CHUD.com Community › Forums › THE MAIN SEWER › Movie Miscellany › October Horror Movie Challenge
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

October Horror Movie Challenge - Page 25

post #1201 of 1824

So turns  out THE HOST is still fantastic. I remember seeing footage from a sequel a couple of years back but since then nothing. Shame because I wouldn't have minded seeing the mythology expanded a little bit.

 

 

 

 

In order of enjoyment:

 

1. Gerald's Game

2. The Host

3. Cult of Chucky

4. The Resurrected

post #1202 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

"Frankenstein Unbound" is a weird one. John Hurt is a scientist in 2031 whose particle beam experiment creates some sort of temporal anomaly that sends him (and his talking car) back to 1817, where he meets Victor Frankenstein, played by Raul Julia. They become fast frenemies, and when you're beginning to wonder if this is PG, the Monster rips someone's heart out.

Oh, and it was directed by Roger Corman. Unreal.

1) Street Trash
2) Nightmare City
3) Frankenstein Unbound
4) Victor Crowley


Man, I haven't thought about "Frankenstein Unbound" in ages. Pretty avant garde for a Corman movie if I remember. It had Michael Hutchence playing Percy Shelley. That was weird.
post #1203 of 1824
I was reading about it in an old Fangoria and was like, "How did I miss this?"
post #1204 of 1824

Decided to watch "Gerald's Game". Made it about 20 minutes then bailed, was not impressed.

 

Followed that up with "XX", not really any better, but I can sit through horror vignettes anyday. The second story wasn't even horror, totally ripped off. Couldn't remember what I saw the actress from, then remembered it's the women obsessed with Charlie Sheen on 2 and a Half Men!

 

Watched "Pod" too. Worst of the bunch, creature was kinda cool looking but you can get that by simply hovering over the film on Netflix. Too much family drama, we all know he really has a monster in the basement don't drag out your poorly acted family drama.

 

1- Night of The Demons

2- Street Trash

3- XX

4- Gerald's Game

5- Pod

post #1205 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

I was reading about it in an old Fangoria and was like, "How did I miss this?"

There was going to be a "Dracula Unbound" too, I think, but this one did shit for business-- no surprise. I actually saw it in the theater (first movie I saw with a real live girlfriend, it happens) because it got covered pretty heavily on MTV's "The Big Picture". I bought Fango regularly back then so I probably saw it covered there too.
post #1206 of 1824
It's a tough sell on an audience because it's not quite sure what kind of movie it wants to be. Buchanan spends forever trying to save the girl accused of witchcraft, then he has an affair with Mary Shelley. Whut? I wanted more Frankenstein shenanigans.
post #1207 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munson View Post

Decided to watch "Gerald's Game". Made it about 20 minutes then bailed, was not impressed.

Followed that up with "XX", not really any better, but I can sit through horror vignettes anyday. The second story wasn't even horror, totally ripped off. Couldn't remember what I saw the actress from, then remembered it's the women obsessed with Charlie Sheen on 2 and a Half Men!

Watched "Pod" too. Worst of the bunch, creature was kinda cool looking but you can get that by simply hovering over the film on Netflix. Too much family drama, we all know he really has a monster in the basement don't drag out your poorly acted family drama.

1- Night of The Demons
2- Street Trash
3- XX
4- Gerald's Game
5- Pod

I'm going to call shenanigans you adding Gerald's Game to the list if you only watched 20 minutes.
post #1208 of 1824

It was mostly a dig at how shitty Pod was. I plan to finish it tonight or tomorrow.

post #1209 of 1824
I really don't know why I said anything. It's not like I care about rules. It was probably more that I thought you should give Gerald's Game more than 20 minutes. But really if you don't like it, you don't like it. It's not going to be everyone's bag of bones.
post #1210 of 1824

 

CULT OF CHUCKY - I kind of went back and forth on this, it's got a saggy middle but a fun third act. Definitely preferred Curse, but this is at least pretty nuts. I think the script was actually pretty fun, but the execution was lacking a lot of the time. Fiona Dourif was a great hire though, and between her and Tilly and Mancini, the whole thing feels charming, like a true family-run cheapo horror franchise. But I thought the asylum was pretty lackluster as a setting, and for an entry that's aiming for funny, it certainly could have been funnier. Better than Seed and CP3, but that's all I got for it.

 

NOSFERATU - I have to admit, I'm not crazy about Nosferatu. I don't find it creepy, not even Shreck, I can only really get into it as a historical appreciation kind of thing. I can be like, 'Oh, that's a innovative shot, and ah, that bit where he just pops out of a coffin is still moody, and stuff like that, but it doesn't engage me as a narrative at all. The expressive performances are just so theatrical. So I'm kind of a philistine, I think, and much like The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari last year, I'm afraid I'm just don't get much out of silent era horror. The overbearing organ attached to the soundtrack didn't help. I expect seeing it in a theater with live music would be aces.

 

In Order of Enjoyment

 

1. High Plains Drifter

2. Gerald's Game

3. Re-Animator

4. Nosferatu

5. Graveyard Shift

6. Cujo

7. Cult of Chucky

8. 47 Meters Down

9. Friend Request

10. Mercy

11. Flatliners

12. The Axe Murders of Vilisca

post #1211 of 1824
I've got a real hankering now to rewatch "Frankenstein Unbound" and see how it plays, but it doesn't seem to be streaming anywhere. I'm so spoiled by our culture of instant access that these things bother me more than they should.

So tonight on TCM:




I remember surprisingly little about Universal's monster team-up movies-- the first, and now probably only, Dark Universe. It's pretty fun, turns out.

Some nice pseudoscientific explanation for vampirism and lycanthropy that wouldn't be out of place in a Bronze Age Marvel comic. John Carradine actually makes for a cool Dracula-- he starts off looking for a cure for his condition, then basically says "fuck it" halfway through so he can get a blonde nurse to renounce God and be his bride.

Also halfway through the guy who's been more or less the hero turns super evil. Then you're left with Lon Chaney Jr. as cured Wolf Man Larry Talbot to fill the hero role and be extremely boring. Then Frankenstein's monster shows up for like two seconds. The end.

It also has the world's hottest hunchback.

1. Bride of Frankenstein
2. Dracula ('31)
3. Gerald's Game
4. Inferno
5. House of Dracula
6. What Have You Done to Solange?
7. Lights Out
8. Whistle and I'll Come to You ('10)
9. Curse of the Crimson Altar
10. Dracula's Daughter
11. Slumber Party Massacre
post #1212 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slim View Post

So tonight on TCM:



I remember surprisingly little about Universal's monster team-up movies-- the first, and now probably only, Dark Universe. It's pretty fun, turns out.

Some nice pseudoscientific explanation for vampirism and lycanthropy that wouldn't be out of place in a Bronze Age Marvel comic. John Carradine actually makes for a cool Dracula-- he starts off looking for a cure for his condition, then basically says "fuck it" halfway through so he can get a blonde nurse to renounce God and be his bride.

Also halfway through the guy who's been more or less the hero turns super evil. Then you're left with Lon Chaney Jr. as cured Wolf Man Larry Talbot to fill the hero role and be extremely boring. Then Frankenstein's monster shows up for like two seconds. The end.

It also has the world's hottest hunchback.

I tend to prefer HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN (because we still get Carradine's Dracula, Chaney's Wolf Man, and Strange's Frankenstein Monster PLUS Boris Karloff as a criminal mad scientist), but this is still a fun one.  It's got a weird narrative structure that I like, and the way it switches its focus to and from certain characters is interesting.  Needs more Frankenstein Monster, though.

post #1213 of 1824

I played catch-up this weekend, thanks to a 24-horror movie marathon I attended.  The rundown is in the horror thread.  In the meantime, here's my updated list:

 

1. In the Mouth of Madness (1995)

2. Land of the Dead (2005) - a nice surprise; I didn't like this film as much on the first try years ago

3. The Monster Squad (1987)

4. The Cat and the Canary (1927) - first time with this one; nice direction

5. Dark Waters (1993) - first time with this one as well; maybe the most beautifully shot horror film of the 90s

6. The Craft (1996)

7. The Manitou (1977) - a terrible film, of course, but it's so much fun with an audience

8. Tales from the Hood (1995)

9. Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare (1991) - with 3D ending!

10. "The Facts in the Case of Mr. Valdemar" (1990) - Romero's short from Two Evil Eyes

11. Cult of Chucky (2017)

 

I'm not including films I sort of slept through because that feels like cheating, but I was lucky to see 35mm prints of The FunhouseHellraiser and Ginger Snaps as well.  I completely slept though Rare Exports: A Christmas Tale, but a person has to sleep some time.

post #1214 of 1824

1 The 'Burbs

2-10 Puppet Masters 1-9

10 Castle Freak

11 lights out

12 The Descent: Original Cut

13 Don't Kill It

14 Cube

15 Gerald's Game

16 Cult of Chucky <- Dang, not that great until the third act, and then it just ends. The knock-off Cronenberg doc sort of rubbed me the wrong way. But holy shit does Fiona have her dad's laugh down.

post #1215 of 1824
Thread Starter 

So far, just to keep track 

 

1. Dracula (1931) - What an opening! But the rest is dull as dishwater, sans Renfield. 

2. Drag Me To Hell - Still my favorite horror movie from the 2000's. 

3. Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 - Can't appreciate this one QUITE like I used to. It's just too obnoxious.

4. Demons 2 - Saw the original about 10 years ago. This...didn't live up to my memories of that one. But weird demon kid was a plus! (The Hulu Shudder app is kind of a pain in the ass.)

 

I miss not working full-time. 

post #1216 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarence Boddicker View Post

The Hulu Shudder app is kind of a pain in the ass.

Had no idea Shudder was also available through Hulu. Or did you mean the Prime Shudder app?
post #1217 of 1824
Do you guys think Fiona Dourif and Brad Dourif are related?

1) Street Trash
2) Nightmare City
3) Frankenstein Unbound
4) Cult of Chucky
5) Victor Crowley
post #1218 of 1824

I skimped out a bit on the weekend. Got busy with other stuff. But tonight we return to our regularly scheduled programming.

 

Day 4: In Memoriam

 

 

I'd forgotten just how fucking well made this movie is. Not an ounce of fat on it. And few horror movie deaths in my mind hit with such simple and brutal efficiency. You really feel them. And Leatherface is SUCH a great monster. All shambling and squealing and feeling both human and decidedly not. Fuck I love this movie. 

 

My list (in order of enjoyment):

 

1) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

2) It Follows

3) Alien 3

4) Hostel Part III

post #1219 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Codename View Post

 

 

I'd forgotten just how fucking well made this movie is. Not an ounce of fat on it. And few horror movie deaths in my mind hit with such simple and brutal efficiency. You really feel them. And Leatherface is SUCH a great monster. All shambling and squealing and feeling both human and decidedly not. Fuck I love this movie. 

It really is the best.

post #1220 of 1824
I watched Bob Balaban's "Parents," and there's a good reason why Bob Balaban's not highly regarded as a horror film director. It's basically an hour and 20 minutes of a movie trying to find its tone. I'll admit, I was drunk and had company, and we were yakking the whole time, so I didn't give it my undivided attention. But it felt like a missed opportunity. I kept yelling, "Cannibalism," at the screen. I do that with most movies.

1) Street Trash
2) Nightmare City
3) Frankenstein Unbound
4) Cult of Chucky
5) Victor Crowley
6) Parents
post #1221 of 1824

Heh. You were yelling "Eat People!" I believe.

post #1222 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

I'll admit, I was drunk and had company, and we were yakking the whole time

I thought this said yanking the first time I read it, and was immediately thankful Brad didn't like me well enough to invite me over.

post #1223 of 1824

Spent the weekend at the in-laws but the kiddos are making up for it with a double feature.

 

 

 

 

 

They preferred the playfulness of Frankenstein's character in BoF, especially the scenes with the blind old man. "I wish there was a whole movie of them hanging out."

 

October Rankings:

 

1. The Invisible Man (they watched it again and have fallen in love with it)

2. Cat's Eye

3. The Bride of Frankenstein

4. The Lost Boys

5. Frankenstein

6. Army of Darkness

7. Dracula

post #1224 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by smugbug View Post

Heh. You were yelling "Eat People!" I believe.

I provide scintillating commentary.
post #1225 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post


I provide scintillating commentary.


Sure.  I know it added to the richness of the film watching experience; especially to that of Randy Quaid's captivating performance in this.  

post #1226 of 1824
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

 

1. THE SHINING - the GOAT. Masterfully directed, of course, with 3 brilliant central performances all in perfect harmony with tone. At the moment I'm thinking Danny Lloyd's is the one to most savor. As pitch perfect and unnerving a child performance as we've ever gotten. As essential as Linda Blair in THE EXORCIST.

 

2. GERALD'S GAME - Jacob Knight called this the quintessential King adaption. That's really overselling it. There's a flatness to it.; a TV movie feel, overcome only by jaw-droppingly terrific Carla Gugino.

 

3. SLEEPWALKERS - not counting LAWNMOWER MAN which King sued to have his name taken off, I always considered this the nadir. However, a fresh look revealed a film that while still a mess is not one without its charms. From a screenplay by King,  if it had any directorial flourishes at all, and creature fx that weren't a total disaster, it might've come off as minor SILVER BULLET-esque  fun camp.

 

4. BODY DOUBLE - the MOST De Palma. Brief scene with Barbara Crampton perhaps most devastating moment in all De Palma canon. The look she gives Wasson ....a soul crusher

 

5. I MARRIED A WITCH -  I Loooove this movie so much. goddess Veronica!

 

6. NEEDFUL THINGS -  adaptation of first King book to disappoint/ bore me doesn't  quite work as a movie either, but omg Ed Harris is all in, and sells the climatic speech making it a great scene

 

7. STAGEFRIGHT ('87) -  Michele Soavi's Neo-Giallo Slasher is one I love a little more each time

 

8. POPCORN -  a fun goof; kind of BAD DREAMS meets MATINEE

 

9. DEMONS -  up with NIGHTMARE CITY as my most revisited 80's Italian Horror and maybe the most inspired NOTLD riff.

 

Tony is a racist caricature, yet still kind of awesomely badass thanks to Bobby Rhodes' swagger.

 

Image result for Demons 1985 Tony

 

Line To Savor:

 

Image result for Demons 1985 Tony

 

10. ANGUISH - I hadn't seen this since 1990. Near dawn after a house party with just a few of us left , a girl put it on. The only thing I remembered was the sight of creepy Michael Lerner slurping bananas in milk made me nauseous.  It's actually way more wild than I recalled. Once it reveals itself as a film within a film, it pulls no punches.

post #1227 of 1824

Night 9:

Wes' most underrated flick.  Damn, I miss this man.

post #1228 of 1824


April Fool's Day (DVD)

Always loved this flick. Saw this in the theater when I was a kid and it was probably the first time I was ever Shyamalanned. And come on, Any Steel. What's not to love?

1. The Fog
2. April Fool's Day
3. Gerald's Game
4. Society
5. Tucker and Dale
6. The Blob '88
7. Monster House
8. The Blackwell Ghost
post #1229 of 1824

Had a late start due to a vacation to NYC but am ready to devour some horror movies.

 

1. Cult of Chucky- If you are still into any horror movie series by the seventh entry, then you are probably in for the eventual end. Reviews online called this the Fast Five of horror movies in how they are bringing back all of the various elements and actors of the different sequels. There is apparently an after credit stinger on the DVD, but not Netlifx, that furthers this. If the sequel brings back Chris Sarandon, Catherine Hicks, and whoever Sarandon's partner was in the original to form a antio-killer doll squad then I am all in. 

 

2. Hush- An amazing surprise on Netlfix. A great home invasion flick with one of the better "fuck yeah" moments of horror victims fighting back.  

post #1230 of 1824

 

It's been a Stephen King year, and I just watched three huge ones. There was a double feature of Dead Zone and Pet Semetary in NY theaters tonight, and I was able to make it happen.

 

THE MIST - This I watched last night, and it's become a movie I've seen quite a few times by now. One of my better DVD purchases, to be sure, especially with the superior B&W version. I usually don't think these pan out too well - most movies use color now for mood, rather than shadows, like the recent Logan B&W - but this one really benefits from an old timey Twilight Zone vibe. The actors are all pitched just a bit higher than usual, and that theatrical tone is complimented by the B&W presentation. Improves the CGI too, although there's not much helping those tentacles. Thomas Jane is really great in this, and as usual, Darabont captures the King essence terrifically. I wouldn't say I've soured on the ending, but I'm no longer convinced it's perfect. It's just too mean, in a way that isn't especially scary. Still, I take it as part and parcel with the film at this point. When it comes to crazy monsters showing up and ruining everyone's day, this is one of the best.

 

THE DEAD ZONE - Weird how this has gone from a film that didn't hold much interest for me to one of the best King adaptations, and a film that resonates dramatically more now, as an adult. Who would have thought Christopher Walken would be absolutely perfect as an everyman? This film, probably more than any other, finds the sweet spot between King's ability to create great human drama and relatable horror, likely now more than ever, what with the unmistakable Trump stand-in. But also because of the way it tallies human loss, of the sort that everyone can identify with. Everything about it is deeply moving, and graceful, and human. I wasn't quite prepared for how hard the ending worked for me, and I'm more and more convinced it's one of King and Cronenberg's best works, in large part because of the restraint. Better now than it's ever been.

 

PET SEMETARY - Such a great, nasty little fable, it struck me for the first time that it's really just an extrapolation of the Monkey's Paw story, heightened for maximum squirminess. This is a better movie than its reputation. I think the reason, and the film's enormous, fatal flaw, is that the lead, Dale Midkiff, is just flat out terrible. It's a difficult role, and he's just nowhere near up to it. Imaging a great actor, someone who could create empathy and understanding for this character, who is absolutely put through the wringer, would improve this movie dramatically, and raise it to the upper echelons of King adaptation. Getting a real actor, a Harrison Ford or a Kevin Costner, or even just someone as competent as a Tim Daly, and you're off to the races here. Instead, just over-emoted moans, pratfalls, prickliness, and a real struggle with King's (admittedly tin-eared) dialogue. On the opposite side of the spectrum is Fred Gwynne, doing career best work and easily the best version of that King mainstay, the New England old timer. He's fantastic. Plus the Zelda scenes. And my weird Tasha Yar crush. And how fucking young that little kid murderer is. Missed chance at greatness, but it's still pretty damn fun, especially in theaters. Even Midkiff's shittiness has its pleasures.

 

In Order of Enjoyment

 

1. The Dead Zone

2. High Plains Drifter

3. Gerald's Game

4. The Mist

5. Re-Animator

6. Pet Semetary

7. Nosferatu

8. Graveyard Shift

9. Cujo

10. Cult of Chucky

11. 47 Meters Down

12. Friend Request

13. Mercy

14. Flatliners

15. The Axe Murders of Vilisca

post #1231 of 1824
Whoa, "Tetsuo: The Iron Man" is the dopest music video ever. It's just wall-to-wall nightmare imagery.

1) Tetsuo: The Iron Man
2) Street Trash
3) Nightmare City
4) Cult of Chucky
5) Victor Crowley
6) Parents
post #1232 of 1824

11. AND SOON THE DARKNESS (original) -  very European rural paranoia thriller. I paid a good chunk of change for OOP Anchor Bay DVD, but it was worth it.  Excellent mood piece where every character is suspicious and makes you uneasy. Slowly escalates to a breathless nail biter finale.

post #1233 of 1824
Quote:
PET SEMETARY - Such a great, nasty little fable, it struck me for the first time that it's really just an extrapolation of the Monkey's Paw story, heightened for maximum squirminess. This is a better movie than its reputation. I think the reason, and the film's enormous, fatal flaw, is that the lead, Dale Midkiff, is just flat out terrible. It's a difficult role, and he's just nowhere near up to it. Imaging a great actor, someone who could create empathy and understanding for this character, who is absolutely put through the wringer, would improve this movie dramatically, and raise it to the upper echelons of King adaptation. Getting a real actor, a Harrison Ford or a Kevin Costner, or even just someone as competent as a Tim Daly, and you're off to the races here. Instead, just over-emoted moans, pratfalls, prickliness, and a real struggle with King's (admittedly tin-eared) dialogue. On the opposite side of the spectrum is Fred Gwynne, doing career best work and easily the best version of that King mainstay, the New England old timer. He's fantastic. Plus the Zelda scenes. And my weird Tasha Yar crush. And how fucking young that little kid murderer is. Missed chance at greatness, but it's still pretty damn fun, especially in theaters. Even Midkiff's shittiness has its pleasures.

Agreed with all of this. Midkiff's best moment is when he's startled out of bed, rolls over and accidentally conks his head on the corner of the bedside table. Probably not good when your character's most interesting moment is a blooper. The child killer (er, child who kills) is also great. His "No fair!" after being wounded is so ... creepy/poignant?

 

The brief Gwynneaissance between this and My Cousin Vinny was a glorious time.

 

I saw this in a packed theater when it came out (jeez), and I remember everyone in the theater leaning back when Zelda walked up to the camera. That moment might be why I'm still fond of this movie.

post #1234 of 1824

1 The 'Burbs

2-10 Puppet Masters 1-9

10 Castle Freak

11 lights out

12 The Descent: Original Cut

13 Don't Kill It

14 Cube

15 Gerald's Game

16 Cult of Chucky

17 Unearthed & Untold: The Path to Pet Sematary <-documentaries count right? This was a lot more in-depth than I anticipated. It's also an interesting approach in that it interviews the residents of the town the movie was filmed in as well. I would not have been surprised to see this on a SHOUT Collector's Edition release.

post #1235 of 1824
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disciple_72 View Post


Had no idea Shudder was also available through Hulu. Or did you mean the Prime Shudder app?

 

They have their own app in the Hulu channel. They have some live streaming movies that always interrupt browsing the different categories. I'll have to try the Prime one.

post #1236 of 1824

DESPERATION 

 

For a while, it seemed like Mick Garris had made an honest-to-God real movie.  The first 45 minutes are well put together, with interesting cinematic flourishes and periods of sustained tension.  Ron Perlman is terrific as Collie Entragian (that character ended up being the only aspect of the novel that didn't completely evaporate from memory); its probably not a coincidence that once Perlman exits the film, everything grinds to a screeching halt and never gets going again.  The schmaltz that plagues Garris' version of THE STAND is here too, except DESPERATION is at an extreme disadvantage because I don't have any built-in affection for any of these characters.  

 

 

GRAVEYARD SHIFT

 

This one is junk, but sometimes its just nice to get a King adaptation that clocks in under 90 minutes.  I'm willing to give it points for all the practical creature effects.  And for Brad Dourif's weirdo exterminator.  

      

 

 

2017 RANKINGS (in order of enjoyment):

 

1. IT (2017)

2. GERALD'S GAME (2017)

3. DREAMCATCHER (2003)

4. THE STAND (1994)

5. PET SEMATARY (1989)

6. THINNER (1996)

7. DESPERATION (2006)

8. PET SEMATARY TWO (1992)

9. IT (1990)

10. GRAVEYARD SHIFT (1990)

post #1237 of 1824

Day 5: 

 

 

First time viewing.

 

You know, if there's one sub-genre of horror that really gets to me, it's the haunted house movie. I don't know why, but they just creep me the fuck out. Always have. And Jesus Christ, this one did the job perfectly. Really gave me the heebie jeebies with some legitimately great jump scares peppered throughout. You get so desensitized to this stuff so it's really fucking neat when one legitimately gets some scares out of you. Really good flick with some damn fine performances. How are the sequels? Any good?

 

My list (in order of enjoyment):

 

1) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre

2) The Conjuring

3) It Follows

4) Alien 3 

5) Hostel Part III

post #1238 of 1824

The Conjuring 2 is pretty good as well. I'm hoping to revisit it myself this month. Not breaking new ground, but similar in style and quality. 

 

The first Annabelle is complete dreck, feel free to skip it completely.

 

Annabelle: Creation was absolutely terrifying to me, but that was probably because I was on mushrooms at the time. If I had to guess though, I think it was very well done in actuality.

post #1239 of 1824

Awesome, they're going on the list. 

post #1240 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Codename View Post

You know, if there's one sub-genre of horror that really gets to me, it's the haunted house movie. I don't know why, but they just creep me the fuck out.

I wish I was a better (capable? better than shitty?) writer because that is a dream project of mine. I think most haunted house movies suck in spite of the fact that they should be so easy to make. A good haunted house movie is so rare, and I would love nothing more than to make one of the best. I dabbled in it as my final film editing project years ago. I wish I could figure out a way to put it online just so everyone here could make fun of me. Heh.

post #1241 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post

 

 

Annabelle: Creation was absolutely terrifying to me, but that was probably because I was on mushrooms at the time.

I've never done any form of hallucinogen, but if I do, I'm going to watch The Thing while they hit.

post #1242 of 1824

I would recommend no. Annabelle: Creation absolutely fucked me up, and The Thing it is not.

post #1243 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

11. AND SOON THE DARKNESS (original) -  very European rural paranoia thriller. I paid a good chunk of change for OOP Anchor Bay DVD, but it was worth it.  Excellent mood piece where every character is suspicious and makes you uneasy. Slowly escalates to a breathless nail biter finale.


12. AND SOON THE DARKNESS (Remake) - enjoyably watchable even if it botches everything that made original a classic.  Argentina locale and Amber Heard scream queen carry the show.

post #1244 of 1824

1. The Final Girls

2. Dracula - Dwight Fry's Renfield steals the show.

3. Dracula's Daughter

 

  Speaking of The Dead Zone, I've always thought that movie was a great use of Walken's weirdness. Who wouldn't be a tad off if they where in a coma for five years, lost the love of their life and could see the future.


Edited by Chaz - 10/11/17 at 9:38pm
post #1245 of 1824


Madman (streaming on Shudder)

Okay, first off, this is not a good movie. Having said that, you put a few beers in me and my wife and it becomes a pretty good movie. Though most of our jokes were at the expense of TP and Galen Ross (many frog jokes were made to our shame). Though after the high of the hot tub scene, it did kind of go down from there. Still, had a fun time watching it as always.

1. The Fog
2. April Fools Day
3. Gerald’s Game
4. Madman
5. Society
6. Tucker and Dale
7. The Blob ‘88
8. Monster House
9. The Blackwell Ghost
post #1246 of 1824

THE NIGHT STALKER (1972)

 

One of the greatest made-for-TV movies ever produced in any genre.  This is such a sharply written script (teleplay by the great Richard Matheson), underlined by a sense of realism and grounded humor which make a great contrast to the supernatural elements; similarly, the Las Vegas setting provides a unique, contemporary backdrop for what is basically a classic horror tale.  Carl Kolchak is simply a tremendous character - part Van Helsing-style monster hunter, part cynical noirish private eye (the story's resolution is right out of noir), and part wise-ass newspaper reporter, Kolchak is an everyman who’s wary of the system, but who is also compelled to find the truth and do the right thing.  Darren McGavin pitches his performance at exactly the right level, and in many ways it’s his crowning achievement.  As his foe, Janos Skorzeny is one of the great vampire villains; Barry Atwater’s hissing vocalizations and strange physicality are complimented by a stark lack of personality which makes the character deeply unsettling.  And the whole vibe of the picture has that wonderful 1970s genre TV “thing”: professionalism in terms of the craft, fun “that guy/gal” supporting faces (folks like Carol Lynley, Simon Oakland, Elisha Cook Jr., and Claude Akins show up), and a half-eerie/half-funky musical score.  I absolutely love this, just as I do its sequel - THE NIGHT STRANGLER - and the ensuing TV show.

 

Availability: A couple of out of print DVD versions, and that seems to be it.  It’s incredibly unfortunate this isn’t more widely available.  This needs a Blu-ray release yesterday.

 

Ranking - In Order of Enjoyment

    1.    DRACULA (1931)
    2.    THE WOLF MAN (1941)
    3.    BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1935)
    4.    THE NIGHT STALKER (1972)
    5.    BEETLEJUICE (1988)
    6.    GERALD’S GAME (2017)
    7.    THE FOG (1980)
    8.    HALLOWEEN III: SEASON OF THE WITCH (1982)
    9.    WE GO ON (2016)
    10.  CREEP (2014)
    11.  THE LIMEHOUSE GOLEM (2017)
    12.  MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM (1933)
    13.  DRACULA’S DAUGHTER (1936)
    14.  TWILIGHT ZONE: THE MOVIE (1983)
    15.  HELLO MARY LOU: PROM NIGHT II (1987)
    16.  SLEEPAWAY CAMP (1983)
    17.  BLAIR WITCH (2016)
    18.  THE BEAST WITHIN (1982)
    19.  THE LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS (1960)
    20.  PROJECT: METALBEAST (1995)
    21.  NIGHT OF THE DEMON (1980)
    22.  LEATHERFACE (2017)


Edited by Belloq87 - 10/10/17 at 8:32pm
post #1247 of 1824

Day 10:

It's still just an alright movie at best, but Zakes Mokae makes it worthwhile.

post #1248 of 1824

13. THE BEGUILED (original) - a psychosexual Southern Gothic Horror Story. In his prime Clint really played around with his image like few classic  movie stars ever dared. He's a charming rogue, but movie pulls no punches in that he's a lying predator creep. That's why I always say Siegel's politics weren't as reactionary as his reputation. Film is almost a feminist revenge cautionary tale.

post #1249 of 1824

I would say moreso than Coppola's Beguiled, actually, which assigns the guilt a little more evenly.

post #1250 of 1824

It's heartbreaking to know that there's an alternate timeline where Peter Weir directed THE SERPENT AND THE RAINBOW.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Movie Miscellany
CHUD.com Community › Forums › THE MAIN SEWER › Movie Miscellany › October Horror Movie Challenge