or Connect
CHUD.com Community › Forums › THE CHEWERS › Drafts & Lists › Should Be On Criterion
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Should Be On Criterion

post #1 of 67
Thread Starter 

The new Personal Criterion thread got me thinking: what films aren't in the Criterion Collection that you think should be? List them here, but also make a case for them. Just because you love a film doesn't mean it would be a good fit for that brand, so explain why you think it would.

 

Here a few of mine:

 

Possession (really all of the films of Anrdzej Zulawski):

 

One of the most mind-blowing, surreal, shocking and viscerally forceful filmmakers in history. His films are filled with innovative camerawork, Gnostic symbolism, and historical significance. He is one of the representative's of Polish filmmaking and his movies are art house masterpieces that don't yet have the masterpiece status they deserve, as well as cult classics that don't yet have the cult they deserve. The behind the scenes stories of his films are as fraught and interesting as the films themselves. The Soviets confiscated and cut up several of his films, rumor has it he's driven his leading ladies to both suicidal despair as well as spiritual enlightenment. His films are these treasure troves of art that never leave you once you see them, and more than any other filmmaker not yet in it, he deserves to be represented in the CC. Possession is his masterpiece, so let's start with that.

 

Plague Dogs:

 

If Criterion were to put out animated films, this is the one they should start with. A shocking, but brilliant film that is all but forgotten, this follow up to Watership Down (using talking dogs) is a deep character piece, a disturbing expose of animal cruelty during a specific time and place (the 80's, in England) and an almost Buddhist meditation on life being suffering. It is perhaps the most deep and adult (without at all being prurient) animated feature ever made. This one is due for a critical and cultural reevaluation and Criterion could provide that.

 

Matewan:

 

John Sayles is another guy who should have his body of work put out by CC, and no film of his is more deserving than this forgotten (a theme emerges in my choices) ensemble about a miners strike during the great depression. Boasting early performances from David Straitharn, Chris Cooper, Mary McDonnel and Will Oldham(!), as well as a greatly underrated James Earl Jones, Sayles is able to build up a political film that blows up in an act of thrilling cathartic action. Few films are as thoughtful and as exciting as this one. With the cast and crew now significantly older and well known, I think there is a great documentary to be made where they all look back on it and discuss it. Plus you know Sayles will provide and awesome commentary track.

 

The Woman Chaser:

 

Great black-and-white neo noir from 2000 boasting a career best performance from Patrick Wahlburton. A surreal, viscous satire on Hollywood filmed in a style that recalls Jim Jarmusch and the Coen Brothers at their best. This is a perfect fit for Criterion, especially that it's not so much forgotten as unknown since it's never had a proper release. But those who have seen it rightfully regard it as masterpiece and if the rights (mostly regarding the soundtrack) can get cleared, this one deserves all the bells and whistles a Criterion release would bestow upon it.

 

Vice Squad:

 

Alright, this is my most questionable pick, but hear me out. While this (once-again) mostly forgotten exploitation flick from the 80's might seem like an odd choice, I think it fits in perfectly with their other action and noir B-flick selections. Besides being a thrilling and perfectly structured film boasting one of the greatest and unrecognized performances ever (Wings Hauser as the villainous pimp Ramrod) it is also shot on location in 1980's Skid Row. That alone makes it an important historical artifact. Though it's an exploitation action film, it takes a hard and realistic (at times surprisingly subtle) look at prostitution and the Los Angeles underground of the 80's. Plus it's just such a blast that people would be so amazed to discover, I honestly think it would become a wild success for Criterion.

post #2 of 67
Phase IV

Is it the most intelligent of the 70's era nature-run-amok films? The scene of the ants building and filling the underground graveyard with their fallen kin, and the one where a series of ants die bringing the queen a small sample of poison, are somehow both creepy and inspiring. Must include the cut ending, so that I may finally see it.
post #3 of 67
Thread Starter 

Good pick. Also, as the only film Saul Bass directed, it's ripe for such a release. You could load it with features on Bass, get people like Scorcesse to talk about him, etc.

post #4 of 67

Drive. Transfer is fine but the extras are pure fluff.

post #5 of 67

Still waiting for Peter Weir's FEARLESS.  Get on it, C-Boys!

post #6 of 67

12 Monkeys (Terry Gilliam, 1995)

13 Assassins (Takashi Miike, 2010)

All About My Mother (Pedro Almodóvar, 1999)

Almost Famous (Cameron Crowe, 2000)

Amélie (Jean-Pierre Jeunet, 2001)

Awakenings (Penny Marshall, 1990)

Before Sunrise (Richard Linklater, 1995)
Before Sunset (Richard Linklater, 2004)

A Bittersweet Life (Kim Ji-woon, 2005)

A Bronx Tale (Robert De Niro, 1993)

Delicatessen (Jean-Pierre Jeunet & Marc Caro, 1991)

The Devil And Miss Jones (Sam Wood, 1941)

Ed Wood (Tim Burton, 1994)

Election (Alexander Payne, 1999)

The Empire Strikes Back (Irvin Kershner, 1980)

A Face In The Crowd (Elia Kazan, 1957)

Flirting (John Duigan, 1991)

Gremlins (Joe Dante, 1984)

Groundhog Day (Harold Ramis, 1993)

Hard Eight (Paul Thomas Anderson, 1996)

Joint Security Area (Park Chan-wook, 2000)

Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (Shane Black, 2005)

Léon: The Professional (Luc Besson, 1994)

Limelight (Charles Chaplin, 1952)

Live Flesh (Pedro Almodóvar, 1997)

The Man Who Wasn't There (Joel Coen, 2001)

A Matter Of Life And Death (Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger, 1946)

Meet John Doe (Frank Capra, 1941)

One, Two, Three (Billy Wilder, 1961)

Out Of Sight (Steven Soderbergh, 1998)

Red Rock West (John Dahl, 1993)

Return Of The Jedi (Richard Marquand, 1983)

Salvador (Oliver Stone, 1986)

Show Me Love (Lukas Moodysson, 1998)

Sleuth (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1972)

Star Wars (George Lucas, 1977)

Starship Troopers (Paul Verhoeven, 1997)

Talk To Her (Pedro Almodóvar, 2002)

The Thing (John Carpenter, 1982)

Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down! (Pedro Almodóvar, 1990)


Edited by Barry Woodward - 1/30/13 at 12:22am
post #7 of 67
Thread Starter 

I definitely think Starship Troopers is overdue. Anyone see that epic Story of Film documentary (it's on Netflix Instant). It's great, not least of for spending as much time looking at why Starship Troopers is as radical a film as any other movie in the entire history of cinema. Probably the most subversive big budget movie Hollywood has put out.

post #8 of 67

VANISHING POINT: The version that's out there is OK but could use a nice cleanup.  This was the ultimate drive-in movie of the early 70s: at midnight, at least one of the screens would be playing this.  As such, I'd love to see Criterion do a documentary about the drive-in culture of the 70s and how this film found its audience there.

 

As to the film itself, it's arguably my favorite of all time.  It's an existential car chase film that explores a lot of counter culture elements (ala EASY RIDER).  It also has a great soundtrack.

post #9 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z.Vasquez View Post

 

Vice Squad:

 

Alright, this is my most questionable pick, but hear me out. While this (once-again) mostly forgotten exploitation flick from the 80's might seem like an odd choice, I think it fits in perfectly with their other action and noir B-flick selections. Besides being a thrilling and perfectly structured film boasting one of the greatest and unrecognized performances ever (Wings Hauser as the villainous pimp Ramrod) it is also shot on location in 1980's Skid Row. That alone makes it an important historical artifact. Though it's an exploitation action film, it takes a hard and realistic (at times surprisingly subtle) look at prostitution and the Los Angeles underground of the 80's. Plus it's just such a blast that people would be so amazed to discover, I honestly think it would become a wild success for Criterion.

 

You don't have to convince me on this one.  I love this movie.  I really wish I could find a copy of the song from the opening credits (sung by Wings Hauser, no less), City of Slime.  It's not the greatest song, and he doesn't have the greatest voice, but that's not the point.  It's how he sung it that makes the song.

post #10 of 67
Found this thread which has some good suggestions in it: http://www.chud.com/community/t/114982/the-personal-criterion-collection
post #11 of 67

Pretty much any film by the Quay brothers, Jan Svankmajer and Sergei Parajanov gets my vote.

post #12 of 67

Here are some trailers in reference to my earlier post:

 

post #13 of 67

Melvin and Howard-Jonathan Demme's masterpiece deserves more than the bare-bones release it has. Not enough people have seen this gem of a movie and that's a shame.

 

Over the Edge-The best "kids run amuck" movie ever. Is like the middle school equivalent of a cross between Dazed and Confused and River's Edge.

 

Fandango-One of the best road pictures ever, Sits greatly alongside American Graffiti and Dazed and Confused.

 

Shampoo-The New Hollywood at its zeitgeist. 

 

Smile-Michael Ritchie's best film. 

post #14 of 67

I can't think of anything Disney could due to signal they're trying to rebuild goodwill with Star Wars fans than to release the original, pre-special editions of the original trilogy, fully restored on blu-ray, via licensing them to Criterion. That would be the biggest WE GET IT AND WE WANT TO MAKE IT RIGHT they could do.

post #15 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Grimm View Post

I can't think of anything Disney could due to signal they're trying to rebuild goodwill with Star Wars fans than to release the original, pre-special editions of the original trilogy, fully restored on blu-ray, via licensing them to Criterion. That would be the biggest WE GET IT AND WE WANT TO MAKE IT RIGHT they could do.

That simply would be amazing. I don't need special feathers. Just the films.

post #16 of 67
Fox owns STAR WARS - as in episode IV - for ever, I think.
post #17 of 67
THE INSIDER is out on blu next month, but with ZERO extras. Which is criminal.
post #18 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluelouboyle View Post

Fox owns STAR WARS - as in episode IV - for ever, I think.

 

If they got a big enough cut, they could probably be persuaded. They weren't the ones holding back rereleases of the originals; it was Lucas.

post #19 of 67
I would love it if they put out an Evil Dead Trilogy box set one of these days. Perhaps coinciding with the release of the remake.
post #20 of 67
Thread Starter 

Not to disparage on other's desire for it, but I want Star Wars to stay away from my beloved Criterion. HAVEN'T YOU MONSTERS TAKEN ENOUGH!

 

In all seriousness, despite the existence of a few early Bay films, blockbuster movies just don't seem to fit with CC's general modus. I'm not saying the case can't be made for them, but once those flood gates open, then really any modern blockbuster of historical significance could be brought in. And something about a Criterion Top Gun - almost as influential in it's way as Star Wars - fills me with existential despiar.

 

Now, The Insider, that's a great choice.

post #21 of 67
I've been shrilly demanding for years that Criterion put out Charles Lane's SIDEWALK STORIES, which isn't on home video in any format, I mean not even on VHS. Ditto Marguerite Duras' THE TRUCK. Either of those is right up their alley and they'd be heroes for saving the flicks from oblivion.
post #22 of 67
Oh, and a big thumbs up on PLAGUE DOGS. I don't think the uncut version is available on Region 1 either.
post #23 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Z.Vasquez View Post


In all seriousness, despite the existence of a few early Bay films, blockbuster movies just don't seem to fit with CC's general modus.

So, no Bad Boys 1 & 2?

Just why did Criterion put out any of Bay's films?
post #24 of 67
Thread Starter 

Well...Bad Boys 2 is as pure an example of  psychotic cinematic misanthropy as I've ever seen, so maybe it deserves a spot. But no way does Bad Boys 1 - as mediocre an action film as can be -deserve a spot.

 

I've read different reasons for the Bay movies (which, in fairness, I do love The Rock) , the most sound being that early in the DVD era Criterion needed to put out a couple films they knew would sell and they had a deal with whatever studio put those out (MGM?).

post #25 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluelouboyle View Post

Fox owns STAR WARS - as in episode IV - for ever, I think.


I'm pretty sure Lucas does/did. All the cease and desists and destroy orders for rep theatres that wanted to show old prints came from LucasFilm, not Fox  (as far as I can tell, anyway). 

post #26 of 67

I'm crossing my fingers that Holy Motors gets the Criterion treatment.

post #27 of 67

My vote would be for SENNA to get the Criterion treatment.  I want the foreign cut (which is about an hour longer) to get released on blu ray, and I want a ton of extra footage and bonus materials relating to Senna's life to make it on there, including anything that they can dig up from Brazil that has never been shown in North America.

post #28 of 67

I would really like to see Lost Highway on Criterion.

 

post #29 of 67

I would love to see Mulholland Dr, preferably with a doc that includes background info on the original TV show that Lynch was hoping to produce.

 

I'd also love a Criterion Blu of Ed Wood, ideally featuring background on Wood, with Plan 9 and Bride of the Monster added as bonuses.

post #30 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

I would love to see Mulholland Dr, preferably with a doc that includes background info on the original TV show that Lynch was hoping to produce.

 

 

Hell, I'd like to see a nicely cleaned-up transfer of the original pilot. Bootlegs are out there, but...

 

It's high time we got a better collection of Lynch's short films, too. Criterion could do an edition consisting of the six shorts Lynch is currently selling directly, as well as any commercials/videos he's done since. The complete Rabbits would be great. It looks like they're doing Eraserhead, so maybe if they develop a good relationship with Lynch...

post #31 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Grimm View Post

I can't think of anything Disney could due to signal they're trying to rebuild goodwill with Star Wars fans than to release the original, pre-special editions of the original trilogy, fully restored on blu-ray, via licensing them to Criterion. That would be the biggest WE GET IT AND WE WANT TO MAKE IT RIGHT they could do.

 

I dummied these up some years ago. You can tell by the outdated CC format:

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Blank View Post

I've been shrilly demanding for years that Criterion put out Charles Lane's SIDEWALK STORIES, which isn't on home video in any format, I mean not even on VHS. Ditto Marguerite Duras' THE TRUCK. Either of those is right up their alley and they'd be heroes for saving the flicks from oblivion.

 

There's a whole raft of excellent indies from the mid-'90s that have completely dropped off the map. I want Chameleon Street, Household Saints, Suture, To Sleep With Anger, and hey how about The Icicle Thief?

post #32 of 67

I'd like to see a box set of: 

 

STREETS OF FIRE

THE IDOLMAKER

GRACE OF MY HEART

EDDIE AND THE CRUISERS

post #33 of 67

I'd love to see a Criterion blu of THE RAPTURE. 

post #34 of 67
Death and the Maiden
post #35 of 67
RAVENOUS. Such an underrated, nasty, darkly humorous little film. Love it to death.
post #36 of 67
Romero's Martin and/or Season of the Witch/Jack's Wife.

From what I understand NOTLD, while perfect, would be unprofitable.

The Crazies as well.

Those Romero ones should do.
post #37 of 67
Here ya go: JOHN WATERS: THE EARLY DREAMLAND FILMS. One of those Eclipse boxes they do.

Hag in a Black Leather Jacket, Roman Candles, Eat Your Makeup, Mondo Trasho, The Diane Linkletter Story. I think the first three are only ever available at museum screenings or something.

Edit: They were shown as part of Waters' photography exhibit. I imagine the films are a big part of the selling point so I'd figure he wouldn't want to cut that off by putting them out on DVD. Also Waters never cleared the music rights for the songs he used in Mondo Trasho, so it's never gotten a video release and likely never will. Bummer.
post #38 of 67

A few more I'd like to see:

 

Petulia-Richard Lester's masterpiece.

 

Prince of the City- Better than Serpico.

 

The Beast-War flick from Fandango auteur Kevin Reynolds.

 

The Loved One and Lord Love a Duck-Wacky mid 60's satires.

post #39 of 67

One minor gem that I'd like to see get a good treatment: Stanley Tucci's Big Night. I bet a group cast commentary would be wonderful, along with recipes of the awesome-looking food they cook in that movie.

post #40 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by nagboy92 View Post

The Beast

Oh, good one. Rewatched it not too long ago with hindsight irony.
post #41 of 67
Thread Starter 

Halie Gerima's Sankofa deserves the CC treatment. A shocking film about a slave rebellion on a plantation in the Dutch West Indies. It reminded me a lot of Herzog's early films while being a wholly personal, crazy and political beast of it's own.

 

Also, while mentioning films about black rebellion, I think a strong case is readily apparent for The Spook Who Sat By The Door. Imagine the special features on that baby.

post #42 of 67
Gemini (dir. Shinya Tsukamoto)
post #43 of 67

They should have all of Cronnberg on Criterion.  Videodrome is great(don't have Naked Lunch/Dead Ringers) but I want The Brood and Scanners stat.

post #44 of 67
Timothy Agoglia Carey's immortal masterpiece THE WORLD'S GREATEST SINNER.
post #45 of 67
Thread Starter 

Ah, someone else must have just read about the Alamo Drafthouse screening of World's Greatest Sinner. I'd never even heard of it before, which is shameful considering how much I dig Carrey. That flick sounds fucking amazing, and I shall not rest until I've seen it.

post #46 of 67

You can get it directly from the almost-source, Carey's son, at www.absolutefilms.net. It's so fucking worth it. I often say Nicolas Cage must have taken a long look at it before embarking on his career.

post #47 of 67
Thread Starter 

I am in your debt sir.

post #48 of 67

 

post #49 of 67

I still need to see SORCERER, but I'll agree 100% on BEING THERE.  Pretty sure that one has been mentioned before, though.

 

Here's a controversial choice for a film that should get the Criterion treatment: DEEP THROAT.  Pair it with INSIDE DEEP THROAT (the documentary from a few years ago) as well as all of the other documentary information surrounding the film and you'd have a really interesting expose on the mid 70s adult film industry.  There's no denying that the film is a landmark film.

post #50 of 67
Thread Starter 

William Friedkin actually tweeted today that Sorcerer is getting a DVD release soon, but that it's not Criterion.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Drafts & Lists
CHUD.com Community › Forums › THE CHEWERS › Drafts & Lists › Should Be On Criterion