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The Official Classic Rock Thread - Page 2

post #51 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chavez View Post

 

 

Even the Crespo/Dufay era? All I've ever heard from that is "Lightning Strikes" which is a good, solid tune, but I generally recall Night in the Ruts and Rock in a Hard Place being generally scorned. 

 

No, they're good too IMO. Nowhere near Rocks/Toys/Draw The Line, but still very enjoyable albums. The first time I heard Rock in a Hard Place I expected to hate it, but was pleasantly surprised. Even second-best Aerosmith of this era kicks the living shit out of anything they've done in the last couple of decades.

post #52 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chavez View Post

 

 

Yeah, listening to it right now, it's really lacking that spark of, uh, "Five-ness" that makes the other 2 albums so appealing. 

True, but "Looking At You" is one of the great lost pre-punk singles:

 

post #53 of 1780

Eric Clapton's self-titled first solo album is underrated, especially the Delaney Bramlett mix. Love "Let It Rain" and "Don't Know Why".

post #54 of 1780

 

It's a damn shame you really only hear For What It's Worth on the radio. This blows that song out of the water.

post #55 of 1780

I used to hear Mr. Soul from time to time, but I don't even hear that anymore. There's a station here in Nashville called Lightning 100 that plays an eclectic mix of stuff, from Clash to John Prine to current singer/songwriters ... I occasionally hear some obscure gems on that, but the classic rock station here is pretty much Journey/BadCo/Foreigner 24/7.

post #56 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben W View Post

 

The day that is coming any second now that I dread is the day when I hear "Smells Like Teen Spirit" on a classic rock station.  That's the day I officially become old.

Well, is "classic rock" a genre or does it refer to music that is a certain amount of years old?

 

 

Labeling music is always something that leaves me confused, but to me "classic rock" is rock(ish) music from, say, '62 to maybe '78 or so. Most bands/artists born after that will never be classic rock in my opinion, no matter how much time passes (by that I mean, in High school in the late 80's/early 90's if I turned on the classic radio station it was possible to hear a song that was 12 years old like early Petty and the Heartbreakers stuff- I couldn't imagine turning on a "classic rock" station today and hearing, say, Fell in Love with a Girl).

post #57 of 1780

As a sound, I sort of figure that "classic rock" is, musically, no more than a few steps removed from the Stones.

 

From a marketing perspective, though, if I were running a "classic rock" radio station today, I have no idea what the hell I'd be programming.

 

And I agree that I dislike the idea of labeling, for the arts in general, not just music.

post #58 of 1780

I'm 90% sure that I've heard 'Smells Like Teen Spirit' on KQRS, our local classic rock station.  I know for a fact that Alice In Chains' 'No Excuses' is on their playlist (I've heard it often enough).

post #59 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raspberry Leper View Post

Well, is "classic rock" a genre or does it refer to music that is a certain amount of years old?

 

 

Labeling music is always something that leaves me confused, but to me "classic rock" is rock(ish) music from, say, '62 to maybe '78 or so. Most bands/artists born after that will never be classic rock in my opinion, no matter how much time passes (by that I mean, in High school in the late 80's/early 90's if I turned on the classic radio station it was possible to hear a song that was 12 years old like early Petty and the Heartbreakers stuff- I couldn't imagine turning on a "classic rock" station today and hearing, say, Fell in Love with a Girl).

 

 

Classic Rock is whatever the station needs it to be....one would think that if it were a "time period" you couldn't/wouldn't play the new album by a Petty/Springsteen/Neil Young/etc, but they do. 

 

If it were a genre, then they could/would play new bands that fit the "classic rock" mold (like Pearl Jam at their most straight-up) but as a general rule, they don't. 

 

 

 

In the 80s/early 90s, most stations didn't really focus on the "classic" part, since rock was rock, and most guitar-based bands came pretty much from the 70s arena rock template anyway - Motley Crue fits right in the playlist next to Thin Lizzy and The Who, when you get down to it. I think the major schism came when the 90s "alt" boom hit - suddenly you had weird, off-kilter acts that were in some weird in-between realm, where a Clapton/Stones fan would like, or at least tolerate, "18 and Life" or "Up All Night" you stand a chance of losing them if you play REM's "Drive" or Jane's Addiction's "Mountain Song" - so it had to be codified into being "of an era" even though "classic rock" artists are still putting out albums. 

 

 

Growing up in the middle of nowhere, we had ONE decent rock station, but it was pretty good - played "classic" stuff, but also played new artists and kept up with the times - sure, they were playing Ted Nugent, Floyd (INCLUDING stuff from Animals which you NEVER hear on the radio anymore), old Scorpions, etc but they played the new glam rock and rolled with the grunge/alternative era when that hit. 

post #60 of 1780

I was never a traditional "classic rock" fan - save for The Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel, Ozzy-era Sabbath, Jim Croce, and Dylan* - but growing up in Northern NJ (and listening to the NY stations) left you with the option of Oldies, Classic Rock, or top 40 - and by default when we were hanging out somewhere and only had the radio we listened to the classic rock station (i forget if there was 1 or 2 - 92.3 and 102.7 were both, at various times, "classic rock", but I don't remember if there was ever an overlap). Towards the early 90's they would occasionally drop in what they called (I think) an "Instant Classic" - Which always seemed to be either a newer Petty/ Stones/ Aerosmith song (bands they played a lot anyway) or, once in a great while, a song from a more "modern artist" (Black Crowes, U2, Gn' R) that had a similar sound - I do remember Evenflow also making the cut really quickly, but that was it from the Seattle-Sound bands. Closer to the mid-90's, the floodgates (temporarily) opened to a slew of current shit (around the time the top 40 stations were playing Pearl Jam and Nirvana and Beck and The Beasties and STP), so the lines got REALLY blurred between stations/formats, but that didn't last.

 

 

 

* I had a Zep phase, and a Doors phase, and a Pink Floyd phase, too.

post #61 of 1780

Black Crowes are a great example of band that, if classic rock really WERE a genre, they would fit right in. Probably the Black Keys as well. 

post #62 of 1780
Thread Starter 

I've never really listened to The Black Crowes except for their live collaboration with Jimmy Page at the Greek Theatre which is all Led Zep covers.

 

The Faces were such a great little band, it's a shame that Rod Stewart Ronnie Wood tended to overshadow Ronnie Lane's contributions to the band, musicwise. He wrote some really great songs like Stone and Debris.

post #63 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanW View Post

I've never really listened to The Black Crowes except for their live collaboration with Jimmy Page at the Greek Theatre which is all Led Zep covers.

 

 

I saw them live for their second album (THE SOUTHERN HARMONY AND MUSICAL COMPANION).  They opened up their tour here in the Twin Cities with 3 sold out shows.  They were pretty damned great live, as I recall.

post #64 of 1780

My first concert: ZZ Top with opening act The Black Crowes. I've seen the Crowes 4-5 times, and each time they seemed more and more stoned.  The Crowes of Shake Your Moneymaker are a carbon copy of The Faces, with Chris Robinson a dead ringer for Rod Stewart in this clip:

 

post #65 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by NathanW View Post
The Faces were such a great little band, it's a shame that Rod Stewart Ronnie Wood tended to overshadow Ronnie Lane's contributions to the band, musicwise. He wrote some really great songs like Stone and Debris.


Not classic rock, but speaking of the Faces, I recently saw Ian MacLagan in the "house band" for "We Walk The Line: A Celebration of the Music of Johnny Cash," along with Buddy Miller, Don Was, Greg Leisz, and Kenny Aronoff.

post #66 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

True, but "Looking At You" is one of the great lost pre-punk singles:

 

That song has the greatest guitar solo(solos?) I have ever heard.  That thing can barely be contained.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raspberry Leper View Post

Well, is "classic rock" a genre or does it refer to music that is a certain amount of years old?

 

 

Labeling music is always something that leaves me confused, but to me "classic rock" is rock(ish) music from, say, '62 to maybe '78 or so. Most bands/artists born after that will never be classic rock in my opinion, no matter how much time passes (by that I mean, in High school in the late 80's/early 90's if I turned on the classic radio station it was possible to hear a song that was 12 years old like early Petty and the Heartbreakers stuff- I couldn't imagine turning on a "classic rock" station today and hearing, say, Fell in Love with a Girl).

Definitely songs from a certain age; there will always be bands that never seem to age-out of classic rock radio (Zeppelin, I'm looking in your direction), but a lot of stuff is being phased out and being replaced by bands from the 80s.

And I definitely think that the White Stripes will be played on some form of classic rock radio in 15-20 years.  It is inevitable.

post #67 of 1780
Thread Starter 

I really don't think Heart get's enough credit, the Wilson Sisters had their Led Zep affectations (like every other band in the seventies) but they also had balls, especially on tracks like 'Barracuda' (I will forever associate that song with Charlie's Angels) and they could rock the fuck out. I love the song Heartless which really shows off the Wilson sister's gift for Harmonies.

 

post #68 of 1780

Kiss at Madison Sqaure Garden 1985 on the Ayslum tour. No make up or Ace and Peter and they're still the hottest band in the world!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pg2O6SLGkQ&feature=share&list=LL64LyJi8tuMFxIMDBNXHdNg

post #69 of 1780
Thread Starter 

If ever there was a band that would define classic rock, it would be Kiss and I don't even really like Kiss.
 

post #70 of 1780

I've always been a little mystified by the lack of T. Rex and Deep Purple in the classic rock mix. I mean you hardly ever hear "Highway Star", and that song screams to have a place next to something by Led Zep or Aerosmith or The Who. Both T. and Purple have loyal/cult fanbases that have totally been denied a radio fix. Oddly, Sirius/XM has been playing a lot of Traffic in on their classic rock and deep cuts stations, kind of elevating the band out of forgotten obscurity. So it can be done.

post #71 of 1780

 Ozzy's Boneyard on Sirius XM plays a lot of Deep Purple, even a couple of Coverdale era tunes. Burn is a killer tune!

post #72 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaz View Post

 Ozzy's Boneyard on Sirius XM plays a lot of Deep Purple, even a couple of Coverdale era tunes. Burn is a killer tune!

 

Ditto Hush. That song has groove for miles. Am seeing Purple in a couple of weeks actually, though I should do some boning up because I have no fucking idea who's in the band at the moment.

 

*Scrambles to Internet* Gillan, Glover, Paice, Steve Morse on guitar... OK, that's pretty decent.

post #73 of 1780
Thread Starter 

I've always loved DP's album Fireball, that opening drum intro is absolutely killer. It's also the first DP album I ever listened to on vinyl.

post #74 of 1780

Another band deserving of being more in the classic rock mix is Humble Pie. They're even more obscure than The Faces. And Steve Marriott is one of the great blue-eyed soul rock n roll singers.

post #75 of 1780
Thread Starter 

Yeah, Humble Pie is one of those band's I've always heard of but never really listened to.

post #76 of 1780

Move over, Brother Ray...

 

post #77 of 1780

And one more for good measure....

 

post #78 of 1780
Thread Starter 

I think the first Santana album I truly fell in love with was Moonflower. Just a great mix of live and studio tracks. His playing was otherworldly and I was completely transfixed by the cover of that cloud covered mountain peak.

 


 

post #79 of 1780

The WOODSTOCK film turned me on to Santana.

post #80 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

The WOODSTOCK film turned me on to Santana.

 

 

There are some really great performances in that movie. Sly and the Family Stone kill it as well. 

post #81 of 1780

Seeing as how Richard Thompson has a new album out, and he just won a lifetime achievement award from the Americana Music Association (despite being pretty much entirely British), I was looking to add something to the Americana thread, but I couldn't find anything good from the new album yet.

 

But being in a Thompson mood, I figured I'd share some "classic" RT, with Elvis Costello and the Imposters:

 

post #82 of 1780

post #83 of 1780

One artist not mentioned a whole lot yet: Jimi Hendrix. Maybe it's because his work is so difficult to cover, but I don't hear about Jimi as much as I used to. I was reminded of this song the other day, maybe my favorite solo and song of his:

 

 

Also, Voodoo Chile. A riff so big and monstrous that the line "I stand up next to a mountain and chop it down with the edge of my hand" doesn't sound like hyperbole.

post #84 of 1780

There was a great SPIN article circa 90-91 that argued Jimi's popularity and influence was greater then than it had ever been. Alternative rock of the period definitely was taking from him, and he was kind of a popular culture of icon of cool. The 20 plus years since then has i agree seen a diminishing of his status; with the more mindblowing and experimental music ignored by radio, with only a few tracks chosen to represent him (it's a shame radio doesn't give the true variety of his sound play like with Led Zep). To kids of today, with less of a contemporary cultural connection, he is thought of more as Dad Rock than iconic genius. In some ways, Bob Marley has taken his place, not just in culture, but even on radio.

post #85 of 1780

I recently saw Cinderella's Tom Kiefer put on a killer solo show! Before anyone rolls their eyes at that statement, click in the link. Its him doing With a Little Help from My Friends.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rX2WAYVCNQE&feature=share&list=LL64LyJi8tuMFxIMDBNXHdNg

post #86 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

There was a great SPIN article circa 90-91 that argued Jimi's popularity and influence was greater then than it had ever been. Alternative rock of the period definitely was taking from him, and he was kind of a popular culture of icon of cool. The 20 plus years since then has i agree seen a diminishing of his status; with the more mindblowing and experimental music ignored by radio, with only a few tracks chosen to represent him (it's a shame radio doesn't give the true variety of his sound play like with Led Zep). To kids of today, with less of a contemporary cultural connection, he is thought of more as Dad Rock than iconic genius. In some ways, Bob Marley has taken his place, not just in culture, but even on radio.

Just saw this way too late, but I was thinking that Hendrix's music was difficult to license at a decent price, that the Hendrix estate charged out the wazoo for usage of the music, way more than other estates. If true, that would certainly affect Hendrix's popularity now.

post #87 of 1780

The Monks

 

 

post #88 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chavez View Post

The Monks

 

 

 

 

One of my great pleasures in life is turning my nephews on to the music I love, a bit at a time, and when I sent a rip of my Black Monk Time LP (the 1979 reissue-- I'm not THAT cool) to one of them, he said that I never had to get him another Christmas present as long as he lives.

post #89 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeb View Post

 

One of my great pleasures in life is turning my nephews on to the music I love, a bit at a time, and when I sent a rip of my Black Monk Time LP (the 1979 reissue-- I'm not THAT cool) to one of them, he said that I never had to get him another Christmas present as long as he lives.

 

I've seen people call The Monks "influential" and credit them for the Krautrock movement - I don't know about THAT, but while some of their stuff is just good, mid-60s rock (nothin' wrong with that!), they do have some really radical shit that makes you go "whoa, they were doing this before the Beatles released Revolver, much less The White Album? [Keanu]Whoa.[/Keanu]"

post #90 of 1780

RIP, Alvin Lee:

 

post #91 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

RIP, Alvin Lee:

 

 

 

Epic. 

post #92 of 1780

post #93 of 1780

I think that might be my favorite Woodstock performance along with Sly and the Family Stone. 

post #94 of 1780
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

I think that might be my favorite Woodstock performance along with Sly and the Family Stone. 
Santana is pretty amazing as well
post #95 of 1780

This summer Alice Cooper and Marylin Manson are going to tour together. No confirmed dates yet, but I do know they're playing Pittsburgh on June 23rd.


Edited by Chaz - 3/10/13 at 11:37am
post #96 of 1780

I don't celebrate Saint Patrick's Day; I celebrate Saint Lynott's Day: Patron Saint of Irish Rock N Roll

post #97 of 1780

One of my favorite "WTF" moments ever came when Phil (and Steve Mariott) popped up, uncredited, on Johnny Thunders' first solo album:

 

post #98 of 1780

One thing I like to do is find songs that were hits on rock stations but not on top 40 and have been forgotten. On KQRS, my local rock station they play some songs like this every once in a while and here is one of my favorites. 

 

post #99 of 1780
Thread Starter 

This thread needs more Deep Purple. I downloaded the live album of Deep Purple & the royal philharmonic orchestra and it's just a magnificent performance. Both the band and the orchestra are in perfect sync thanks to Malcolm Arnold and Jon Lord, usually it's a case of stepping on each others toes or trying to find a space to allow the music to breathe. The band's musical chops are on full display here, just incredible musicianship, Jon Lord and Ritchie Blackmore really are in sync with each other and both get a chance to display their musical chops. Lord and Blackmore both get showcases in 'Wring that Neck' especially Lord, what an incredible solo from him.

 

The band gels with the orchestra so well, the jam during First Movement: Moderato - Allegro is tight and funky. This album should be compulsory listening for any rock band wanting to playing an orchestra (I'm looking at you Metallica)

 

post #100 of 1780
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