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Film Critic Catch-All - Page 202

post #10051 of 10170

Night Moves is the definitive 70s neo-noir for me, and a huge influence on me as a writer. That ending. 

post #10052 of 10170

Scott Tobias: "Much like our good friend @kphipps3000, I've been hot-and-cold (mostly cold) on THE BREAKFAST CLUB over the years, but his essay has me ready for another round"

 

Looking At ‘The Breakfast Club’ From The Other Side

 
Keith Phipps
 
Editorial Director, Film And Television
 
 
 
 
"I can tell you a lot about The Breakfast Club. That it was originally called Detention. That it was supposed to be John Hughes’ first film as a director, but a script he wrote after it, Sixteen Candles, made it to the screen first. That Sixteen Candles began a relationship with Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall that led to them appearing in The Breakfast Club. That Shermer, the fictional setting of the Hughes films, is based on the Chicago suburb of Northbrook where Hughes, a Michigan native, spent his teen years. That Universal feared it would flop upon its February 1985 release. That it did not flop, instead becoming so beloved that it was selected for preservation by the National Film Registry in 2016 and recently received a home video re-release as part of the Criterion Collection. There’s no official film canon, but these sorts of honors come close. Not that The Breakfast Club needed them to seem canonical. Ask anyone for the definitive teen movie of the 1980s and chances are this will be the first answer you get.
 

Here’s a question I couldn’t really answer until revisiting the film again via that new Blu-ray: Do I even like The Breakfast Club?

 

That shouldn’t be a tough one. But The Breakfast Club is a movie I’ve been hot and cold on over the years, mostly cold. That happens with movies sometimes. What we like as kids can look embarrassing now. And what we once dismissed can start to look profound. But with The Breakfast Club I’ve always vacillated between cheerless indifference and a distant admiration.

 

As a Gen X-er, I’m not even sure this is allowed. It’s like everyone held an election to determine what my generation’s defining teen movie would be and I didn’t get a vote. I’ve never hated The Breakfast Club and I got why others like it. It just never got to me the way it apparently got to everyone else my age (and, at this point, every succeeding generation that’s embraced it). And I’ve never bought the opinions that have seemingly hardened into accepted fact: that this was a movie about shattering stereotypes instead of perpetuating them, that it’s the best example of Hughes’ uncanny empathy for teens, that it captured how ‘80s kids really felt and talked.

 

Honestly, I still don’t buy them. This time around, I found myself repeatedly distracted by Judd Nelson’s performance as John Bender, the wrong-side-of-the-tracks rebel. Nelson was 24 while shooting the film (and was still claiming to be 24 upon its release nearly a year later in a Today show interview included on the disc), and he looks appreciably older than his co-stars. (Only Ringwald and Hall were teens while making the film, but Emilio Estevez and Ally Sheedy could pass.) He gives a big, bellowing performance in the film’s most overwritten part, one filled with profane soliloquies and florid insults. (Did Hughes really write the way teens talk or did it just come to seem that way when phrases like “slip her the hot beef injection” and, years before Bart Simpson, “eat my shorts” started echoing through middle schools after the film’s release?) Bender dominates much of the film, and there’s a lot of visible effort in Nelson’s work and Hughes’ dialogue. He’s trying way too hard at playing someone who doesn’t try at all.

 

It’s also a film filled with mixed messages. Allison, the weirdo played by Ally Sheedy, gets a makeover and wins the heart of Andrew (Estevez), a jock who’d previously never given her a second look. (She might be more of an individual in black, the film seems to suggest, but isn’t she pretty in pink?) Bender pairs off with rich girl Claire (Ringwald) after haranguing her with insults and abuse for much of the movie. Brian, the suicidal brain played by Hall, doesn’t seem that much better off than when the film began. His reward for Saturday detention: getting to do everyone else’s homework by writing the “Who You Think You Are” essay for the whole group. (Thanks, newfound chums.) “We found out is that each one of us is a brain, and an athlete, and a basket case, a princess, and a criminal,” the essay goes. But did they? Simple Minds’ “Don’t You Forget About Me” swells on the soundtrack to drive the point home, and it feels right. But ultimately The Breakfast Club does a much better job of saying this than showing it."


Edited by Fat Elvis - 2/13/18 at 1:19pm
post #10053 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 
 

Here’s a question I couldn’t really answer until revisiting the film again via that new Blu-ray: Do I even like The Breakfast Club?

 

 

Always a good way to start an analysis by asking yourself a question you presumably already know the answer to, simply as a segue to show how hip, and above others, you are to seeing the "faults" in a movie that most people tend to agree is pretty good, if not great.

 

Here's a question.  Do I even care if this guy likes The Breakfast Club?  Not really, you see...

 

 

Seriously though, the complaints he has with the film are very thin, to say the least, and not backed up by much else other than overly fussy nitpicking.

post #10054 of 10170

Breakfast Club isn't even in the same ballpark as films like Goonies, Stand by Me, E.T., Back to the Future, Ghostbusters, Indiana Jones, among the "seminal youth cinema experiences."  Hell, Ferris Bueller's Day Off is the 80s John Hughes film, at least for us born-mid-70s-or-later Gen X'ers.  

post #10055 of 10170

Aside from Planes, Trains, and Automobiles, John Hughes does nothing for me.

 

Give me Fast Times at Ridgemont High any day of the week when it comes to eighties teen comedies. 

post #10056 of 10170

I'm not sure "I don't like the characters" is an 'overly' 'fussy' 'nitpick.' Maybe because I agree with him?

I watched Ferris Bueller for the first time in ages a few weeks ago. That movie is garbage. I can't think of a better summation of the 80s than the notion that Ferris Bueller is considered charming and not an awful sociopath.

post #10057 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

Aside from Planes, Trains, and Automobiles, John Hughes does nothing for me.

 

Give me Fast Times at Ridgemont High any day of the week when it comes to eighties teen comedies. 

 

You know you have a soft spot for Culkin and Pesci's charming face-off in Home Alone.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

I'm not sure "I don't like the characters" is an 'overly' 'fussy' 'nitpick.' Maybe because I agree with him?
 

 

Does anyone like The Breakfast Club characters?  

post #10058 of 10170
I like the principal!
post #10059 of 10170
I like the janitor.
post #10060 of 10170
I like the window that emilio murderer
post #10061 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

I like the principal!

 

Of course you do.  Cause he looks like he could be Mendy's older brother.

 

post #10062 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post
 

I'm not sure "I don't like the characters" is an 'overly' 'fussy' 'nitpick.' Maybe because I agree with him?
 

 

You don't think this is nitpicky and not really relevant to the film itself?

 

Quote:
 I found myself repeatedly distracted by Judd Nelson’s performance as John Bender, the wrong-side-of-the-tracks rebel. Nelson was 24 while shooting the film (and was still claiming to be 24 upon its release nearly a year later in a Today show interview included on the disc), and he looks appreciably older than his co-stars.

 

What?  People in their 20's playing high school kids?  This never happens!

post #10063 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCA View Post
 

 

You don't think this is nitpicky and not really relevant to the film itself?

 

What?  People in their 20's playing high school kids?  This never happens!

 

People continuing to complain about dumb things that somehow keep happening?  That never happens!

post #10064 of 10170

I was 17 when The Breakfast Club was released, and living in/going to school in a suburb very, very much like the fictional Shermer.
 

The essay above rightly points out some problematic issues (though I am inclined to give them something of a pass partly out of nostalgia, partly out of "hey, it was the times"). However, I think the essay wrongly takes the film to task for not offering solutions or profoundly (in the immediate) changed characters. There's a bleak truth that underlies the story and emerges a few times in dialogue: this is the caste system we're in, and we're able to recognize it's toxic but unable/unwilling to change it. It's the climax of the conversation the teens have when sitting around near the end of the film, and Brian asks if they're friends on Monday morning. Claire answers and the room explodes - not because she's wrong or mean but because the truth is jagged, twisting knife in all of them.

 

The hope offered by the film is long term hope: that this day, this lesson, will carry forward and as they get out of the peculiar, crushing pressure of teenager-dom, they'll perhaps transcend the strict categories they've been forced into or clung to.

 

I think Sixteen Candles, for all its hilarity and heightened plot, is much more "how teens actually talked" than TBC. (That film, too has some deeply problematic elements, primarily in that it seems to approve of date rape.) TBC is meant to be emotionally real and grounded but like all things teenaged, what we're seeing and hearing is heightened, sharpened, and exaggerated.

 

Having lived through that era as a teen, in a very similar environment, I can tell you that TBC was spot on in bringing to light the unforgiving nature of suburban castes in that time, and also spot on in basically depicting the average teen's feeling of that system being both inescapable and inexorable. The sense of male athletes being adored just short of godhood, and "popular girls" being either blind to their privilege or sharply wielding it to strengthen their position in the pecking order.

 

The really funny thing: NONE of the characters represented me at all. I was not in the popular clique. I was neither a jock nor an academic nerd. And I wasn't a "stoner" or outcast. Just one of the hoi polloi that was on the outside looking into these social strata. Despite that, I loved the the film when it was released, and felt a deep connection to the characters who yearned for connections of their own that broke through imposed (externally and internally) boundaries.

 

 

Having said all that, I do think TBC is essentially a cultural artifact and not, thankfully, timeless. My daughters, who attended a magnet school for the arts (which was majority POC for the student population) could not relate at all to the film and didn't like it. It's just not how things are anymore, and for the most part, that's a good thing.  As a too-fucking-old adult, I still enjoy the film though recognize it's problems and flaws. I think there's a lot to be said for its compassion for all the characters and for striving, at least, to let them have their say.

post #10065 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCA View Post
 

 

You don't think this is nitpicky and not really relevant to the film itself?

 

 

What?  People in their 20's playing high school kids?  This never happens!

Judd Nelson could have been 17 and his character still would have sucked shit. There are several sentences all around the one you pointed out which elaborate on that further.

post #10066 of 10170

I agree that Bender's given a disproportionate amount of dialogue, and the film for a while skews sympathetic to his POV. But I'd argue he's also called out on his bullshit eventually, and we're given deeper glimpses into the rest of the students which helps shrug off Bender's rebel glamor.

 

Only Sheedy's character remains a true mystery.

post #10067 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelM View Post
 

I agree that Bender's given a disproportionate amount of dialogue, and the film for a while skews sympathetic to his POV. But I'd argue he's also called out on his bullshit eventually, and we're given deeper glimpses into the rest of the students which helps shrug off Bender's rebel glamor.

 

Only Sheedy's character remains a true mystery.

She is a mystery...until she gets her makeover, then she's pretty and none of that mystery stuff matters anymore.

post #10068 of 10170

I think there are a lot of comparisons to be made between something like THE BREAKFAST CLUB and THE BIG CHILL, both of which capture a particular moment in life that make them somewhat timeless with regards to their themes and characters, but are also intrinsically tied to the cultural moment in which they were released - The Breakfast Club with regards to eighties youth culture (particularly as a document before the emergence of so many dominant cultural forces that shaped teen culture in the nineties and aughts), and The Big Chill as one of the first pieces of culture that was repackaging boomer nostalgia into a feel-good commercialism that would culminate with FORREST GUMP.

post #10069 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

She is a mystery...until she gets her makeover, then she's pretty and none of that mystery stuff matters anymore.

 

Again, I agree with this. Very much a thing of its time. Doesn't make it "right" but it gives it cultural context and meaning.

 

It also doesn't negate the good things about the film. For me, at least.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

I think there are a lot of comparisons to be made between something like THE BREAKFAST CLUB and THE BIG CHILL, both of which capture a particular moment in life that make them somewhat timeless with regards to their themes and characters, but are also intrinsically tied to the cultural moment in which they were released - The Breakfast Club with regards to eighties youth culture (particularly as a document before the emergence of so many dominant cultural forces that shaped teen culture in the nineties and aughts), and The Big Chill as one of the first pieces of culture that was repackaging boomer nostalgia into a feel-good commercialism that would culminate with FORREST GUMP.

 

These comparisons were rife when the film was released. Yep. I think an argument can be made, though, that Breakfast Club is more clear-eyed about its times than The Big Chill is. They're alike in that each features a disparate set of characters spending time in close proximity ruminating on the Nature of Things. They're different in that Chill bathes in nostalgia while Club does more pushing against the fence.

post #10070 of 10170

I watched Big Chill again when it came out on Criterion, and I found it more resonant and rich than I expected. Yes, it's a SECAUCUS SEVEN knockoff and yes, it's got gauze over its eyes with regards to Boomer culture, but there's something about it that struck me, that resonates. I really don't like Lena Dunham for any number of reasons, but I love the thing she wrote for Criterion about how Big Chill acts as a way for millennials to understand their parents: 

 

Quote:
 

There is so much you can’t imagine. You can’t imagine your parents on this weekend, dancing around the kitchen to Motown as they cook a big meal, moving their butts jauntily and leading with their shoulders. Many years later, at your bat mitzvah or your cousin Stephanie’s wedding, the way they dance will make you want to kill yourself. But if you could see them over this weekend, all together, if you trained a camera on them and let them dance back and forth, you would understand: they were young once too, and this is how they learned to dance, and now every time they dance that way they feel young again, even if you’re scowling at them from across the room and wishing they would explode.
 

What if someone found a way to show you? To show you that your father’s friend with the glasses and the nasal voice, someone found him sexy once, held his hand furtively, thought he was the wit of the century. And your mother’s friend with the boucle? jacket who calls a thousand times to ask if you got her email about her son’s wedding invitations? Someone once wanted her badly enough that he chased her into the freezing yard and gnawed on her neck like a lamb shank. And that big lazy drunk who sends money at Christmas, who gets food stuck in his mustache and dates social workers? Well, he did the gnawing. And your aunt who isn’t really technically your aunt, she did want kids of her own. She tried.

 

Your mother and father have had moments when they couldn’t stand to look at each other, and moments when they couldn’t believe they had found each other. They’ve touched other people, then touched each other again, and been surprised that it still felt the same. They’ve been in screaming fights with people besides you. They’ve been hurt by people besides you, been scared for people besides you, been something other than your parents. Been too drunk to get up the stairs and too coked up to sleep.

 

You will grow up with certain friends who have been chosen for you purely because your parents don’t mind sitting in lawn chairs next to their parents, can find something to talk about. Sometimes your mother will even see the other mothers socially, put on a bunch of gold rings and spray perfume in her henna-red hair and head out the door to meet them at ten past seven for a glass of wine. But you will know the difference between those friends and these old friends, these primal friends, these friends as entrenched as bone. You will know the difference even though you can’t articulate it. You will just know that when they get together, whenever that is, the cadence of their speech changes, their laughs go up a register, they throw their heads back and shake their hair and that laughter comes unbidden, and at surprising times, and about things you don’t think are funny. The laughter is catching, and soon the guys are laughing too, outside by the grill, ignoring their kids and letting the laughter move them. Their eyes soften and their foreheads smooth. They look like old photos.

 

You will have seen those photos, of your parents and their friends on this weekend, in sweaters so baggy and slacks so olive drab that you won’t be able to tell whether they were hip or Hasidic, or what they might have thought when they looked at one another. But what if you could know? Know them right now, on this weekend, which is still happening for them and tells you all that they are: They are beautiful and they are hideous. They are young and they are ancient. They are laughing and they are angry. They are trying to remember who they were and become who they will be. It has nothing to do with you. It is the reason for you. It is just a weekend, the weather changing minute by minute, minutes slipping away.

 

And someday, even further down the line, you will be standing in the bedroom, looking out at the slice of the river that is your view, your lover flipping through the mail in the kitchen, and you’ll realize that at some point, without knowing it, you missed the deadline: You’re not going to graduate school for ceramics. You’re not moving to Sweden for a year. You’re not going to become a cop. You’ll probably never shave your head or launch a campaign to save one single redwood tree. You aren’t vegan anymore. Your contribution is your tax dollars, your good moral center, your respect for your building’s recycling rules. You wear sunglasses when it’s sunny, a raincoat when it’s not. You keep almonds in your purse, and you charge your electric toothbrush. You trim your hair. You aren’t where you thought you’d be. You are just where they found you. So you pick up the phone, and you dial someone who remembers you as you want to remember yourself.



https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/3250-the-big-chill-these-are-your-parents

post #10071 of 10170
Originally Posted by MichaelM View Post
 

I was 17 when The Breakfast Club was released, and living in/going to school in a suburb very, very much like the fictional Shermer.
 

The essay above rightly points out some problematic issues (though I am inclined to give them something of a pass partly out of nostalgia, partly out of "hey, it was the times"). However, I think the essay wrongly takes the film to task for not offering solutions or profoundly (in the immediate) changed characters. There's a bleak truth that underlies the story and emerges a few times in dialogue: this is the caste system we're in, and we're able to recognize it's toxic but unable/unwilling to change it. It's the climax of the conversation the teens have when sitting around near the end of the film, and Brian asks if they're friends on Monday morning. Claire answers and the room explodes - not because she's wrong or mean but because the truth is jagged, twisting knife in all of them.

 

The hope offered by the film is long term hope: that this day, this lesson, will carry forward and as they get out of the peculiar, crushing pressure of teenager-dom, they'll perhaps transcend the strict categories they've been forced into or clung to.

 

I think Sixteen Candles, for all its hilarity and heightened plot, is much more "how teens actually talked" than TBC. (That film, too has some deeply problematic elements, primarily in that it seems to approve of date rape.) TBC is meant to be emotionally real and grounded but like all things teenaged, what we're seeing and hearing is heightened, sharpened, and exaggerated.

 

Having lived through that era as a teen, in a very similar environment, I can tell you that TBC was spot on in bringing to light the unforgiving nature of suburban castes in that time, and also spot on in basically depicting the average teen's feeling of that system being both inescapable and inexorable. The sense of male athletes being adored just short of godhood, and "popular girls" being either blind to their privilege or sharply wielding it to strengthen their position in the pecking order.

 

The really funny thing: NONE of the characters represented me at all. I was not in the popular clique. I was neither a jock nor an academic nerd. And I wasn't a "stoner" or outcast. Just one of the hoi polloi that was on the outside looking into these social strata. Despite that, I loved the the film when it was released, and felt a deep connection to the characters who yearned for connections of their own that broke through imposed (externally and internally) boundaries.

 

 

Having said all that, I do think TBC is essentially a cultural artifact and not, thankfully, timeless. My daughters, who attended a magnet school for the arts (which was majority POC for the student population) could not relate at all to the film and didn't like it. It's just not how things are anymore, and for the most part, that's a good thing.  As a too-fucking-old adult, I still enjoy the film though recognize it's problems and flaws. I think there's a lot to be said for its compassion for all the characters and for striving, at least, to let them have their say.


Very well said. 

 

I actually felt a little different in that I felt I had a foot in each of the characters, while not being relegated to one or the other.  I was near the top of my class academically (nerd), I played hockey for most of my life (jock), I was raised in a fairly blue collar family and most of my friends were "losers" who failed in school (burnout).  My one sister was an art major (weirdo) and my other sister was part of the "popular" crowd. I also grew up in the suburbs of Chicago and, to me, it was a great reflection of growing up in that world. 

post #10072 of 10170

As a final* note, I will say the only "timeless" aspect that might be ascribed to The Breakfast Club is the struggle to be seen as something whole and real rather than a type....but there are much better and more relevant films dealing with those themes.

post #10073 of 10170
Originally Posted by MichaelM View Post
 

As a final* note, I will say the only "timeless" aspect that might be ascribed to The Breakfast Club is the struggle to be seen as something whole and real rather than a type....but there are much better and more relevant films dealing with those themes.

I don't know, I thought that ass tape story was pretty unique.

post #10074 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post



I watched Ferris Bueller for the first time in ages a few weeks ago. That movie is garbage. I can't think of a better summation of the 80s than the notion that Ferris Bueller is considered charming and not an awful sociopath.

I repped you for this so fast I almost broke my thumb. I’m sure the backlash to the backlash will be momentarily cruel to us Bueller haters but history will vindicate us.
post #10075 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightning Slim View Post


I repped you for this so fast I almost broke my thumb. I’m sure the backlash to the backlash will be momentarily cruel to us Bueller haters but history will vindicate us.

post #10076 of 10170

The Breakfast Club is not good. It's cartoonish without being very funny, and melodramatic without being very affecting.  Imo, obviously.  

 

 

And I don't buy that Hughes's dialogue is heightened to match the heightened emotions of adolescence, any more than I buy it when that is trotted out for any other teen movie.  Hughes didn't write how teenagers actually talked.  I don't think any of his movies are written how people actually talk.  But in a world where Dazed And Confused and Ladybird and Freaks And Geeks exist, you can't tell me that it's impossible to write teenage dialogue that is believable and entertaining.

post #10077 of 10170
Quote:

Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post

 

And I don't buy that Hughes's dialogue is heightened to match the heightened emotions of adolescence, any more than I buy it when that is trotted out for any other teen movie.  Hughes didn't write how teenagers actually talked.  I don't think any of his movies are written how people actually talk.  But in a world where Dazed And Confused and Ladybird and Freaks And Geeks exist, you can't tell me that it's impossible to write teenage dialogue that is believable and entertaining.

 

Don't forget Friday Night Lights, my vote for perhaps the most underrated television show of all time.  

 

John Hughes made some entertaining films, but he was the teen dialogue version of Aaron Sorkin.  Nobody talked anything like that.  

post #10078 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Overlord View Post
 

 

Don't forget Friday Night Lights, my vote for perhaps the most underrated television show of all time.  

 

post #10079 of 10170
CLEAR EYES

FULL HEARTS

DIDN'T STUTTER!!!
post #10080 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post
 

The Breakfast Club is not good. It's cartoonish without being very funny, and melodramatic without being very affecting.  Imo, obviously.  

 

 

And I don't buy that Hughes's dialogue is heightened to match the heightened emotions of adolescence, any more than I buy it when that is trotted out for any other teen movie.  Hughes didn't write how teenagers actually talked.  I don't think any of his movies are written how people actually talk.  But in a world where Dazed And Confused and Ladybird and Freaks And Geeks exist, you can't tell me that it's impossible to write teenage dialogue that is believable and entertaining.


I don't know, I think Dazed and Confused is a bit cartoonish, if not moreso than TBC.  I like it, and The Breakfast Club though, for different reasons.  Both have value. 

 

I also think if you are going to cite Freaks and Geeks as an example of how it is "done right", one might want to consider what inspired its creator:

 

"Apatow: Knocked Up is about a guy who gets a girl pregnant who would never consider being in a relationship with him. Forced intimacy with good-looking people, this is the common thread. It's like The Breakfast Club. Everything I do is based on The Breakfast Club."

 

https://www.wired.com/2007/05/ff-apatow/

post #10081 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Overlord View Post
John Hughes made some entertaining films, but he was the teen dialogue version of Aaron Sorkin. 

 

This is a big reason I like The Breakfast Club.

post #10082 of 10170

Also, in reference to Ladybird, which I have yet to see, but definitely am looking forward to checking out:

 

 

http://www.anothermag.com/design-living/10570/the-cultural-references-behind-greta-gerwigs-lady-bird

Quote:
 

1. King of the Teen Movie, John Hughes

Molly Ringwald showing up to prom in a home-sewn, polyester frankenfrock in Pretty in Pink; eating carrots in the hope of expanding her cup-size in Sixteen Candles; or languishing in Saturday detention in The Breakfast Club… To give Saoirse Ronan a crash-course in American high school life, Greta Gerwig suggested she indulge in a John Hughes movie-marathon. Ronan herself never had to endure the adolescent obstacle course of secondary education; after primary years at a tiny, rural County Carlow school she was home-tutored between film roles. “One time we went over to Greta’s house in New York and went through her photo albums from when she was a kid,” Ronan remembers. “I didn’t really do school in a conventional way, so it was great for me to see Greta in a big high school sweatshirt with her hair all messy, see photographs of her onstage in the school musical, just getting the look of that world.”

post #10083 of 10170

The 50 Greatest Rock and Roll Movies of All Time

Read this list with a candle burning and you will see your entire future

by CoS Staff
on February 13, 2018, 12:05pm

 

https://consequenceofsound.net/2018/02/the-50-greatest-rock-and-roll-movies-of-all-time/

 

"I’d argue that it’s easier to identify a rock and roll movie than define one. Looking through this list, there are docs and biopics, concert films and musicals, movies with flick-making and generation-defining soundtracks, and films that don’t seem to have very much to do with music at all. And yet, they all feel like they should be categorized under the old devil horns in some way. They boast a common ethos, carry a certain swagger, and feel rebellious in their own, often unlikely, ways. So, here they are: The 50 Greatest Rock and Roll Movies of All Time.

 

For all these movies (and others) that rock, we salute them."

post #10084 of 10170

Man, what a thoroughly unsurprising and uncreative list.

post #10085 of 10170

And Streets Of Fire is fucking nowhere on it!

post #10086 of 10170

*scrolls down to see if entirety of article is on one page.  Sees that it is spread across multiple pages, with no option to select an individual page.  Evidence overwhelmingly leads me to conclude it is bait click garbage.  Closes entire page having read none of it.*

post #10087 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Overlord View Post
 

*scrolls down to see if entirety of article is on one page.  Sees that it is spread across multiple pages, with no option to select an individual page.  Evidence overwhelmingly leads me to conclude it is bait click garbage.  Closes entire page having read none of it.*

 

Yep. I fucking hate it when images or lists are space to one or two items a page.

post #10088 of 10170

It gives you the option to 'View All'.

 

I kind of can't believe FORREST GUMP....

post #10089 of 10170

STREETS OF FIRE, is, of course, the biggest missing piece. But I'M NOT THERE and GRACE OF MY HEART are both nowhere to be found, nor are THE FOUR HEARTBEATS or THE IDOLMAKER. Nor STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON. And 24 HOUR PARTY PEOPLE is top 5. 

post #10090 of 10170

Also no Sign "☮" the Times

 

Great call on FIVE HEARTBEATS

post #10091 of 10170

WE ARE THE BEST!, TIMES SQUARE, DUDES even CHRISTIANE F..

 

And WATTSTAX

post #10092 of 10170

HEDWIG, its lesser known cousin PREY FOR ROCK AND ROLL...

post #10093 of 10170

Just did my good (film) deed for the day and wrote to Rotten Tomatoes and asked them to delete this "review" from Mad Max 2's Rotten Tomato Score and then recalculate it.

 

Because, this is not a review.

 

https://www.csmonitor.com/1982/1021/102102.html

 

If this works, its score will be 100%.

 

AS IT SHOULD BE!

post #10094 of 10170

We Are the Best! is, indeed, so fucking great.

post #10095 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shan View Post

Just did my good (film) deed for the day and wrote to Rotten Tomatoes and asked them to delete this "review" from Mad Max 2's Rotten Tomato Score and then recalculate it.

Because, this is not a review.

https://www.csmonitor.com/1982/1021/102102.html

If this works, its score will be 100%.

AS IT SHOULD BE!

I’m kind of in awe that someone took the time to write that...thing. Or maybe the guy sent the CSM a hundred tiny capsule reviews and they published them as a single paragraph?

My Mom’s dog eared 1998 Leonard Martin guide is more helpful in choosing a film than that wall of text.
post #10096 of 10170

Shout Out to Phil on his cool new gig:

 

 

http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2018/02/15/fangoria-returns

 

The Return Of FANGORIA

The iconic horror magazine is coming back - with some familiar faces at the helm.
 
"Fangoria will be reborn later this year as a deluxe quarterly edition, a collectible horror film journal featuring voices both new and familiar (do the names Timpone, Gingold, Zimmerman, or Borders ring a bell?). It will present smart, fun, exclusive horror film coverage - all in time for the magazine’s 40th anniversary next year.

 

I know what you’re thinking: why is the BMD Bond guy leaving to run Fangoria? I guess that’s a fair question, though long-time readers (and my friends) know that I’m just as steeped in horror, even if it hasn’t really been my primary beat here at BMD. But if you require receipts, in the past I’ve written about The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (and its most hated sequel), authored several posts about the career of David Cronenberg, and written here and elsewhere about George Romero. I once wrote and directed a feature-length documentary about John Carpenter’s Halloween for A&E. I was one of the masterminds behind Within Week, for God’s sake. The truth is I was a horror guy long before I was a Bond guy, and I’m looking forward to creating and curating more content in that space. That I’ll be doing it under the brand that’s singularly responsible for my lifelong fascination with films and filmmaking is something about which I’m immeasurably excited. Real talk: I bought my first issue of Fango over 30 years ago; becoming its new Editor-in-Chief is gonna be surreal as hell!"

post #10097 of 10170
Thread Starter 

Congrats, Phil!

 

Welcome back, Fango!

post #10098 of 10170
PHILGORIA!!!
post #10099 of 10170
Gorezone came back, albeit briefly, a few years ago. I think I may have been their only subscriber. But it was fun to get a horror mag in the mail every couple months!
post #10100 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by RCA View Post

 

I also think if you are going to cite Freaks and Geeks as an example of how it is "done right", one might want to consider what inspired its creator:

 

"Apatow: Knocked Up is about a guy who gets a girl pregnant who would never consider being in a relationship with him. Forced intimacy with good-looking people, this is the common thread. It's like The Breakfast Club. Everything I do is based on The Breakfast Club."

Apatow put his own twist on it by making it much, much better.

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