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Best Movies With The Worst Endings - Page 3

post #101 of 173
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Originally Posted by Art Decade View Post

700


One of the best westerns of the past 40 years, I'd rank this almost as high as Open Range or Jeremiah Johnson. It's an INCREDIBLE film...until it's jaw-droppingly stupid final 10 minutes when it nosedives into "magic realism" & turns into the clumsiest, ham-handed metaphor for "brother against brother" you'll ever see. Such a shame.

 

I never considered it anything close to great, but yeah, the ending really lets what could have been a solid little film down.  Good call.

post #102 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Art Decade View Post

700



One of the best westerns of the past 40 years, I'd rank this almost as high as Open Range or Jeremiah Johnson. It's an INCREDIBLE film...until it's jaw-droppingly stupid final 10 minutes when it nosedives into "magic realism" & turns into the clumsiest, ham-handed metaphor for "brother against brother" you'll ever see. Such a shame.

Damn, completely agreed. I wanted to love this movie so badly, but that ending, wow. I am hoping some day I will warm to it, because right now it seems like it sinks what is otherwise as taught and compelling a western chase film as I've yet seen. Pierce Brosnan still owns in this movie, in any case. His self surgery scene is one of the most harrowing of it's type I've seen on film. The danger of exposure and the environment feels palpable, as they move from the freezing mountains to the burning desert.
post #103 of 173

One more point regarding Drag Me To Hell that seems to get washed over with the image of poor Alison Lohman suffering for an eternity is that it opens with a fucking child being dragged to hell and very few people ever seem to question the unfairness there. While I don't necessarily agree with all of Raimi's views regarding the female protagonist, he seems to stay true to the message he's driving home. Given his vision, the casting was spot-on as well.

post #104 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by avoideverything View Post

For me, The Grey really went out with a whimper.  For a film that was willing to show some pretty brutal realities, it's ending really copped out.  I get the themes and I accept the ending but if there were literally 5 seconds added to it, continuing the narrative, I would have been sold.  It felt like it was going there and then chickened out.

 

The ending was perfect for the story that we were being told.  Ottway makes the decision to live without fear, in the moment.  Ottway also chooses to fight and therefore chooses to live, which is all that really matters.  Continuing the narrative would've made zero thematic sense. 

 

I always give directors props for having the balls to end their stories at the appropriate climax as opposed to pandering to the audience.  Great examples would be No Country for Old Men, There Will be Blood, Children of Men and The Sopranos

post #105 of 173

More I think about it, the better I like L.A. Confidential's ending compared to the book. It's more morally ambiguous than where the book ends with Exley promising Bud that he'll take down Dudley one day, which I think is a little trite, to be honest. The hero choosing fame, power and promotion over getting justice done is a lot more interesting to me. I think the book itself is better, but the movie has the better ending that's both satisfying as a stand-alone movie (How exactly would they do White Jazz with Dudley dead? Re-written as a prequel?) and very nicely noir.

 

I also think Out of Sight has a better ending too. The book doesn't have the epilogue and I thought that was way more satisfying than the book's ending. (Basically the movie right before the epilogue.) Hell, even Leonard likes it better.

post #106 of 173

I love Seraphim Falls, especially the ending. I know it turned off a lot of people but for some reason it gelled with me.

 

I dislike Children Of Men's ending not because it is abrupt but because

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Theo dies. I usually like it when the hero dies (not a sadist I swear) but it felt hollow and completely useless. It didn't even make sense on a thematic level because he wasn't really a bad person before the mission, just indifferent. It also didn't help that it was a cliche "turns out I got a bullet in me afterall" ordeal.

post #107 of 173
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I think Theo went from someone who could barely be arsed to keep on living to someone proud to die for a cause he believed in.
post #108 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post

What movies still manage to be good overall despite a genuinely weak ending?  

Sunshine is a big one for me.  It is marred somewhat by the need to introduce a villain for the end even though the movie had managed to be a terrific thriller without one (no mean feat) for the fist 2/3rds.  And things get a little esoteric at the very end, which doesn't bother me overmuch, but I can see how it is sort of an awkward fit for the movie that precedes it.  Still, that movie that comes before is incredible, enough that I still recommend it as a good movie.  But it would be a classic with a better ending.


I don't get when people rag on the end of Sunshine. The "burnt" guy makes perfect sense if you are paying attention, and those saying "it was so great before they introduced a bad guy". He is introduced TWICE earlier in the movie in footage showing him losing his grip(you know it is the same character right?). He is the one who stopped Icarus from completing it's mission and why the second crew is sent in the first place. The sun is shown as having a powerful psychological affect on those exposed to greater intensity, and Pinbacker is the end result of what the captain and the psychologist are experiencing. He sees the sun as a God and forgoes science to protect what he feels are the Sun's true intentions. Much like religious extremists he will do anything to protect his blind irrationality, even going so far to kill both crews. His motivations are what influence the second mission, and his character is the "secret" driving force of the movie.

I don't really get what movie people were watching that they say the first part is great, but then it falls apart. It's actually quite rigidly structured. Maybe they just weren't paying attention?

I love the ending and the movie definitely makes you think about the Sun in a different way(our bodies are made up entirely of elements that exist in the sun, for example).

Just curious, does anyone have an ending that would've genuinely been better? Would you remove the second ship(why even have the second crew then, or even a movie about it?)

Danny Boyle knows that engaging and entertaining the audience is a top priority. Having a threat come INSIDE the ship and threaten the crew is the natural progression.of the tension that he is building. Would you rather there were some more system failures and a rote philosophical ending that would most likely be more Mission to Mars than 2001?
post #109 of 173

So for a film so rigidly structured, how does having irradiated Jason Vorhees appear (jumping ships even!) as some kind of indestructible supermonster fit at all with what the film sets up in the first two thirds? Nothing mystical, metaphysical, or supernatural is even hinted at, and then Captain Sunscreen shows up and starts offing people. I agree, having the threat come from inside the crew would've been great--except that's not what happens. Crispy Fried Captain is just as external a threat as them losing oxygen or losing power, even more so. It's a tonal shift that has good thematic intent, but in the end it just doesn't fit.

 

And it's funny you should say that having inanimate/philosophical threats would make the film more Mission to Mars, since this film throws a rod at a last-minute introduction of something fantastical...which is exactly what Mission to Mars does.

post #110 of 173
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Originally Posted by RCA View Post

I don't get when people rag on the end of Sunshine. The "burnt" guy makes perfect sense if you are paying attention, and those saying "it was so great before they introduced a bad guy". He is introduced TWICE earlier in the movie in footage showing him losing his grip(you know it is the same character right?). He is the one who stopped Icarus from completing it's mission and why the second crew is sent in the first place. The sun is shown as having a powerful psychological affect on those exposed to greater intensity, and Pinbacker is the end result of what the captain and the psychologist are experiencing. He sees the sun as a God and forgoes science to protect what he feels are the Sun's true intentions. Much like religious extremists he will do anything to protect his blind irrationality, even going so far to kill both crews. His motivations are what influence the second mission, and his character is the "secret" driving force of the movie.
I don't really get what movie people were watching that they say the first part is great, but then it falls apart. It's actually quite rigidly structured. Maybe they just weren't paying attention?
I love the ending and the movie definitely makes you think about the Sun in a different way(our bodies are made up entirely of elements that exist in the sun, for example).
Just curious, does anyone have an ending that would've genuinely been better? Would you remove the second ship(why even have the second crew then, or even a movie about it?)
Danny Boyle knows that engaging and entertaining the audience is a top priority. Having a threat come INSIDE the ship and threaten the crew is the natural progression.of the tension that he is building. Would you rather there were some more system failures and a rote philosophical ending that would most likely be more Mission to Mars than 2001?

You've made an excellent case and summed up my own opinions on the film. I think the third act and fhe appearance of 'Melanoma Man' definitely works within the context of the story, and Sunshine stands as one of my favorite science fiction films of all time.
post #111 of 173
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Originally Posted by John Matrix View Post

Speaking of movies featuring Jamie Foxx that had bad endings, Law Abiding Citizen needs to mentioned.

 

I can see why it doesn't fit this particular topic, but that's immediately what jumped to mind for me as well. Probably #1 on my "movie most fucked by its own ending" list.

post #112 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCA View Post


I don't get when people rag on the end of Sunshine. The "burnt" guy makes perfect sense if you are paying attention, and those saying "it was so great before they introduced a bad guy". He is introduced TWICE earlier in the movie in footage showing him losing his grip(you know it is the same character right?). He is the one who stopped Icarus from completing it's mission and why the second crew is sent in the first place. The sun is shown as having a powerful psychological affect on those exposed to greater intensity, and Pinbacker is the end result of what the captain and the psychologist are experiencing. He sees the sun as a God and forgoes science to protect what he feels are the Sun's true intentions. Much like religious extremists he will do anything to protect his blind irrationality, even going so far to kill both crews. His motivations are what influence the second mission, and his character is the "secret" driving force of the movie.
I don't really get what movie people were watching that they say the first part is great, but then it falls apart. It's actually quite rigidly structured. Maybe they just weren't paying attention?
I love the ending and the movie definitely makes you think about the Sun in a different way(our bodies are made up entirely of elements that exist in the sun, for example).
Just curious, does anyone have an ending that would've genuinely been better? Would you remove the second ship(why even have the second crew then, or even a movie about it?)
Danny Boyle knows that engaging and entertaining the audience is a top priority. Having a threat come INSIDE the ship and threaten the crew is the natural progression.of the tension that he is building. Would you rather there were some more system failures and a rote philosophical ending that would most likely be more Mission to Mars than 2001?

 

Mostly I agree.  The film somehow did make me look at the sun differently, even though it was telling me stuff and showing me images I already "knew" in some sense.  Which is pretty potent work.

I agree that the build up to 'solar madness' is good and the themes work generally.  But the problem is it's mostly in hindsight you notice this.  The accusations that it turns into a slasher movie at the end are pretty accurate.  There's some weird and gruesome dispatching going on that doesn't feel like it belongs there.  I don't hate it.  It just feels wrong somehow.

 

My preferred version is more of a cabin fever take on it.  Where they rescue Pinbacker and he tries to sabotage the mission and fails/is stopped, but he plants the seed (or fertilizes it if you like) and wins a couple over to his 'cult' in the process.  Then you get the internal decay, conflict, final bomb desperation etc.  It might be about half an hour longer this way.  But space travel ain't no afternoon jaunt.

post #113 of 173
Thread Starter 

It's been a few years since I watched Sunshine, but you could probably rejigger the script so that the psychologist (I think?) who was becoming obsessed with the sun goes completely mental and becomes the threat that the Senor Sunkist represents for the last act.  Which would actually be an internal threat, and would allow the process of going mad, which is innately a very dramatic process, to be better dramatized.

post #114 of 173
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Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post

It's been a few years since I watched Sunshine, but you could probably rejigger the script so that the psychologist (I think?) who was becoming obsessed with the sun goes completely mental and becomes the threat that the Senor Sunkist represents for the last act.  Which would actually be an internal threat, and would allow the process of going mad, which is innately a very dramatic process, to be better dramatized.

 

Exactly. I love SUNSHINE, I even don't mind the 3rd act that much, but that would have been a much more natural progression. It didn't even need to be that different, they could have discovered that Pinbacker sabotaged his crew's mission, which would in turn have planted a similar idea in the psychiatrist's mind. That also would have made the "sun as god" stuff feel less sudden, since we would have been following his line of thinking rather than having it thrusted upon us by an external source.

post #115 of 173

I always took his decision to stay behind as being driven by his realization that what happened to Icarus I was the logical conclusion of his obsession when he saw the ash bodies. Icarus I's failure was that their shrink (if they even had one) was never granted that moment of self-awareness.

 

And I never thought the 'sun as god' thing was thrust too suddenly, when Searle talks about turning down the polarization to barely tolerable levels his language borders on describing it as a religious experience, and Kaneda is kind of a convert himself.
 

post #116 of 173

The "Sun as God" thing is kind of interesting but the idea wasn't explored enough, so the "mad astronaut" came off as a poorly considered slasher cliche. It's like watching The Wages Of Fear and seeing a Edward G. Robinson-esque gangster subplot come into it.

post #117 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCA View Post


I don't get when people rag on the end of Sunshine. The "burnt" guy makes perfect sense if you are paying attention, and those saying "it was so great before they introduced a bad guy". He is introduced TWICE earlier in the movie in footage showing him losing his grip(you know it is the same character right?). He is the one who stopped Icarus from completing it's mission and why the second crew is sent in the first place. The sun is shown as having a powerful psychological affect on those exposed to greater intensity, and Pinbacker is the end result of what the captain and the psychologist are experiencing. He sees the sun as a God and forgoes science to protect what he feels are the Sun's true intentions. Much like religious extremists he will do anything to protect his blind irrationality, even going so far to kill both crews. His motivations are what influence the second mission, and his character is the "secret" driving force of the movie.
I don't really get what movie people were watching that they say the first part is great, but then it falls apart. It's actually quite rigidly structured. Maybe they just weren't paying attention?
I love the ending and the movie definitely makes you think about the Sun in a different way(our bodies are made up entirely of elements that exist in the sun, for example).
Just curious, does anyone have an ending that would've genuinely been better? Would you remove the second ship(why even have the second crew then, or even a movie about it?)
Danny Boyle knows that engaging and entertaining the audience is a top priority. Having a threat come INSIDE the ship and threaten the crew is the natural progression.of the tension that he is building. Would you rather there were some more system failures and a rote philosophical ending that would most likely be more Mission to Mars than 2001?

really great explanation of the end, I did get that, but thought that it was too jarring...and felt like it took away from the film.  I think the movie might of worked better if the inexorable draw of the sun room started killing the crew, and there was open debate and conflict over completeing the mission. The burnt guy running around shanking folks just seemed out of tone with what preceeded it. I think discovering the second crew all burnt in the sun room...and finding a recording from pinbacker explaining things would of been more interesting and powerful.

 

You could see Boyle forshadowing the choice of the first crew with the psychologist, I really enjoyed that.....in the end I guess I just wanted more thought...less chase.

post #118 of 173

And less erratic editing that completely called attention to itself well beyond what seemed to be intended.

 

Still, I love Sunshine.

post #119 of 173
I disliked the crazy editing at first, but then I realized it was supposed to depict the space / time distortions experienced by those who ventured too close to the sun's gravity field.
post #120 of 173

X-Men: First Class doesn't have a BAD ending, but after the Cuban Missile Crisis ends, we move *way* too fast to the denoument. Although the final reveal of Magneto's outfit with his theme music booming nearly makes up for it in sheer cheesy awesomeness.

post #121 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Spider View Post

X-Men: First Class doesn't have a BAD ending, but after the Cuban Missile Crisis ends, we move *way* too fast to the denoument. Although the final reveal of Magneto's outfit with his theme music booming nearly makes up for it in sheer cheesy awesomeness.

 

Doesn't help that it looks like he's wearing pajamas.

 

post #122 of 173

See, but I love that. Fassbender has the perfect smirk on his face, the music is damn near operatic, and it does resemble what will be Magneto's outfit in later films.

post #123 of 173

Kind of a derail, but I just want to add that the soundtrack to Sunshine is one of my favorite soundtracks of all time.  The Underworld / John Murphy duo is fucking sublime.

post #124 of 173

Coincidentally, I'm actually watching Sunshine right now (roommate's idea) and a thought occured.

 

The main problem in the film (Pinbacker) stems from them deviating from their original course to access Icarus 1 and it's payload.  Why not just continue on their journey to the sun, then on the return trip, if their bomb doesn't work, change course and then try and pilot Icarus 1 and its bomb.  Nitpicky, but I think it might be feasible.

post #125 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Spider View Post

See, but I love that. Fassbender has the perfect smirk on his face, the music is damn near operatic, and it does resemble what will be Magneto's outfit in later films.

And that helmet is so much cooler and stylish than Singer's dull films. ( I used to like them a lot, mainly because they were among the first Marvel movies to be good, but now after the Spider-Man movies and the Marvel Studios movies, especially The Avengers, I find they're a chore to get through. I still like certain aspects like the acting, especially Stewart, McKellen and Jackman and Nightcrawler in X2 is a blast. Almost everything else? Blech.)

post #126 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Costco Mike View Post

Coincidentally, I'm actually watching Sunshine right now (roommate's idea) and a thought occured.

The main problem in the film (Pinbacker) stems from them deviating from their original course to access Icarus 1 and it's payload.  Why not just continue on their journey to the sun, then on the return trip, if their bomb doesn't work, change course and then try and pilot Icarus 1 and its bomb.  Nitpicky, but I think it might be feasible.


Personally I think the best call was simply to follow the mission as planned. The "two payloads are better" logic seems flawed, since if the physics of one payload don't work, why would a second attempt with an equal volume of fissile materials necessarily 'help'? It's not like they could have arranged truly simultaneous delivery, which seems like it would be key in nuclear physics.

I also think the whole 'return journey' was never really a certainty, given the extreme conditions as they approach the sun and the unknown and unpredictable consequences to the ship. So your idea isn't bad, but really I think the right move would be to complete the mission, return to earth (let's hope), and if the mission fails inform the earth people about the fact Icarus I's payload is still floating out there, if anyone had a good plan for something to do with it. You could then send a sun ship out to pick it up and fix it if anyone had any brilliant ideas as to how to make it more successful than Icarus II's attempt. If you don't tell earth, which has no more fissile material to use, and you screw up your (perhaps pointless) second payload attempt.... Then what?

Maybe best to if nothing else tell the earth about all that nuclear material in space, so it can be recovered to power generators in dooms day bunkers, in order to preserve the species.
post #127 of 173
Then again if you figure that it would be at least 3 years before the earth could get in contact with the Icarus II, figure out the physics for a better solution, and then send a new ship out to do something with the hulk of the Icarus I, you then run the risk that the Icarus I might break up or encounter terminal space danger in that time period, meaning you'd lose the opportunity to make a second attempt.

It is a tricky call.
post #128 of 173
No easy solutions, just seems like it would be really difficult to find a way to pilot the first ship. Mace definitely had the right idea, even if he was a raging asshole.
post #129 of 173
Quote:

 

Originally Posted by avoideverything View Post

For me, The Grey really went out with a whimper.  For a film that was willing to show some pretty brutal realities, it's ending really copped out.  I get the themes and I accept the ending but if there were literally 5 seconds added to it, continuing the narrative, I would have been sold.  It felt like it was going there and then chickened out.

 

 

Originally Posted by poindexter View Post
 

 

The ending was perfect for the story that we were being told.  Ottway makes the decision to live without fear, in the moment.  Ottway also chooses to fight and therefore chooses to live, which is all that really matters.  Continuing the narrative would've made zero thematic sense. 

 

I always give directors props for having the balls to end their stories at the appropriate climax as opposed to pandering to the audience.  Great examples would be No Country for Old Men, There Will be Blood, Children of Men and The Sopranos

 

Wow... Sorry for the tardiness.  I agree with everything you wrote however the ending comes down to the editing.  An extra 5 more seconds hell, even 2 would have brought it all home.  We already knew Ottaway would make his decision - we saw it at the beginning when he had the shotgun in his mouth.  For me it was a matter of too little too early.  Bearing in mind The Grey's post credit scene (Which I wish didn't exist as it really spells things out), just a little, tiny, insignificant bit more would have wrapped things up so nicely.

post #130 of 173

Training Day is 3/4's of possibly the best cop movie since To Live and Die in LA until Ethan Hawke gives up his gun at the poker table and the entire ghetto turns on Denzel. It just seemed trite and cheapens a truly great movie.

post #131 of 173
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Originally Posted by Cameron Hughes View Post

More I think about it, the better I like L.A. Confidential's ending compared to the book. It's more morally ambiguous than where the book ends with Exley promising Bud that he'll take down Dudley one day, which I think is a little trite, to be honest. The hero choosing fame, power and promotion over getting justice done is a lot more interesting to me. I think the book itself is better, but the movie has the better ending that's both satisfying as a stand-alone movie (How exactly would they do White Jazz with Dudley dead? Re-written as a prequel?) and very nicely noir.

 

I also think Out of Sight has a better ending too. The book doesn't have the epilogue and I thought that was way more satisfying than the book's ending. (Basically the movie right before the epilogue.) Hell, even Leonard likes it better.

 

Late to the party on this, but I just finished re-reading Ellroy's L.A. quartet. Still extremely impressed by the adaptation of L.A. Confidential.  Its a dense, meandering book that takes place over years, and was successfully streamlined extremely well to film.  Bravo to Helgeland and Curtis Hanson.  Yeah, they took their liberties - killing Dudley and having Buzz Meeks appear at all is not something I particularly liked, but both Stenz being at the Nite Owl and "Rollo Tomasi" are great.  But I gotta say, I still dislike Bud surviving at all, in both the book and the film.  Granted, he was all sorts of fucked up in the end, but still, I feel that the character earned a noble, heroic death in both formats.  And I do agree that with Cameron that Exley choosing opportunity over justice, as he did in the book, is more interesting than killing Dudley. 

 

Eh, The Big Nowhere is still my favorite, I think.  If only for Buzz Meeks, the flawed, anti-hero.

post #132 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagboy92 View Post
 

Training Day is 3/4's of possibly the best cop movie since To Live and Die in LA until Ethan Hawke gives up his gun at the poker table and the entire ghetto turns on Denzel. It just seemed trite and cheapens a truly great movie.

 

I can agree with you on that to a degree. It's not one of those endings that completely ruins the film for me but it definitely keeps it from being a "great" film, as opposed to a "very good" one.

post #133 of 173

Though not a masterpiece by any means JURASSIC PARK III was a fun monster movie that ended in the laziest fashion possible, inserting an improbable rescue that feels like the writer just ran out of time and decided to bring the army in so the movie could just end. It's boring, and the fact that the film neglects to have a sequence where the Spinosaurus runs out of the woods and attacks the army is just so disappointing, that's what everyone was hoping and expecting to happen.

post #134 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jokezilla View Post
 

Though not a masterpiece by any means JURASSIC PARK III was a fun monster movie that ended in the laziest fashion possible, inserting an improbable rescue that feels like the writer just ran out of time and decided to bring the army in so the movie could just end. It's boring, and the fact that the film neglects to have a sequence where the Spinosaurus runs out of the woods and attacks the army is just so disappointing, that's what everyone was hoping and expecting to happen.

 

I'll agree with that one but everything about JP3 came off half-assed and rushed to me. I still can't get over the considerable drop in the quality of the CGI in that one.

post #135 of 173

Explorers

 

This could have been Joe Dante's masterpiece. When the kids fly out into space to meet the aliens it should have turned very serious with the aliens telling them that the reason they contacted them was to warn them that the adults of Earth are destroying it - so it's the KIDS responsibility to grow up and repair the damage. We then find out they've been sending the EXACT SAME instructions on how to build a space ship to BILLIONS of kids all over the world... ending on a positive note.

 

But no. Robert Picardo in a stupid suit, contacting the earth cause he likes some of the TV. What a fucking joke. 

post #136 of 173
I think that was kind of the point. Dante was pulling the rug out from under us in typically, subversive fashion. It was disappointing as a kid but now i think it's kind of genius. At the time of its release, we were all so conditioned by E.T.--the benevolent savior from the heavens that we weren't expecting that sort of reverse manipulation.
post #137 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rumpledforeskin View Post

I think that was kind of the point. Dante was pulling the rug out from under us in typically, subversive fashion. It was disappointing as a kid but now i think it's kind of genius. At the time of its release, we were all so conditioned by E.T.--the benevolent savior from the heavens that we weren't expecting that sort of reverse manipulation.

I've always like the reveal of the gods as sociopathic children in Eric The Viking for the same reason. It deliberately rejects looking to the heavens for the answers, putting the responsibility for surviving and thriving solely on man.
post #138 of 173
Is it safe to put Schindler's List on here for that awful meltdown scene with Neeson who starts channeling the worst kind of ham-fisted cheese this side of Charleton Heston? Or how about that neat bowtie ending to Saving Private Ryan?
post #139 of 173
The Grey pulls the same stunt as Schindler's List; punctuating two hours of solid, understated, dramatic acting, from a giant of a talent like Niam Leeson, with thirty seconds of ham to be submitted to the Academy for Oscar consideration. They're both great films, and others' mileage may vary, but those two moments are jarring to me.

"Earn it, ya fucker!"
post #140 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reasor View Post

The Grey pulls the same stunt as Schindler's List; punctuating two hours of solid, understated, dramatic acting, from a giant of a talent like Niam Leeson, with thirty seconds of ham to be submitted to the Academy for Oscar consideration. They're both great films, and others' mileage may vary, but those two moments are jarring to me.

"Earn it, ya fucker!"

Both should of said "GOOD BYE JEWS!"
post #141 of 173
I really enjoyed The Grey. Funny...I think I know what scene you're talking about but I guess it never struck me that way. Still, in retrospect--I can definitely see how it lays it on a bit heavy. At least it ends with some ambiguity.
post #142 of 173

I completely disagree that the Grey's ending was bad or some kind of betrayal of the rest of the film. It's very much the point of the film, no, albeit in big blinking neon rather than the slightly more subtle rest of the story?

 

I haven't read this whole thread in a while, but has someone mentioned CHASING AMY? Because that ending was pure and utter bullshit, and wholly ruined the film for me.

post #143 of 173

The Prestige

 

The whole film was about debunking magic and them it went all sci-fi in the 3rd act.  I always thought it was a cheat and went against everything before it.  Cloning and all that crap!  Rubbish.   

post #144 of 173
I remember this as a point of contention when the film came out, but why is the scifi angle to THE PRESTIGE a cheat, exactly? I never felt that way.
post #145 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post

I remember this as a point of contention when the film came out, but why is the scifi angle to THE PRESTIGE a cheat, exactly? I never felt that way.

 

It just seemed like the scifi elements where so slapped in there.  It was out of place with the rest of it.  It's a movie about debunking magic and you resort to cloning in the the late 1800's?  Just didn't flow for me. 

post #146 of 173

You're just not as steeped in the weird secret histories about Tesla as half the internet I suppose.

(although, my mum isn't either and she loved it.  I'll have to break it to her that she might be a steampunk fan)

post #147 of 173

I disagree completely.  It's not a movie about debunking magic.  It's a movie about obsession and the dangerous extent to which it can drive a man who is consumed by it.

 

The supernatural element isn't slapped on at all.  The movie's first shot depicts the results of the supernatural.  Angier is convinced of the supernatural almost as soon as he witnesses Borden's all too simple transported man trick, and it takes only the tiniest misdirection on Borden's part to confirm the assumption in Angier's mind.  He goes to Colorado believing 100% that Tesla can build him a magic machine that can duplicate himself.  That he's right is not some shattering revelation that changes everything that's come before.  The twist is not the existence of the magic machine - the twist is that Borden never used any such hocus pocus in the first place.

 

That said, I don't think it's appropriate to think of THE PRESTIGE as a "twist" movie at all.  It's a movie driven by reveals, and the movie's nonlinear structure delivers them to maximum effect, but I don't think that final reveal about Borden's twin is meant to be a shocker to anyone but Angier himself.  Everyone around Angier told him from the beginning that the secret was mundane and simple (which he confused as easy or unimpressive), and the movie bears them out.  Angier's insistence that there must be dark magic involved leads him to find it, to terrible consequences.

post #148 of 173

The ending to the Prestige is an all-time great. I love watching it with people, certain they'll figure it out before the end, and nobody ever does. Of course, its possible all of my friends are idiots. Still, one of my absolute favorites. I think the division caused by the sci-fi elements may be generational, a bit. For younger people, raised on 'quantum weirdness', its exciting. I suppose I can see why older folks would find it to be bad Star Trek tomfoolery. But its not, so nyaaah.

post #149 of 173
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zhukov View Post
 

The ending to the Prestige is an all-time great. I love watching it with people, certain they'll figure it out before the end, and nobody ever does. Of course, its possible all of my friends are idiots. Still, one of my absolute favorites. I think the division caused by the sci-fi elements may be generational, a bit. For younger people, raised on 'quantum weirdness', its exciting. I suppose I can see why older folks would find it to be bad Star Trek tomfoolery. But its not, so nyaaah.

 

Really? That's weird. I found the "twist" in The Prestige to be laughable in how obvious it was. However, as I've stated in another thread, Now You See Me has given me a renewed appreciation for The Prestige and The Illusionist.

post #150 of 173

Isn't the real twist that Roote the actor actually takes over takes over the whole thing? I forget.  It's not hard to follow,  but I seem to recall it makes you feel clever for being able to follow along, but is pulling some other stunt at the same time.  Better known as misdirection.

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