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October Horror Movie Challenge

post #1 of 1824
Thread Starter 
Every year for the past 5 years or so, I make it a mission to watch as many horror movies as possible during the month of October. I'm thinking I could spread this to CHUD where we each list the movies watched, where they were watched (home, theater, etc.), and whether they are rewatches or new viewings. We could list the movies with short blurbs on our thoughts on each. Would anyone be interested in joining such a challenge? This thread can be moved to the Lists forum if that is more appropriate.
post #2 of 1824

I had the same idea as you. Last night I started watching Tucker and Dale vs Evil for the first time at home. I only made it about 30 minutes into it before I fell asleep, and I went in with really low expectations but this movie is hilarious. I should learn to never doubt Alan Tudyk.

post #3 of 1824
I'm reading Gunnar Hansen's book about the making of "Texas Chain Saw Massacre," so I revisited the film last night. Franklin still kills me.

I watched the beginning of "The Purge" last night before I went to bed. I'd meant to see it in theaters but never got around to it. So far, it's all right. Almost didn't recognize Ethan Hawke without scraggly facial hair.
post #4 of 1824

I'm in but I'm still marathoning through Breaking Bad so may not be able to kick in until mid-Oct. 

post #5 of 1824

I might give this a go as well.  I certainly have a long list of films to see thanks to the Horror draft.

post #6 of 1824

I might try this, too, although I'll be out of town for a week, mid-month, so my movie count will suffer.

post #7 of 1824

Sounds like fun. While I'm normally not a big horror buff (I know, I know, but guys, I cry easy) I actually cranked out 3-4 in September, so we'll see if I can't keep the ball rolling.

post #8 of 1824

Not exactly a horror, but my favourite film The Wicker Man (1973) is having its restored version released nationwide this Friday. And seeing as how I missed watching it this year on 30th April as I do every year, you can bet I'm going to be there front and center this Friday.

post #9 of 1824

Count me in. I have Byzantium and The Moth Diaries lined up and ready to go, with No One Lives on stand by : )

post #10 of 1824

Count me in, this sounds like it could be interesting.

post #11 of 1824
Just finished "The Purge." There's a movie that doesn't know what to do with itself.
post #12 of 1824

Texas Chainsaw 3D. Good Lord. I'll be writing a more detailed post in the Horror Movie Warning/ Recommendation thread.

post #13 of 1824

Hmmm. I might interested in this, seeing as I love horror! I'm currently behind with Boardwalk Empire and Breaking Bad but, if I can catch up with the former by the end of the week and leave the latter until next month, I can probably join in with this one.

post #14 of 1824
Thread Starter 
I guess everyone can just post one list and edit it as you update. But since it's October already...
post #15 of 1824
I watched the Lindsay Lohan thriller, "The Canyons," hoping for some madness on par with "I Know Who Killed Me." Holy shit, it's like a bad student film: lifeless, nihilistic and boring. During the opening scene in a restaurant, I found myself more curious about the conversations the extras at the other tables were having because I'd already lost interest in the core group of assholes this movie's about.

All that being said, I like to imagine this conversation took place in real life...

"Mom, Dad, guess what...! I got cast in a movie!"

"That's great, son! What's the part?"

"Well, it's a small role, but I get to strip naked and masturbate in a chair while watching a porn actor go down on Lindsay Lohan!"

"We're so proud of you, son!"

"Thanks, Mom and Dad!"
post #16 of 1824
Thanks to Film4, I have BASKET CASE, RE-ANIMATOR, THE KEEP, VACANCY and, err, DEVIL stacked up on my PVR.

This is gonna be good. First up, RE- ANIMATOR. The missus is out, so put the kids to bed and I'm sorted.
post #17 of 1824
Hans Gruber?? I like it.

And Jeffrey Coombs as Herbet West sounds like Renn.
post #18 of 1824
Well that was fun. I can see where BOGUS JOURNEY got it's inspiration from.
post #19 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluelouboyle View Post

Well that was fun. I can see where BOGUS JOURNEY got it's inspiration from.

 

What was fun?

 

 

Last night was John Carpenter's Christine for me. I've expressed my thoughts on it in another thread but I'll re-iterate. It's not A+ Carpenter but it's definitely B+ Carpenter. It was a "For Hire" gig after the The Thing bombed but there's still a lot to like. Christine running the first bully down is still a horrifying sequence and even though he's Mr. Indie Director now, I always thought Keith Gordon was a good actor. And John Stockwell became a director, too. Alexandra Paul, you're up!

 

I'm a bigger fan of the book but Robert Prosky was spot-on casting as Darnell. Most of his lines are taken verbatim from the book and he nails it.

 

Worth a watch and even if it's a notch below what came before and after, Christine is still a part of that hot streak Carpenter had from '76 to '88.

post #20 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike J View Post
 

 

What was fun?

 

 

Last night was John Carpenter's Christine for me. I've expressed my thoughts on it in another thread but I'll re-iterate. It's not A+ Carpenter but it's definitely B+ Carpenter. It was a "For Hire" gig after the The Thing bombed but there's still a lot to like. Christine running the first bully down is still a horrifying sequence and even though he's Mr. Indie Director now, I always thought Keith Gordon was a good actor. And John Stockwell became a director, too. Alexandra Paul, you're up!

 

I'm a bigger fan of the book but Robert Prosky was spot-on casting as Darnell. Most of his lines are taken verbatim from the book and he nails it.

 

Worth a watch and even if it's a notch below what came before and after, Christine is still a part of that hot streak Carpenter had from '76 to '88.

 

I love Christine; it's one of my favorite movies, and I have most of the dialogue imprinted in my head from watching it so many times.  I re-read the book recently, and almost all of the script is lifted ver batim from the novel, albeit rearranged a little.  But I think everything about it is wonderful.  And you're talking about the lonesome death of Moochie Welsh.  "Is that you, Cunningham??  Y-you're a dead man now!"

 

ETA: I actually wrote this Christine quiz and this one that ended up being absorbed into Flixtster. 

post #21 of 1824

Alright, movie #1 courtesy of Netflix, and quite apropos I think: C.H.U.D.

 

Knowing the film's cult status, I was actually kind of shocked to find that as a movie, it was actually un-ironically palatable. It's overwrought certainly but in a generally charming way, and as stock as some of the characters are a nice mix of acting well and acting really, really hard at least keep things more interesting than your average B horror flick. It's not exactly a story for the ages, but in my (admittedly limited) experience the non-monster part of these movies tend to be disposable at best, an active drag at worst, so at least this was entertaining, with a few great lines and scenes here and there. A good thing too, because holy shit if it weren't for the last 30 minutes you could easily forget this was supposed to be a horror movie. Slow burn, delayed gratification, we have no money, I get it, but there is just so little to early proceedings, and what we do get is just sort of...eh (the sewer flamethrower bit is especially underwhelming). We get a little bit of schlocky fun at the end (I liked the sword decapitation) but even then it's a whole lot of cutting away and very little straightforward action. Hell, we don't even get a big climatic showdown with the CHUDs, they're all (presumably) gassed off camera and instead we get Wilson blowed up but good. Which is OK I suppose, but how do you not have that guy get eaten by his inadvertent creations? It's a bummer, because even though C.H.U.D. gets a lot of things right that other movies in the genre don't, without that basic element of gory thrills its largely for naught. That being said, I've heard great things about the commentary track, and would totally be down to watch it again with that. Overall, a surprisingly good movie but a surprisingly disappointing horror experience.

 

Also, can anyone explain what the heck was going on in that shower scene? That was totally confusing to me.

 

The List So Far:

 

1. C.H.U.D.

post #22 of 1824

We watched the original NOSFERATU (1922, F.W. Murnau) last night.  It's amazing how well this thing holds up as an atmospheric piece of horror.  It's DRACULA in everything but title, and it is creepy as hell.  The use of shadows in here has never been topped.  

 

Highly recommended if you've never seen it before.

 

So, my list:

1.  NOSFERATU (1922)

post #23 of 1824

Great idea! The wife and I do this every year as well, and we're already a couple of movies in. I guess I'll just edit this post as we go?

 

1. Turistas - Well made if generic entry into the "Never Travel Anywhere" sub-genre. This time, the place to avoid forever is Brazil. A pretty decent cast (Olivia Wilde, Josh Duhamel) and some intense gore make it semi-memorable.

 

2. The Blair Witch Project - I hadn't seen this in years, but it really is fantastic, and one of the few found footage films I can stand. The use of natural sound (and silence) is brilliant, and while some are annoyed by Heather MacDonald's performance, I think she nails the artsy, bratty college student who'd rather keep talking than admit they're wrong about anything. 

 

The remastered Halloween 35th anniversary Blu should be at the house today. Looking forward to it!

post #24 of 1824
Thread Starter 

Clarence Boddicker's (aka Paul) October 2013 Camp Blood list

 

1. Halloween 2 (1981) - Watched my recently ordered Scream Factory blu ray (without a slip cover!) Haven't seen it in a while, but it still cements itself as the best Halloween sequel, although a pale comparison to the original. Dean Cundey is the real star here, and due to his cinematography, it remains the only sequel to come close to the original's atmosphere. Sure it's lazy, but it's far better than other praised sequels in the series (I'm looking at you, Halloween 4!) What I took away from this viewing is how creepy Jimmy the paramedic is. You're what, 25, and you're hitting on a high school patient who just got attacked by a psychopath? What a weirdo!

 

2. Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954) - Finally finished off my Universal Monster set I got last year. I always found it strange that this was included in the canon of the classic 30's and 40's films, as it seemingly fits better with the '50s sci-fi/horror movement. However, now it does seem to fit pretty well with the classics, especially in the end with the monster kidnapping the girl with Wolfman stock music! Still, I prefer its gothic counterparts. 

 

3. Lords of Salem - Why do I still watch Rob Zombie movies?

 

4. V/H/S 2 - As someone who was lukewarm on the first, I though this was marginally better. Although the whole thing has a Hot Topic, "No, you shut the fuck up dad!" faux edginess to it. But the world needs more horror anthologies, and I'll support them as they come. 


Edited by Clarence Boddicker - 10/6/13 at 2:05pm
post #25 of 1824
Last night I started watching "Return to Horror High," the film debut of George Clooney, who also dies first.

It's a horror-comedy that's neither scary nor funny. I don't know if I'll be able to power through the rest. The whole movie-within-a-movie conceit is boring me to tears. "Terror Firmer" does all this shit better and is way gorier.

Marcia Brady's in it, though. At first, I was like, "Is that Melody from 'Hey, Dude?'"

Oh, me.
post #26 of 1824

Started off October with a viewing of Slither.  Always a fun flick to show to the uninitiated - its gross, its funny, the cast is aces.  Obviously I've seen this one a bunch already, but what stood out to me this time was how wonderfully its paced.  Gunn is amazingly efficient; its a breezy 90 minutes and not a second is wasted.  Perfectly structured.  I also always seem to forget just how much heart its got.  It would be so easy for a lesser filmmaker to paint Grant Grant as an irredeemable jerk and a true antagonist, but there's a sweetness to him that gets to me every time.  

 

The List:

1. Slither (2006) 

post #27 of 1824

1. No One Lives

 

Something to know about me - I love the Saw movies and The Collector/Collection. Bearing that in mind, I really recommend No One Lives. It is deeply amoral, siding entirely with its serial killer anti-hero to the extent of positioning him as romantic lead by the ending, but the kills are so good I let that go. Death by grappling hook, shower curtain, industrial mincer, and the killer smuggles himself into his enemies house by

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
hiding in the body of a big guy he killed.

 

2. The Moth Diaries

 

Maybe-vampire shenanigans at an all-girls school. A bore, and it shared both a director with American Psycho, and that film's ambigious ending. More coming-of-age story than horror, though in its favour Cronenberg-regular dolly Sarah Gadon looks absolutely astonishing dressed as a schoolgirl (relax, she's in her twenties : ))

 

3. Donkey Punch

 

Pissed up Brits on holiday in Spain head out on a yacht for some sun and sex, and one of the guys executes the title move on an unfortunate young lady. Executes being literal. Everyone goes mad and tries to kill each other. Less transgressive than it sounds/would like to be. An engaging enough slasher while you're watching it, but you wouldn't watch it twice.

 

4. Dead Silence

 

The lost James Wan film. Killer puppets controlled by a mad ghostly old bint. Short but still very slowly-paced, it has a couple of good scenes and a great, chucklesome final twist, but it's too dull to really get the juices flowing, and the mad old bat's giant CGI tongue is a step too far towards Troma. All the original versions of the (much superior) Insidious imagery are present here though, making it an interesting time capsule.

 

5. Splice

 

Diet Cronenberg, as two scientists engineer a new-species "child" with wings and a pointy tail. The creature - named Dren - is impressive, but the rest of the film is more of a bad-parent metaphor than a horror film. Sarah Polley plays the female lead, and is the best thing about the film. Average.

 

In order of enjoyment:

 

1. No One Lives
2. Dead Silence
3. Splice
4. Donkey Punch
5. The Moth Diaries

post #28 of 1824

So in honor of the challenge and Netflix's ability to browse by genre, I thought it would fun to pick some of my movies the old-school way: title and cover only. This worked out almost exactly as well as you'd expect, which brings me to my second entry: Monster Brawl.

 

Woof. Just truly awful in every respect, a horrendous attempt at pre-packaged cult schlock that totally misses the appeal of films like Toxic Avenger. It's a solid concept (who doesn't love classic monsters battling it out?) and contrived as it would have been a more straightforward approach that just combined a bare minimum of decent writing with some solid gore would have been enough to at least be serviceable. Instead though it's a monster pro wrestling movie, which in and of itself isn't a problem (I like both those things) but it's an approach that requires a far defter touch and much, much, MUCH smarter writing to not be a complete waste of time. This thing doesn't even feel like a movie, it feels like the world's worst Youtube sketch stretched out interminably. There's not real plot, just dull match after dull match until it slowly creaks to a halt. It's not even a proper tournament, as two of the matches are just random one-off's.

 

It's also an incredibly daft mix of complex and stupid. They take the time to make up fake stats for all the monsters and break them into conferences and weight-classes (sort of) but then they battle it out in a cheap ring in the world's shittiest fake cemetery. There's no story, just a series of vignettes setting up each creature's background, half of which aren't even funny and only a couple of which seem to actually tie into the monsters as fighters theme. Actually none of them are funny, but half are prevented in a relatively straightforward manner that begs questions like "what the hell is the tone supposed to be here," "does this writer understand how comedy works" and "why the hell am I watching this." The same goes for the long stretches of joke free commentary. Really, I couldn't decide which was worse, the straightlaced approach (well, as straightlaced as pro-wrestling ever gets) or the attempts at wink-wink, nudge nudge humor that uniformly fell flat. Even when there is the hint of a decent idea, the execution undermines any potential humor. Herb Dean referring a no-holds barred fight to the death with no rules? Potentially funny. Herb Dean spending 2 minutes explaining that? Not funny. And the cherry on the shit sundae? The wrestling isn't even very good! It's the type of movie I would have turned off 15 minutes in if I hadn't been committed to this challenge, and seems am appropriate recipient for the old "Fuck You out of 5" rating. The fact that this pandering crap played at festivals and wasn't immediately booed off the stage is just baffling to me.

 

In the interest of fairness, I will say that the movie got one genuine laugh out of me. During the mummy vignette, while the sheriff is asking for information as to its whereabouts and the tagline reads MILF Alert: Mummy I'd Like to Find. Congrats Monster Brawl, you got one right.

 

The List so Far:

 

1. C.H.U.D.

2. Monster Brawl

post #29 of 1824

Movie #3: Mimic

 

Unintentional on my part, but this was actually a pretty interesting companion piece to C.H.U.D. that covers some common ground. Alright, mainly just subways and an ending involving an explosion and gas, but still, parallels. Thankfully this was WAY better paced, and while it definitely felt like a lesser Del Toro film, lesser Del Toro is still well ahead of par. While things got fairly generic around the 2/3ish mark, I loved the little humorous touches peppered throughout. The exploding paint can in the beginning was a great little subversive bit of non-gore, and goofy as the trench-coat man roach concept was, there was enough early glimpses and little dramatic beats to keep the tension high. Also, aside from the first big roachman reveal (which, yow, 90s), the dated CGI is for the most part smartly disguised under a lot of dark lighting, and practical effects. Plus, not just a single but a double gruesome kid kill? Del Toro does not fuck around. If I have one complaint, it's that the actual mimic concept seems way underutilized. It's a cool visual gimmick and the idea that these creatures could actually be more evolved than us thanks to rapid breeding is interesting, but again towards the end of the film they just revert to being dumb generic critters. I mean they're smart enough to skulk around the city at night and break into a lab to rescue one of their young (I'm presuming to cover up their presence) yet they're fooled by the simple no-stank trick and then charge blindly into oncoming trains. Then there was the weird kidnapping and subsequent abandoning of the autistic kid, which just felt like a dumb plot contrivance. Between that and the "they don't kill unless you enter their territory" line I was half-expecting there to be some higher purpose or intelligence behind the Judas' actions, but nope, they're just bugs. Certainly not a deal breaker, it just made the creatures feel slightly schizophrenic in their motivation compared to the calculated invasion the doc seems to be implying. Overall though, dug it quite a bit, and a much need palette cleanser after the last flick.

 

The List So Far:

 

1. C.H.U.D.

2. Monster Brawl

3. Mimic

 

EDIT: Huh, after reading a little about about the DTV sequels it seems like the intelligent insect concept actually gets taken a step further in those, even though it sounds like the overall quality is way lower.

post #30 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splatoon View Post

Movie #3: Mimic

Unintentional on my part, but this was actually a pretty interesting companion piece to C.H.U.D. that covers some common ground. Alright, mainly just subways and an ending involving an explosion and gas, but still, parallels.

If you want to continue with another movie with even more parallels I recommend you throw on the Relic (1997)
post #31 of 1824
I'm about to watch a midnight screening of "Tremors." I've never seen it on the big screen. I can't wait for the reaction to Kevin Bacon's inimitable line, "We killed it... FUUUCK YOU!!!"
post #32 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim K View Post


If you want to continue with another movie with even more parallels I recommend you throw on the Relic (1997)

 

I think for my next one I'm going to take a detour out of creature features, but I'll definitely add it to the queue.

post #33 of 1824

THE RELIC...ugh.  What a terrible waste of a pretty damned good book.  It has its moments but is pretty awful on the whole.

post #34 of 1824
Peter Hyams saved a shitload of money on lighting equipment while making "The Relic." I think the whole film's lit by Tom Sizemore's flashlight.
post #35 of 1824

The main issue is that they combined two characters...Pendergast and D'Agosta...into one character and named him D'Agosta (Tom Sizemore).  This was stupid, as the interplay between the two characters is 75% of the reason why the book works.  Also, the character of special agent Pendergast is one of the more popular characters in fiction (Preston and Child have made a mint with their Pendergast books) and would have been amazing onscreen.  

 

Actually, it's probably a good thing this didn't have Pendergast.  Now he isn't ruined if they ever decide to make some of the other books in to films.

post #36 of 1824

1.   WE ARE WHAT WE ARE (2013)

 

An extremely well-acted but somewhat predictable bit of American Gothic nastiness about a rural family in New York adjusting to the death of the mother.  They have some strange religious-based eating habits that now need to be taken care of.       

post #37 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post

The main issue is that they combined two characters...Pendergast and D'Agosta...into one character and named him D'Agosta (Tom Sizemore).  This was stupid, as the interplay between the two characters is 75% of the reason why the book works.  Also, the character of special agent Pendergast is one of the more popular characters in fiction (Preston and Child have made a mint with their Pendergast books) and would have been amazing onscreen.  

Actually, it's probably a good thing this didn't have Pendergast.  Now he isn't ruined if they ever decide to make some of the other books in to films.

I encountered the film before I even knew the book existed. As a creature feature I still find it to be a really fun time, despite the ancient CGI. Personally I find it is a better Alien clone than Alien 3.
post #38 of 1824

I'm going to be starting my October Halloween movie festival by watching Young Frankenstein for the first time. 

post #39 of 1824

Movie #4: Pontypool (Spoilers Ahoy!)

 

Well that was weird. Went into this with only the surprisingly vague Netflix description, so it being an (admittedly off-kilter) no budget zombie flick was a bit of a surprise, and unfortunately a disappointing one. Stephen McHattie was great as the lead and I was super impressed with the claustrophobic opening half, with the radio staff trapped in the basement trying to piece together the horrific events being described to them by their man in the field and various witnesses.  It's genuinely tense, and hews to the old adage that what you imagine is far more disturbing than what you see. I also thought the broad "twist" of having the infection be delivered via words was interesting, a sort of horror take on Snow Crash's Asherah. The problems really set in with the out of nowhere appearance of one Dr. B Exposition, a character so cartoonish it felt like he was transported in from another movie...at least until the rest of the film quickly shifts gears to match him. The terrifying hordes built up so effectively by the movie are revealed to be...a bunch of blood drooling extras, and the more the various characters try to explain the premise ("They're attracted to speech! Only English is infected!") the less sense it makes, finally descending into full-blown farce with the word-association "cure." Reading reviews after the fact a lot of the films fans say it grows on repeat viewings and the seemingly non-sequitur post credits scene suggests there's definitely something going on under the hood (I'd be curious to check out the source novel), but if there were subversive themes at play here outside the obvious they were too subtle for me to pick up on. Still, I'd say it's easily worth a watch for the excellent work by McHattie and the novelty of the premise if nothing else.

 

The List So Far:

 

1. C.H.U.D.

2. Monster Brawl

3. Mimic

4. Pontypool

post #40 of 1824

Movie #5: V/H/S (More Spoilers Ahead!)

 

I'll give V/H/S this: it was the first of my October horror choices that had me inching my hands up towards my eyes like the little baby I am. This one I had heard some scuttlebutt on going in (hard not to on this board), and I think I fell pretty much in line with the general "mixed bag" consensus. There's obviously gonna be a lot of willing suspension of disbelief with this kind of film (and some of these segments stretch it hard) but I think in general the gimmick works even if the execution of the films is hit and miss. Amateur Night and 10/31/98 definitely steal the show, and were smart picks to bookend the lesser fare. Not much to say about those, just solid little genre exercises. The girl who played the succubus was flat out creepy, and 98 got the biggest laugh for me with the 4 dudes joining in during the exorcism chant. The rest would be where the "mixed" part of the mixed bag came in. The honeymooners bit was dull and nonsensical, while the slasher one just felt cheap and undercooked, which is dissapointing because I think with a longer run time and someone competent behind the camera it may have had the most potential. I like the idea of the ex-victim using people as bait, and wouldn't mind seeing someone else take a crack at it. Then there's The Sick Thing, which I was surprised people seemed to latch on to as one of the stronger of the bunch. I'd defintiely put it ahead of 2 and 3, but despite having the most disturbing scene in the movie (rooting around in the arm...blargh) it tips its hand WAY early regarding the boyfriend, and as a certified wuss I just didn't find the scuttling toddler particularly scary. Also, while the final scene with him cutting open the girlfriend was appropriately gross, everything from the crap looking fetus to the ghost aliens all sitting around nagging gave the whole thing a comical air. Overall though I was definitely entertained, and in this case the brevity and variety definitely helped smooth over the weaker elements.

 

The List So Far:

 

1. C.H.U.D.

2. Monster Brawl

3. Mimic

4. Pontypool

5. V/H/S

post #41 of 1824

 #1: Evil Dead (2013)

 

This was a first viewing for me. I missed it when it hit theaters and was kinda "meh" about seeing it at all. My brother brought it over and insisted that I watch it. I have to say I really enjoyed it. I was shocked at how not bad it was.It had decent atmosphere and some really well done blood and gore effects.

post #42 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

Great idea! The wife and I do this every year as well, and we're already a couple of movies in. I guess I'll just edit this post as we go?

 

1. Turistas - Well made if generic entry into the "Never Travel Anywhere" sub-genre. This time, the place to avoid forever is Brazil. A pretty decent cast (Olivia Wilde, Josh Duhamel) and some intense gore make it semi-memorable.

 

2. The Blair Witch Project - I hadn't seen this in years, but it really is fantastic, and one of the few found footage films I can stand. The use of natural sound (and silence) is brilliant, and while some are annoyed by Heather MacDonald's performance, I think she nails the artsy, bratty college student who'd rather keep talking than admit they're wrong about anything. 

 

The remastered Halloween 35th anniversary Blu should be at the house today. Looking forward to it!

 

Not sure of the proper format for doing this, so I thought I'd catch up this way.

 

The transfer of the Halloween Blu is fantastic, although I think I've seen it too much. I have Hostel II, House of a 1000 Corpses and Carnival of Souls on my DVR. I saw a terrible transfer of CoS earlier, looking forward to seeing it in HD.

 

I think one thing inhibiting us is that we recently watched the film Frontier(s), and it's so brutal that it kinda rewired our views of horror. I still haven't seen Inside or Martyrs, but the New French Extremity films that I've seen have scarred me so far. 

post #43 of 1824
Tonight I watched "Cannibal Ferox." Now there's a film with some fantastic ADR work.

I don't think the American Humane Society had someone on-set during the shoot. Jesus H. Christ, what's it with cannibal movies and animal cruelty? I'm totally fine with watching one of the human protagonists get his dick cut off and eaten in front of him, but I don't want to see a turtle get decaptated. Bleh.
post #44 of 1824

Hey, I was doing this in the Horror Thread, little knowing there was a whole other thread ready to go. I'm aiming, futilely, for the full 31.

 

Rudd's Great List (in order of enjoyment):

 

1. Take Shelter

2. The Lords of Salem

3. White Zombie

4. Solomon Kane

 

Gravity probably doesn't count right? It was scarier than all four.

post #45 of 1824

EYES OF THE MOTHMAN (5)

 

This is a documentary available on Netflix. Don't take me mentioning that as any sort of recommendation, as this is one of the most tedious things I've sat through, easily. It's two and a half hours, and feels like staying inside all day and watching four hours straight of the absolute worst programming the History Channel ever had. Like an Unsolved Mysteries/Sightings marathon, but quite a bit less fun than either. It's a documentary in the sense that those are documentaries, and I can't imagine how this was allowed to get expanded out so much instead of being edited into a forty five minute forgettable episode of somesuch show.

 

It's ostensibly about the Mothman phenomena that famously occurred in Point Pleasant, WV in the 60s, and while the film does touch on that, it spends equal time dithering it's way through the most tangentially related local history imaginable, from Revolutionary War Indian raids to industrialization and pollution plaguing the city in the 20th century. All fairly dull, but worse still is the small group of yokels and nutjobs they repeatedly wheel out to interview about every single subject, as if these white trash conspiracy theorists have an insight on every single boring subject in the town's history. I begin to wonder whether or not they were all superstitious hicks that believed in every crazy notion presented to them or local opportunists burnishing the Mothman legend because their small piece of the economy depended on it, and was the entire purpose of the film to begin with. I was determined to make it all the way through, but I have to admit, I tapped out with forty five minutes to go. It doesn't technically count as a finish, but I'll be damned if I don't take credit, because watching as much as I did was like going to war. Just fuck this movie completely.

 

1. Take Shelter

2. The Lords of Salem

3. White Zombie

4. Solomon Kane

5. Eyes of the Mothman

post #46 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

Tonight I watched "Cannibal Ferox." Now there's a film with some fantastic ADR work.

I don't think the American Humane Society had someone on-set during the shoot. Jesus H. Christ, what's it with cannibal movies and animal cruelty? I'm totally fine with watching one of the human protagonists get his dick cut off and eaten in front of him, but I don't want to see a turtle get decaptated. Bleh.

 

Is it Ferox you're watching? Holocaust is the one with the poor turtle. Ferox is the one with the chick with hooks through her tits. Both are pretty despicable, but I think a horror fan kinda has to see them just to tick them off the list.

 

 

 

post #47 of 1824
No, I'm not confusing "Cannibal Holocaust" with "Cannibal Ferox." They kill a turtle (and a pig and and a baby alligator) in Ferox, too. Is there no originality in cannibal movies?
post #48 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

No, I'm not confusing "Cannibal Holocaust" with "Cannibal Ferox." They kill a turtle (and a pig and and a baby alligator) in Ferox, too. Is there no originality in cannibal movies?

 

Ah, my apologies - I was distracted by the hung-up-by-the-breasts thing, and Giovanni Lombardo Radice getting turned into a KFC meal bucket : ) Remember when Radice was the man who had died the most awful deaths in cinema? Nowadays I think Eli Roth might be trying to catch up with him.

 

6. Lord Of Illusions

 

I've seen pretty much all the Clive Barker adaptions over the years - including the really appalling ones, like Book Of Blood and Rawhead Rex - but somehow had never caught Lord Of Illusions. Short review: It's fucking ace. Not quite a lost classic, and in my estimation not quite as good as Nightbreed or Hellraiser The First, but still - no-one else makes horror movies like this. Evil baboons. Gay S&M assassins. A hardboiled detective hero played by the guy from Quantum Leap. A vulnerable femme fatale played by Xenia Onnatopp. Why didn't this become a franchise? I know it didn't make much money, but you could make a lot of these for not a lot of cash, if you so desired. This is what I wanted from the Hellblazer adaption, more or less.

 

It's not perfect, of course - the ending's a bit of a non-starter, I didn't quite follow a lot of the reasoning for why the big bad was doing what he was doing ("I was born to murder the world!"), and it's got some of those not-so-hot early CGI effects. But still, loved this movie. More D'Amour, please!

 

1. Lord Of Illusions
2. No One Lives
3. Dead Silence
4. Splice
5. Donkey Punch
6. The Moth Diaries

post #49 of 1824

Burke and Hare tonight. I'll check in tomorrow with my thoughts.

post #50 of 1824
Thread Starter 
5. Room 237 - Pretty entertaining documentary about some whacked out theories on the Shining's "true" meaning. I especially liked the one about the whole thing being Kubrick's confession that he helped the government fake the moon landings. If you're a fan of postmodernist film theory, this one's essential.

6. Vampire Lovers - Finally watched my blu ray of the first in the Karnstein trilogy. Hammer movies are an acquired taste, and I remember being bored by it the first time I saw it several years ago, but it grew on me with this second viewing. It was made at a time when Hammer provided plenty of gratuitious nudity in their pictures, and that is a big plus as well. Now all I need is Lust for a Vampire to be released and by Karstein triology set to be complete!

List so far:

1. Halloween 2
2. Creature from the Black Lagoon
3. Lords of Salem
4. V/H/S 2
5. Room 237
6. Vampire Lovers
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