
BARRY LYNDON
A CLOCKWORK ORANGE
CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND
DON'T LOOK NOW
F FOR FAKE
THE LAST WAVE
OBSESSION
STALKER
YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN

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