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Django Unchained - Post-Release - Page 3

post #101 of 978

I saw a poster at another board complaining about how dull this was and wishing the story had been given to J.J. Abrams or Michael Bay.

 

Said poster was serious.

 

We're sure the Mayans weren't just off by seven or eight days?

post #102 of 978

More lens flare and O&T!

post #103 of 978

DJANGO VS. KHAN!

post #104 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebastian OB View Post

Stephen is the true villain of the story, not Candie. Django facing down Stephen in the end is the proper conclusion. Candie was more Waltz's antagonist.

Yup. Although Candie is a villain/antagonist to all humanity in a general sense.

 

"Evil Uncle Ben" is genius.

 

 

1000

post #105 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dark Shape View Post

I saw a poster at another board complaining about how dull this was and wishing the story had been given to J.J. Abrams or Michael Bay.

 

Said poster was serious.

 

We're sure the Mayans weren't just off by seven or eight days?

Yahoo News?

post #106 of 978

Loved the hell out of this. Rivals EXPENDABLES 2 for most fun I've had at the theater this year.

post #107 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebastian OB View Post

 

 

 

Here's what's on DEATH PROOF's mind: "VANISHING POINT is cool!" The end. 

 

If you actually think this, it's quite possible you're not giving the movie a fair chance. 

post #108 of 978

Hell, if you think that, it's quite possible you should just stop watching Tarantino movies altogether.

post #109 of 978

The Stuntman Mike stuff is all aces. It's the casting and writing for the female characters that really bog down Death Proof. It's like his Kevin Smith homage or something.

post #110 of 978

I actually think the casting and the acting of the ladies is important. The second half especially. They all represent different parts of his personality and collectively they're all girls he'd probably be interested in. They might be annoying and loud-mouthed at times, but so is he. The whole thing is a fantasy and Stuntman Mike is probably one of the closest characters to Tarantino he's written, just a perverted, evil version that indulges in his misogyny; an old guy who loves old fashioned shit who gets turned on when he sees a bunch of girls who might be into the same thing.

 

With the first group of girls, you get the sense of Tarantino's anger when he talks to a cute girl and they have no idea who Monte Hellman is or whatever. So in the second half, when he sees a group of gals that might get his deal, his way of flirting with them is dangerous (this is a horror movie, after all) and he ends up dead for it. But it's telling that the opening shots involve bare feet and cars and Mike dies by getting a boot to the face. Is it indulgent? Absolutely, but what Tarantino movie isn't (well, Jackie Brown, I guess) but it's certainly personal and it's certainly interesting. 

post #111 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

I actually think the casting and the acting of the ladies is important. The second half especially. They all represent different parts of his personality and collectively they're all girls he'd probably be interested in. They might be annoying and loud-mouthed at times, but so is he. The whole thing is a fantasy and Stuntman Mike is probably one of the closest characters to Tarantino he's written, just a perverted, evil version that indulges in his misogyny; an old guy who loves old fashioned shit who gets turned on when he sees a bunch of girls who might be into the same thing.

 

With the first group of girls, you get the sense of Tarantino's anger when he talks to a cute girl and they have no idea who Monte Hellman is or whatever. So in the second half, when he sees a group of gals that might get his deal, his way of flirting with them is dangerous (this is a horror movie, after all) and he ends up dead for it. But it's telling that the opening shots involve bare feet and cars and Mike dies by getting a boot to the face. Is it indulgent? Absolutely, but what Tarantino movie isn't (well, Jackie Brown, I guess) but it's certainly personal and it's certainly interesting. 

 

Exactafuckingmundo. What movie could possibly be forgiven more for being indulgent than one that isn't afraid to examine and poke at the director's own foibles and fetishes?  In fact, I'd argue the indulgence is pretty much a necessity.

post #112 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bailey View Post

Hell, if you think that, it's quite possible you should just stop watching Tarantino movies altogether.

 

I guess this is what I'll have to do. Here I was thinking that loving DJANGO UNCHAINED would finally get me into the Cool Guys Who Are Into Tarantino club, but sadly my dislike of DEATH PROOF will forever keep me an outsider. 

post #113 of 978

That's pretty interesting, and makes a strong statement for Death Proof being a terrific piece of art, but it's considerably more interesting that way than it is as an entertainment, which is a problem no other Tarantino film shares. The actresses, especially those in the second half, are not giving credible performances, and in truth, seeing it as an exploration of his personal sexuality and fetishes makes me somewhat less eager to revisit it.

 

But revisit it I will. I just got the Tarantino Blu Ray box, and started out with True Romance tonight. Such a damn good movie. And I didn't notice at the time how completely Savages was aping it.

post #114 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebastian OB View Post

 

I guess this is what I'll have to do. Here I was thinking that loving DJANGO UNCHAINED would finally get me into the Cool Guys Who Are Into Tarantino club, but sadly my dislike of DEATH PROOF will forever keep me an outsider. 

 

Oh, don't pout.  The point was not that you have to like Death Proof.  It's a pretty acquired taste.  The point was that if you can't at least see how it's a film that has more thought behind it than "Hey, other movies are cool and imma copy them!", then maybe you haven't figured out what Tarantino is playing at in all his movies.  People who think he's an homage-machine at best, and a cinematic plagiarist at worst, need to just do themselves a favor and stop watching.

post #115 of 978
Man, the discussions I've been having with people about this movie may be the best, most interesting I've ever had about a film. That being said, I've noticed a huge (and expected) difference between people who are giant film fans and those that aren't. The former seem to LOVE this movie (not across the board - Parker's observations are 100% legit) and revel in all of the themes it deals with (some of which are without a doubt troubling), whereas everyone else is flabbergasted that Tarantino would have the nerve to tell this story. I'm loving all of it, even though it's kind of annoying the rush to judgement people who haven't seen the film tend to make against it. But goddamn it's exhilarating - a fucking Tarantino WESTERN is pushing major, major buttons. Fucking A. Also, I just want to say, as a Mex, I would love -LOVE - for Tarantino to tell a story about my peoples.
post #116 of 978

For now I'd put this squarely in the middle of my ranking of QT movies, but definitely at the top of my theater viewing experiences.

 

I live in a small southern town and my theater demographic this afternoon was about 65/35 black/white. I could hardly focus on the movie, so busy was I noticing what parts got a laugh by which demographic. In the beginning there was tittering at every use of the word, "nigger." By the end there was clapping and cheering (honestly mostly by the African-Americans in the audience). The scene most of the crowd seemed to have a problem with was when Django killed the sister. 

post #117 of 978

Weird. The sister killing scene got huge applause/laughs at my screening.

post #118 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by pagoda View Post

The scene most of the crowd seemed to have a problem with was when Django killed the sister. 

That bit got the single biggest laugh in my theater. The place went apeshit when she went a-flyin'.

 

EDIT: You beat me by seconds, levrock!

 

Pagoda, clearly the crowd you saw it with was weird. Who doesn't love the sister getting blown away?!

post #119 of 978

I saw Django Unchained tonight, and I must say that I loved it. After watching the movie, I came to a few conclusions, one I had already come to. Spike Lee is full of shit, Will Smith fucked up by turning down the role of Django, and Waltz, DiCaprio, and Jackson were the highlights of Django Unchained. There were some parts that made me uncomfortable, the scene with the runaway slave being torn apart by dogs making me the most uncomfortable. Other than that, I enjoyed the hell out of Django Unchained. Before I forget, Don Johnson was also pretty good as Big Daddy.

post #120 of 978

I was the only one laughing. I heard a lot of, "Good Lord!" and, "Oh my God!" but then again, I live in the Deep South. I can't help but think that seeing the punishment of someone who was semi-complicit in, and benefited from, slavery, hits a little close to home. 

post #121 of 978

A couple points:

 

*The sister getting killed got the second biggest laughter/applause reaction at my screening, after Tarantino being explodeded. My audience was lilly white.

 

*Don Johnson was great playing Big Daddy pretty much the same way he played Kenny Powers's big daddy.

 

*I really, REALLY want to see this with a black audience. I know it's considered stereotyping, but I've seen a good amount of films with a predominantly black audience and they really give it up when they like a film. Surprisingly, the film I've seen with a black audience that got - far and away - the biggest, most positive reaction was Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call: New Orleans. Make of that what you will.

 

*I don't know why, but the line I keep returning to and cracking up at is a throwaway line at the beginning, when the crippled slave driver who Shucltz shoots in the woods says to one of the approaching slaves: "Blueberry - didn't I give you my last appel?!" Makes me giggle like an idiot.

post #122 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z.Vasquez View Post

A couple points:

 

*The sister getting killed got the second biggest laughter/applause reaction at my screening, after Tarantino being explodeded. My audience was lilly white.

 

*Don Johnson was great playing Big Daddy pretty much the same way he played Kenny Powers's big daddy.

 

*I really, REALLY want to see this with a black audience. I know it's considered stereotyping, but I've seen a good amount of films with a predominantly black audience and they really give it up when they like a film. Surprisingly, the film I've seen with a black audience that got - far and away - the biggest, most positive reaction was Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call: New Orleans. Make of that what you will.

 

*I don't know why, but the line I keep returning to and cracking up at is a throwaway line at the beginning, when the crippled slave driver who Shucltz shoots in the woods says to one of the approaching slaves: "Blueberry - didn't I give you my last appel?!" Makes me giggle like an idiot.

The crowd I saw Django Unchained with wasn't big, but it seemed to be about an even mix of black and white, maybe leaning a bit more to white. Everybody seemed to like it. The only thing bad about my moviegoing experience tonight was having to watch the last hour or so of the movie while having to piss like a racehorse. It was my own fault for drinking a large Mountain Dew.

post #123 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by pagoda View Post

I was the only one laughing. I heard a lot of, "Good Lord!" and, "Oh my God!" but then again, I live in the Deep South. I can't help but think that seeing the punishment of someone who was semi-complicit in, and benefited from, slavery, hits a little close to home. 

 

I think people may be forgetting that when Jackson's character has Django chained upside down, he explains that it was the sister's idea to have worked to a slow, painful death in the mines, as opposed to the quick death everyone else wanted. She wasn't an innocent little flower.

post #124 of 978

Well, yeah, but it was Jackson who planted that idea in her head. He was always running the show, although letting Django live doesn't make a hell of a lot of sense, they do go out of their way to explain it. 

Her death was one of my favorite gags though. They must have borrowed the pull cable from a Walter Hill movie. 

post #125 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebastian OB View Post

 

I guess this is what I'll have to do. Here I was thinking that loving DJANGO UNCHAINED would finally get me into the Cool Guys Who Are Into Tarantino club, but sadly my dislike of DEATH PROOF will forever keep me an outsider. 

 

I was simply explaining myself. You were the one saying that there is no earthly way anyone could appreciate one movie (Death Proof) over another (Django), a concept we all know is absolutely ludicrous. Taste is subjective. 

post #126 of 978
Well, I for one think you're both awesome at Tarantino ranking! Hooray!
post #127 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

Well, yeah, but it was Jackson who planted that idea in her head. He was always running the show, although letting Django live doesn't make a hell of a lot of sense, they do go out of their way to explain it. 

Her death was one of my favorite gags though. They must have borrowed the pull cable from a Walter Hill movie. 

 

That had to have been Zoe Bell doing that gag.  

post #128 of 978

I hope so!

post #129 of 978

I REALLY enjoyed this, but it's the first time since Reservoir Dogs that I haven't been fully engaged with Tarantino. And pretty much everything Parker's said rings true to me.

 

But it's still more interesting than a lot of other bullshit that's come down the turnpike this year, so I'm still mostly positive if a little distant on it.

post #130 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

Well, yeah, but it was Jackson who planted that idea in her head. He was always running the show, although letting Django live doesn't make a hell of a lot of sense, they do go out of their way to explain it. 

Her death was one of my favorite gags though. They must have borrowed the pull cable from a Walter Hill movie. 

To play devil's advocate, the sister (Lara Lee) was just seeking vengeance for the death of her brother, which Django was vaguely complicit in. And then Django kills her for being vaguely complicit in Candie's operation. But, eh, who gives a fuck?

post #131 of 978
Yeah, she's not the problem at Candieland. And the implication is that everyone was trying to come up with the worst thing they could do to Django and the answer was always 'its not as bad as the mine', so it just makes sense that someone would finally say, hey, how bout the mine then?

But it was funny when Django shot her. So, whatever.
post #132 of 978

Saw this Christmas morning in a mostly-full theatre and it was a really fun experience. I'd definitely put DJANGO in the top tier of Tarantino's movies.

 

There was a surprising (maybe "surprising" isn't exactly the word) lack of some of his usual flourishes, like non-linear narrative or chapter breaks. It's the most straightforward film Tarantino's made, I think-- as though it's less his interpretation of, or commentary on, the kinds of movies he loves, and actually is one of those movies instead. If that makes any sense. I don't know-- it just felt somehow different from the rest of his work to me.

 

I was, I'll admit, expecting DJANGO to wrap up with the shoot-out right after Schultz kills Candie, and was bugged a little that it carried on for so long after that. But that was mainly because I'd come to love Waltz's character so much, and I didn't like that it cast his rash decision to shoot Candie down in an even worse light.

 

If Django had immediately shot his and Hildy's way out of danger, or even if they had died in the attempt, that would have been one thing. But as we saw, Schultz's action had potentially more horrific consequences for Django and Hildy. It does diminish Schultz as a character, just a little.

 

Still, I understand why the movie needed Django to ride alone for a while. And we did get Tarantino blowing up real good-- which was probably the biggest laugh from the crowd I saw it with. 

 

I also thought Tarantino set Schultz's ill-advised decision up perfectly. I especially liked the use of "Für Elise" (and the parallel with Basterds, where Waltz plays the other side of the coin). It can be such an anxious tune, and Tarantino uses it to good effect as Schultz is offended to his core and goes over the edge: "Stop it! Stop playing Beethoven!"

 

Jesus, that guy needs another Oscar (it would have to be for lead actor this time wouldn't it?). For that matter, all the principals deserve recognition for this. It is beautifully acted, all around. Except for Quentin, of course-- but he blows up, so it's okay.

post #133 of 978

I know I should refrain from comment until I have seen the film (hopefully this weekend), especially since the ending has apparently been changed somewhat. The Death Proof discussion caught my eye, and then I saw some mention of Lara Lee being "vaguely complicit", so I had to chime in a bit.

 

If the version I read months ago maintained its core stance, and I see no reason why it wouldn't have, there's nothing vague about it.  I have no idea if anything close to the showdown against the "Plantation Family Unit" remains, but the guiding idea behind that was clearly that everyone involved was morally culpable, and deserved the same harsh judgment.  Not that Tarantino was saying a blanket death sentence could have or should have been carried out on every white person at every plantation, but symbolically it stood as a powerful statement.  And seemed especially appropriate when considering the influence the black militant culture of the 60's and 70's had on the film.

post #134 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slim View Post

Saw this Christmas morning in a mostly-full theatre and it was a really fun experience. I'd definitely put DJANGO in the top tier of Tarantino's movies.

 

There was a surprising (maybe "surprising" isn't exactly the word) lack of some of his usual flourishes, like non-linear narrative or chapter breaks. It's the most straightforward film Tarantino's made, I think-- as though it's less his interpretation of, or commentary on, the kinds of movies he loves, and actually is one of those movies instead. If that makes any sense. I don't know-- it just felt somehow different from the rest of his work to me.

 

I was, I'll admit, expecting DJANGO to wrap up with the shoot-out right after Schultz kills Candie, and was bugged a little that it carried on for so long after that. But that was mainly because I'd come to love Waltz's character so much, and I didn't like that it cast his rash decision to shoot Candie down in an even worse light.

 

If Django had immediately shot his and Hildy's way out of danger, or even if they had died in the attempt, that would have been one thing. But as we saw, Schultz's action had potentially more horrific consequences for Django and Hildy. It does diminish Schultz as a character, just a little.

 

Still, I understand why the movie needed Django to ride alone for a while. And we did get Tarantino blowing up real good-- which was probably the biggest laugh from the crowd I saw it with. 

 

I also thought Tarantino set Schultz's ill-advised decision up perfectly. I especially liked the use of "Für Elise" (and the parallel with Basterds, where Waltz plays the other side of the coin). It can be such an anxious tune, and Tarantino uses it to good effect as Schultz is offended to his core and goes over the edge: "Stop it! Stop playing Beethoven!"

 

Jesus, that guy needs another Oscar (it would have to be for lead actor this time wouldn't it?). For that matter, all the principals deserve recognition for this. It is beautifully acted, all around. Except for Quentin, of course-- but he blows up, so it's okay.

 

Instead of going to a Marshall to let him know that a recently elected Sheriff is an outlaw, he guns down the Sheriff on the street in cold blood. This guy is not really a rational, or I would say, fully sane man. He likes creating chaos, or maybe he can't handle it not being present. Either way, him gunning down Candie fit the personality of a man who would rather pretend to be in the Mandingo game than just try to buy a runaway slave like any other normal person.

 

The one quibble I have about this movie is that Django is ultimately not as eye drawing a character as Sholtz. I get what they were trying to do, have Django play the strong silent type, but the iconic example of this, Blondie in Leone's movies, manages to be at least one of the most interesting things on the screen whenever he shows up. Django, not so much.

post #135 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bailey View Post

I know I should refrain from comment until I have seen the film (hopefully this weekend), especially since the ending has apparently been changed somewhat. The Death Proof discussion caught my eye, and then I saw some mention of Lara Lee being "vaguely complicit", so I had to chime in a bit.

 

If the version I read months ago maintained its core stance, and I see no reason why it wouldn't have, there's nothing vague about it.  I have no idea if anything close to the showdown against the "Plantation Family Unit" remains, but the guiding idea behind that was clearly that everyone involved was morally culpable, and deserved the same harsh judgment.  Not that Tarantino was saying a blanket death sentence could have or should have been carried out on every white person at every plantation, but symbolically it stood as a powerful statement.  And seemed especially appropriate when considering the influence the black militant culture of the 60's and 70's had on the film.

 

Yeah, I mean whether or not she wanted Django dead or did anything evil, she was still a horrible racist and part of the plantation hierarchy. 

post #136 of 978

Still cracking up at QT's bizarre aussie accent. "Did you see a sign on my garage that said dead BLECK storage?" 

 

Everyone in Candieland needed to die. It was an evil place full of evil people. I almost wanted the lawyer to have somehow survived the first gunfight only to be gunned down yet again after the funeral. 

post #137 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parker View Post

 

Yeah, I mean whether or not she wanted Django dead or did anything evil, she was still a horrible racist and part of the plantation hierarchy. 


She was also the one to get Hildy "cleaned up" and delivered to Schultz for the night, something it's clear she does with the girls there regularly. So it's not surprising Django would hold a special grudge against her.

post #138 of 978

I'm always in a weird place with Tarantino. On the one hand, I think the crowd of people who write him off as a copy-cat hack are nuts. Yeah, fine, he borrows from this, that, and the other source, but his sense of craft is impeccable and I think, more often than not, his films work or don't for reasons beyond his indulgences as a director and his penchant for gleefully showcasing his influences. (Generally.) If a person can watch a Tarantino film and call him a bad filmmaker, I have to question how much they know about filmmaking and how much they actually like films. Which sounds kind of snotty, but it's true-- I don't love all of his films, but even in my least favorite QT pictures, the guy shows off a deep-rooted discipline and artistry in filmmaking. He's a master.

 

At the same time, I don't think all of his films are good, and if taste is subjective then I think it's fair game to say that Death Proof is a fucking pile, no matter how many neat things you can mine out of it (as Matt Singer did here). It's certainly possible that it is his most personal film, of course, but personal or not the first half works fine and the second half grinds to a halt and becomes boring, staid, and insufferable before it ends with a really cool car chase. That QT's paying tribute to the trade of the stunt person doesn't, for me, mitigate the fact that Death Proof is a bad movie. It's not even a matter of his indulgences getting the better of him-- the writing is flat and has absolutely no pop, and the casting half works and half doesn't. It's interesting to read the film and mine it for details that speak to QT as a person and an artist, but I'd rather do that than watch it again (at least, not all the way through).

 

That's why Inglourious Basterds is my favorite QT film, and that's why Django Unchained may be tied in second with Jackie Brown. I think QT's films always say something personal about him as a director and as a movie lover, and if Kill Bill hints at his love for Spaghetti Westerns then Django Unchained blares it out through a blood-stained bullhorn. If nothing else, this is a movie that reminds me of the time I spent watching the films of Corbucci, Castellari, Baldi, and Leone (among others), and it reminds me why I love those pictures so much; they made movies about justice, and Django Unchained frames that honorable quest on a huge, painful, historical scale. Arguably, most of QT's films are about justice, but micro justice; the Bride getting even with Bill over a personal vendetta, the girls in Death Proof turning the tables on Mike, the Basterds brutalizing Nazis for brutalizing Jews. But this is different. This is timely. This is about a man revenging himself on the culture of domination and racism that pulsed like a cancerous tumor throughout the Deep South, and getting some justice for his fellow tormented in the process. 

 

It all stems from a personal place, of course-- really this is a movie about a husband trying to rescue his wife-- but if Django Unchained was only about that quest, it wouldn't bother offering so much imagery and action that dovetails the sort of horrors visited upon slaves during America's Antebellum era. Interestingly, Django Unchained reminded me-- in its violence-- of Ichi the Killer in terms of how it contrasts brutal, unforgiving, discomfiting violence against more juvenile, silly stuff that we want to pump our fists at; we flinch during moments where Broomhilda suffers in a hot box or gets branded on her face, but we cheer at the sight of Candie's goons getting gunned down by Django. Similarly, we're totally into Ichi dicing up bad guys but we blanch at depictions of violence visited upon women. In both cases the directors take violence seriously when it's inflicted upon disempowered, helpless people, but treat it with righteousness when it's visited upon villains. 

 

And you can't find someone more villainous than a slave driver in the Deep South or an SS officer. I think with Inglourious Basterds, and now with Django Unchained, Tarantino is entering a phase of his career where he's not just interested in making pastiche pictures based on the films that he loves. (Though he is doing that here, just to what I believe to be a much more limited extent.) This is an angry picture. This is a movie in which QT is airing out his own outrage over atrocities committed in his country, by people who you may well consider "his" people. (After all, he's from Tennessee. His dad might be a New York Italian, but still.) You want to talk about how QT sees him in his other movies? I don't think it's an accident that he casts himself as a slaver here, and winds up blowing himself sky-high in one of the film's best pay-off moments; I think this is the film where he deals with whatever white guilt he holds while expressing his general distaste of and contempt for that long-dead culture of abuse and bigotry, though given how much racially-charged invective has come up in our political discourse in the last four years and change, it might not be so dead as we think. 

 

Of course this is all in a film where Christoph Waltz plays the charming German and men's heads explode like melons and blood splurts across the screen in torrents, so I'm sure it's easy to ignore the subtext coded into Tarantino's narrative. Django Unchained is incredibly entertaining and fun. I don't think anyone can really dispute that. Watching Jamie Foxx, on fire here as he's almost never been in his career, gun down wicked white folks, perpetrators of one of the greatest shames of our nation, is immensely satisfying in its fashion, and of course the dialogue pops and the characters charm. But it's that stew of grittiness and pop-culture cartoonishness and subtext that makes QT movies what they are, more than the cocktail of references and influences that he brings to his work-- but good god if I didn't love Django Unchained for both of those aspects. What can I add to this discussion? The cast is great, notably Foxx, Waltz, Washington, and Di Caprio, and if there aren't awards for them out there then there's something fucked up about this world; the music is wonderful and eclectic, as QT scores usually are, though I found the rap a bit jarring at first; it's shot beautifully, so much that I wanted to be there with Django and Schultz, riding across the snowy plains of the South. I did find the number of cameos here kind of obnoxious, but they're so fleeting that they hardly make a difference in the long run. 

 

TL;DR, great movie, thumbs up, if you think there's no subtext here I don't know what to do with you.

post #139 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloy View Post


She was also the one to get Hildy "cleaned up" and delivered to Schultz for the night, something it's clear she does with the girls there regularly. So it's not surprising Django would hold a special grudge against her.


Bingo, you catch a glimpse of her ugly side when Hilda takes a long time to respond to Shultz at the door, she was ready to lay the smack down. I think she was meant to display bullshit southern hospitality, which in her case was clearly all for appearance. As long as you're polite and look nice, your sins are forgiven.

post #140 of 978
I think the issue with her might just be that she, Billy Crash and Stephen have to step up and assume much of Candie's villainy, and of the three, she's the least able to bear the weight. No one's crying for Racist Sister.
post #141 of 978

 While I thought Django Unchained a great movie, I would say I prefer most QT movies to it. The middle section did drag for me. It was needed for the movie because its the introduction to Candie and its the start of the plan to rescue Broomhilda. It still was needed for the movie. I do like that Django is captured after the gun fight. Out smarting the Aussie slavers shows what Django learned from Schultz. I knew what the joke of the proto-Klan scene was going to be and I still laughed my head off during it. Like everybody else here, I though Di Caprio, Waltz and Jackson where outstanding in this.

 

  Death Proof has the greatest car chase ever, so its got that going for it.

 

 "I'm positive he's dead."

post #142 of 978

I thoroughly enjoyed the shit out of Django: Unchained. Nobody brings out the greatness in Sam Jackson quite like Quentin does. I can't say I agree about him being an unsatisfactory fill-in for Candie at the end. He was by far, one of the most despicable characters in recent memory and by the time, he ratted out our heroes' plan at the dinner table, he had earned himself a spot as the true villian of this piece.

 

I am very much glad that they went with Foxx, instead of Will Smith, in the title role. Smith, to me, brings a level of baggage that I would say rivals, if not equals, that of Tom Cruise in terms of being a distraction. They are both at their best when they are playing parts that more closely resemble their perceived public personas.

 

And yes, Quentin needs to retire from performing in his own movies.

post #143 of 978
post #144 of 978

Oh, that crazy Katt!

post #145 of 978

I don't know why, but when I clicked that link I was kind of hoping The Greatest American hero had weighed in on Django Unchained.

post #146 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bailey View Post

I don't know why, but when I clicked that link I was kind of hoping The Greatest American hero had weighed in on Django Unchained.

"Believe it or not, IIIIII'm avenging the slaves, I never thought I could be so freeeee!!!!!!!!!!"

 

Sorry.

post #147 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

"Believe it or not, IIIIII'm avenging the slaves, I never thought I could be so freeeee!!!!!!!!!!"

 

 

I didn't read this post, I sang it!

post #148 of 978
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post

I have two other candidates, based on trailer footage.  They clearly filmed the scene in the script with Schultz and Big Daddy talking on the back porch while Django is exploring the grounds.  This is where we would have gotten to hear Don Johnson speak the line, "Dr. Schultz, five thousand dollar nigger, is practically my middle name."

 

It was absolutely shot....because that entire exchange is present on the soundtrack!  As is another between Django and King before they enter the saloon in the town where Schultz kills the sheriff.

 

And count me in on the "What Schultz did to Candie actually DOES make sense in terms of character" group......aka Team "King Schultz was always a crazy irrational mofo".

post #149 of 978

By the way, I keep picturing Joseph Gordon-Levitt (who originally had the role that QT did for his 2nd cameo) exploding and it cracks me up every time the image enters my mind.

post #150 of 978

Interesting, interesting.  I remember back in the day he was cast in this movie as one of the Aussies, and I had vaguely remembered that they came up at the end of the second act...  So imagine my extra surprise to see QT instead of JGL...

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