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The Sherlock Holmes Thread (Movies, Books, Television Shows, Games etc.)

post #1 of 36
Thread Starter 

 

It seems to me that if we have threads for the likes of Batman and Jack Reacher, we should also have one for Sherlock Holmes. He is, after all, incredibly popular at the moment with television projects on either side of the pond and supposedly a third movie with Robert Downey Jnr in the works. Not coincidentally, I’ve just started reading the stories of Arthur Conan Doyles, having recently realized that Sherlock Holmes might be my favourite fictional character despite barely reading any of the original source material throughout my life.

 

I guess that’s a testament to how well Sherlock Holmes has made the transition into other media. In the same way that I can use Bond as a series of markers for significant events in my life (having been a child when the ludicrous adventures of Roger Moore played out on national television each Christmas, and being close enough to adulthood for a maverick uncle to sneak me into the second of the more grown-up Timothy Dalton pictures at the cinema), the same is true of Sherlock Holmes.

 

One of my first encounters with the consulting detective came via the magic of Walt Disney. I’m not entirely sure if I was old enough to connect Basil The Great Mouse Detective with the character it was drawing inspiration from, only that I had recently visited London for the first time and was amazed to see this grand adventure occurring in that very same location!

 

However, he would have a much greater influence on me later, ironically via a movie made a year earlier. I didn’t see Young Sherlock Holmes on the big screen on its original release, instead he arrived into my life via the magic of a television which my mother finally convinced my father to let me keep in my bedroom. One of my absolute favourite movies, Young Sherlock Holmes’ mixture of whimsy and horror, combined with (at the time) state-of-the-art special effects, fired up my imagination. I could write several lengthy paragraphs on this movie, and may do so later in this thread, but will end here by saying that it was this movie which made me a fan of the world’s most famous consulting detective.

 

Sherlock Holmes has continued to appear throughout the years in various forms of media, always remaining in the public consciousness; his popularity seemingly growing as the years have passed. For a long time, he was a reminder, in a world of advancing technology and increasing complexities, that the most powerful tool remains the human mind.  More than that, he represented a much simpler time when fingerprints and databases gave way to the most elementary (pun intended) of conflicts: a mind on the side of the law pitting itself against a mind on the side of criminality to see which was greater.

 

The recent successes of both Elementary and Sherlock have proved that, much like with Bond, it is not so much the world around these characters which interests us but the characters themselves. As interesting as it is to see Sherlock Holmes face against the criminal elements of the Victorian era, it is equally captivating to watch the man apply his same deductive reasoning to the modern era. The later movies of Basil Rathbone also took this approach, with the great detective pitting his wits against Nazis, but these two shows have found greater popularity with the format.

 

Both of these shows have also shown how diversely the character can be depicted whilst remaining true to who the character is. Both are incredibly brilliant but incredibly flawed human beings whose gifts are what sets them apart from humanity. If Cumberbatch’s version has accepted and embraced this to make himself stronger, Miller’s has been broken by it and faces a constant struggle as to how much further he can step back into the light without changing what makes him special. The first is without emotional pain, whilst the second has allowed himself to be defined by it.

 

It is for this long-lasting appeals and his diversity that I think we owe Sherlock Holmes a thread on CHUD alongside other great fictional characters. One of my New Years Resolutions is to make my way through the movies of Basil Rathbone and so this will at least give me a place to discuss them, if nothing else!  

post #2 of 36

I guess I'm somewhat of a purist when it comes to Sherlock Holmes. Maybe it's because I read some of Doyle's stories as a kid before seeing any adaptations, but I've found almost all of them seriously lacking and neglecting source material. There are two notable exceptions though. One is the British tv-series from 80's, The Adventures/Memoirs/From a Casebook of Sherlock Holmes. They absolutely nailed the character and the world in that series, like the fact for example that Sherlock Holmes didn't smoke pipe but cigarettes. They even brought up his cocaine habbit a couple of times.

 I'm surprised you didn't mention that show in your post, if you haven't seen it I urge you to track it down. If you like Sherlock, there's a good chance that you'll like this one too.

 

 The other successful adaptation is, of course, Sherlock. It succeeds to do exactly what the 80's series did and gets the character right. Well, minus the cocaine part. 

 

Then there's stuff like those Downey jr. movies. Entertaining movies and Downey and Law are a good team. But every problem is solved by beating the crap out of someone. No investigating, no analyzing, no deducting. Just beating the crap out of someone.

 

And lastly I want to recommend the worst Holmes adaptation ever made: Sherlock Holmes in New York starring Roger Moore, Patrick Macnee and John Huston. You have to see it to believe it. Both Moore and Macnee have utterly bizzarre speech patterns and voices and are simply just terrible in their roles. And John Huston isn't any better either. Also, Holmes is roughly one third of the movie wearing a disguise that makes him look like 1970's Elvis.

post #3 of 36
Not a huge fan of either Downey or Cumberbatch as Holmes, although better writing could take care of that. They certainly could do justice to the role, but the stories and dialogue are just too much. Freeman is good as Watson but I think Law may be the best Watson ever.
post #4 of 36

I am a fan of most iterations of Sherlock Holmes but not very well versed, I can't recall if I have read any of the original stories.  I agree that the Downey Jr franchise is way too much of an action hero, it's silly. 

 

The 1980's series with Jeremy Brett was pretty good but I can't recall any details.  I liked Sherlock a lot mainly due to the lead actors.  I tried to watch Elementary but the fact that it wasn't (as good as) Sherlock made me give up on it.

 

Young Sherlock Holmes was pretty good for its time.  The main problem I have, for all of the stories, is an inability to recall any plot details at all, even for stories I've seen a few different versions of like Hound of the Baskervilles.  It all blurs together.

 

The Seven Percent Solution is pretty different, and has Freud in it.

post #5 of 36

I can't remember my first exposure to Sherlock Holmes. Most of it was pretty contemporaneous in my early life, I think: The Rathbone movies, "The Great Mouse Detective", "Young Sherlock Holmes", Peter Cushing in Hammer's "The Hound of the Baskervilles"-- it's all a jumble. Pretty sure I started reading and loving Doyle on my own, but one of the things Texas school literature textbooks get right is that there's always some Doyle story tucked in right next to Dickens, usually "The Red-Headed League". So all school children here get at least some exposure to the literary Holmes.

 

To agree with Majestyk, Jeremy Brett and the Granada TV series (which aired over here variously on public television, or the A&E channel) will always be my favorite screen Holmes. Brett's Homes is dead-on in both look and manner, and the show largely stuck with the source material.

 

I also really love Cushing in "Baskervilles". Rathbone is good too, and I think the actor whom most Americans always associated the character-- until RDJ, I guess. Some of those Rathbone movies also set the precedent for a modernization like "Sherlock" too... "The Secret Weapon", for instance, brings Holmes into the then-contemporary WWII era. 

 

I dig Nicol Williamson in "The Seven-Percent Solution", and would have liked to see him play the part in a straight-up Doyle adaptation. "Solution" is a pastiche, of course, based on Nicholas Meyer's (of "Wrath of Khan" fame) novel. But when it comes to that, Meyer's novels like "Solution" and "The West-End Horror" are awfully good. If you've gone through all of Doyle, I'd highly recommend those.

 

"Young Sherlock" is a fun movie. I think Young Lad Slim was in a bit of a purist phase when that came out, so I didn't like it at the time ("Holmes and Watson didn't meet at school!"). But I enjoy it now.

 

But on that purist note, I still couldn't get into "Elementary". What I saw was so far removed from the character and his environs that I frankly wondered why they bothered. It also pales incredibly next to "Sherlock", which I love.  People keep urging me to give "Elementary" another chance, though. Maybe I will.

 

I'll throw out maybe the oddest representation of Holmes I've ever seen: There was a cartoon called "BraveStar" when I was a kid, which was a space Western about a marshall on an alien planet, and his sentient anthropomorphic horse. They did a two-parter (unusual for a cartoon at the time) where Marshall BraveStar visits Earth to meet none other than Sherlock Holmes-- who, when he and Moriarty had plunged from Reichenbach Falls, went through a time vortex to arrive in the future. And he could shoot lightning from his hands as a side-effect. No shit.

post #6 of 36

LOVED this comic as a kid.  My two favourite characters coming together to solve a mystery.

 

 

When I was in London, I sought out Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub and had lunch in Doyle's favourite seat.

Now where the hell you suppose Bob Kane eats? 

post #7 of 36

Cool. I'll have to add that to my itinerary when I make my visit...

 

I imagine Bob Kane was dining at 21, while Bill Finger and Jerry Robinson were back at the studio doing all the work on the Batman strip.

post #8 of 36

Ya it's a really cool old pub near the courthouse with a lot of history.  Definitely worth a stop. 

https://www.google.ca/search?q=ye+olde+cheshire+cheese+london&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=JbHIUo7bMsqFyQGu14HIDQ&sqi=2&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1680&bih=885

 

AND you have to swing by 221 Baker street.

post #9 of 36

MrSaxon (or anyone else) have you read Caleb Carr's THE ITALIAN SECRETARY ?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Italian_Secretary

 

I'm a huge fan of Caleb's THE ALIENST but sadly, this was just 'okay'.

post #10 of 36

Visiting 221B Baker St on my visit to London was a highlight of my life!

 

I third or fourth (or whatever we're up to now) the recommendation of the 80's BBC Series starring Jeremy Brett. Really well done show and Brett is the best depiction of Literary Holmes I've seen.

 

There is a whole library's worth of books with Sherlock Holmes post-Doyle.

 

My favorite is Ten Years Beyond Baker Street (Holmes vs. Fu Manchu!), by Cay Van Ash. Also the two Moriarty novels by John Gardner, while not Canon, are a hoot, especially if you like James Bond.

 

I'd add Solar Pons as a US Pulp knock off of Holmes to the mix as well.

post #11 of 36

I have to admit, knowing that Natalie Dormer is now on Elementary and the character she plays has me very intrigued and considering watching the show again.  She's great on Game of Thrones and imagine she's good on Elementary as well.

 

My problem with that show is mostly JLM and his portrayal of Holmes.  He comes off as an asshole whereas Cumberbatch comes off as an eccentric weirdo.  

post #12 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Hallorhan View Post
 

MrSaxon (or anyone else) have you read Caleb Carr's THE ITALIAN SECRETARY ?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Italian_Secretary

 

I'm a huge fan of Caleb's THE ALIENST but sadly, this was just 'okay'.

 

Yeah, "just okay" pretty much sums that one up, though I'm generally a fan of Carr's novels. Still, it's one of the better Holmes pastiches I've read outside of Meyer. (Also, I've always meant to track down some Solar Pons stories, as Cylon suggests above. Just haven't gotten around to it yet.)

 

And then there's that whole long afterword to The Italian Secretary, where Carr compares Holmes to his own "Alienist" character. That rubbed me the wrong way for being a little presumptuous... Lazlo Kreizler ain't in the same league as Sherlock Holmes, Carr!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rylander View Post
 

I have to admit, knowing that Natalie Dormer is now on Elementary and the character she plays has me very intrigued and considering watching the show again.  She's great on Game of Thrones and imagine she's good on Elementary as well.

 

My problem with that show is mostly JLM and his portrayal of Holmes.  He comes off as an asshole whereas Cumberbatch comes off as an eccentric weirdo.  

 

May as well tell me now-- is Dormer playing Irene Adler on the show?

 

I'd say both Miller and Cumberbatch come off as assholes in their portrayals. The literary Holmes, while being a brusque ascetic sometimes, was more often than not very cordial to other people. He was a Victorian, after all. It's as though all the modern Holmeses (I'm including RDJ's here too) are being filtered through a take-off of Holmes, Dr. Gregory House-- the socially repugnant dickhead everyone tolerates because he's a genius.

post #13 of 36

Rupert Everett was terrific in a one-off as Holmes maybe ten years ago.

 

I also remember enjoying very much Sherlock, with James D'Arcy pre-M&C as a younger, somewhat callow Holmes, Vincent Donofrio as Moriarty, and Richard E. Graves, splendid as a hobbled Mycroft. 

post #14 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slim View Post
 

 

May as well tell me now-- is Dormer playing Irene Adler on the show?

 

Both. Moriarty is the Criminal Mastermind personae she uses.

post #15 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr Majestyk View Post
 

One is the British tv-series from 80's, The Adventures/Memoirs/From a Casebook of Sherlock Holmes. They absolutely nailed the character and the world in that series, like the fact for example that Sherlock Holmes didn't smoke pipe but cigarettes. They even brought up his cocaine habbit a couple of times.

 

 I'm surprised you didn't mention that show in your post, if you haven't seen it I urge you to track it down. If you like Sherlock, there's a good chance that you'll like this one too.

 

 

Unbelievably, I've never seen this despite the unanimous glowing reviews I've read and listened to throughout the years. I've decided that 2014 is my Sherlock Holmes year (reading the books, going through the Rathbone movies) and so I'll see if I can track this down.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Hallorhan View Post
 

LOVED this comic as a kid.  My two favourite characters coming together to solve a mystery.

 

 

 

I love this idea.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Hallorhan View Post
 

MrSaxon (or anyone else) have you read Caleb Carr's THE ITALIAN SECRETARY ?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Italian_Secretary

 

I'm a huge fan of Caleb's THE ALIENST but sadly, this was just 'okay'.

 

I've not read this. I'm doing a book order later in the week and so I may as well order this too.

post #16 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Subotai View Post
 

Rupert Everett was terrific in a one-off as Holmes maybe ten years ago.

 

I also remember enjoying very much Sherlock, with James D'Arcy pre-M&C as a younger, somewhat callow Holmes, Vincent Donofrio as Moriarty, and Richard E. Graves, splendid as a hobbled Mycroft. 

 

Well, you made me track down that Everett-Homes film on Youtube-- "The Silk Stocking", because I'd never heard of it. I'm about halfway through, and it's not bad. Everett makes for a rather low-key Holmes doesn't he? Moments where a lot of the other Holmes actors would go for a kind of manic energy, he keeps it cool. It's different. Funny also that he comes off as a very young Holmes, even though Everett had to be already past forty when he made it. 

 

My cursory research also tells me that this was a production sequel to yet another version of "The Hound of the Baskervilles"-- same guy playing Watson but a different Holmes, Richard Roxburgh. May have to give that one a shot too. 

post #17 of 36

There are tons of episodes of the BBC show on youtube and even full length Rathbone movies.

 

post #18 of 36
The 1959 Hammer adaptation of THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES has a reputation as the best Holmes film. Maybe it is, maybe it isn't. I don't care. Love it to bits. It just blazes along at a terrific pace, a perfect entertainment. Cushing is a delightfully coked-up show-off. And Morell is the definitive Conan Doylesque Watson. Hammer strays from ACD in some aspects, choosing to pump up the elements of horror, sex, and humor. Fisher was in his prime as a director. His version of The Legend Of The Hound is nightmare fuel. A shame they didn't make it a series.

Here's the trailer, which is lousy with spoilers and fun.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQRQ8MXqS10
post #19 of 36

Finished watching "The Silk Stocking" tonight finally... Actually, what I wrote above about Everett being "low-key" is an understatement-- he's practically a somnambulist throughout the thing. That was clearly a choice on his part, which distinguishes him from a lot of the other Holmes actors, but it doesn't quite work. And that's a shame, because he otherwise cuts a fine figure in the role. Would have liked to have seen what he would have done if he'd had another go at it.

 

The movie was okay over all. The mystery was pretty substandard, with not a whole lot of deducing going on. Much of the movie puts Holmes in a sort of "profiler" position, examining the psychological MO behind a series of sex crimes-- which is more modern network TV procedural than Doyle-esque story...  And the solution to the case is even more obvious as soon as you spot the actor in the credits who was a nobody ten years ago, but a fairly big name these days. Still, worth a watch if you've nothing better to do.

 

YouTube then rolled directly into a Jeremy Brett episode "The Master Blackmailer", which I then got sucked into watching. An episode I don't remember having seen before-- and a story which likewise didn't require much detective work on Holmes's part. The show makes a point of that though, that Holmes faces a known adversary whom he cannot defeat with his brain, and so he has to resort to some pretty direct and underhanded tactics out of desperation... So that's somewhat interesting.

 

Rylander's right-- there's apparently a ton of that Granada series up there. Also worth a watch if you want to kill an hour or three... I'm going to try and remember the Brett episodes I thought were particularly good back in the day, and if I can come up with some I'll recommend them here.

post #20 of 36
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the write-up of "The Silk Stocking". I haven't seen it and probably won't do so based on what you've written. It's a shame as I can imagine Everett in the role and, with a tweak, I'm sure he would have made an excellent Holmes. 

 

I'm very much looking forward to getting around to those Jeremy Brett episodes, having never seen any of them whilst hearing nothing but praise for them.

 

I recently stumbled over a 1994 television movie called 1994 Baker Street: The Return Of Sherlock Holmes and, what struck me, is that they were attempting the same premise that both Sherlock and Elementary have had success with but were far too literal in their approach. Instead of Sherlock having been born into the modern world, he's still a Victorian detective but one who cryogenically froze himself, having grown bored with solving crimes of that era, and is awoken in San Francisco by an earthquake. Anthony Higgins is actually really good in the role, even if the surrounding story involving a decendant of Moriarty, is only average entertainment (although there are certainly some nice touches, including a man mauled to death by a tiger in a street and a reference to Basil Rathbone). The entire thing is on Youtube for any one who is both curious and has too much time to spare.

post #21 of 36

"Devil's Foot" is a particulary good episode from the Jeremy Brett Holmes series.

post #22 of 36

"In the world of BBC's SHERLOCK nobody ever grew up saying "No shit, Sherlock".#mindblown -Devin

post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

"In the world of BBC's SHERLOCK nobody ever grew up saying "No shit, Sherlock".#mindblown -Devin

 

Ha. That's actually one of the first things that occurred to me when I first heard about the BBC show long ago (the show also sounded like a fucking stupid idea to me then-- more fool, me). Same would go for "Elementary" of course... Updating cultural icons always carries some of this. Years ago I was working on a Frankenstein modernization and realized we were dealing with a universe in which the common-to-us phrase "Frankenstein's monster" had not been a phrase yet.

 

Even with something like "The Walking Dead"-- when I still bothered to watch it-- well, that's clearly some alternate universe in which George Romero never made movies. Otherwise characters would be constantly saying "This is just like that movie!" And they'd be calling the undead "zombies" rather than any of the other bullshit terms they contrive on that show. 

 

....

 

I gather this has been batted around over in the "Sherlock" thread, but I haven't read through it in order to avoid spoilers for the two upcoming episodes:

 

http://www.avclub.com/article/its-elementary-sherlock-how-the-cbs-procedural-sur-200870

 

What a load of horseshit.

 

Okay, that's a bit harsh... I realize many people like "Elementary". But I've given the last few episodes a watch and find it merely okay, and on a base-line, ignoring the fact that it features main characters named Holmes and Watson, I fail to see what distinguishes it from something like "The Mentalist". The AV Club's recommendation seems to rest on the fact that they find it an above-average procedural with some decent character development over an American 22-episode season-- but that development, in turn, rests on how radically the characters depart from the literary source, and on a supporting cast who have no literary source in the first place. Hell, you could have said similar things about "House" when it was good... From an adaptation standpoint, you're talking apples and oranges, really. To say it surpasses "Sherlock" as a Sherlock Holmes show is absolutely ridiculous. 

post #24 of 36

It's been 20-something years since I read it, but I remember really loving Mark Frost's pseudo-Holmes book, THE LIST OF SEVEN.   Del Toro was attached to the film version many, many years back and would have nailed it.   It was a lot of fun.

post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratty View Post
 

It's been 20-something years since I read it, but I remember really loving Mark Frost's pseudo-Holmes book, THE LIST OF SEVEN.   Del Toro was attached to the film version many, many years back and would have nailed it.   It was a lot of fun.

 

Hadn't heard of that novel before. It sounds pretty cool, and I'm now adding it to my "to-read" list. Thanks, Ratty. From what I read of the plot, it reminds me a little of a novel Robert Bloch wrote a long time ago about Jack the Ripper, which featured Doyle as a character.

 

Another cool thing I'm just now hearing about is "A Slight Trick of the Mind", an upcoming movie starring Sir Ian McKellen as a aged Holmes... McKellen as Holmes is so goddamn, ahem, elementary-- why the hell has that not happened already?

 

Looking around on Amazon today I've also come across a fairly recent Holmes novel, "House of Silk" by Anthony Horowitz. Horowitz is the creator of the WWII detective series "Foyle's War" which I really dig. Anybody around here read that book?

post #26 of 36

I've actually been revisiting the Jeremy Brett series in between catching up on my Doctor Who and it's no small wonder why I always think of him when I think of Holmes. I saw a bunch of those episodes when I was a kid and the thing that strikes me now is how underplayed his version of the character is, especially compared the irreverent, nigh superhuman genius we see in current interpretations. I would sooner trust Brett's Holmes with helping me out of a tight spot than most any other.

post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny View Post
 

I've actually been revisiting the Jeremy Brett series in between catching up on my Doctor Who and it's no small wonder why I always think of him when I think of Holmes. I saw a bunch of those episodes when I was a kid and the thing that strikes me now is how underplayed his version of the character is, especially compared the irreverent, nigh superhuman genius we see in current interpretations. I would sooner trust Brett's Holmes with helping me out of a tight spot than most any other.

 

I agree totally, Johnny. Though I wouldn't call Brett's Holmes "underplayed" (that would be Rupert Everett in the role, as I wrote above). But revisiting Brett is refreshing after all the more "modern" takes we've seen lately, either drug-addled or-- in "Sherlock"-- the borderline "sociopath" versions (and those versions, of course, have their obvious merits). Brett is almost always the cool professional. He is, in short, the literary Holmes brought to life. And I'd trust him with mine too. 

post #28 of 36

Vulture recently had a list of Holmes movies that can be streamed online

 

http://www.vulture.com/2014/01/best-netflix-other-sherlock-holmes-to-stream.html

post #29 of 36

Well, I'm finally caught up on the new season of "Sherlock"-- which means I now have to get caught up on the thread for that one, and post some detailed thoughts there. Suffice to say, though, I really liked it for the most part.

 

But I found it pretty damned coincidental that the episode "His Last Vow" was based on "The Master Blackmailer" ("The Adventure of  Charles Augustus Milverton"), the Jeremy Brett episode I watched by total chance a few weeks ago, as I wrote about above.

post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rylander View Post
 

Vulture recently had a list of Holmes movies that can be streamed online

 

http://www.vulture.com/2014/01/best-netflix-other-sherlock-holmes-to-stream.html

 

Ach. I see that "Murder by Decree" is up there on Netflix. That one completely slipped my mind when I was running down actors I've enjoyed in the Holmes role. Haven't seen it in a dog's age, but I remember Christopher Plummer (and one of my all-time favorite actors, James motherfucking Mason, as Watson!)  -- and the movie-- being pretty good. Have to give that another watch. Like now.

post #31 of 36
I'd never seen any of the Jeremy Brett series so I've watched most of the "Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" series over the last month or so and have absolutely no problem understanding why his is the preferred embodiment of the character.

It's not just the most charismatic, magnetic, impressive and fun Holmes I've ever seen, it's maybe the most charismatic, magnetic, impressive and fun performance I've ever seen in a television show. The show is somewhat dated but the performance remains nothing short of thrilling. It's on the level of Gandolfini's Tony Soprano. Just awesome.
post #32 of 36
You been watching that on Jones fella? I too have been indulging.

I actually lived for a month in the same tenement Arthur Conan Doyle was born in in Edinburgh.

Only recently finished all the stories. Its amazing how people talk about Canon when ACD was pretty loose with it.

In terms of character Johnny Lee Miller is actually my favourite Holmes. I'd love to see him in a period version.
post #33 of 36
Thread Starter 

Brett is my second favorite "traditional" Holmes (Rathbone has too much nostalgic value to me to ever lose that first place) and I agree with you, Andy, about Miller. Whatever problems I may have with the show around him, I love his modern version of Holmes and think he'd be equally wonderful in a period setting. He's definitely my favorite "modern" Holmes.

post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Bain View Post


In terms of character Johnny Lee Miller is actually my favourite Holmes. I'd love to see him in a period version.


That would be interesting to see. I understand Cumberbatch and Freeman are going Victorian with the characters soon, so maybe the "Elementary" crew will follow suit at some point.

Nobody will ever trump Jeremy Brett, though.
post #35 of 36
Brett's so insanely magnetic there were moments I'd rewind and watch twice every episode. I fell in love with Charles Dance for how wickedly charismatic he was on Game of Thrones but Brett is a level above even that. I've never read the stories so I can't say how faithful I find the performance, but in terms of being a compelling small screen presence I can't think of anyone who matches him outside of Gandolfini.
post #36 of 36
Thread Starter 

There's a book about Mycroft Holmes, written by a basketball player, and it actually sounds pretty good!

 

Quote:
 

We barely spend much time with Sherlock, but that’s okay. The story introduces Mycroft’s best friend and confidante, Cyrus Douglas, who, though a man of color, has managed to start a (very successful) tobacco shop in London, importing rare tobacco from all over the world. The book doesn’t shy away from the hard facts, and as you can imagine, being a black man in London in the 1860s, things are never easy for Cyrus. He constantly has to act like a servant, even when spending time with his friend, the apparently open-minded and liberal Mycroft Holmes. One great passage that sums this experience up is as follows:

 

 

Douglas counted. Fewer than fifty were present. Nevertheless, that meant one hundred eyes, all critical of a tall, somber black man in his middle years, who—though he might be staring humbly at the floor—seemed too self-possessed to be a servant. Especially since he stood next to a young man of no more than three-and-twenty…

 

 

The real story starts when Mycroft and Cyrus Douglas get wind of an odd thing happening in Cyrus’ homeland, Trinidad. Children are being murdered along a beach on the coast of the island. When Mycroft’s young and beautiful fiancée leaves abruptly to go back to Trinidad (where her family has a vast plantation), Mycroft cannot stop himself from following her, and Cyrus goes as well, since the children who are dying just happen to be from his village.

 

From there on, the story reads quickly, and becomes quite a page-turner towards the end. The attention to detail and the historical facts are all extremely interesting, and the plot, if at some times far-fetched, is still an enjoyable read.

 

Am going to add this to my list of Books To Read.

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