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Misogyny and the discrimination and abuse of women in the US and around the world

post #1 of 2353
Thread Starter 

I listened to the amazing former President Carter on the Diane Rehm show this morning.  He has written a new book about the world's failure to accord equality, respect and basic dignity to women.  Obviously, this human phenomenon runs the gamut from everyday misogyny to the fact that one in four college age women will be raped yet an extremely low percentage ever report it to the great income disparity between the sexes and the ubiquity and blind-eye-turning to spousal abuse in our own culture to the horrors of oppression and prevalence of the barbaric and disgusting genital mutilation abroad, etc. 

 

Aside from basic decency, fairness and the value of all human life, the treatment of women and girls is a proven indicator and facilitator of progress, enlightenment, peace, education, even economic development. 

 

Strong recommend!

 

Quote:

President Jimmy Carter, our 39th president, has set a high bar for post-presidential accomplishments: He’s written more than 24 books, been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and continues to work to solve problems around the world.In recent years, he says he’s "become convinced that the most serious and unaddressed worldwide challenge is the deprivation and abuse of women and girls." It's a problem that he says is connected to the misinterpretation of selected religious texts and a general acceptance of violence and warfare. Join Diane for a conversation with President Jimmy Carter on his call to action for women and girls.

 

 

Listen at the WAMU website...

post #2 of 2353

It really is an important issue that should be discussed more.  Studies have shown that the main factor in controlling population growth, is education of young females.  Humanities growing numbers present the biggest threat to the quality of life on the planet.  More educated women leads to a better future of everyone. 

post #3 of 2353

Former POTUS Carter was on Colbert last night.

 

Unfortunately, the Colbert website seems to be borked right now....

Here's an alternate.

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/03/26/jimmy-carter-tells-stephen-colbert-the-bible-is-misused-to-subjugate-women/

 

 

It should be noted that one of the main driving forces when it comes to misogyny is fundamentalist religion.

post #4 of 2353

We'll never have gender equality when so many of the world's religions actively force females to take on a subservient role.  It's pathetic.

post #5 of 2353

We have to get beyond the male/female dichotomy...it's as outdated as parachute pants.  There are smart people and dumb people and they should be judged on those merits alone...not gender or skin color.

post #6 of 2353

I have no idea why this is still a issue

Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post
 

We'll never have gender equality when so many of the world's religions actively force females to take on a subservient role.  It's pathetic.

 

Bingo!  

 

Besides that I have no idea why this is still a issue in 2014?   

post #7 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by yt View Post
 

 this human phenomenon runs the gamut from everyday misogyny to the fact that one in four college age women will be raped yet an extremely low percentage ever report it 

 

 

I read this sentence three times to ensure I hadn't misread it. That's an absolutely appalling statistic. 

post #8 of 2353
Too appalling. I don't normally question numbers, but that has to be inflated.

Carter rocked on Colbert last night.
post #9 of 2353
Thread Starter 

It's true, and it mostly goes unreported and the rapists walk through the raindrops.  Those and more ugly stats here.  What Pres. Carter talked about was how young women are disinclined to report rape anyway because of all of the glorious slut-shaming and victim-blaming that goes on in this country (my words, not his) but that the colleges actually discourage victims further because they don't want the bad publicity. 

 

He obviously also talks about the role various religious leaders and organizations play in promoting misogyny and discrimination against women, saying how the Koran and Jesus both are reverent towards women and treat them as equals, but that (as with everything having to do with these texts) people cherry-pick only those verses that support their gross agenda.  I do recommend listening to the interview on WAMU and I may pick up his book and add it to the pile.

post #10 of 2353

My friend lives across the street from a fairly conservative college.  I went to hang out with him and we walked his dog at the college...he told me a girl he used to date went there, and that she was tied to a bed post and raped, and then left there, and that it was a source of her trauma that she played out in their relationship.  I couldn't believe it.  I even dated a girl who had PTSD from childhood and adult rape incidents.  Crazy.

post #11 of 2353
Thread Starter 

post #12 of 2353

/\

This video above makes for an interesting psychological/sociological litmus test....

 

I posted it on another forum I frequent and, like clockwork, some of the members there didn't see any problems with the actions/vocalizations sent Roberts' way.

 

Now I realize that this is not actually scientific but I can't help but see a correlation....the individuals that didn't see any problems with the actions of the men in that video tend to be some of the more outspoken conservative members. Many (most?) have been the ones calling for mandatory ebola quarantines as well.

 

Make of this what you will... 

post #13 of 2353

There's nothing wrong with a quick, polite "Good morning" as you pass someone on the street, especially if you happen to make eye contact.  And if you're just reading the subtitles, some of those comments do seem pretty harmless.  But you have to also take into account the body language and tone of the speaker, and most of those guys weren't interested in how good a morning she was having.  And you have to take into account her demeanor.  Her mere existence isn't an invitation to start talking to her.

post #14 of 2353
There's nothing wrong with someone catching your eye, there's nothing wrong with trying chat up someone if you find them attractive (if there's a decent window and you're not encroaching on them), but that is some creepy shit. How the hell do you stalk alongside someone like that and somehow think that sort of thing is okay?

Everyone, male / female, gay / straight, is programmed to steal a look or two - everyone eyefucks to some degree or another - it's a natural thing, but Christ. The compression of those hours is pretty effective and gross.
post #15 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post
 

There's nothing wrong with a quick, polite "Good morning" as you pass someone on the street, especially if you happen to make eye contact.  And if you're just reading the subtitles, some of those comments do seem pretty harmless.  But you have to also take into account the body language and tone of the speaker, and most of those guys weren't interested in how good a morning she was having.  And you have to take into account her demeanor.  Her mere existence isn't an invitation to start talking to her.

 

I think none of the interactions in that video (maybe 1 is arguable) could be considered innocent polite "good morning" type of exchanges. 

 

I'm appalled at the online reaction to this video, shouldn't be a surprise, but when I had to argue with women on twitter how this is wrong, you can't help but get a bit depressed.

post #16 of 2353

This is something that definitely sprung to mind... but I was reluctant to bring it up in other discussions of the video because I didn't want it to get derailed anymore than such discussions always do anyway.

 

http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2014/10/29/catcalling_video_hollaback_s_look_at_street_harassment_in_nyc_edited_out.html

post #17 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

This is something that definitely sprung to mind... but I was reluctant to bring it up in other discussions of the video because I didn't want it to get derailed anymore than such discussions always do anyway.

 

http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2014/10/29/catcalling_video_hollaback_s_look_at_street_harassment_in_nyc_edited_out.html

I knew that was coming.

post #18 of 2353
Yeah, when I noticed the make-up of the men and saw the disclaimer, I figured it was only a matter of time. It's not unfair to question whether the narrative was manipulated, but it doesn't immediately need to be an insidious editing job.
post #19 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny View Post

Yeah, when I noticed the make-up of the men and saw the disclaimer, I figured it was only a matter of time. Need it be an insidious editing job?

Doesn't need to be but this can't be discussed otherwise. 

post #20 of 2353

Is it possible that the intensity/frequency of catcalling is culturally based?

 

I don't know the answer, but I know in Latin America the situation is horrible. I got a tour of the equivalent of "congress" in Panama, by a member of the diplomatic corps, and she was harassed while giving us the tour by co-workers at least 2-3 times. It was to the point that one guy was trying to setup a date with her that night, I had to stop the tour and ask her if she was OK, and all she told me was that she was used to it and couldn't complain to her bosses about it.

post #21 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElCapitanAmerica View Post
 

Is it possible that the intensity/frequency of catcalling is culturally based?

No

post #22 of 2353

For the sake of 'clarity', it's understandable to edit out the 'less brazen' instances of catcalling and wolf-whistling.  But it does have the potential to give certain groups an 'out' by giving them an opportunity to derail from the legit point the video makes.

 

So it doesn't even need to be an insidious editing job for it to be a problem in the dialogue it causes.  It makes it easier to generalize this as a black and Latino problem more than a problem with men in general.

post #23 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waaaaaaaalt View Post
 

No

 

Not sure, I can't really tell to be honest. I get the feeling this is worst in big cities, and when I lived in one was in Latin America, where the standards for sexual harassment are much lower than here ... that's just a fact. (ex: In Colombia they still send out resumes with pictures, making it easy to discriminate against women based on looks)

post #24 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElCapitanAmerica View Post
 

 

(ex: In Colombia they still send out resumes with pictures, making it easy to discriminate against women based on looks)

Korea is the same way.

 

A very normalized culture of plastic surgery there...

 

There is a part of my mind combatting that urge to think as ElCapitan does: that certain cultures are more inclined to indulge in this behavior.  But I think it's really more of an issue of how casually brazen that behavior is delivered in media.  And I'm certainly not immune to being affected by that over a lifetime of consuming said media.

 

It makes me think that everyone else who isn't black or Latino men are simply more subtle/sneaky/passive-aggressive about it.  Doesn't make it any worse or better.  It just makes it less likely for it to be included in a video pointing out that behavior.

 

Then there's the fact that I saw this behavior play out in real life as I worked a counter at a convenience store.  And unfortunately, my own confirmation biases at the time certainly played a part in seeing that behavior play out a lot like representation of that video.

post #25 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElCapitanAmerica View Post

Is it possible that the intensity/frequency of catcalling is culturally based?

I don't know the answer, but I know in Latin America the situation is horrible. I got a tour of the equivalent of "congress" in Panama, by a member of the diplomatic corps, and she was harassed while giving us the tour by co-workers at least 2-3 times. It was to the point that one guy was trying to setup a date with her that night, I had to stop the tour and ask her if she was OK, and all she told me was that she was used to it and couldn't complain to her bosses about it.

Depends on what one means by "culture". It's more subcultural and not anything to do with race. You put any three guys in a certain environment and they'll probably come out three different ways depending on how they allow said environment to inform them. I have three brothers, all of whom are straight and into sports and drinking and music I do not personally listen to. Yet, they are all profoundly different in temperament and treat women differently from one another.* Also, none of them approach women in as tacky a fashion as seen in the video.




*We all grew up under an emotionally and physically abusive father and wear those scars differently, some of us better than the other.
post #26 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmurdoch View Post

It really is an important issue that should be discussed more. Studies have shown that the main factor in controlling population growth, is education of young females. Humanities growing numbers present the biggest threat to the quality of life on the planet. More educated women leads to a better future of everyone.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post

We'll never have gender equality when so many of the world's religions actively force females to take on a subservient role. It's pathetic.


I've learned the hard way to just clam up and listen in most forums where this comes up, precisely because I have the same unashamedly hostile attitude toward organized religion. The first wave of suffragists were women who correctly pointed out the historical role that religious authorities had played in the subjugation of women, my own feminism is inextricably linked with my atheism, but phrase it the wrong way and you have women who claim to be intersectional feminists shouting you down with cries of "Islamophobe."


ETA: Not to make this about my feelings. My point has more to do with tactics, inclusiveness, and the fact that women's rights have been on the defensive in the US for years, while the gay rights movement has made astonishing progress, despite what should be a vast difference in movement size in favor of feminism. I think that's because the gay rights movement never got comfortable enough to turn on its own and start telling people they couldn't be allies.
Edited by Reasor - 10/29/14 at 3:19pm
post #27 of 2353
Thread Starter 

From the age of about 15 until late-thirties/early-forties, women are basically treated like produce, and while some women do think of it as "nice," I can attest having lived through it that it's a kind of prison.  It definitely crosses racial and cultural borders, but like Nooj says, the brazen street commentary is a cakewalk compared to the much more subtle or insidious forms of this kind of harassment, especially in an institutional or work environment.  I think it's great when witnesses hold out a hand because it's even tougher when you're young and on your own.   Luckily (at least for me), after a certain age you literally become invisible.  It was really only when I got older that I realized how much of an effect being under constant siege can have on your life and how freeing it is when it stops.

 

ps. I'm glad that slate article linked to Jessica Williams's piece on this from The Daily Show.  It's hilarious and perfect, but  in not being as in-your-face as this video, it didn't get the same attention -- which I hope it starts to get now. 

post #28 of 2353

: )

Quote:

Street Harasser Haunted By Woman Who Got Away With Dignity Intact

 

CHICAGO—Regretting his failure to take advantage of the perfect opportunity, local street harasser Jason Foster told reporters Wednesday that he continues to be haunted by the woman who got away with her dignity intact. “I will go the rest of my life wondering if I could have made this woman feel completely demeaned, if maybe there was something else sexually degrading I could have shouted,” said a visibly emotional Foster, reportedly agonizing about the moment that morning when he did not make more of an effort to intimidate the woman by leering at her body or following closely behind her down the street. “It’s eating me up inside that I didn’t trust my gut instinct to go after her and continue making obscene remarks and unwelcome sexual advances. I truly believe she’s the one I could have totally humiliated by yelling ‘nice ass, baby doll’ one more time.” At press time, sources confirmed that an elated Foster had successfully robbed the woman of her dignity while she was returning home from work.

post #29 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by yt View Post
 

From the age of about 15 until late-thirties/early-forties, women are basically treated like produce, and while some women do think of it as "nice," I can attest having lived through it that it's a kind of prison.  

 

Oddly enough I can appreciate what this feels like.  When I was in my early 20s I had long hair.  I'm quite short and, at the time, was quite slight of build.

 

I was walking home from a party one night, around 1am, in Edinburgh.  This guy who was walking towards me kept moving so that he was walking right at me (this was from about 100m away).  I moved to the right, he moved to his left.  This kept happening right up until he was almost in my face.  "Alright darlin'... HOLY FUCK IT'S A GUY" and he quickly scarpered.

 

It was appalling.  And all I could think was "but what if I wasn't?"  

 

It's absolutely beyond appalling that one wouldn't be able to simply walk down the street without being harassed in any way shape or form, regardless of gender, race or any such shite.

post #30 of 2353

What clinches it for me is, the expression on the woman's face is not in any way inviting of anything, certainly not inviting of amorous attentions.

 

In San Francisco I've experienced what I call "the SF Stare". It's when I'm walking down the street, feel someone looking at me, spy out a woman staring at me, she sees me, then quickly looks away like I've committed an assault. It's annoying and disturbing. The one thing it does not do is make me want to engage with her in any way.

post #31 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElCapitanAmerica View Post

Is it possible that the intensity/frequency of catcalling is culturally based?

Rejected alternate title for that video: Black guys with no game
post #32 of 2353
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Bain View Post
 

 

Oddly enough I can appreciate what this feels like.  When I was in my early 20s I had long hair.  I'm quite short and, at the time, was quite slight of build.

 

I was walking home from a party one night, around 1am, in Edinburgh.  This guy who was walking towards me kept moving so that he was walking right at me (this was from about 100m away).  I moved to the right, he moved to his left.  This kept happening right up until he was almost in my face.  "Alright darlin'... HOLY FUCK IT'S A GUY" and he quickly scarpered.

 

It was appalling.  And all I could think was "but what if I wasn't?"  

 

It's absolutely beyond appalling that one wouldn't be able to simply walk down the street without being harassed in any way shape or form, regardless of gender, race or any such shite.

 

Andy, this is such an interesting story.  I've heard of straight guys getting hit on by gay guys (and the occasional accompanying homophobic panic), but this is the first time I've heard of a guy actually experiencing true male heterosexual aggression.  I think you completely get it in a way that I think is hard for men generally - through no lack of empathy or sensitivity - just because it's something they can go through life having never encountered directly.  It's like how white people have to gain awareness of the very different experience of being a person of color in this country because it's not something you're confronted with every day.

 

Meanwhile, I probably laughed a little too hard at this:  Funny Or Die's 10 Hours of Walking in NYC for a Man.

post #33 of 2353

How I wish that I were surprised.....

Quote:

Rape threats target woman in viral anti-harassment video

 

A viral video intended to raise awareness about the rampant catcalls and sexual harassment faced by women and sexual minorities in the public sphere resulted in harassment and threats across a different medium: the Internet.

 

Earlier this week, the anti-street harassment advocacy group Hollaback posted a public service video online in which a young woman, wearing a plain T-shirt and jeans, received more than 100 shouts, comments about her body, invitations for dates or admonishments to “smile” while she walked around New York City for a day.

 

In just 24 hours on YouTube, the video had received more than 8.5 million hits and prompted newspapers and websites to publish think pieces about the cultural implications of unwelcome attention paid to women walking down the street.

 

By Wednesday, the woman at the center of the experiment — actress Shoshanna Roberts — had received the first of many rape threats in the video's comments section, according to Hollaback’s Twitter account, which urged users to report them so they could be removed from the site.

 

"The rape threats indicate that we are hitting a nerve," Hollaback director Emily May told Long Island newspaper Newsday

 

The escalation of online responses from thoughtful to violent is part of a pattern that experts contend is an attempt to intimidate women into silence or inaction.

 

<cont>

post #34 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by yt View Post
 

 

Andy, this is such an interesting story.  I've heard of straight guys getting hit on by gay guys (and the occasional accompanying homophobic panic), but this is the first time I've heard of a guy actually experiencing true male heterosexual aggression.  I think you completely get it in a way that I think is hard for men generally - through no lack of empathy or sensitivity - just because it's something they can go through life having never encountered directly.  It's like how white people have to gain awareness of the very different experience of being a person of color in this country because it's not something you're confronted with every day.

 

Meanwhile, I probably laughed a little too hard at this:  Funny Or Die's 10 Hours of Walking in NYC for a Man.

 

 

I've been hit on by Gay men. It disturbs me in the sense that said men are creepy as hell. I also have friends who moved to SF from Kenya and it's been heartbreaking to see them change from very friendly, open people to closed and somewhat bitter people, specifically because of the daily experience of being Black in the US.

post #35 of 2353
post #36 of 2353
post #37 of 2353

Most distressing from the article:White men, on the other hand, have no use for that sort of catcalling. They marked their territory centuries ago.

 

Women are even getting hit on by guys that are centuries old. Fucking zombies are even harassing women. And white zombies of course. Rob would totally have never named his band that had he known.


Edited by Waaaaaaaalt - 11/1/14 at 10:05pm
post #38 of 2353


Shirtgate. All of the real problems for women in the world and we're doing this? Really?
post #39 of 2353
I want to see that dude's closet.
post #40 of 2353
Isnt modern life wonderful
post #41 of 2353
It's a tacky shirt. This guy, who is actually doing important and impressive work was shamed and driven to tears for wearing a tacky shirt. A shirt that, by the way, appears far less explicit than I'd heard described.

My irritation over this doesn't mean I empathize with the turds verbally attacking the women who brought up this nonsense, but it *is* utter nonsense. A kinetic, celestial object was successfully harpooned and this is what we want to talk about? Yeah...
post #42 of 2353
Ah well. At least we're not talking about Kim Kardasian shitting into a bin bag, or whatever the hell that picture was supposed to be.
post #43 of 2353

Why isn't PMR denouncing this???

post #44 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

Why isn't PMR denouncing this???

He should.

post #45 of 2353
No, I'm with the social justice crowd this time. It's obvious women are such emotionally frail creatures, they'll see this single shirt and not want to go into science anymore. I mean, if you don't believe that, it's pretty clear you're a misogynist.
post #46 of 2353

THAT's the way!

post #47 of 2353

The problem with that phrase you hear quite a bit is it's not a matter of switching one ostensibly feminist issue for a more severe and 'real' one, but you can put anything there.

eg. All of the real problems for women in the world and we're... worried about  a shirt.  But also  ...watching game of thrones; ...keeping up with the Kardashians ..uploading pictures of what we're eating ...playing Candy Crush saga ..analysing box office taking data ...getting insider leaks about the new iPhone ...discussing that footballer who crosses himself or whatever ...micromanaging our investment portfolio ...buying goretex jackets we'll never actually need  etc etc.  Pick anything from the middle class litany.  Most things pale compared to 'real' issues.   Yet here we are.

But I'm not sure the bandwidth of concern has been calculated yet.  So a given bit of consternation in one area for a while doesn't clip off a whole bunch of "important" stuff by itself.

post #48 of 2353
No, but this is rather specifically about a shirt that allegedly "exposes" sexism in a professional field (that exact thing has been suggested). Something like rape in GoT is different because of the overarching trend on the show to regularly cast its female characters as sex objects or expose them to sexual violence (a criticism that is basically impossible to deny of a trend that is worrisome). Would he have drawn the same criticism if it was Marilyn Monroe on the shirt? We constantly see her in images displayed in some fashion by both men and women (more women in recent years I think) and posited in the media as the "epitome of the feminine sex symbol", so I *suspect* this never would have become a thing in that alternate reality fashion choice simply by virtue of osmosis. Yet, because the shirt features a group of fictional, ostensibly faceless depictions of the idealized female form (as opposed to the inherent and superficial historicity of a Monroe figure), it becomes a conversation.

A reactionary would read that as "blah, blah, wimmens should just shut up!" but in my mind what I'm talking about cannot be any clearer. It's not the conversation so much as the variations that I believe would not have generated a conversation despite bearing no essential difference. I think I've complained often and virulently enough about pedantry in the past to evade any accusation that my opinions are gender-based.
post #49 of 2353

No it's specifically about the notion that going on about this is somehow distracting from or blotting out concerns for other more serious matters and I don't think that's true.

 

People argue about this stuff I think largely for the reasons Batman takes up half this site's conversation sometimes (at the risk of derailing the conversation completely).  If something wholly good or well done comes along there's not a lot to say, especially if most people (who see it) like it. Batman is complicated and open to many interpretations, contradictory and mutually exclusive.

Likewise the semiotics of this shirt and the political divide surrounding such thoughts are much harder to figure out than whether women in the tribal areas of Pakistan have it bad and it should stop.  That's an easy one.  But less easy to alter one way or the other.

If you're disappointed by the apparent disparity there you're disappointed with modern life, full stop.  And that is a thoroughly reasonable position.

 

 

For the sake of it we can speculate what else might have been on the shirt until the cows come home.  Seems like what was on the shirt is the thing and the representation of women in comics is a touchier subject for many people.  Particularly for its habit of altering body forms into unrealistic shapes and poses (unlike Monroe).  Making a collage like that as well probably has certain implications for some too I wager.  Could read in some devaluing meaning to that I guess.

I don't know off hand.  It's mostly quirky and low brow to me.  People have said that if he was working in most offices he would have been warned off wearing it and I'd say that's true.  He said he was sorry if it bothered anyone so that's really that I think.

post #50 of 2353
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElCapitanAmerica View Post
 

Is it possible that the intensity/frequency of catcalling is culturally based?

 

I have a different opinion on this. This... isn't a simple question to answer. While I admit that the answer tends to slide towards racism, or anti-theism (like it has in this very thread - and anti-theism is considered just as politically incorrect as, if not more than, racism in several parts of the world), the fact still remains that the prevalence of gender-based discrimination is correlated with culture.

 

I think the distinction that we have to make here is this - no one section of the population is genetically predisposed towards sexism than another.

 

Cultural enablers for sexism, on the other hand, do exist, IMO.

 

Indeed, what is the difference between religion - that some of you so virulently oppose - and culture, really? Both endorse a common set of values, of expected behaviors from people in general; gender expectations, treatment of people along various sections of the social rung etc. are all a part and parcel of one's culture (just as you think they are a part of certain religions), right?

 

However, there is one crucial difference between religion and culture - the former is relatively rigid (though religion has changed over the years, especially in the more "moderate" spheres), while the latter is considered fluid and is subject to change (often drastic, in some cases). So, the key thing to remember, I suppose is that a culture can change, given time as well as internal and extraneous influences.

 

I'll take my own culture as an example - in Indian Hindu culture (and this is where the line between religion and culture gets really, really blurry), gender-based discrimination was once extremely prevalent. I'll cite a single horrendous practice - widow burning (sati) was a frequent occurrence. But the statistics have changed drastically in recent times and widow-burning is now considered a freak occurrence (there is still the problem of people revering the practice as a historical symbol of womanly chastity - but I believe that's being rooted out as well).

 

But the culture still is Indian Hindu culture - certain traditions and practices have changed drastically, but we still identify with the same cultural label.

 

That's a crucial point - cultural enablers may exist that support sexism (which probably means that certain cultures may show more support for sexist behaviors than others... or, to be more politically correct, certain cultures may not chastise sexist behavior as vehemently as certain other cultures), but they can be wiped out within the confines of that same culture. That is a crucial part of this conversation about culture and sexism, I think.

However, I don't think that means a person belonging to a certain cultural group or geographical region should feel innately inferior or something - like I said, cultures do change, and have changed over the years.

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