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October Horror Movie Challenge - Page 21

post #1001 of 1824

 

THE AXE MURDERS OF VILISCA

 

I enjoy the occasional random Netflix Horror garbage from the bottom of the bin, so I watched one of the shorter ones, with an attention grabbing title. This is a complete piece of shit, not even remotely enjoyable. Just inept, dull and without the smallest hint of inspiration, a real slog at 77 minutes. The single thing I suppose you could suggest is unique about this is that the titular murders are an unsolved true crime from 100 years ago. Might as well not be, for all the value they get from that. This was a waste of time, and my wife mocked me for finishing it, which I suppose I only did so I could list it here. I hope this stays at the bottom of the list.

 

In Order of Enjoyment

 

1. Cujo

2. Friend Request

3. The Axe Murders of Vilisca

post #1002 of 1824

Damn, I saw that and was thinking about watching it, solely because of that title. Too bad.

post #1003 of 1824

Took a break from the endurance test that is THE STAND last night for the exquisitely terrible DREAMCATCHER. 

 

I know the novel isn't usually held in high regard, but I was in high school when it was released and it's scattershot nature - gross aliens, telepathy, military black ops, childhood adventure, lifelong friendships - kickstarted my teenage imagination in a really special way, even if the most effective parts of DREAMCATCHER are essentially watered down elements from IT.  Timing can be everything though, and this novel hit me at just the right time.  Its one of my favorites.

 

but...

 

Watching the film makes me question all that big time; its the reason I probably won't ever go back and re-read the book.  As far as I can tell, Kasdan's film stays pretty true to the source material.  I can't make the argument that he's betraying King's vision.  If anything, Kasdan is exposing King's vision as really fucking stupid.  A lot of this movie is just embarrassing to watch, not because its so catastrophically inept (it certainly IS that), but because I loved this stuff so much on the page.  

 

As a Bad Movie though, it really is a sight to behold.  One of the all-time greats.  

 

 

 

2017 RANKINGS (in order of enjoyment):

 

1. IT (2017)

2. DREAMCATCHER (2003)

3. IT (1990)

post #1004 of 1824
I revisited "The Stand" miniseries a few months ago after finishing the book. Truly the most awful thing about it is the twangy country-western honky tonk music. Guh.
post #1005 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

I revisited "The Stand" miniseries a few months ago after finishing the book. Truly the most awful thing about it is the twangy country-western honky tonk music. Guh.

 

Its hard to pick a single awful thing as most awful, but the twangy country-western guitars are right up there with Randall Flagg's outfit, Randall Flagg's haircut and Molly Ringwald. 

post #1006 of 1824

I really didn't like anything about Flagg in that miniseries.

post #1007 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzy dunlop View Post
 

Took a break from the endurance test that is THE STAND last night for the exquisitely terrible DREAMCATCHER. 

 

I know the novel isn't usually held in high regard, but I was in high school when it was released and it's scattershot nature - gross aliens, telepathy, military black ops, childhood adventure, lifelong friendships - kickstarted my teenage imagination in a really special way, even if the most effective parts of DREAMCATCHER are essentially watered down elements from IT.  Timing can be everything though, and this novel hit me at just the right time.  Its one of my favorites.

 

but...

 

Watching the film makes me question all that big time; its the reason I probably won't ever go back and re-read the book.  As far as I can tell, Kasdan's film stays pretty true to the source material.  I can't make the argument that he's betraying King's vision.  If anything, Kasdan is exposing King's vision as really fucking stupid.  A lot of this movie is just embarrassing to watch, not because its so catastrophically inept (it certainly IS that), but because I loved this stuff so much on the page.  

 

As a Bad Movie though, it really is a sight to behold.  One of the all-time greats. 

The only thing I remember about Dreamcatcher is that it was my first exposure to Damien Lewis, and I was convinced he was doing a horrible English accent.

post #1008 of 1824
I've been thinking about reading "Dreamcatcher" after I finish "It." Then I discovered that the characters are also from Derry. So I think I kind of have to now.

I have to...
post #1009 of 1824

Ooooh I had no idea this was going on. Im in, starting tomorrow.

post #1010 of 1824

THE LIMEHOUSE GOLEM (2017)

Having seen the movie, it’s clearly not a true horror film, but it flirts with enough genre-y tropes and atmosphere that I’m still comfortable including it.  Sort of a period drama, sort of a Victorian police procedural, and sort of a serial killer mystery, the movie is a unique and engrossing yarn that is ambitious in its intentions.  On the surface, one might be forgiven for seeing the clear Jack the Ripper influences, but there are layers of complexity in the structure, characterization, and relationships that give the film’s story a fairly fresh and idiosyncratic personality.  The film explores the Victorian-era theatre/music hall scene, which makes for a fun backdrop against which to play the dark thriller elements.  In some ways, the screenplay is almost novel-like (appropriate, since it’s a novel adaptation); it’s unafraid of digressions which (at least on the surface) appear unrelated to the central plotline, and it’s keenly interested in the inner lives of the major characters as human beings.  This is a handsome film, with the rich and sumptuous production design leaving a strong impression.  Bill Nighy delivers a consummate professional’s performance, playing things grounded and real, with no scenery-chewing in sight.  Olivia Cooke is also strong, doing work that is equal parts wide-eyed and world-weary, while Douglas Booth might be the real revelation here, handing in a turn that is vibrant, layered, and memorable.  Much of the film has an uneasy quality, punctuated by bursts of grisly bloodletting, and while I don’t know that I can say the movie will really satisfy genre appetites, I can vouch for the quality of the production and the intriguing and compelling way in which it tells its story.

 

Ranking - In Order of Enjoyment

    1.    WE GO ON (2016)
    2.    THE LIMEHOUSE GOLEM (2017)
    3.    HELLO MARY LOU: PROM NIGHT II (1987)
    4.    THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1960)
    5.    NIGHT OF THE DEMON (1980)
    6.    LEATHERFACE (2017)

post #1011 of 1824
The Limehouse Golem is a terrible name. Ripper is way cooler.
post #1012 of 1824

You folks should maybe include if these movies are available and where. Night of the Demon, for instance, can be found on Amazon Prime.

post #1013 of 1824

 

GRAVEYARD SHIFT - Underrated. Certainly not a great movie or anything, or even a good one, but as far as movies about textile mills full of rats that sort of worship a giant bat? It's not bad at all. It's novel, having a cast of middle-aged blue collar types, none of them photogenic, all of them over 40. Brad Dourif is a lot of fun, and so is the bizarre Russia-by-way-of-New-England human bad guy, who pretty much walks away with the film. It's got a lot of violence, and some really terrible storytelling. Even though I haven't seen it in 27 years, it turns out I've got a bit of nostalgia for it (I remember convincing my mother to take me to it, which she regretted immensely). Surprisingly, the most fun I've had with a movie this week.

 

FLATLINERS - About as bad as the original, a film I can't begin to understand people's fondness for. I'll grant it one plot twist I didn't see coming (which also managed to make the film considerably worse afterwards), but otherwise, I can't give this any credit. It's just some dumb Flatliners movie. Ellen Page is so shamefully above material like this that it's almost sad to watch. My MoviePass card is teaching me that even if a movie doesn't cost any money, it's still not free. Its currency is the time you spend watching it, and as much as I enjoy the cinema, maybe don't go see Flatliners remakes. Still, better than Axe Murders of Vilisca. But not Friend Request.

 

In Order of Enjoyment:

 

1. Graveyard Shift

2. Cujo

3. Friend Request

4. Flatliners

5. The Axe Murders of Vilisca

post #1014 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacob Singer View Post
 

You folks should maybe include if these movies are available and where. Night of the Demon, for instance, can be found on Amazon Prime.


That's a good idea.

 

WE GO ON I rented on iTunes.  THE LIMEHOUSE GOLEM and LEATHERFACE I watched at a friend's place; LEATHERFACE is streaming via DirecTV, while LIMEHOUSE we watched via a physical copy he brought back from a trip to the UK.  I don't believe it's available in the the States yet.

 

ETA: Just checked, and LIMEHOUSE is on iTunes, as well.

post #1015 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacob Singer View Post

You folks should maybe include if these movies are available and where. Night of the Demon, for instance, can be found on Amazon Prime.
Belko was a rental from the library. It helps when your wife buys and receives all library material. Candyman and Eden Lake are both streaming from the Starz app. A Dark Song is on Netflix. I just subscribed to Shudder, which is five bucks a month. I would recommend it for the month of October and the Horror challenge. Also Shudder has Noroi: The Curse, which by itself is worth five dollars.
post #1016 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post

 

GRAVEYARD SHIFT - Underrated. Certainly not a great movie or anything, or even a good one, but as far as movies about textile mills full of rats that sort of worship a giant bat? It's not bad at all. It's novel, having a cast of middle-aged blue collar types, none of them photogenic, all of them over 40. Brad Dourif is a lot of fun, and so is the bizarre Russia-by-way-of-New-England human bad guy, who pretty much walks away with the film. It's got a lot of violence, and some really terrible storytelling. Even though I haven't seen it in 27 years, it turns out I've got a bit of nostalgia for it (I remember convincing my mother to take me to it, which she regretted immensely). Surprisingly, the most fun I've had with a movie this week.

It's been a long time since I revisited this.  It's part of a box set I own, alongside THE DEAD ZONE, SILVER BULLET, and PET SEMATARY, so this might be one I'll have to give a spin this season.

post #1017 of 1824

Amazon Prime for Cujo and Graveyard Shift, Netflix for Axe Murders, and the Kaufman Astoria 14 for everything else.

 

5 a month for Shudder is compelling. May do so.

post #1018 of 1824

GERALD'S GAME - I read Gerald's Game as a kid and it was one of the books that ended my love affair with Stephen King. Still I was hopeful that this adaptation would at the very least be decent thanks to the talent amassed both behind and in front of the camera. I wasn't wrong on that count. Mike Flanagan has taken King's painful prose and translated it into a tense, nasty thriller anchored by a phenomenal Carla Gugino (with an equally good supporting turn by Bruce Greenwood). It maybe should've ended five minutes before it does but this is one of those cases where a weak ending couldn't dampen my enthusiasm for the finished film.

 

In order of enjoyment:

 

1. Gerald's Game

post #1019 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evi View Post
 

GERALD'S GAME - I read Gerald's Game as a kid and it was one of the books that ended my love affair with Stephen King. Still I was hopeful that this adaptation would at the very least be decent thanks to the talent amassed both behind and in front of the camera. I wasn't wrong on that count. Mike Flanagan has taken King's painful prose and translated it into a tense, nasty thriller anchored by a phenomenal Carla Gugino (with an equally good supporting turn by Bruce Greenwood). It maybe should've ended five minutes before it does but this is one of those cases where a weak ending couldn't dampen my enthusiasm for the finished film.

 

Saw this last night as well, and as someone who didn't read the book, I found that epilogue to be pretty terrible. I really liked the rest, however.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacob Singer View Post
 

You folks should maybe include if these movies are available and where. Night of the Demon, for instance, can be found on Amazon Prime.

Good call. I found Asylum and The Incubus on Amazon Prime.

 

My list in order of preference:

1. Gerald's Game (2017 - Netflix)

2. Asylum (1972 - Amazon Prime)

3. Incubus (1982 - Amazon Prime)

post #1020 of 1824

4. Fiend Without A Face (1958 - watched on Filmstruck, available on Dailymotion here)

 


Even at only 74 minutes, this was surprisingly dull until the climax, although I really loved the sound design of the invisible monsters, and the faceless fiends look pretty damn cool once they finally show up, especially for a movie from 60 years ago. It's too bad the characters are so forgettable, save for the British scientist who provides the necessary exposition.

 

My list in order of preference:

1. Gerald's Game (2017 - Netflix)

2. Fiend Without A Face (1958 - Filmstruck, Dailymotion)

3. Asylum (1972 - Amazon Prime)

4. Incubus (1982 - Amazon Prime)

post #1021 of 1824

MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM (1933)

 

The first attempt at the ‘House of Wax’ story, this one is an early chiller from Warner Bros. and the great Michael Curtiz.  The film employs the Two-Strip Technicolor process, which results in a unique, semi-desaturated, semi-pastel look.  Vincent Price’s HOUSE OF WAX from 1953 is the more polished effort, but this movie is, in many ways, the weirdest version, with Lionel Atwill’s deformity a truly ghastly sight that the movie doesn’t shy away from showing off.  Atwill also delivers a terrific performance; the scene when Fay Wray (who was having a great year in 1933) “unmasks” him results in a brief moment of subtle, nonverbal acting from Atwill that is actually kind of touching.  Some parts of the movie don’t work (there’s a subplot involving a spunky, fast-talking newspaper gal that feels like it would belong more in something like HIS GIRL FRIDAY, and for a short film it’s awkwardly paced), but the cinematography and production design are terrific, and everything with Atwill is gold.

 

Availability: Turner Classic Movies / Presented as a second feature on various HOUSE OF WAX Blu and DVD releases.

 

Ranking - In Order of Enjoyment

    1.    WE GO ON (2016)
    2.    THE LIMEHOUSE GOLEM (2017)
    3.    MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM (1933)
    4.    HELLO MARY LOU: PROM NIGHT II (1987)
    5.    THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1960)
    6.    NIGHT OF THE DEMON (1980)
    7.    LEATHERFACE (2017)

post #1022 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post
 

 

GRAVEYARD SHIFT - Underrated. Certainly not a great movie or anything, or even a good one, but as far as movies about textile mills full of rats that sort of worship a giant bat? It's not bad at all. It's novel, having a cast of middle-aged blue collar types, none of them photogenic, all of them over 40. Brad Dourif is a lot of fun, and so is the bizarre Russia-by-way-of-New-England human bad guy, who pretty much walks away with the film. It's got a lot of violence, and some really terrible storytelling. Even though I haven't seen it in 27 years, it turns out I've got a bit of nostalgia for it (I remember convincing my mother to take me to it, which she regretted immensely). Surprisingly, the most fun I've had with a movie this week.

 

 

 

The genius of Lex G.: "Stephen King's Graveyard Shift HAHA SHOW'S OVAAAAA! Can't believe MACHT in this isn't a huger cult item of Campbell/Atkins proportions"   "Some part in THE SHIFT where Macht goes "we gotta get you that AUDITION ON STAAAAAAH SEARCH!" is super funny."   "GRAVEYARD SHIFT is an AWFUL movie but its scuzziness makes you actually feel like you need a tetanus shot just watching it."

 

 "GABRIEL MACHT should have one and only one career goal: A spinoff movie fleshing out his dad's AWESOME character from GRAVEYARD SHIFT" "GRAVEYARD SHIFT FACE THE SHIFT SHOOOOW'S OVAHHHHH! CAAAAN'T BE MORE THAN AN INSTANT ENEMA BY NOW HAHAHA MACHT OWNAGE" "Some part in THE SHIFT where Macht goes "GOTTA GET YOU THAT AUDITION ON STAAAAAAR SEARCH!" Laughed about this for 15yrs at one point"

 

I never gave THE SHIFT a chance back in the day because it looked so rent, but it's been one of my favorite discoveries of the decade. So fun!

 

And you absolutely know in his heart of hearts our Uncle Stevie thinks this is a better movie than THE SHINING!

post #1023 of 1824

Kicked off my own October with a run of Stephen King flicks:

 

1. THE SHINING - the GOAT. Masterfully directed, of course, with 3 brilliant central performances all in perfect harmony with tone. At the moment I'm thinking Danny Lloyd's is the one to most savor. As pitch perfect and unnerving a child performance as we've ever gotten. As essential as Linda Blair in THE EXORCIST.

 

2. GERALD'S GAME - Jacob Knight called this the quintessential King adaption. That's really overselling it. There's a flatness to it.; a TV movie feel, overcome only by jaw-droppingly terrific Carla Gugino.

 

3. SLEEPWALKERS - not counting LAWNMOWER MAN which King sued to have his name taken off, I always considered this the nadir. However, a fresh look revealed a film that while still a mess is not one without its charms. From a screenplay by King,  if it had any directorial flourishes at all, and creature fx that weren't a total disaster, it might've come off as minor SILVER BULLET-esque  fun camp.

 

 

post #1024 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

 

The genius of Lex G.

 

The Last Horror Film (1982, Amazon Prime)

 

 

This was a pleasant surprise! Originally called "Fanatic" (and still called that in the opening credits), Joe Spinnell stalks Caroline Munro at the Cannes Film Festival. It's an excuse to shoot a ton of B-roll in crowds, and capturing movie stars who walk by the camera, which adds to the illusion of a budget. Even for a Troma film, there's a remarkable amount of nudity, but the filmmaking is maybe the most competent I've seen from something they produced (not the highest compliment, but still). Spinnell was never sweatier, the soundtrack is chockful of 80s songs which never stood a chance of becoming hits, and one character's hair reminded me of Ric Flair. Also, the final moment made me do a spit take. I liked this!

 

My list in order of preference:

1. Gerald's Game (2017 - Netflix)

2. The Last Horror Film (1982, Amazon Prime)

3. Fiend Without A Face (1958 - Filmstruck, Dailymotion)

4. Asylum (1972 - Amazon Prime)

5. Incubus (1982 - Amazon Prime)

post #1025 of 1824

While I'm not going to make it part of my list, I suggest everyone catch up with this season of CHANNEL ZERO. The story itself is a mixed bag of horror tropes, but that's made up for by the spooky atmosphere and some truly chilling Hannibal-esque imagery. There's also a couple of great performances courtesy of some talented younger actors (it's not often that I find horror teens to be likeable) and a creepy-as-fuck John Carrol Lynch proving as he did with Zodiac and Carnivale that he's in his element when injecting a disquieting air of malevolence into a veneer of affability.

post #1026 of 1824
I co-sign Channel Zero. Great Horror.
post #1027 of 1824
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

 

Spinnell was never sweatier

That's really saying something!

post #1028 of 1824


mother!

I really have no words at the moment. There is a lot to unpack.

1: mother!
2: A Dark Song
3: Candyman
4: The Belko Experiment
5: Eden Lake
post #1029 of 1824

Tonight I watched THE RESURRECTED (1991) based on The Case of Charles Dexter Ward by HP Lovecraft. An ornery detective is hired to investigate strange occurrences and is sucked into the world of the occult... Detective Noir meets Lovecraft with shades of Cast A Deadly Spell? This one should've been right up my alley. Unfortunately apart from some gore and a few nifty creature effects reminiscent of The Thing, this one doesn't really work. It's a bit predictable and frankly kind of boring. Can't recommend it unless you're a Lovecraft completist.

 

 

 

 

In order of enjoyment:

 

1. Gerald's Game

2. The Resurrected

post #1030 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dalyn View Post



mother!

I really have no words at the moment. There is a lot to unpack.

1: mother!
2: A Dark Song
3: Candyman
4: The Belko Experiment
5: Eden Lake


I'd classify it more as genre-adjacent than full-on genre, but the same could be said for my LIMEHOUSE GOLEM entry.

 

I didn't like the film as much as you seemingly did (Better than CANDYMAN?  No way!), but you're right that there's a lot to unpack and it's a potentially rich movie to discuss.

post #1031 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post


I'd classify it more as genre-adjacent than full-on genre, but the same could be said for my LIMEHOUSE GOLEM entry.

I didn't like the film as much as you seemingly did (Better than CANDYMAN?  No way!), but you're right that there's a lot to unpack and it's a potentially rich movie to discuss.
And your probably right. This probably doesn't necessarily qualify as a horror film. Not in the way that Black Swan would qualify.
post #1032 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dalyn View Post


And your probably right. This probably doesn't necessarily qualify as a horror film. Not in the way that Black Swan would qualify.


Right.  BLACK SWAN fully functions as a genre piece with art-house leanings.  MOTHER! is just the art-house leanings.

post #1033 of 1824
Well I have another one lined up for tonight to take mother!'s place.
post #1034 of 1824
Eh, you can keep it. It's fine! All up to you.
post #1035 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dalyn View Post

Well I have another one lined up for tonight to take mother!'s place.


Keep it.  We don't have to be that strict!

post #1036 of 1824

Oh hey look guess what it's STILL SEPTEMBER YOU ABSOLUTE FUCKERS!

post #1037 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeman View Post
 

Oh hey look guess what it's STILL SEPTEMBER YOU ABSOLUTE FUCKERS!

 

you have my sword

 

i'm trying to decide between DON'T LOOK NOW and NIGHT OF THE DEMON for my first.

post #1038 of 1824

In my opinion start with Don't Look Now.  Night of the Demon is, well it's funny.  But maybe ha ha oh wow so bad funny is not the right note to start SPOOKTOBER on.  

post #1039 of 1824
post #1040 of 1824
This year, I'm going to watch (for the most part), movies I either haven't seen or have no memory of. Today I started with "Street Trash," the most handsomely-shot melt movie ever made. I think it runs a little long for a grindhouse movie (the middle section is almost an entirely different movie with the same characters), but the gore is so wonderful. I wanted more melting. But who doesn't?

1) Street Trash
post #1041 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

This one: 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_of_the_Demon

Which one has the goofy tree man? 

post #1042 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeman View Post
 

Oh hey look guess what it's STILL SEPTEMBER YOU ABSOLUTE FUCKERS!

Oh hey look guess what WE STILL DON'T CARE!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

This one: 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_of_the_Demon

Also known as CURSE OF THE DEMON.  Really solid little film, and a surprisingly strong companion piece to Sam Raimi's DRAG ME TO HELL.

post #1043 of 1824

What the FUCK is the movie called I'm thinking of?  With the laughable tree man demon suit?

post #1044 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeman View Post
 

What the FUCK is the movie called I'm thinking of?  With the laughable tree man demon suit?


FROM HELL IT CAME

 

post #1045 of 1824

That's the one!!!

post #1046 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post


FROM HELL IT CAME



Freeman's prom photo.
post #1047 of 1824

The jokes on you, I went stag!

post #1048 of 1824


Susan Tyrrell = GOAT
And if you don’t know, now you know, motherfuckers.

1: Night Warning
2: A Daek Song
3: Candyman
4: The Belko Experiment
5: Eden Lake
post #1049 of 1824

PROJECT: METALBEAST (1995)

 

A staple of my VHS childhood.  It’s total nonsense, but walks the fine line between taking its (silly but kind of cool) premise seriously and having some fun with the inherent cheesiness.  The movie has it all: secret military operations to extract werewolf blood, scientific experimentation gone awry, unscrupulous and weaselly government bureaucrats (hi, Barry Bostwick), a high tech research facility that is mostly just one lab and a couple of hallways redressed to look like many, a werewolf that acts like a slasher villain who stalks his (surprisingly likable) victims, bulletproof skin, monster vision, and some actually decent creature effects with Kane Hodder as the titular Metalbeast!  It also has a grand, orchestral score by Conrad Pope that is way better than the movie deserves.

 

Availability: I’m not sure it ever got an official DVD release, and I was relegated to my VHS copy.

 

Ranking - In Order of Enjoyment

    1.    WE GO ON (2016)
    2.    THE LIMEHOUSE GOLEM (2017)
    3.    MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM (1933)
    4.    HELLO MARY LOU: PROM NIGHT II (1987)
    5.    THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1960)
    6.    PROJECT: METALBEAST (1995)
    7.    NIGHT OF THE DEMON (1980)
    8.    LEATHERFACE (2017)

post #1050 of 1824

The Thing (1982 - Shout Factory Blu-Ray, which looks awesome)

 

It's The Thing. It's amazing.

 

My list in order of preference:

1. The Thing (1982 - Blu-Ray)

2. Gerald's Game (2017 - Netflix)

3. The Last Horror Film (1982, Amazon Prime)

4. Fiend Without A Face (1958 - Filmstruck, Dailymotion)

5. Asylum (1972 - Amazon Prime)

6. Incubus (1982 - Amazon Prime)

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