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October Horror Movie Challenge - Page 2

post #51 of 1824

I wanted to like Lords of Salem, but it just didn't work for me.  Rob Zombie as a filmmaker just doesn't work for me.  There are some gorgeous shots and some legitimately creepy stuff in here, but its all in service of a pretty boring movie.  It also doesn't help that the entire film rests on the shoulders of a non-actor in the lead role.  While I didn't think Sherri Moon was terrible, a stronger central performance might go a long way towards making this mess watchable.  Zombie knows how to shoot though, that's for sure.  Would like to see him tackle a decent script.

 

I also caught The People Under The Stairs.  Craven has never been one of my favorites, but this one is the goods.  Its weird and crazy and depraved and Everett McGill is all kinds of nuts in it.  Love the urban fairy tale vibe and there's even a strong current of social commentary running through the whole thing to boot.  Can't believe this one slipped through the cracks for so long.

 

The List, in order of enjoyment:

1. Slither (2006)

2. The People Under The Stairs (1991)

3. Lords of Salem (2013)   

post #52 of 1824

Hated Lords Of Salem. I am the horror fan who's never liked a Rob Zombie film. H2 gets closest, but it's still crap.

 

7. Byzantium

 

Neil Jordan returns to the vampire genre after a few years in the wilderness. Really wanted to like this, but didn't. It's great at capturing the ambiance of a British seaside town, but mostly hopeless with its vampire mythology. The exception is the image of

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
a newly vamp'd Gemma Arterton bathing in a waterfall of blood.

 

A great deal of time is spent on the budding relationship between Arterton's "daughter" and a local oddball. The ending is shockingly predictable and dull. A noble failure, with just enough good stuff for me to rate it generously.

 

In order of enjoyment:

 

1. Lord Of Illusions
2. No One Lives
3. Dead Silence
4. Byzantium
5. Splice
6. Donkey Punch
7. The Moth Diaries

post #53 of 1824

So Burke and Hare was a huge let-down. Amazing cast but a limp script and no stakes really bogged it down for me. When I first heard about it, I was really hoping for An American Werewolf in London-esque return to form for John Landis but alas, we didn't get that.

 

The narrator mentioning at the end that Burke and Hare really weren't nice guys didn't work for me. It felt like a last minute re-write when the filmmakers realized these cold-blooded murderers were being portrayed as likable doofuses. Isla Fisher is wasted and Pegg's "Aw schucks" romance with her rang a little false.

 

Overall, aside from the stellar cast and production design, this feels like a surprisingly small film with no real narrative drive. If you're hankering for a Landis horror-comedy, pop in An American Werewolf in London. That's a film that's never lost its zeal for me.

post #54 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike J View Post

So Burke and Hare was a huge let-down. Amazing cast but a limp script and no stakes really bogged it down for me. When I first heard about it, I was really hoping for An American Werewolf in London-esque return to form for John Landis but alas, we didn't get that.

The narrator mentioning at the end that Burke and Hare really weren't nice guys didn't work for me. It felt like a last minute re-write when the filmmakers realized these cold-blooded murderers were being portrayed as likable doofuses. Isla Fisher is wasted and Pegg's "Aw schucks" romance with her rang a little false.

Overall, aside from the stellar cast and production design, this feels like a surprisingly small film with no real narrative drive. If you're hankering for a Landis horror-comedy, pop in An American Werewolf in London. That's a film that's never lost its zeal for me.

Yeah, that film's failure to be entertaining bummed me out for a week. I thought Burke and Hare were pretty much assholes throughout though, so that aspect at least felt consistent.
post #55 of 1824
I watched "Scream 4" again. I love the first five minutes. After that, it becomes such an unfocused jumble of ideas, half-assedly remaking and resigning itself to its own tired formula.

Neve Campbell is still crazy-hot, though.
post #56 of 1824

The fact of Burke and Hare's relative invisibility strongly suggested to me it did not work out. Simon Pegg, AndySerkis, Isla Fisher and John Landis should be enough to sell a geek property right now, at least as much as, say, Curse of Chucky is getting sold. Instead, they sneak it out years after the fact with no fanfare. A real vote of no confidence.

post #57 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

I watched "Scream 4" again. I love the first five minutes. After that, it becomes such an unfocused jumble of ideas, half-assedly remaking and resigning itself to its own tired formula.

Neve Campbell is still crazy-hot, though.

Scream 4 could have worked if the original cast had been marginalized or written out altogether. The film fails to become what it set out to satirize: Remakes. With Neve Campbell, Courtney Cox and David Arquette as the main focus, it's just another sequel. I appreciate how they upped the gore factor but otherwise, it falls flat. It's not bad but it just doesn't deliver on its promise.

 

Color me mildly curious for the TV show, though.

post #58 of 1824

Watched a couple.

 

-Curse of Chucky

 

I thought it was surprisingly decent, even as I'm able to list the significant problems it had. In theory I like the back to basics approach, trying to make the character frightening again, but in practice I think too much water has gone under that particular bridge, and plus, Chucky was never actually very frightening. He was always in wisecracker in the latter day Freddy Krueger vein, and this movie is probably best served when he's in that mode. The kills are kind of weak too, and this is a series with a penchant for comic setpiece murders.

 

That said, I liked it! I'm a fan of the series, now that I reflect on them, and Brad Dourif is a real treat. Some of the best moments in this feature flashback to the Charles Lee Ray, and Dourif aces those scenes. I also thought his daughter was good in the lead role too - it's fascinating seeing a pretty lady that also looks kind of like Brad Dourif. The bitchy sister was did some fine Horror movie asshole acting, and they managed to give the creepy house a nice sense of geography and menace. It reminded me occasonally of Stuart Gordon's Dolls. Plus, it blew my mind that they actually made the continuity for the whole series work. I'm going to NY Comic Con this weekend, and I hope I make it to the Chucky panel - Dourif and Jennifer Tilly are scheduled!

 

But it was, on the whole, kind of eliminated from my mind, because I also watched

 

-Martyrs

 

Whoa, fucking hell. Now that's a grisly fuck of a movie. I knew nothing about it and threw it onto my queue based on its showing in the Horror Draft, and it certainly made an impression. Definitely falls into the "not remotely fun to watch" category of horror movies, and as I'm trying to sample all types this season, I was glad to get such a distinct entry, but ugh, what a difficult sit. I really liked Inside, which it reminded me quite a bit, but it's a far less exciting film. Not much suspense, really, just grisly act after gruesome violation. 

 

But I think once you get over the hump of the first forty five minutes or so, and the actual narrative presents itself, it becomes a much more rewarding film and the final twenty minutes, despite just being brutally ugly, actually turned it into an effective and thought-provoking film. I can't imagine ever watching it again - the Hostel films explore similar ground a much more entertaining way - but what I had originally just assumed was a cynical piece of torture masquerading as art house actually did have some cool ideas about what it was doing, and there's even a hint of Funny Games-esque audience indictment. Memorable.

 

 

1. Take Shelter

2. Martyrs

3. The Lords of Salem

4. Curse of Chucky

5. White Zombie

6. Solomon Kane

7. Eyes of the Mothman

post #59 of 1824

I also liked Curse of Chucky. The deaths weren't amazing (thought I liked the guy getting his jaw chopped off) but they used the main location well and there was no nepotism at work because Fiona Dourif was great. And while it may have been mainly fan service, the cameos that tied the entire series together worked very well and the one after the credits was particularly awesome.

post #60 of 1824
I missed the post credits bit. What was it?
post #61 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post

I missed the post credits bit. What was it?
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Chucky gets delivered to Andy Barclay (complete with goatee). While Andy is on the phone with his mother, Chucky unwraps himself with a knife and examines Andy's apartment, which includes his certificate from military school and a picture of Kyle from Part 2. When he turns back around, Andy has a gun pointed in his face. Chucky looks shocked and after Andy says "Play with this!" (or something like that), he pulls the trigger and it cuts to black.

Edited by Mike J - 10/9/13 at 7:49pm
post #62 of 1824
That's kind of fun, but doesn't it negate the end of the movie in a fundamental way? As in, it's impossible?
post #63 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post

I missed the post credits bit. What was it?

 

Sweet jesus you missed something special.

post #64 of 1824

I have so far managed to get one horror movie in a day as is the plan for the month. I have deliberatly gone for a mixture of first time views and rewatches of movies I have not seen in forever.

 

1. Stakeland. First watch. I was pleasently surprised by this. I expected some kind of I am Legend knock but to its credit the movie tries to be much deeper than its premise suggests. It did seem like it was missing "something" though that I could not put my finger on. Maybe another round with the script or a better developed villain could have elevated it further.

 

2. Critters. Rewatch. I forget these little bastards talk! "They have weapons." "So?" BANG! "Fuck!"

 

3. Cube. Rewatch. God lord I forgot how horrible the acting was with this movie. The concept is interesting but would probably work more for a short film. It fails at the slight existential themes it tries. Watch the Twilight Zone episode Four Characters in Search of an Exit for an amazing take on a similar idea. How they stretched it over 3 movies is beyond me although I didn't really hate the others either. 

 

4. Dog Soldiers. Rewatch. Aliens with werewolves basically. Far better than the vast wasteland that makes up werewolf movies but that is not difficult to achieve.

 

5. The Wolfman remake. Rewatch. Speaking of crappy werewolf movies. Ang Lee's Hulk with werewolves. Such lost potential although better than we should expect with the behind the scenes fuckups.

 

6. Dead before Dawn. First watch. Tries too hard to be funny and has a pussy ass ending. It's a shame because it has a good idea going (a demon spirit is unleashed that tries to kill the kids in the way they mocked it) but fumbles it completely.

 

7. Tremors. Rewatch. "Fuuuuck, you!!!." A classic.

 

8. The Blob 1988. Either this movies is not as gory as I remember or I have seen too many gorier horror movies since I watched this as a teen. Still love that they have the balls to kill a kid.

 

9. Hollow Man. Any invisible man story needs to be a period piece. Invisible men, sadly any old Universal monsters, would be pretty helpless against modern technology. And becoming invisible also seemingly makes you invincible as well. Jesus Bacon should have been killed at least half a dozen times. 

post #65 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post

That's kind of fun, but doesn't it negate the end of the movie in a fundamental way? As in, it's impossible?


Do you mean does it contradict the final scene with the little girl? I thought about that but I guess we're meant to think he didn't succeed with that round of "Hide the Soul".

 

Regardless, that post credits scene works like gangbusters. It didn't have that "Wait a minute..." effect on me until after it ended but I liked it so much, I just let it slide.

post #66 of 1824
Thread Starter 

7. The Shining

 

Room 237 motivated me to watch this again. Maybe I'm a weird, bitter recluse, but I always kinda related to Jack Torrance in this and envied his cool job as the caretaker of an abandoned hotel in the Rockies. I can also relate to the feeling of being trapped and resentful with life's circumstances, so the film has always been a cautionary tale on why I should never start a family. After all these years, I still fail to see why Stephen King hates this so much. Who cares if Jack Nicholson seems crazy from the get go? I've always interpreted the film as the thin line between love and loathing for one's family, and how isolation from normal society can trigger the primal and selfish impulses in human nature. Sure it doesn't live up to the MICK GARRIS masterpiece starring The Guy from Wings; it's still neck and neck with the original Dawn of the Dead as my favorite horror film.

 

Side note: I lol'd when I read Dr. Sleep's epilogue where Stephen King hails MICK GARRIS' Psycho 4 as one of the great horror sequels.

 

List so far:

1. Halloween 2
2. Creature from the Black Lagoon
3. Lords of Salem
4. V/H/S 2
5. Room 237
6. Vampire Lovers

7. The Shining

post #67 of 1824

OK, playing catchup:

 

The JUDAS BOOTH classic horror-thon continues with:

 

2. THE CABINET OF DR.CALIGARI

3. HAXAN

 

and then we settled down and watched:

4. THE SHINING

 

My wife was doing some other things, so I watched:

5.  FROM BEYOND

 

Anyways, CABINET and HAXAN are interesting efforts.  I don't enjoy them at the same level as NOSFERATU and didn't find them particularly scary, but they are good films to watch from an educational point of view.  I had never seen HAXAN before and, I'll admit, had to kinda struggle through it.  I'd seen CABINET before and it was fun to watch my wife come to terms with the surrealistic sets.

 

THE SHINING is what it is.  It's a classic.

 

FROM BEYOND is a hoot, one of the most fun horror films ever made.  If you like RE-ANIMATOR, do yourself a favor and watch this.

 

So, the grand total so far:

1.  NOSFERATU

2.  THE CABINET OF DR, CALIGARI

3.  HAXAN

4.  THE SHINING

5.  FROM BEYOND

 

We also watched UN CHIEN ANDALOU, but I wouldn't count that as horror...just bizarre.

post #68 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbrother View Post
 

4. Dog Soldiers. Rewatch. Aliens with werewolves basically. Far better than the vast wasteland that makes up werewolf movies but that is not difficult to achieve.

 

I just watched this one too.  I think it is one of the best werewolf movies of the modern era, although as you point out, its mostly by default.  Don't want to sell Neil Marshall short though.  He doesn't have a particularly unique voice, but he 'gets' the genre better than most, and he's really good on a tight budget.  Dog Soldiers is riffing on Carpenter and Cameron and others, but it also feels like its own thing.  Dig the werewolf design as well, and its fun to see Ser Davos in action.

 

List, in order of enjoyment:

1. Slither (2006)

2. The People Under The Stairs (1991)

3. Dog Soldiers (2002)

4. Lords of Salem (2013)


Edited by fuzzy dunlop - 10/11/13 at 6:39am
post #69 of 1824

Forgot to mention I indulged in one of my longest standing October traditions the other night with Creepshow. My favorite horror anthology film ever (hell, my favorite anthology film ever). Great cast, fun script and the lurid, colorful cinematography and lighting are unbeatable. Trick 'R Treat came so close but I have yet to see an anthology film that matches this.

post #70 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike J View Post

Forgot to mention I indulged in one of my longest standing October traditions the other night with Creepshow. My favorite horror anthology film ever (hell, my favorite anthology film ever). Great cast, fun script and the lurid, colorful cinematography and lighting are unbeatable. Trick 'R Treat came so close but I have yet to see an anthology film that matches this.


 



Speak of the devil. I just watched Trick R Treat tonight. We really need a revival of horror anthology. Little Sam in this movie could still be a minor horror icon.
post #71 of 1824

Nice to know I have fellow Chudders that share in my annual OD'ing on horror flicks during October. I like to use this time of month to educate my niece/nephews now that they're of age. I'll just list what I've watched already and look to put actual thoughts into movies going forward.

 

The List (all of which are rewatches):

01. A Nightmare on Elm Street

02. Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare

03. Wes Craven's New Nightmare

04. Friday the 13th Part II

05. Friday the 13th Part V: A New Beginning

06. Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives

07. Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood

08. Freddy vs. Jason

09. Crystal Lake Memories: The Complete History of Friday the 13th

10. The Faculty - My niece/nephews asked, "Is that Usher?!"

11. Evil Dead (Remake) - My niece proclaimed it to be the grossest movie she's seen yet.

12. The People Under the Stairs

13. Hocus Pocus

14. Constantine

15. The Descent

16. Fright Night (Remake)

17. From Dusk Till Dawn

18. Slither

19. Teen Wolf

20. This is the End

 

I'm waiting until I see them again to expose them to Trick r' Treat and might take the niece to The Lost Boys in the theater since she didn't get to see it when I showed the boys.

post #72 of 1824
I'm revisiting "Blade Trinity." I'm not disliking it as much as I did when I saw it in the theater, but it's still just not very good. It plays like a rough cut. Everything's just a little "off." Nothing clicks quite right.
post #73 of 1824

Rewatched The People Under The Stairs for the first time in ages. Satire so heavy-handed it makes George Romero say "Guys, ease up a bit."

post #74 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

Rewatched The People Under The Stairs for the first time in ages. Satire so heavy-handed it makes George Romero say "Guys, ease up a bit."


But Wendy Robie and Everett McGill are so, so good. Some of the slapstick stuff really hurts the film but Robie and McGill are always a blast to watch.

 

I'm stuck with a cold that I hope I can get over before the weekend ends, so I'm taking it easy and watching Phantasm II. Logic and solid continuity was never a strong point in this franchise but Angus Scrimm, Reggis Bannister and James LeGros nail it. Michael Baldwin (the original Mike) isn't a fan of this sequel because he's not in it but LeGros is a better actor and I always thought he had better chemistry with Reggie.

 

Another issue I always had was the adding of new characters with each sequel when Mike and Reggie are more than enough. And I think Coscarelli felt that way, too, hence killing Liz at the beginning of 3 and then making the annoying little kid disappear at the beginning of 4. Liz is just such a useless character. Does anyone know if that was a Universal mandate? "The younger guy needs a love interest!"
 

post #75 of 1824

V/H/S. Didn't care for it. Wraparound story doesn't go anywhere, just ends, and that was true of a lot of the short films too. I sort of liked the Saturday The 14th thing with the killer who couldn't be captured on camera, and kind of admired what they managed to pull off in the last story FX-wise given the budget, but the rest of it was a snore.

 

Much preferred The Divide. End of the world story about a group of people going crazy in a bunker. Michael Biehn gets his fingernails pulled out when he won't play good host. By the end, some of the inhabitants of the bunker have digressed to the point where they look like the bad guy in Blade 2. But in a dress. As a bit of French nihilism, it fits comfortably alongside Inside and Martyrs, though it's not as extreme as those two. Lovely piano score, and the final images are breathtaking.

 

In order of enjoyment:

 

1. Lord Of Illusions
2. No One Lives

3. The Divide
4. Dead Silence
5. Byzantium
6. Splice
7. Donkey Punch
8. V/H/S
9. The Moth Diaries


Edited by EricBlair - 10/12/13 at 5:09am
post #76 of 1824
Firing up IT. It's cheesy but I can't help myself, especially with the first half. Something about it gives me the feeling of going home. I have some strange comfort movies, to say the least. And Tim Curry's performance goes without saying.
post #77 of 1824

Whelp, fell a little bit off my pace, but I'm gonna step things up over the next few weeks. Thankfully #6 was a treat.

 

Movie #6: Ghostbusters!

 

The first re-watch on my list, but also the first time seeing it on the back-screen, at the Drive-In no less. Not much to say about this one, deservedly held up as a classic and still funny from top to bottom. The only thing that struck me this time around was a realization of just how little action there actually is in the film, which certainly isn't a knock against the movie as it's paced perfectly. It just made me think how much different that final fight with the Stay Puft marshmallow man would probably be in a modern spectacle blockbuster.

 

The List So Far:

 

1. C.H.U.D.

2. Monster Brawl

3. Mimic

4. Pontypool

5. V/H/S

6. Ghostbusters (Re-Watch)

post #78 of 1824

Inspired by others here and in the Horror Recommendation thread, thought I'd give Candyman a rewatch. Haven't seen it since the VHS days, when I remember being a bit underwhelmed.

 

It's a good, imaginative film. I would rank it below Lord Of Illusions because of predictability - it was clear to me fairly early on when Candyman was going, whereas I had no idea where Lord Of Illusions was bound for - and I'd knock back a few points for the old cliche of character waking up at a murder scene, and picking up the murder weapon to have a closer look. I get the implication that this is all in Helen's mind, but this particular story has been re-run so many times it feels too familiar for a Barker-inspired film.

 

Todd is fantastic, and I would've liked to see more of the Candyman character (before he turned into a Freddy-clone in the sequels). Madsen as well is a great leading lady, although her character arc is a bit too straightforward. Where's the Barker kink?

 

Thought they were a bit harsh on Xander Berkely at the end too.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
All he'd done was screw around and not be a great husband - so the movie punishes him by gutting him in a bath tub.

 

In order of enjoyment:

 

1. Lord Of Illusions
2. No One Lives
3. Candyman
4. The Divide
5. Dead Silence
6. Byzantium
7. Splice
8. Donkey Punch
9. V/H/S
10. The Moth Diaries

post #79 of 1824
Introduced the Mrs. to Rosemary's Baby, which was only my second time having seen it. Still enjoyed it (as did she) though it moved a lot slower the second time around.

We also watched Elvira: Mistress of the Dark for the first time. I don't know what I expected since I've only known the image, so the tone was a surprise. But the boobs never got old.
post #80 of 1824
The part at the end with Elvira and the tassels is about the only reason to see the movie. If only it'd been 90 minutes of that.
post #81 of 1824

# 2 on my list is Fright Night (2011)

This was a rewatch. I really enjoy this movie. I was surprised at how well it turned out and Colin Farrell really steals the movie. I wanted to see much more of him than what we got.

 

My list so far

# 1 Evil Dead (2013)

# 2 Fright Night (2011)

post #82 of 1824

The Purge was pretty OK.  I might be cutting it some serious slack because of how unsettling the backdrop was, as presented, where the wealthy are given 12 hours every year to murder the contingent of the population that contributes the least.  Maybe that's an oversimplification, but the movie does revolve around a group of smug white people hunting down a homeless black guy, while the richest of the rich lock themselves away in fortified mansions.  Its all very on-the-nose, but I liked that about The Purge.  The movie is otherwise unremarkable; the cast is mostly just there, the exception being Rhys Wakefield, who is so creepy that he singlehandedly bumps the movie into horror (I think without him, its purely sci-fi).  The layout of the house in incomprehensible, which is a problem, but for the most part the tension sticks and the action is good.  

 

List, in order of enjoyment:

1. Slither (2006)

2. The People Under The Stairs (1991)

3. Dog Soldiers (2002)

4. The Purge (2013)

5. Lords of Salem (2013)

post #83 of 1824

This last weekend brought on:

 

-My Bloody Valentine (1981)

-Young Frankenstein (1974)*

 

*Not horror but great for this season (or any season). It's as classic as the movies its intended to be a loose companion piece to.

post #84 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike J View Post
 

But Wendy Robie and Everett McGill are so, so good. Some of the slapstick stuff really hurts the film but Robie and McGill are always a blast to watch.

Absolutely, they're performances are so unhinged that it elevates the rest of the movie. Craven's films are often technically shoddy (imo), but he always adds some demented touches that serves to make his work memorable.

post #85 of 1824

Keeping on the Clive Barker theme, revisited The Midnight Meat Train. It's too long, but the strangeness of it and the undeniably adult tone make it an interesting watch. Also, after The Condemned, the second film I've enjoyed Vinnie Jones in. Some gnarly gore. Still not buying Bradley Cooper as a leading man, though. What do directors have against Ted Raimi?

 

In order of enjoyment:

 

1. Lord Of Illusions
2. No One Lives
3. Candyman
4. The Divide
5. The Midnight Meat Train
6. Dead Silence
7. Byzantium
8. Splice
9. Donkey Punch
10. V/H/S
11. The Moth Diaries

post #86 of 1824
when are you going to do NIGHTBREED?
post #87 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post

when are you going to do NIGHTBREED?

 

Nightbreed rocks, but I've gotta wait for The Cabal Cut, so not this October : )

post #88 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzy dunlop View Post
 

The Purge was pretty OK.  I might be cutting it some serious slack because of how unsettling the backdrop was, as presented, where the wealthy are given 12 hours every year to murder the contingent of the population that contributes the least.  Maybe that's an oversimplification, but the movie does revolve around a group of smug white people hunting down a homeless black guy, while the richest of the rich lock themselves away in fortified mansions.  Its all very on-the-nose, but I liked that about The Purge.  The movie is otherwise unremarkable; the cast is mostly just there, the exception being Rhys Wakefield, who is so creepy that he singlehandedly bumps the movie into horror (I think without him, its purely sci-fi).  The layout of the house in incomprehensible, which is a problem, but for the most part the tension sticks and the action is good.  

 

List, in order of enjoyment:

1. Slither (2006)

2. The People Under The Stairs (1991)

3. Dog Soldiers (2002)

4. The Purge (2013)

5. Lords of Salem (2013)

 

I thought he singlehandedly bumped the movie into plain horrible. He wasn't intimidating in the least and reminded me of an extra-hammy Jason Mewes.

 

Yeah, I didn't like The Purge. I mostly agree with your ranking order though.

post #89 of 1824
Thread Starter 
8. The Howling

Finally got around to watching my Scream Factory blu ray. I only saw this once about 8 years ago, and remember it being okay. I suppose that's my assesment this time as well. For a 90 minute movie there are some pacing problems, especially with the first 20 minutes focusing on Dee Wallace's PTSD from the rapist werewolf attack. I also found the Terry character much more likeable and sympatheic than Dee Wallace, and was generally bummed to see her die. 1981 had two classic werewolf movies: this and American Werewolf in London. I'm still firmly on Team London.

List so far:

1. Halloween 2
2. Creature from the Black Lagoon
3. Lords of Salem
4. V/H/S 2
5. Room 237
6. Vampire Lovers
7. The Shining
8. The Howling
post #90 of 1824
The Nightmare Before Christmas and Demon Knight. I really wish I could've been able to experience Tales from the Crypt back in its heyday, as I know I would've loved it, but I ended up being able to see it only once I was too old.

I asked a buddy for some first-viewing ideas, so I hope to start cranking out some new viewings here soon. There's so much garbage out there to sift through and I hate the feeling of there being nothing of quality left to discover.
post #91 of 1824
"Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation" should just be called "Noise: The Movie."
post #92 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agent Z View Post
 

I thought he singlehandedly bumped the movie into plain horrible. He wasn't intimidating in the least and reminded me of an extra-hammy Jason Mewes.

 

Yeah, I didn't like The Purge. I mostly agree with your ranking order though.

 

He reminded me of both Michael Pitt and Brady Corbet from the US Funny Games.  In a good way, I think.  I enjoyed the performance, but I can see how it might rub the wrong way; its almost like the character is popping in from a completely different movie.  The overall creepiness of the home invaders in general feels arbitrary.

 

I revisited 30 Days Of Night - I don't think I'd seen it since theaters - and I hated it less this time.  The concept is still aces, and its gory as hell.  David Slade has a decent eye, and I actually love some of the visuals.  Its still a terrible movie though.  The pacing is weird, there's no sense of geography or the passage of time, and the vamp design / execution may be the worst ever committed to film.  The cast is mostly shit too; if only everyone was half as engaged as Ben Foster.  What little energy the movie has completely dissipates once Foster exits.

 

List, in order of enjoyment:

1. Slither (2006)

2. The People Under The Stairs (1991)

3. Dog Soldiers (2002)

4. The Purge (2013)

5. 30 Days Of Night (2007)

6. Lords of Salem (2013)

post #93 of 1824

I have spent the last few evenings re-watching Tales from the Crypt episodes. It was one of my favorite shows as a kid. It really benefits from being an anthology show in that sense that some of the episodes are awful (and were that way when they initially aired) but there's enough classics to justify the show's existence and it allow it to still be relevant.

 

One episode I've really come to appreciate is Easel Kill Ya with Tim Roth and William Atherton. Roth plays an struggling ex-alcoholic artist who finds an interesting inspiration for his artwork (read: murder). Atherton is a rich creep who enjoys morbid imagery and begins commissioning Roth's work. And Roth meets a lady which further complicates matters.

 

In a show that often coasted on gore and tits, Easel Kill Ya is the rare episode that is REALLY elevated by the performances. Atherton's character suddenly makes no sense when he makes a plea for Roth's character to appreciate love and happiness but damned if Atherton doesn't totally sell it. And Roth's look to the camera when his comeuppance/ ironic twist hits is haunting. Great stuff. John Harrison has an eye for interesting shots and weird touches (Roth's accidental sex dream about Atherton) but without those two actors, it would have been just an okay episode.

post #94 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarence Boddicker View Post

8. The Howling

Finally got around to watching my Scream Factory blu ray. I only saw this once about 8 years ago, and remember it being okay. I suppose that's my assesment this time as well. For a 90 minute movie there are some pacing problems, especially with the first 20 minutes focusing on Dee Wallace's PTSD from the rapist werewolf attack. I also found the Terry character much more likeable and sympatheic than Dee Wallace, and was generally bummed to see her die. 1981 had two classic werewolf movies: this and American Werewolf in London. I'm still firmly on Team London.

 

 

Completely agree. I love The Howling for what it could be, not what it is.

post #95 of 1824
We started watching Room 237, the documentary concerning fan theories about The Shining. Man, there be some retards* out there.

Moving onto Pet Semetary, a movie that starts out as a great horror film then transforms into a full-fledged comedy because scary children LOL.

*No offense meant to any persons of retardation out there, as you are much better people than these kooks.
Edited by Shaun H - 10/15/13 at 5:06pm
post #96 of 1824

 Update to the recently watched list:

 

Bubba Ho-tep: Bruce Campbell is a god among us but here he shows he does have some real dramatic potential. Who would have thought that a movie with a killer mummy, a guy who thinks he is Elvis and another guy who claims to be JFK could have some real pathos. 

 

Killer Klown from Outer Space: How the hell did this movie get made? A real guilty pleasure. I actually wouldn't mind a modern remake since the idea is so absurdly stupid (but awesome) and we need more silly plus goofy horror movies nowadays.  

post #97 of 1824

I'll chime in. So far I've put down:

 

Halloween ( The original classic, not that remake bullshit )

Dead and Breakfast

Child's Play

 

All were watched at home and were rewatches. I've been meaning to get to the exorcist for the last couple of days but just haven't got around to it.

post #98 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike J View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Chucky gets delivered to Andy Barclay (complete with goatee). While Andy is on the phone with his mother, Chucky unwraps himself with a knife and examines Andy's apartment, which includes his certificate from military school and a picture of Kyle from Part 2. When he turns back around, Andy has a gun pointed in his face. Chucky looks shocked and after Andy says "Play with this!" (or something like that), he pulls the trigger and it cuts to black.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike J View Post
 


Do you mean does it contradict the final scene with the little girl? I thought about that but I guess we're meant to think he didn't succeed with that round of "Hide the Soul".

 

Regardless, that post credits scene works like gangbusters. It didn't have that "Wait a minute..." effect on me until after it ended but I liked it so much, I just let it slide.

Technically the game of hide the soul wouldn't work with her or anybody else. He has been in the same doll all this time so the first person he ever revealed himself to be alive to was and always will be [name redacted]

post #99 of 1824

Starting this off pretty damn late due to the first half of the month watching three seasons of Luther and two season of Life on Mars.  Now that I have that out of the way.....

 

1. The Burning (1981)- One of the first Miramax films.  A summer camp slasher flick based on an old campfire tale.  Tom Savini skipped out on FT13th Part 2 to do this, so the effects are great. Also first film for Jason Alexander, Fisher Stevens, and Holly Hunter.  Not too bad and worth a look.

 

2. Piranha (1978) - The original Roger Corman/Joe Dante flick.  Scared me as a kid, but everything did.  Pretty silly, yet still entertaining.  The always awesome Dick Miller makes an appearance.  Filmed down the road from me in San Marcos.

 

 

 

So to catch up a bit I'm watching half of a flick on my lunch break on Netflix.  Watching a whole movie at home at night before bed. Then the next morning finishing up the Netflix flick.  The Netflix one will probably be something silly, i.e. Piranha, that I won't mind splitting in two.  Today's lunch movie was CHUD.  Tonight I think I'll be watching Sleepaway Camp.  The Burning got me in the mood for more summer camp hi jinks. Been wanting to watch Noroi: The Curse again, so that one will probably happen sooner rather than later.

post #100 of 1824

PHANTASM - I'd never seen any Phantasm movies; they're kind of the biggest horror franchise holdout for me. So maybe this October is the month to finally do the series. I liked this mostly because it was so fucking weird, but I do think it's reputation did it a bit of a disservice here. Going in being aware of all the biggest gags - the Tall Man, the flying balls, the weird sexuality, "BOYYY!" - it didn't really surprise the way it might have. The real discovery was the plotline, which is honestly pretty much indecipherable. So much so that I was never less than intrigued. 

 

But it does occasionally become a bit of a slog, particularly the first half. Once shit goes insane, it gets better, and it would play well with some of the more crazy bizarro filmd from the era, like Krull or Zardoz. I get why everyone loves Angus Scrimm so much, and I'm reasonably interested in watching the next one. Such a strange film, so strange to imagine someone writing it.

 

1. Take Shelter

2. Martyrs

3. The Lords of Salem

4. Curse of Chucky

5. Phantasm

6. White Zombie

7. Solomon Kane

8. Eyes of the Mothman

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