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October Horror Movie Challenge - Page 18

post #851 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post


For whatever reason, I'm usually unmoved by "reveals" and "twists." If the rest of the movie arrived at those moments in an interesting way, then I don't really care that I "figured the movie out." I don't like to treat movies as if they're puzzles.

I hear you.  I'm a person who does like to be surprised by story turns, and even though I don't go into movies actively trying to "solve" them, I can't help it if I suss out a reveal before the story gets there.

 

 

THE CONJURING (2013)

 

This sucker still works.  Its primary strength is James Wan's filmmaking; he's not afraid to linger on shots, to let scenes play out for maximum effect.  It's packed full of jump scares, but none of them are cheap, and many of them pack a real punch (there's one in particular that gets me every time even though I know it's coming).  The performances are excellent, as well.  I maintain this is the best major-studio-released horror movie of this decade.

 

1.   CARRIE (1976)
2.   FRANKENSTEIN (1931)
3.   NOSFERATU (1922)
4.   THE WITCH (2016)
5.   IT FOLLOWS (2015)
6.   THE INVITATION (2016)
7.   THE CONJURING (2013)
8.   THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999)
9.   SIGNS (2002)
10. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (1972)
11. SINISTER (2012)
12. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969)
13. THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960)
14. THE MUMMY (1959)
15. EVIL DEAD (2013)
16. THE STRANGERS (2008)
17. THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005)
18. WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)
19. GOOSEBUMPS (2015)
20. CORPSE BRIDE (2005)
21. THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL (2009)
22. THE WATCHER IN THE WOODS (1980)
23. TUCKER AND DALE VS. EVIL (2010)
24. LIGHTS OUT (2016)
25. THE VAULT OF HORROR (1973)
26. AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION (1982)
27. THE RAVEN (2012)
28. 31 (2016)
29. BASKIN (2016)
30. MOCKINGBIRD (2014)
31. GIRLS NITE OUT (1983)

post #852 of 1824
Quote:
I hear you.  I'm a person who does like to be surprised by story turns, and even though I don't go into movies actively trying to "solve" them, I can't help it if I suss out a reveal before the story gets there.

Definitely. I think I notice story turns more if they don't make sense within the film. Kill List and The Sacrament both had clearly telegraphed moments, but they worked for me because it fit within the context of the respective films. Both films felt more like an inevitable destination than a deliberate attempt to surprise the viewer.

 

Belloq just watched #31, and so did I. It's not 31.

 

Pulse (2001)

 

 

In my living room, there's a large smudge on the wall from where we replaced the drywall. I've struggled to find the motivation to paint over it . . . until this movie.

 

I liked Kiyoshi Kurosawa's "Cure" well enough, although I thought it was a bit too long and drawn out. This has similar issues, but I liked it much, much better. The technology is ultra-dated, but if you can accept that, this film will creep you out, at least intermittently. If a movie can unnerve you with an office chair rolling into frame, I submit the filmmaker has done their job. This is the best film I saw this month that I hadn't seen before.

So, here's my final-ish list, in order of preference:

 

1) The Thing

2) Alien

3) Carrie

4) The Innocents

5) Cabin in the Woods
6) Carnival of Souls
7) Pulse

8) Deep Red

9) Kill List

10) Crimson Peak

11) Return of the Living Dead

12) Lake Mungo

13) Martyrs

14) Kill, Baby, Kill

15) Phantasm

16) Ghostbusters

17) Dead & Buried

18) Intruder

19) Donkey Punch
20) Demonoid: Messenger of Death

21) Eaten Alive

22) Lights Out

23) Lovely Molly

24) Tourist Trap
25) Shutter
26) The New Daughter

27) Kill Theory

28) Rush Week

29) Ghost in the Machine

30) The Rambler

31) Don't Go In the Woods

post #853 of 1824
What I like about The Conjuring most is that very early in the film Wan sets up the geography of the house, and then later stages scenes with action that take place in multiple rooms around the house.
post #854 of 1824

Don't Look Now...  Wtf.  What the actual fuck?!

post #855 of 1824
THE NINTH GATE.

I've always liked this one more than most. It's Raymond Chandler meets Hammer horror. Depp is aces.

FYI - avoid the Blu. It's hideously washed-out. Stick with the DVD, which does better justice to the look of the film.
post #856 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeman View Post

Don't Look Now...  Wtf.  What the actual fuck?!

Yeah!

I love the credits for Ninth Gate. It's like a counting game.
post #857 of 1824
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

 

20. RAW MEAT aka DEAD LINE / 21. CREEP (2004) -Christopher Smith claimed not to haw seen RAW MEAT, but t's hard to believe. It borrows about as much as LOCKUP did from ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK. Doesn't matter, though, because it's very well directed, even more delightfully nasty, and carried by a great scream queen in Franka Potente.

 

It's a shame RAW MEAT isn't well known outside of the Horror hardcore, because it really is brilliant. It must have shocked audiences at the time. It's an almost direct precursor to TEXAS CHAINSAW + HILLS HAVE EYES in tone, yet there's also an undercurrent of melancholy that harkens back to classic Universal Horror like FRANKENSTEIN. It's one of the great 70's Horror films.

 

22. BLUE SUNSHINE - Jeff Lieberman's freak out masterpiece

 

23. EYES WITHOUT A FACE - a delirious New Wave 'Twilight Zone'. I can't stop thinking about this one. Not really Twilight Zone-ish. It's lurid pulp told with elegant flash. It's an uncomfortable film. And I love that about it.

 

24. OFFICE KILLER - I appreciated this one at the time but had completely forgotten about it before reading of it being screened as part of a 'Final Girls' festival exploring 'feminist themes in horror cinema highlighting the representation and work of women in horror, both in front of and behind the camera' . The only feature by legendary photographer Cindy Sherman, it is a twisted comedy-horror tale carried by a fabulous Carol Kane. Deftly directed by Sherman, it captures feel of the office as layer of hell, and how the everyday mundane bullshit can finally push the little person to insanity. Strong recommendation.

 

25. THE SENDER - QT called it the best horror movie of 1982!

 

26. RAVENOUS - revisit on HDNMV. This has aged into my favorite Horror film of the 90's. And I love the Western elements. The score accents the film's mood brilliantly.  Robert Carlyle's introductory monologue is an alltimer.

 

Favorite line: "It's lonely being a cannibal. Tough making friends."

 

27. LIGHTS OUT - i'd read some complaints that this movie based on a short film sensation was stretched thin at feature length, but I think it does an awesome job of being spooky. Sandberg has chops. It's fully modern, but has feel of a cool 70's ghost story.

 

28. DOPPLEGANGER - interesting forgotten 90's curio, part art film, part exploitation. From this pre-adult breakthrough period, where Drew Barrymore was sexualized to a sleazy degree. Not sure if I can exactly recommend it, but it was fun how it kept getting weirder and weirder.  It flirts with going to similar places as De Palma's RAISING CAIN, but doesn't have the same sense of humor and wit to pull it off. Ending turns into a bizzaro F/X extravaganza.

 

29. BURNING BRIGHT - after letting my video store buddy borrow VENOM because he had never seen it, he told me I had to see this. I had never even heard of it - which is kind of rare for me - but it turned out to be quite the fun surprise. It's kind of a Die Hard movie with a tiger! The scenario is kind of silly, and i was indeed skeptical, but if you go with it  instead of snickering, it's a blast. Garret Dillahunt plays maybe the biggest dickhead stepdad in the history of cinema (apologies Terry O'Quinn). As the pull quote says ' incredibly tense and suspenseful sequences that had me gasping for air'. 

 

 

30. THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD - As a Hawks fanatic I've spent most of my adult life insisting his original classic is better than Carpenter's remake/ update. I mean it's pretty close. I'd hate to have to live on the difference. Like the best of Hawks' stuff, it's a hang out movie. Kenneth Tobey is an almost Kurt-like god in it.

 

 

31. JOHN CARPENTER'S THE THING -  ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 is my favorite Carpenter, but this is the one I revisit the most. The ultimate Kurt.

post #858 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by catartik View Post

What I like about The Conjuring most is that very early in the film Wan sets up the geography of the house, and then later stages scenes with action that take place in multiple rooms around the house.


One thing I like about The Conjuring is Wan has that 70s aesthetic down even though it's shot on digital. There's an early zoom shot in that movie which I really love.

post #859 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

 

31. JOHN CARPENTER'S THE THING -  ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 is my favorite Carpenter, but this is the one I revisit the most. The ultimate Kurt.

Like you, I like THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD A LOT, but THE THING is one of my favorite films of all time, in part because of Kurt. However, I do think The Thing From Another World features the greatest older jump scare of all time. Every time that moment happens, I can't help but let out an "AIEEE!"

 

Halloween is my 2nd favorite Carpenter, but I concede that it's dating rather rapidly. The price of being one of the most influential films of the last 50 years.

post #860 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post


Yeah!

I love the credits for Ninth Gate. It's like a counting game.

The ending made me sort of look around the room and go "wtf?"  Anyone else seeing this?!  What is happening?!  I was alone though.

 

I shall die alone, with Bradito in our two bedroom apartment.

post #861 of 1824

THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)

 

Roger Corman may have had his hand in a lot of schlock, but his Poe adaptations are quality productions all the way.  Great production design and widescreen cinematography.  You can never go wrong with Vincent Price being driven mad, and he's damn good in this (as he is in everything, of course).  It’s not the best of Corman and Price’s Poe collaborations, but it’s very solid.

 

1.   CARRIE (1976)
2.   FRANKENSTEIN (1931)
3.   NOSFERATU (1922)
4.   THE WITCH (2016)
5.   IT FOLLOWS (2015)
6.   THE INVITATION (2016)
7.   THE CONJURING (2013)
8.   THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999)
9.   SIGNS (2002)
10. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (1972)
11. SINISTER (2012)
12. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969)
13. THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960)
14. THE MUMMY (1959)
15. EVIL DEAD (2013)
16. THE STRANGERS (2008)
17. THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005)
18. WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)
19. GOOSEBUMPS (2015)
20. CORPSE BRIDE (2005)
21. THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)
22. THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL (2009)
23. THE WATCHER IN THE WOODS (1980)
24. TUCKER AND DALE VS. EVIL (2010)
25. LIGHTS OUT (2016)
26. THE VAULT OF HORROR (1973)
27. AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION (1982)
28. THE RAVEN (2012)
29. 31 (2016)
30. BASKIN (2016)
31. MOCKINGBIRD (2014)
32. GIRLS NITE OUT (1983)

post #862 of 1824
Ok, I guess I should break down and finally admit The Conjuring sounds like it is worth watching, yes?

How about part 2?

(edited) After watching Lake Mungo and being impressed, I am looking to give ghostish movies more of a chance.

Any other suggestions?

Other than, you know, "Ghost"...
post #863 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post

Ok, I guess I should break down and finally admit The Conjuring sounds like it is worth watching, yes?

How about part 2?

(edited) After watching Lake Mungo and being impressed, I am looking to give ghostish movies more of a chance.

Any other suggestions?

Other than, you know, "Ghost"...

 

And what does THAT mean?

post #864 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splatoon View Post

And what does THAT mean?

It means I have already watched it enough in my life, and to try to introduce me to something I have already seen and pleasured myself to would be an exercise in futility.
post #865 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post

THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)

Roger Corman may have had his hand in a lot of schlock, but his Poe adaptations are quality productions all the way.  Great production design and widescreen cinematography.  You can never go wrong with Vincent Price being driven mad, and he's damn good in this (as he is in everything, of course).  It’s not the best of Corman and Price’s Poe collaborations, but it’s very solid.

1.   CARRIE (1976)

2.   FRANKENSTEIN (1931)

3.   NOSFERATU (1922)

4.   THE WITCH (2016)

5.   IT FOLLOWS (2015)

6.   THE INVITATION (2016)

7.   THE CONJURING (2013)

8.   THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999)

9.   SIGNS (2002)

10. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (1972)

11. SINISTER (2012)

12. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969)

13. THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960)

14. THE MUMMY (1959)

15. EVIL DEAD (2013)

16. THE STRANGERS (2008)

17. THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005)

18. WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)

19. GOOSEBUMPS (2015)

20. CORPSE BRIDE (2005)

21. THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)

22. THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL (2009)

23. THE WATCHER IN THE WOODS (1980)

24. TUCKER AND DALE VS. EVIL (2010)

25. LIGHTS OUT (2016)

26. THE VAULT OF HORROR (1973)

27. AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION (1982)

28. THE RAVEN (2012)

29. 31 (2016)

30. BASKIN (2016)

31. MOCKINGBIRD (2014)

32. GIRLS NITE OUT (1983)
I love PIT AND THE PENDULUM.

You should be ashamed of yourself for ranking it below CORPSE BRIDE.
post #866 of 1824

The Price/Corman Poe adaptations are my jam.  Price is my definitive Roderick Usher.

 

Shit, I'm watching both of those tonight.  Thanks, guys!

post #867 of 1824
They're my jam, too. They're not just camp classics but genuinely great, accomplished pictures, made with impressive formal and thematic clarity. (I'd go as far as to say that PIT is better than every film on Belloq's list except for his top 3.)

This thematic analysis of the Corman Poe films is both thorough and compelling:

http://brightlightsfilm.com/from-the-house-to-the-tomb-exploring-the-corman-poe-films/#.WBNNwMspDqA
post #868 of 1824

Quote:

Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post


It means I have already watched it enough in my life, and to try to introduce me to something I have already seen and pleasured myself to would be an exercise in futility.

 

Hmmm...I don't know about that first part, but acceptable.

post #869 of 1824

HP Lovecraft / Stuart Gordon double feature, starting with the combo's masterpiece FROM BEYOND.  Someone in this thread or the horror thread (I think it was Elvis) said this one was perfect for Halloween, given that its the ultimate haunted house movie.  I completely agree.  You could argue RE-ANIMATOR is technically the more well made film, but nothing quite captures the unknowable horror of Lovecraft, and the madness that comes with it, like FROM BEYOND.

 

The second part of the double header was DAGON, which is... uh.. less successful, but certainly not without its charms.  Where FROM BEYOND feels low budget, DAGON just feels cheap.  I'll lazily blame the digital effects (the CG storm in the beginning is really rough) and the acting (can't always get Crampton and Combs).  But even with his lesser Lovecraft adaptations, Gordon is more or less on the same wavelength, and the escalation of weirdness in the rain soaked town is just right.

 

And since I need to make up ground... the nightcap was Larry Fessenden's parable on global warming THE LAST WINTER, which is barely a horror film, although it does fall nicely into one of my favorite subgenres: isolated folks in extremely harsh conditions succumbing to supernatural forces and/or the elements.  The supernatural stuff is on the backburner for most of the film, but its definitely there, and Fessenden knows when to draw it to the forefront.  Solid.      

 

 

 

In order of enjoyment:

 

1. BONE TOMAHAWK (2015)

2. FROM BEYOND (1986)

3. LEVIATHAN (1989)

4. DEEP RISING (1998)

5. CREEPSHOW (1982)

6. HALLOWEEN III (1982)

7. LAND OF THE DEAD (2005)

8. KRAMPUS (2015)

9. HALLOWEEN II (1981)

10. HALLOWEEN (1978)

11. INVADERS FROM MARS (1986)

12. BODY SNATCHERS (1993)

13. DEEPSTAR SIX (1989)

14. DAGON (2002)

15. CAT'S EYE (1985)

16. THE LAST WINTER (2006)

17. LET US PREY (2014)

18. DARK FLOORS (2008)

19. BLAIR WITCH (2016)

20. THE RELIC (1997)

21. THE GREASY STRANGLER (2016)

22. THE RIFT (1989)

23. THE FOREST (2015)

24. HALLOWEEN (2007)

25. ERNEST SCARED STUPID (1991)

26. PHANTASM: RAVAGER (2016)

post #870 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Call Me Roy View Post

Ok, I guess I should break down and finally admit The Conjuring sounds like it is worth watching, yes?

How about part 2?

(edited) After watching Lake Mungo and being impressed, I am looking to give ghostish movies more of a chance.

Any other suggestions?

Other than, you know, "Ghost"...

THE CONJURING is worth watching, for sure.  2 is less good, but still solidly-made and well-acted.

 

As for other "ghost" movies, if you can handle stories that are slower paced, THE HAUNTING (Robert Wise's version), THE CHANGELING (the George C. Scott movie), and THE INNOCENTS are all pretty wonderful.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

I love PIT AND THE PENDULUM.

You should be ashamed of yourself for ranking it below CORPSE BRIDE.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

They're my jam, too. They're not just camp classics but genuinely great, accomplished pictures, made with impressive formal and thematic clarity. (I'd go as far as to say that PIT is better than every film on Belloq's list except for his top 3.)

Sorry!  It's probably my fourth favorite of the Corman/Price/Poe run, and I couldn't justify putting it any higher!  I still like it a lot, though!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzy dunlop View Post
 

The second part of the double header was DAGON, which is... uh.. less successful, but certainly not without its charms.  Where FROM BEYOND feels low budget, DAGON just feels cheap.  I'll lazily blame the digital effects (the CG storm in the beginning is really rough) and the acting (can't always get Crampton and Combs).  But even with his lesser Lovecraft adaptations, Gordon is more or less on the same wavelength, and the escalation of weirdness in the rain soaked town is just right.

DAGON's got some good stuff, but it's severely marred (for me) by the often amateurish acting and the big face-skinning scene, which is so graphic and unpleasant (in contrast to anything else in the movie) that it overwhelms.  It comes out of nowhere in terms of its intensity, and not in a good way.

post #871 of 1824
PIT AND THE PENDULUM has the tightest storytelling of any of the Corman Poe films (there's not a wasted moment), delivering a punchier, witty riff on HOUSE OF USHER's narrative that remains close in spirit to Poe's themes. The torture chamber in the basement is perhaps the series' strongest metaphor for the latent madness lurking in the subconscious.

It's also the most aesthetically unified of the films. Every scene is directed and edited with admirable clarity, and with the occasional intelligent flourish (note the way that the "miasma of barbarity" seen during the prologue and end credits recurs throughout the film in key moments as color wash).

And then there's the film's final image, one of the great horror movie stingers!
post #872 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

PIT AND THE PENDULUM has the tightest storytelling of any of the Corman Poe films (there's not a wasted moment), delivering a punchier, witty riff on HOUSE OF USHER's narrative that remains close in spirit to Poe's themes. The torture chamber in the basement is perhaps the series' strongest metaphor for the latent madness lurking in the subconscious.

It's also the most aesthetically unified of the films. Every scene is directed and edited with admirable clarity, and with the occasional intelligent flourish (note the way that the "miasma of barbarity" seen during the prologue and end credits recurs throughout the film in key moments as color wash).

And then there's the film's final image, one of the great horror movie stingers!

You're defending a movie that requires no defense!  I can't necessarily argue with any of that, I can only say that I tend to prefer THE MASQUE OF THE RED DEATH, THE TOMB OF LIGEIA, and HOUSE OF USHER.

 

But they're all great.

post #873 of 1824
You prefer CORPSE BRIDE and fucking DIARY OF EMILY ROSE!

Every time I think about that I come dangerously close to having an aneurysm!
post #874 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

You prefer CORPSE BRIDE and fucking DIARY OF EMILY ROSE!

Every time I think about that I come dangerously close to having an aneurysm!

Calm down, buddy.  We're gonna get through this.


I should point out that my ranking reflects only the way the movies struck me while watching this time.  Ask me next year, and it might look quite different.

post #875 of 1824
raiders-indy-belloq-2.jpg
post #876 of 1824

ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932)

 

Though it feels like it should be part of Universal’s horror cycle (and is now owned by Universal), this is a Paramount production, and it’s as strong as many of its rival’s top tier genre efforts of the 1930s.  Laughton is on fire with his devilish turn, Lugosi brings some pathos, and the makeup designs are eerie and effective.  It's very well directed (particularly the second half) and its fairly frank handling of moral and sexual themes is admirable for the era.  While it takes liberties with the source material, this is unquestionably the best ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU adaptation we’ve gotten thus far, and it’s one of the better horrors of its decade.

 

1.   CARRIE (1976)
2.   FRANKENSTEIN (1931)
3.   NOSFERATU (1922)
4.   THE WITCH (2016)
5.   IT FOLLOWS (2015)
6.   ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932)
7.   THE INVITATION (2016)
8.   THE CONJURING (2013)
9.   THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999)
10. SIGNS (2002)
11. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (1972)
12. SINISTER (2012)
13. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969)
14. THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960)
15. THE MUMMY (1959)
16. EVIL DEAD (2013)
17. THE STRANGERS (2008)
18. THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005)
19. WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)
20. GOOSEBUMPS (2015)
21. CORPSE BRIDE (2005)
22. THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)
23. THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL (2009)
24. THE WATCHER IN THE WOODS (1980)
25. TUCKER AND DALE VS. EVIL (2010)
26. LIGHTS OUT (2016)
27. THE VAULT OF HORROR (1973)
28. AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION (1982)
29. THE RAVEN (2012)
30. 31 (2016)
31. BASKIN (2016)
32. MOCKINGBIRD (2014)
33. GIRLS NITE OUT (1983)

post #877 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

 

 

31. JOHN CARPENTER'S THE THING -  ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 is my favorite Carpenter, but this is the one I revisit the most. The ultimate Kurt.

 

32. FIEND WITHOUT A FACE - (Criterion) wonderfully weird B movie relic of Atomic Age paranoia.. stop motion 'mental vampires' siege finale both silly and awesome. I love the tone of this, where unnerving moments trump camp


Edited by Fat Elvis - 10/28/16 at 9:01pm
post #878 of 1824

So, #Horror is certainly the worst film I've watched this month. It's incompetent in ways 31 and Cell can't even begin to match. A completely failed art project, it's kind of a shitty version of Unfriended, with an opening credits sequence that rips off Enter the Void but cross pollinates it with emojis and Candy Crush graphics. These bizarre super-speed internet image storms cover most transitions in the film, and they're just the worst thing. The movie also takes place in a ultra modern glass house full of art pieces by the likes of Julian Schnabel and other less famous artists, which makes it a distinctive looking film, at least. Not too many slashers have giant portraits of Marilyn Monroe with a breathing egg yolk for a face featured so prominently. 

 

The plot is a mean girls slasher, in the Sorority Row vein (or Unfriended, for sure), but the caveat here is that all the kids are actresses 12-14 years old, literally children. They're bitchy little kids, but they're also, completely, little kids. It's disturbing to watch a movie about them being stalked, no matter how nasty they are (and they are vicious. I don't think I've ever seen the Fat Girl treated with so much venom, by the filmmakers even). Timothy Hutton has a role, as a bellowing Nicolas Cage character, and Chloe Sevigny is in there. Mostly terrible child acting too. It's a fascinating trainwreck, so it rates higher than a lot of stuff I saw this month on my list, but it's definitely obnoxious and terrible. Just fascinatingly so.

 

1. Don't Look Now

2. Kwaidan

3. Ravenous

4. The Cabin in the Woods

5. It Follows

6. Castle Freak

7. The Nightmare

8. The Shallows

9. Halloween III: Season of the Witch

10. The Funhouse

11. Night Creatues

12. The Brides of Dracula

13. The Taking of Deborah Logan

14. [REC]4 Apocalypse

15. Paranoic

16. The Phantom of the Opera

17. The Haunting

18. Baskin

19. Curse of the Werewolf

20. The Beast of Xmoor

21. Westworld

22. #Horror

23. Kiss of the Vampire

24. Nightmare

25. The House by the Cemetery

26. 31

27. Cell

post #879 of 1824
Timothy Hutton watched me bomb spectacularly at the Comedy Store once.
post #880 of 1824

I AM THE PRETTY THING THAT LIVES IN THE HOUSE (2016)

 

Disappointing.  This one isn't just a slow burn, it's a no burn.  I usually have no problem with deliberately-paced movies, but this one didn't do it for me at all.  On a certain level, I can admire the intention behind it, as there's definitely a strong "voice" that can be felt, and it's hauntingly photographed.  However, the narrative is nonexistent, so the movie never achieves any sort of momentum at all.  Ruth Wilson is very good as the lead, though.

 

1.   CARRIE (1976)
2.   FRANKENSTEIN (1931)
3.   NOSFERATU (1922)
4.   THE WITCH (2016)
5.   IT FOLLOWS (2015)
6.   ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932)
7.   THE INVITATION (2016)
8.   THE CONJURING (2013)
9.   THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999)
10. SIGNS (2002)
11. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (1972)
12. SINISTER (2012)
13. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969)
14. THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960)
15. THE MUMMY (1959)
16. EVIL DEAD (2013)
17. THE STRANGERS (2008)
18. THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005)
19. WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)
20. GOOSEBUMPS (2015)
21. CORPSE BRIDE (2005)
22. THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)
23. THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL (2009)
24. THE WATCHER IN THE WOODS (1980)
25. TUCKER AND DALE VS. EVIL (2010)
26. LIGHTS OUT (2016)
27. THE VAULT OF HORROR (1973)
28. AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION (1982)
29. THE RAVEN (2012)
30. I AM THE PRETTY THING THAT LIVES IN THE HOUSE (2016)
31. 31 (2016)
32. BASKIN (2016)
33. MOCKINGBIRD (2014)
34. GIRLS NITE OUT (1983)

post #881 of 1824

33. IT FOLLOWS - For my money mood is the most important thing in making a great Horror film. It's something that trips up a lot of films. The mood created by this movie is astonishing. One of the best tricks was to have a slight out of time quality to the setting; it's modern, yet has 80's feel.

post #882 of 1824

THE BLOB (1958)

 

Classic “Small Town USA under siege by supernatural forces” flick.  Steve McQueen is WAY too old to be playing a teen (well, all the actors are), but he’s got a terrific screen presence even at this early stage in his career.  I really love the all-in-one-night, small town feel of this film, as well as the increasing escalation of the threat that the Blob poses.  The remake’s great for its nastiness and mean-spirited violence, but I tend to prefer this original’s charming, aw shucks flavor.

 

1.   CARRIE (1976)
2.   FRANKENSTEIN (1931)
3.   NOSFERATU (1922)
4.   THE WITCH (2016)
5.   IT FOLLOWS (2015)
6.   ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932)
7.   THE INVITATION (2016)
8.   THE CONJURING (2013)
9.   THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999)
10. SIGNS (2002)
11. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (1972)
12. SINISTER (2012)
13. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969)
14. THE BLOB (1958)
15. THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960)
16. THE MUMMY (1959)
17. EVIL DEAD (2013)
18. THE STRANGERS (2008)
19. THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005)
20. WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)
21. GOOSEBUMPS (2015)
22. CORPSE BRIDE (2005)
23. THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)
24. THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL (2009)
25. THE WATCHER IN THE WOODS (1980)
26. TUCKER AND DALE VS. EVIL (2010)
27. LIGHTS OUT (2016)
28. THE VAULT OF HORROR (1973)
29. AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION (1982)
30. THE RAVEN (2012)
31. I AM THE PRETTY THING THAT LIVES IN THE HOUSE (2016)
32. 31 (2016)
33. BASKIN (2016)
34. MOCKINGBIRD (2014)
35. GIRLS NITE OUT (1983)

post #883 of 1824

FRIGHT NIGHT (1985)

 

I love this movie. It oozes tremendous affection for the genre, and has legitimately great performances from McDowall and Sarandon. The idea of marrying the vampire legend with a REAR WINDOW-style framework was a fantastic one, and the film manages to be playful and comedic without turning into anything even close to a spoof. It’s just a blast, and easily one of my favorite vampire films.

 

1.   CARRIE (1976)
2.   FRANKENSTEIN (1931)
3.   NOSFERATU (1922)
4.   THE WITCH (2016)
5.   IT FOLLOWS (2015)
6.   ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932)
7.   FRIGHT NIGHT (1985)
8.   THE INVITATION (2016)
9.   THE CONJURING (2013)
10. THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999)
11. SIGNS (2002)
12. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (1972)
13. SINISTER (2012)
14. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969)
15. THE BLOB (1958)
16. THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960)
17. THE MUMMY (1959)
18. EVIL DEAD (2013)
19. THE STRANGERS (2008)
20. THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005)
21. WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)
22. GOOSEBUMPS (2015)
23. CORPSE BRIDE (2005)
24. THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)
25. THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL (2009)
26. THE WATCHER IN THE WOODS (1980)
27. TUCKER AND DALE VS. EVIL (2010)
28. LIGHTS OUT (2016)
29. THE VAULT OF HORROR (1973)
30. AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION (1982)
31. THE RAVEN (2012)
32. I AM THE PRETTY THING THAT LIVES IN THE HOUSE (2016)
33. 31 (2016)
34. BASKIN (2016)
35. MOCKINGBIRD (2014)
36. GIRLS NITE OUT (1983)

post #884 of 1824

34. CHRISTINE - I've fallen super hard for this movie this decade. It gets better with each viewing. It's now firmly my third favorite King movie. It's so well directed. A mash up of a Teen/ High School movie with Horror. Carpenter nails everything. And Keith Gordon is so great in it.

 

"Let me tell you a little something about love, Dennis. It has a voracious appetite. It eats everything. Friendship. Family. It kills me how much it eats. But I'll tell you something else. You feed it right, and it can be a beautiful thing, and that's what we have. You know, when someone believes in you, man, you can do anything, any fucking thing in the entire universe. And when you believe right back in that someone, then watch out world, because nobody can stop you then, nobody! Ever!"

 "You feel this way about Leigh?"

"What? Fuck no, I'm talkin' about Christine, man! No shitter ever came between me and Christine..."

 

Fun Fact: Nic Cage auditioned for "Buddy" Repperton! The mind boggles.

 

The only thing the movie lacks is the epic car chase from the novel.

post #885 of 1824
Carpenter directs the hell out of CHRISTINE.
post #886 of 1824
Christine is filmed so well and so beautifully that your forget that you're just watching a movie about a murder car. Ok, it qualifies for much more than "just" that but you know what I mean.

DAT WIDESCREEN
post #887 of 1824

CHRISTINE is great.  The death of Moochie is one of my favorite sequences in Carpenter's canon; the buildup, with "Little Bitty Pretty One" playing from the car while Moochie cautiously gets closer to it only for the headlights to blaze on as Carpenter's own hard-charging score erupts is just terrific stuff.

 

 

post #888 of 1824
A local art house is running the digitally remastered "Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer." I'd never seen it on the big screen before. It's such a great slasher movie in that it's a social realism piece about a mass murderer. There's just no other horror movie quite like it.

I love the guy they go to buy a TV from.

"Oh, good... I see you've had some college."
post #889 of 1824

Watching "Henry" makes me feel queasy inside, like something I was never meant to see.  I respect it for that alone.

post #890 of 1824
I guess it's a good thing. It means they certainly accomplished their goal. But yeah, I've seen it a couple times and each time I wondered why, once it was over. It's just TOO yuck at times. Tom Towles is one of the most disgusting, loathsome characters ever in that movie..
post #891 of 1824

NIGHT OF THE DEMONS (1988)

 

Hadn’t seen this one before. It’s a fun time, surprisingly stylish in terms of its direction (some of the camera moves and shot compositions are great), and it’s always nice to see a horror movie actually set on Halloween, so that adds a bit of extra texture. It also has a terrific animated main title sequence. The characters are the weakest element, but that’s nothing new for this genre. I know this one has a cult following, and I can see why to an extent, but I think there are certainly other, better examples of fun ‘80s horror. Still, it was certainly an enjoyable watch.

 

1.   CARRIE (1976)
2.   FRANKENSTEIN (1931)
3.   NOSFERATU (1922)
4.   THE WITCH (2016)
5.   IT FOLLOWS (2015)
6.   ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932)
7.   FRIGHT NIGHT (1985)
8.   THE INVITATION (2016)
9.   THE CONJURING (2013)
10. THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999)
11. SIGNS (2002)
12. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (1972)
13. SINISTER (2012)
14. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969)
15. THE BLOB (1958)
16. THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960)
17. THE MUMMY (1959)
18. EVIL DEAD (2013)
19. THE STRANGERS (2008)
20. THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005)
21. WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)
22. GOOSEBUMPS (2015)
23. CORPSE BRIDE (2005)
24. THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)
25. THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL (2009)
26. THE WATCHER IN THE WOODS (1980)
27. TUCKER AND DALE VS. EVIL (2010)
28. NIGHT OF THE DEMONS (1988)
29. LIGHTS OUT (2016)
30. THE VAULT OF HORROR (1973)
31. AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION (1982)
32. THE RAVEN (2012)
33. I AM THE PRETTY THING THAT LIVES IN THE HOUSE (2016)
34. 31 (2016)
35. BASKIN (2016)
36. MOCKINGBIRD (2014)
37. GIRLS NITE OUT (1983)

post #892 of 1824

Knocked out a few more over the weekend:

 

First was HIDDEN, the debut film from the guys who made STRANGER THINGS.  It follows a family of 3 living in a grimy bunker after some unknown event has destroyed much of civilization.  Mysterious creatures with glowing eyes called 'Breathers' roam the surface.  Its a tight little thriller, and the plot takes some unconventional turns towards the end.  Its a small movie, but quick and a lot of fun.

 

Next was EVIL DEAD, the remake.  As far as remakes of beloved properties go, I'm pretty OK with this one.  Even with the dull characters, the whole drug addict in recovery thing is a really great framing device, and feels like a zig where most movies would zag.  I'm more than willing to meet this one half way.  The exceptional gore helps.

 

Last but not least, PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE.  I love this movie.  My favorite dePalma.  Seen it a bunch, but watching it on Halloween just feels right.

 

 

In order of enjoyment:

 

1. PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE (1974)

2. BONE TOMAHAWK (2015)

3. FROM BEYOND (1986)

4. LEVIATHAN (1989)

5. DEEP RISING (1998)

6. CREEPSHOW (1982)

7. HALLOWEEN III (1982)

8. LAND OF THE DEAD (2005)

9. KRAMPUS (2015)

10. HALLOWEEN II (1981)

11. HALLOWEEN (1978)

12. INVADERS FROM MARS (1986)

13. EVIL DEAD (2013)

14. BODY SNATCHERS (1993)

15. HIDDEN (2015)

16. DEEPSTAR SIX (1989)

17. DAGON (2002)

18. CAT'S EYE (1985)

19. THE LAST WINTER (2006)

20. LET US PREY (2014)

21. DARK FLOORS (2008)

22. BLAIR WITCH (2016)

23. THE RELIC (1997)

24. THE GREASY STRANGLER (2016)

25. THE RIFT (1989)

26. THE FOREST (2015)

27. HALLOWEEN (2007)

28. ERNEST SCARED STUPID (1991)

29. PHANTASM: RAVAGER (2016)

post #893 of 1824

Working from home today, which gives me a perfect excuse to fill my day with some appropriate viewing material…

 

HALLOWEEN (1978)

 

Not much to say about this one!  It’s still my favorite John Carpenter film, and easily one of my five favorite horror movies.  Not just a great genre film, it’s a great film, period, and Carpenter’s classic, classy filmmaking style rewards every time I watch.  Where the movies that imitated HALLOWEEN often resorted to excess, this movie’s great strength is its (relative) restraint.  Dean Cundey’s cinematography is tremendous, too, and goes a long way towards making the movie seem bigger (read: more expensive) than it really is.

 

1.   HALLOWEEN (1978)
2.   CARRIE (1976)
3.   FRANKENSTEIN (1931)
4.   NOSFERATU (1922)
5.   THE WITCH (2016)
6.   IT FOLLOWS (2015)
7.   ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932)
8.   FRIGHT NIGHT (1985)
9.   THE INVITATION (2016)
10. THE CONJURING (2013)
11. THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999)
12. SIGNS (2002)
13. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (1972)
14. SINISTER (2012)
15. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969)
16. THE BLOB (1958)
17. THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960)
18. THE MUMMY (1959)
19. EVIL DEAD (2013)
20. THE STRANGERS (2008)
21. THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005)
22. WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)
23. GOOSEBUMPS (2015)
24. CORPSE BRIDE (2005)
25. THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)
26. THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL (2009)
27. THE WATCHER IN THE WOODS (1980)
28. TUCKER AND DALE VS. EVIL (2010)
29. NIGHT OF THE DEMONS (1988)
30. LIGHTS OUT (2016)
31. THE VAULT OF HORROR (1973)
32. AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION (1982)
33. THE RAVEN (2012)
34. I AM THE PRETTY THING THAT LIVES IN THE HOUSE (2016)
35. 31 (2016)
36. BASKIN (2016)
37. MOCKINGBIRD (2014)
38. GIRLS NITE OUT (1983)

post #894 of 1824

35. FROM DUSK TIL DAWN - This one was HUGE for me back in the day. Multiple midnight shows with friends. Still love it. Kind of a dry run for GRINDHOUSE.

 

36. EQUINOX- awesomely weird low budget wonder. Proto original THE EVIL DEAD

 

37. JOHN CARPENTER'S THE FOG - one of the great modern ghost stories. As del Toro called it" Highly original blend of bare bones folk tale horror and metaphor".  The mood is a JC slam dunk, and I always crack up at the climax when Adrienne Barbeau is completely losing it and freaking out on the radio hysterically screaming "Stay out of The Fog!". This has shot back into my Carpenter Top 5.

 

38. DEAD & BURIED - perfect companion piece to THE FOG. Soooo very E.C. Maximum creepiness. I know Dan O'Bannon disowned it, but his touch is still all over it.

post #895 of 1824

Whelp, my challenge is done, but I think I made a pretty respectable showing. 3 more notches on the belt, and our industry Chewers should brace themselves for some laymen discussion of film-making techniques with...

 

Movie #19: Deep Red (1975)

 

This was (as far as I can remember) my first ever Argento flick, and it's easy to see where the love comes from. I lack the technical knowledge to do this justice, but I was blown away by stuff like the wide angles, how he framed shots through different objects, how he layered different elements, those moving track (?) shots where most film-makers would have just gone with a cut. It felt, for lack of a better term, like someone directing the ever-loving shit out of a movie. Basically the antithesis of the found footage "Point it here and wave it around a bunch!" style. And that soundtrack. I mentioned before that movie music often fades into the background for me, but this was just great, weird and oh so very 70's. There's just so much to love with the technical elements of this movie. Which is why it's so heartbreaking for me to say, but guys this movie was...it was boring. And I mean boring. This is undoubtedly the higher-caliber film, but in my mini-giallo duology A Bay of Blood was the clear winner in terms of entertainment value. The sheer artistry of it was enough to keep me moving forward, but I was 100% disengaged basically the entire time. Didn't care about the characters, the murders, the plot: it was all just such dull, dull white noise.

 

There are some flashes of great creepiness like the doll scene (I don't want to say more) and the eye in the closest, but overall it's all this fantastic craftsmanship in service of...nothing. You've got that amazing Goblin soundtrack pumping like the climax of the world's dopest heist film, but what you're watching is some doughy guy awkwardly shimmy down a column incredibly slowly.  It was crushing, because even 90 minutes in when the doll moment happens (and again, that is an AMAZING moment) I was ready and willing to jump on board, but at 2+ hours this felt punishing. I also apparently got some kind of restored version with sections that switched to subtitled Italian, and it wasn't hard to see why these scenes got cut for the English release. No idea if this is the Director's preferred cut or what, but what little tension there may have been was completely undercut by the low-rent romcom shenanigans. I mean we literally go from a scene of the protagonist discovering the horribly scalded dead body of a woman, to him joking about it with his reporter gal pal. At the end of the day the craft is just too good not to give it an incredibly reserved thumbs up, but while I'm eager to check out more Argento I can't see myself revisiting this outside of individual scenes.

 

Movie #20: Trick 'r Treat (2007) [Rewatch]

 

My first rewatch of the year, I chose this one because I figured that based on the success of Tales of Halloween last year it would make for a good party opener. This turned out to be moot as thanks to a round of flu at the school my party was down to me and our dope IT guy, but we made the best of it. That said, my reaction to this was basically the same as the first time around: eh. Going in with the knowledge that all these people were fucked did help me get on the movie's wavelength a bit more, but on the flip-side losing the element of surprise really sapped a lot of the energy (dat werewolf innuendo, woof). There's some fun to be had (I actually enjoyed the Cox/Sam fight more this time around, and even warmed up to the pumpkin face reveal) but it's really just a whole lot of OK. Honesty the only genuinely unsettling bit was the scene on the school-bus before the kids all get zombified, that was weird and upsetting in a way I wish the movie had tapped into more. I appreciate the spirit and the effort, but much like Krampus it just didn't move the needle that much and while it was pleasant enough, it's definitely out of the rotation at this point, unlike my last movie:

 

Movie #21: Braindead/Dead Alive (1992)

 

I mentioned before that Robert Rodriquez's Planet Terror was the goriest movie by volume I'd ever seen. It is nothing. It is a drop of water in the ocean. Being slightly (OK, seriously) buzzed obviously helped, but by gawd this was a movie. If you haven't seen it, I don't want to say anything. If you have seen it, I don't need to say anything. OK, one thing: punching that zombie baby. I wasn't even planning to watch this but my buddy saw the cover and wanted to try it and thank Sam we did. 90 minutes of alternately laughing hysterically and gagging, and it was truly the perfect way to cap off the Halloween season. It's been more of a mixed bag than years past, so I was happy to go out with a big, big win, and I look forward to subjecting more people to this. 

 

1. Creep (2014)

2. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986)

3. Critters (1986)

4. Goodnight Mommy (2014)

5. Screamers (1995)

6. Moontrap (1989)

7. A Bay of Blood (1971)

8. Paranoiac (1963)

9. Tremors 3: Back to Perfection (2001)

10. Humanoids from the Deep (1980)

11. Spawn (1997)

12. Baskin (2015)

13. Tremors 4: The Legend Begins (2004)

14. Witchfinder General (1968)

15. Split Second (1992)

16. The Devil's Rejects (2005)

17. Castle Freak (1995)

18. Puppet Master 5: The Final Chapter (1994)

19. Deep Red (1975)

20. Trick 'r Treat (2007) [Rewatch]

21. Braindead/Dead Alive (1992)

post #896 of 1824

So the final reckoning, with the usual caveat that this is strictly a "did I walk away net positive" system.

 

SEVERED THUMBS UP:

Critters (1986)

Goodnight Mommy (2014)

A Bay of Blood (1971)

Paranoiac (1963)

Tremors 3: Back to Perfection (2001)

Tremors 4: The Legend Begins (2004)

Witchfinder General (1968)

Split Second (1992)

Castle Freak (1995)

Deep Red (1975)

Trick 'r Treat (2007) [Rewatch]

Braindead/Dead Alive (1992)

 

SEVERED THUMBS DOWN:

Creep (2014)

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986)

Screamers (1995)

Moontrap (1989)

Humanoids from the Deep (1980)

Spawn (1997)

Baskin (2015)

The Devil's Rejects (2005)

Puppet Master 5: The Final Chapter (1994)

 

Once again I've topped last year, though I don't know how long I'll be able to keep that up. That said, it would be fun to hit the mythical 31 for 31 one of these years, and I'm definitely not lacking for choice, as my "too watch" pile is half again as big as my damn watched list. So...many...Puppet Master movies. Thanks again to everybody for participating, this really is one of my favorite CHUD traditions and I look forward to reading everyone's wrap-up in a slightly more sober state tomorrow. 

post #897 of 1824

I think I'm going to make it through here. My big Halloween plans tonight are more movies.

 

Last night was also a double feature, starting with the junk classic, Anaconda. It's still total shit, and still entertainingly so. I think back when I was child seeing this in theaters, I took it more seriously than I do now, and that seems insane. This is about as knowing as a Letterman monologue. Jon Voight really keeps the whole thing afloat somehow. It's as good a garbage performance as you'll ever see. The facial expressions he's pulling here are the best kind of camp, utterly committed. The CGI snake is a thing of beauty. Ice Cube, before he had even the first idea how to act. It's the cheese sweet spot that SciFi's been aiming at and missing for a decade now. This remains the right kind of awful.

 

And what would be the perfect double feature with Anaconda? Obviously, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, a piece of German expressionism from 1920! Completely absent the inherent creepiness that Nosfeartu still exudes, this is pretty much only of interest as a history lesson, but it's pretty remarkable in those terms. The set design, a creepy-Halloween pop-up book that clearly inspired everything about Tim Burton, is the easy stand out element of this. It's impressive stagecraft. The story and performances, again, are most interesting in a historical context. I can imagine a hundred years ago that people were really concerned that they'd murdered by people walking in their sleep. The title character ends up being a Dickensian cartoon more than a threatening presence. The deep piss-yellow filter that covers everything is kind of evocative. I'm all over the place with this movie. I liked it well enough for what it was, but I would say if I'm ever to watch it again, it would have to be with a live orchestra. Silent movies at home are a tough prospect for me, and this one lacks any Chaplin or Keaton (or Max Schreck) to keep my interest. Glad to have finally watched it in its entirety though.

 

1. Don't Look Now

2. Kwaidan

3. Ravenous

4. The Cabin in the Woods

5. It Follows

6. Castle Freak

7. The Nightmare

8. The Shallows

9. Halloween III: Season of the Witch

10. The Funhouse

11. Night Creatues

12. The Brides of Dracula

13. The Taking of Deborah Logan

14. Anaconda

15. [REC]4 Apocalypse

16. Paranoic

17. The Phantom of the Opera

18. The Haunting

19. Baskin

20. Curse of the Werewolf

21. The Beast of Xmoor

22. Westworld

23. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

24. #Horror

25. Kiss of the Vampire

26. Nightmare

27. The House by the Cemetery

28. 31

29. Cell

post #898 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post
 

Last night was also a double feature, starting with the junk classic, Anaconda. It's still total shit, and still entertainingly so. I think back when I was child seeing this in theaters, I took it more seriously than I do now, and that seems insane. This is about as knowing as a Letterman monologue. Jon Voight really keeps the whole thing afloat somehow. It's as good a garbage performance as you'll ever see. The facial expressions he's pulling here are the best kind of camp, utterly committed. The CGI snake is a thing of beauty. Ice Cube, before he had even the first idea how to act. It's the cheese sweet spot that SciFi's been aiming at and missing for a decade now. This remains the right kind of awful.

I unabashedly enjoy ANACONDA.  Voight is so damn entertaining in that thing, and I maintain he's the only member of the cast actually aware of what sort of movie they're all in.  I've seen some write off his work as "bad," but that's crazy; everything he's doing in there is 100% deliberately odd and goofy, and I love it.

 

In other news, my marathon continues...

 

HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1944)

 

Universal’s first attempt at bringing their “Big Three” monsters together in one film, and the result isn’t quite as cohesive as one might hope; Dracula ends up being a first act threat (joined by a whole set of supporting characters we never see again), while the Frankenstein Monster is only revived for the climax, so never do all three characters interact, which seems like a curious choice.  That said, we’ve got Boris Karloff playing a prototypical mad scientist, which is neat, and Lon Chaney Jr. continues to deliver the tormented goods as Talbot.  J. Carrol Naish is also really good (and sympathetic) as Karloff’s hunchback assistant.  It’s fun, but definitely in the lower tier of Universal’s horror cycle.

 

THE EXORCIST (1973)

 

A total masterpiece, and one of my favorite films of all time.  William Friedkin’s ferocious, uncompromising craft pairs incredibly well with William Peter Blatty’s nuanced and thoughtful character writing.  Ellen Burstyn and Linda Blair are both Oscar-worthy, but for me the performance of the film has always belonged to Jason Miller, and I regard it as one of the best turns of the 1970s; never has a crisis of faith been so subtly and richly etched on the screen.  I know some don’t find the movie to be scary (I think the most visceral moments still pack an incredible and frightening punch, but that’s a debate for another time), but I can’t imagine a person sitting down to watch THE EXORCIST and not being enormously impressed just by the filmmaking alone.

 

1.   THE EXORCIST (1973)
2.   HALLOWEEN (1978)
3.   CARRIE (1976)
4.   FRANKENSTEIN (1931)
5.   NOSFERATU (1922)
6.   THE WITCH (2016)
7.   IT FOLLOWS (2015)
8.   ISLAND OF LOST SOULS (1932)
9.   FRIGHT NIGHT (1985)
10. THE INVITATION (2016)
11. THE CONJURING (2013)
12. THE BLAIR WITCH PROJECT (1999)
13. SIGNS (2002)
14. TALES FROM THE CRYPT (1972)
15. SINISTER (2012)
16. FRANKENSTEIN MUST BE DESTROYED (1969)
17. THE BLOB (1958)
18. THE BRIDES OF DRACULA (1960)
19. THE MUMMY (1959)
20. EVIL DEAD (2013)
21. THE STRANGERS (2008)
22. THE EXORCISM OF EMILY ROSE (2005)
23. WEREWOLF OF LONDON (1935)
24. GOOSEBUMPS (2015)
25. CORPSE BRIDE (2005)
26. THE PIT AND THE PENDULUM (1961)
27. THE HOUSE OF THE DEVIL (2009)
28. HOUSE OF FRANKENSTEIN (1944)
29. THE WATCHER IN THE WOODS (1980)
30. TUCKER AND DALE VS. EVIL (2010)
31. NIGHT OF THE DEMONS (1988)
32. LIGHTS OUT (2016)
33. THE VAULT OF HORROR (1973)
34. AMITYVILLE II: THE POSSESSION (1982)
35. THE RAVEN (2012)
36. I AM THE PRETTY THING THAT LIVES IN THE HOUSE (2016)
37. 31 (2016)
38. BASKIN (2016)
39. MOCKINGBIRD (2014)
40. GIRLS NITE OUT (1983)


Edited by Belloq87 - 10/31/16 at 10:26pm
post #899 of 1824
Jon Voight has THE rapiest scowl on his face that whole movie. But yeah he is damn entertaining in it.

Anaconda is my Dad's favorite movie. Like....over everything else ever favorite. He took me to see it in the theater multiple times. Even back then I thought that was a bit weird. His second favorite is Fool's Gold. I have no idea what's going on in his head..
post #900 of 1824
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

35. FROM DUSK TIL DAWN - This one was HUGE for me back in the day. Multiple midnight shows with friends. Still love it. Kind of a dry run for GRINDHOUSE.

 

36. EQUINOX- awesomely weird low budget wonder. Proto original THE EVIL DEAD

 

37. JOHN CARPENTER'S THE FOG - one of the great modern ghost stories. As del Toro called it" Highly original blend of bare bones folk tale horror and metaphor".  The mood is a JC slam dunk, and I always crack up at the climax when Adrienne Barbeau is completely losing it and freaking out on the radio hysterically screaming "Stay out of The Fog!". This has shot back into my Carpenter Top 5.

 

38. DEAD & BURIED - perfect companion piece to THE FOG. Soooo very E.C. Maximum creepiness. I know Dan O'Bannon disowned it, but his touch is still all over it.


39. MESSIAH OF EVIL - deep cut! almost as effective as PHANTASM as nightmare mood piece. Maybe THE underrated 70's Horror film.

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