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The NSA spying and whistleblower thread - Page 2

post #51 of 87
The Guardian UK: The NSA spends so much to fund Britain's GCHQ spy agency that it's essentially the NSA's British satellite

The Wall Street Journal: The government can turn on the camera and microphone in your Google Android phone by remote

Google's involvement in this keeps cropping up. Again and again, from their smart phones to their cloud storage, Google is going to be in serious trouble if they come to be perceived as having security flaws built in by design. remember, a lot of the data that the NSA is hoovering up is being analyzed by private contractors. That's a recipe for corporate espionage, never mind the threat to private citizens.

It's astonishing that the brains behind all this understood the Internet so poorly that they thought conscientious people wouldn't or couldn't anonymously leak stories like this to the world.
post #52 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reasor View Post

The Guardian UK: The NSA spends so much to fund Britain's GCHQ spy agency that it's essentially the NSA's British satellite

The Wall Street Journal: The government can turn on the camera and microphone in your Google Android phone by remote

Google's involvement in this keeps cropping up. Again and again, from their smart phones to their cloud storage, Google is going to be in serious trouble if they come to be perceived as having security flaws built in by design. remember, a lot of the data that the NSA is hoovering up is being analyzed by private contractors. That's a recipe for corporate espionage, never mind the threat to private citizens.

It's astonishing that the brains behind all this understood the Internet so poorly that they thought conscientious people wouldn't or couldn't anonymously leak stories like this to the world.

 

I have no doubt that iPhones...hell, probably most cell/smartphones, are equally vulnerable to remote control to someone who knows what they are doing. 

 

The DEA/NSA revelations could easily throw into question any and all legal proceedings related to people being prosecuted for drug crimes.

It could be a blessing in disguise for defense attorneys and a nightmare for prosecutors.

post #53 of 87
Thread Starter 

The e-mail service Snowden reportedly used, Lavabit, was shut down abruptly by its owner today with a message on their site:

 

Quote:
I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people or walk away from nearly ten years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit. After significant soul searching, I have decided to suspend operations. I wish that I could legally share with you the events that led to my decision. I cannot.

 

Quote:
This experience has taught me one very important lesson: without congressional action or a strong judicial precedent, I would _strongly_ recommend against anyone trusting their private data to a company with physical ties to the United States.

 

Lavabit claimed to encrypt its e-mail in a way such that they didn't have access to the content on their own servers. So this is the choice given to tech companies that refuse to comply with the U.S. government's demands?

post #54 of 87
Thread Starter 
post #55 of 87


Offered without opinion....

 

from C&L

 

http://crooksandliars.com/nicole-belle/greenwalds-partner-detained-london-ai

Quote: <excerpt>

UPDATE: To be fair, the Terrorism Act under which Miranda was detained is one of those overbroad statutes (written decades ago as a response to IRA violence) that makes what happened completely legal and does not require the detaining officer to suspect a person specifically of terrorism. According to Tom Nichols of The War Room, 60,000 people were detained in the last year under this same statute. The New York Times reports with more detail than the initial Guardian article that the Guardian paid for Miranda's trip to Berlin to meet with a filmmaker who is working on a documentary on Edward Snowden, so it's disingenuous to claim that Miranda is an innocent bystander caught up in the persecution of a journalist either.

But caveats aside, I have to say this is EXACTLY the wrong way to go about reassuring citizens that their privacy is being respected and that the government isn't abusing their privileges.


Edited by VTRan - 8/18/13 at 6:14pm
post #56 of 87
So, wait, they're suggesting that "met with a filmmaker working on a documentary about Snowden" is grounds for detainment? Yeah, that sounds reasonable.
post #57 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by PMR View Post

The previous discussion needed a more descriptive thread title.

 

So now Latin America is mad because Bolivia's prez's plane was banned from flying over France and Portugal because someone *cough* the US *cough* thought that Ed Snowden was onboard, which he seemingly wasn't. So now we've pissed off an entire region of the world for nothing because we hate whistleblowers.

 

Do South American leaders still travel by plane given their aptness to, you know, crash inexplicably?

post #58 of 87
Thread Starter 

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/19/david-miranda-interview-detention-heathrow

 

And from the below article:

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/19/david-miranda-schedule7-danger-reporters

 

Quote:

A little over two months ago I was contacted by a very senior government official claiming to represent the views of the prime minister. There followed two meetings in which he demanded the return or destruction of all the material we were working on. The tone was steely, if cordial, but there was an implicit threat that others within government and Whitehall favoured a far more draconian approach.

 

The mood toughened just over a month ago, when I received a phone call from the centre of government telling me: "You've had your fun. Now we want the stuff back." There followed further meetings with shadowy Whitehall figures. The demand was the same: hand the Snowden material back or destroy it. I explained that we could not research and report on this subject if we complied with this request. The man from Whitehall looked mystified. "You've had your debate. There's no need to write any more."

post #59 of 87

From the stories that have been reported in the weeks following Snowden's disclosures, I think Snowden himself has earned a lot more credibility than initially.  It didn't help that his de facto spokesman was the always self-important and slanted Glenn Greenwald.  I heard a fascinating interview with Barton Gellman, a reporter and author whom Snowden provided some files to, and he gave me a much better understanding of Snowden himself, his reasoning and his practices.  Gellman also at least partially dispelled my problems with the whole question of whether or not he'd release files to Chinese or Russian officials.  That interview is here.

post #60 of 87

Confirmed, the NSA knows what turns you on (and by extension Google, Yahoo, Microsoft, your home ISP, your cell provider), and will use it against you:

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/26/nsa-porn-muslims_n_4346128.html?1385526024

post #61 of 87
Crypto Kids?! I can't believe this is a real thing. Talk about disturbing propaganda. This is something out of a fascist dystopian novel. Just messed up.

http://io9.com/the-nsas-website-for-kids-isnt-creepy-nope-not-cree-1508865211?utm_campaign=socialflow_io9_facebook&utm_source=io9_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow
post #62 of 87
Impressive achievement managing to create a set of cartoon animals about whom the most disturbing thing isn't going to be the inevitable FurAffinity hermaphrodite bondage latex macrophilia porn. Very, very impressive achievement, that.
post #63 of 87

How else are we going to fight the Farfours of the world?

 

 

 

We need the Cyber Twins Cyndi and Cy now more than ever!

post #64 of 87

 

Ed Snowden and the ACLU guys did a live hangout at SXSW last week.  If nothing else it's amusing for them pointing out the connection is bad because his link was re-routed so many times (picture that bit from Sneakers over at the NSA while they try to find him.  Is there a US government department James Earl Jones hasn't run?  Shoulda been president at some point)

 

I'd never heard him talk before.  There's been a fair bit of FUD around the guy.  Even seemingly sensible Americans had been calling him a traitor and all sorts of other things.  He really doesn't seem like a radical though.  In fact he says pretty much the exact same stuff Bruce Schneier and the ACLU says.  That should only be radical enough for the fundy Right to get excited about, but who knows these days.

post #65 of 87
"We tortured some folks."

In the wake of the Senate's investigation into the CIA's interrogation program, and the CIA's surveillance on the Senate in the hopes of thwarting same, President Obama addresses the press. (Link w/video)
post #66 of 87

When the timeframes get compressed down for textbook consumption fifty years hence, the bolded header to the paragraph on extrajudicial torture is going to read "we tortured some folks."
 

post #67 of 87

I think it's only fair to include the whole statement....

Quote:

With respect to the larger point of the RDI report itself, even before I came into office I was very clear that in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 we did some things that were wrong. We did a whole lot of things that were right, but we tortured some folks. We did some things that were contrary to our values.

 

I understand why it happened. I think it’s important when we look back to recall how afraid people were after the Twin Towers fell and the Pentagon had been hit and the plane in Pennsylvania had fallen, and people did not know whether more attacks were imminent, and there was enormous pressure on our law enforcement and our national security teams to try to deal with this. And it’s important for us not to feel too sanctimonious in retrospect about the tough job that those folks had. And a lot of those folks were working hard under enormous pressure and are real patriots.

 

But having said all that, we did some things that were wrong. And that's what that report reflects. And that's the reason why, after I took office, one of the first things I did was to ban some of the extraordinary interrogation techniques that are the subject of that report.

 

And my hope is, is that this report reminds us once again that the character of our country has to be measured in part not by what we do when things are easy, but what we do when things are hard. And when we engaged in some of these enhanced interrogation techniques, techniques that I believe and I think any fair-minded person would believe were torture, we crossed a line. And that needs to be -- that needs to be understood and accepted. And we have to, as a country, take responsibility for that so that, hopefully, we don't do it again in the future.

 

 
 


http://iipdigital.usembassy.gov/st/english/texttrans/2014/08/20140801304770.html#axzz39CWKJ1G4

 

 

...that being said, I've read that this report that's coming out is going to piss off / freak out a lot of people.

Also, I can't help but think that Brennan's days as Dir. of the CIA are numbered. I bet he will (be asked to?) resign.

post #68 of 87

Resurrecting this thread because the whistle of whistles has been blown.

 

Quote:
 A huge leak of confidential documents has revealed how the rich and powerful use tax havens to hide their wealth.
Eleven million documents were leaked from one of the world's most secretive companies, Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca.

They show how Mossack Fonseca has helped clients launder money, dodge sanctions and evade tax.

The company says it has operated beyond reproach for 40 years and has never been charged with criminal wrong-doing.

The documents show links to 72 current or former heads of state in the data, including dictators accused of looting their own countries.

Gerard Ryle, director of the ICIJ, said the documents covered the day-to-day business at Mossack Fonseca over the past 40 years.
"I think the leak will prove to be probably the biggest blow the offshore world has ever taken because of the extent of the documents," he said.
 

 

Quote:
 The data contains secret offshore companies linked to the families and associates of Egypt's former president Hosni Mubarak, Libya's former leader Muammar Gaddafi and Syria's president Bashar al-Assad.
 
It also reveals a suspected billion-dollar money laundering ring that was run by a Russian bank and involved close associates of President Putin.
The operation was run by Bank Rossiya, which is subject to US and EU sanctions following Russia's annexation of Crimea.
The documents reveal for the first time how the bank operates.

 

Quote:
 Money has been channelled through offshore companies, two of which were officially owned by one of the Russian president's closest friends.
Concert cellist Sergei Roldugin has known Vladimir Putin since they were teenagers and is godfather to the president's daughter Maria.
On paper, Mr Roldugin has personally made hundreds of millions of dollars in profits from suspicious deals.
But documents from Mr Roldugin's companies state that: "The company is a corporate screen established principally to protect the identity and confidentiality of the ultimate beneficial owner of the company."

 

Over 100 news agencies in over 80 countries are disclosing the leaked documents (2.6 Terrabytes worth, 11.6 Million individual documents) at the same time.  Presumably because no one can assassinate that many journalists.

Original article

post #69 of 87
post #70 of 87

This should be a fun few days!

post #71 of 87

Always listen to String

 

https://youtu.be/hGo5bxWy21g?t=1m24s 

post #72 of 87

Funny how literally not a single US major media site is covering this hey?


Edited by Codename - 4/3/16 at 10:53pm
post #73 of 87
Huffington Post had a few headlines about it up tonight. They're essentially just links to Panamapapers.sueddeutsche.de and Daily Beast, but they're at least bothering to help put more eyes on other journalists' work.

You're right, though; CNN and MSNBC have nothing. I used to expect better from MSNBC. Sometimes I wonder if the good that Keith Olbermann did by finally making it safe to criticize George Bush after Hurricane Katrina is outweighed by the harm he inadvertently did by lending that channel a patina of credibility.
Edited by Reasor - 4/4/16 at 12:12am
post #74 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Codename View Post
 

Funny how literally not a single US major media site is covering this hey?

Hey, they gotta cover The Donald.

 

(Amazing if he's in there.  Although 1) he's probably too small fry and 2) it'd probably make him more popular, like he's 'anti-tax' and so forth)

post #75 of 87

I would LOVE if Trump was implicated!  

 

Although there is a conspicuous lack of Americans listed.  Apparently because the US is stricter about off-shore accounts than other countries.  But still, I figured SOME would be present.  

post #76 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Codename View Post
 

Although there is a conspicuous lack of Americans listed.  Apparently because the US is stricter about off-shore accounts than other countries.  But still, I figured SOME would be present.  

Quote:
 

Editor of Süddeutsche Zeitung responded to the lack of U.S. individuals in the documents, saying "Just wait for what is coming next"

 
7:37 PM - 3 Apr 2016
post #77 of 87

Hmmm...I'll take an outside bet that this might have a knock on effect on the Democrat nomination as much as the Republican.

 

I'd like to think such complete disclosure will cause such a shock that we can finally get on with a globally co-ordinated attack on tax evasion and a measured redistribution of wealth to combat poverty, improve education and invest in infrastructure that can help mitigate climate change and resource scarcity.

 

A man can dream can't he?

post #78 of 87

Holy shit, this is getting interesting.

 

So Icelandic PM Sigmundur Gunnlaugsson is one of the world leaders being implicated.  The people of Iceland have been calling for his resignation since the information has come to light.

 

Well, not only did he refuse to resign, he's now calling for the President of Iceland to dissolve Parliament.

 

Oh, and my country's own President, himself currently facing calls for impeachment due to breaching our constitution by misusing state funds to build a lavish mansion, is also being implicated because his nephew runs an off-shore account.

 

My inner-Marxist is doing backflips.

post #79 of 87

I can only imagine the trouble I'd have getting around if my balls were as big as this guy's.

post #80 of 87
post #81 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Codename View Post

My inner-Marxist is doing backflips.
My inner spectator is grabbing the popcorn.
post #82 of 87

One small but fascinating aspect of this the journalistic conspiracy to distribute, research and release this stuff globally.

 

Australia's public broadcasting investigative journalism arm had this report and interviews ready to go on the day.

 

http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/stories/2016/04/04/4434529.htm

post #83 of 87
Jackie Chan and Pedro Almodovar are on the list.
post #84 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

Jackie Chan and Pedro Almodovar are on the list.

 

Looks like Almodovar's brother is trying to take the fall for it.

 

Kind of a shame that the two celebs implicated are people I have nothing against. I'd rather it was Michael Bay or someone else you'd half expect it from.

post #85 of 87
post #86 of 87
.
Edited by Agentsands77 - 5/5/17 at 4:50am
post #87 of 87
Whistleblower news to cheer about: Chelsea Manning is reportedly being released from prison some time next week.

Manning's sentence was commuted by President Obama in one of his final official acts as President. Manning will have served seven years out of a 35 year sentence.

Manning's attorneys said in a public statement, "Chelsea has already served the longest sentence of any whistleblower in the history of this country. It has been far too long, too severe, too draconian. President Obama's act of commutation was the first time the military took care of this soldier who risked so much to disclose information that served the public interest."
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