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Film Critic Catch-All - Page 192

post #9551 of 10170
N/M, moved to podcast thread
post #9552 of 10170
Thread Starter 
Nah Sax, someone asked up above how we have time for podcasts. Since /film is hosted by film critics (who appear to be divisive in this thread!) I was offering my two cents.
post #9553 of 10170

This is what happens when I read CHUD in a tiny browser window at work. 

post #9554 of 10170

Maybe ask a few opinions of people in the office, Sax, about the most effective way to read movie sites on company time?

post #9555 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

 

"Anyway, 2017 was the year I finished my book on Walter Hill's films. It's over 400 pages in its rough form and James Ellroy is writing the introduction for it. I'm in the middle of a deep edit on it with my editor Bill Chambers. Bill has been my steadfast friend for, lo, these last 18 years or so. This was one of those years where I realized how much I value and, indeed, need my friends. I started writing the book after a screening of The Warriors on 35mm at one of the two Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas I manage in Denver. I wanted to understand why I loved so many of Hill's films. I wanted to understand, too, why it is there's no longform examination of his pictures in English. Two years later, there still isn't--but we're close."

 

This sounds exactly like what I was afraid of -- Chaw pontificating for 400 pages and making the book more about him than the filmmaker. I would rather someone like Brad Stevens (who wrote the terrific Abel Ferrara: The Moral Vision) had tackled a book on Hill. Stevens would do extensive research and interviews while also applying a level-headed analysis of Hill's work. Chaw is too much of a navel-gazer.

 

I'll give the book a shot, but my hopes are diminished.

post #9556 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malmordo View Post

 

This sounds exactly like what I was afraid of -- Chaw pontificating for 400 pages and making the book more about him than the filmmaker. I would rather someone like Brad Stevens (who wrote the terrific Abel Ferrara: The Moral Vision) had tackled a book on Hill. Stevens would do extensive research and interviews while also applying a level-headed analysis of Hill's work. Chaw is too much of a navel-gazer.

 

I'll give the book a shot, but my hopes are diminished.

Thanks for mentioning that book. Sounds interesting; I'll check it out.

 

I've been trying to find an affordable edition of The Emperor and the Wolf: The Lives and Films of Akira Kurosawa and Toshiro Mifune. The cheapest copy I can find online is still $40. Any leads on a more affordable copy would be welcome. It doesn't appear to be in e-book form anywhere; if you find, please send me the link!

post #9557 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mangy View Post

 

I've been trying to find an affordable edition of The Emperor and the Wolf: The Lives and Films of Akira Kurosawa and Toshiro Mifune. The cheapest copy I can find online is still $40. Any leads on a more affordable copy would be welcome. It doesn't appear to be in e-book form anywhere; if you find, please send me the link!

 

I haven't read that one, but I did enjoy Something Like an Autobiography by Kurosawa.

 

Monte Hellman: His Life and Films is another great book by Brad Stevens.

post #9558 of 10170

An Alamo Drafthouse Series Assembles the Delights and Depravities of ‘Fashion in Film’

 

by Abbey Bender

January 11, 2018
 
post #9559 of 10170

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

 

Back to 1976: THE BAD NEWS BEARS

 

http://www.fthismovie.net/2018/01/back-to-1976-bad-news-bears.html

 

"Maybe the reason I connect so deeply with this movie is because it reminds me of my own childhood, which is why I identify it as an early Generation X movie. Generation Xers are traditionally defined as being born between the years from 1961 to 1981, and that makes every single kid in this movie a member of Generation X. The Bad News Bears offers us an entire cast of latchkey kids who are not being raised by helicopter parents and must fend for themselves during the daytime. The reason Buttermaker is coaching these kids is presumably because there were no parents willing to take the job. Each kid is coping in his or her own way: some turn to food, some to work, and some lash out against the system that made them. Though it’s slightly before my time, the world in this movie is the one I grew up in. This is my childhood, with the bad snuggled right up alongside the good. Other kids movies at the time couched reality inside fantasy (like Freaky Friday), but this one is shows it like it was, and those of us who saw this when we were young appreciated that it felt like real life. The Boomers had Rebel Without a Cause and The Graduate. My generation had The Bad News Bears."

post #9560 of 10170

A History of Violence finished it run last week. And it dies the last worthwhile series on the AV Club (Is Random Roles still going on?).

 

You can complain about the quality of the writers beforehand, but everything went down the shitter once the AV Club joined Io9 and shifted to Kinja.

 

Everything is just a blur of headlines. There's no organization. All the articles look the same (Io9, Kotaku). No easy referencing.

 

I just feel sad. From such vaulted heights...to this.

post #9561 of 10170

I wonder how much longer that site will be around for. It felt like a lot of the regular readership jumped ship with the transition, and I fail to believe the new format has brought in many new viewers. 

post #9562 of 10170

I miss The Dissolve.

 

Can anyone recommend a good film analysis site? I trust Outlaw Vern and am following Todd VanDerWerff at Vox.

post #9563 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post

Wednesday, January 10, 2018




Back to 1976: THE BAD NEWS BEARS



 
http://www.fthismovie.net/2018/01/back-to-1976-bad-news-bears.html

"Maybe the reason I connect so deeply with this movie is because it reminds me of my own childhood, which is why I identify it as an early Generation X movie. Generation Xers are traditionally defined as being born between the years from 1961 to 1981, and that makes every single kid in this movie a member of Generation X. The Bad News Bears offers us an entire cast of latchkey kids who are not being raised by helicopter parents and must fend for themselves during the daytime. The reason Buttermaker is coaching these kids is presumably because there were no parents willing to take the job. Each kid is coping in his or her own way: some turn to food, some to work, and some lash out against the system that made them. Though it’s slightly before my time, the world in this movie is the one I grew up in. This is my childhood, with the bad snuggled right up alongside the good. Other kids movies at the time couched reality inside fantasy (like Freaky Friday), but this one is shows it like it was, and those of us who saw this when we were young appreciated that it felt like real life. The Boomers had Rebel Without a Cause and The Graduate. My generation had The Bad News Bears."

Yes. I did a re-watch of this last year and it holds up wonderfully. Such a great movie.
post #9564 of 10170
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post
 

I miss The Dissolve.

 

Can anyone recommend a good film analysis site? I trust Outlaw Vern and am following Todd VanDerWerff at Vox.

I've talked them up before, but Phil Sandifer and Jack Graham on Eruditorum Press are my favorite writers at the moment. Unfortunately, that site updates infrequently, and they pretty much write about whatever they want, ranging from TV to comics to video games to anything, so it's not always going to be film analysis. But when it is, especially some of the Star Wars stuff (and Doctor Who stuff I've skimmed, though I'm not a fan of that show), it's the best film writing around.

 

They do tend to approach things from an anti-capitalist, pacifist perspective. So a lot of the essays will veer in a direction of dissecting class and the effects of violence.

 

Other than that, there's no one site that's a great hub for film criticism at the moment. I've noticed many people flocking to the blogosphere again, and Twitter. Consequently, I get most of my film criticism from YouTube vloggers these days. 

post #9565 of 10170

Not a lot to add re: Bad News Bears (original version) but that article is spot on. I was a young kid (and I am Gen X) when it was released and it's as true a reflection of us as the John Hughes films were (are).

post #9566 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSaxon View Post
 

I wonder how much longer that site will be around for. It felt like a lot of the regular readership jumped ship with the transition, and I fail to believe the new format has brought in many new viewers. 


I think they'll just keep chugging along. I still visit every once in a while but that's more out of habit than anything. The writing has gone down the shitter and even the comment section, which used to be a fun place for injokes is unreadable. The only new viewers are probably the ones who cross-post from the other Kinja sites. There's a fucking lot of it now on the main page, they trick you into visiting the other sites by not being clear about which site an article leads to.

post #9567 of 10170
Thread Starter 
post #9568 of 10170

Happy Birthday, John Carpenter

Posted on January 16, 2018 by Sheila
 
 
"Happy birthday, John Carpenter! Here are some brief thoughts on his ELVIS. It's a very personal film"
 

"John Carpenter, director:

 

In dealing with Elvis, I’m bringing a lot of my own feelings to it and how I feel about him, and how I interpret the script, how I interpret his life. And in that sense, from my point, it’s a personal film. I really love Elvis a lot. I’ve always been a fan of his. I love his music. I have a strong feeling for him, it means something to me, I care a lot about the character, I care about his story. And in some senses I feel lucky to be able to direct a film about Elvis, this kind of a film which I don’t feel is exploiting him but I feel is trying to tell his story, trying to tell a story about a man who is bigger than life which is very interesting because he really was a human being, but somewhere in his life I think he transcended that and became mythical.

 

I am thankful this movie exists. It was the first attempt to “deal with” Elvis after his death in 1977. So many horrible details had come out following Elvis’ death (as well as right before his death, with the tell-all Bodyguard Betrayal) that Carpenter already felt that an Act of Redress was necessary. Same with Dave Marsh, whose spectacular 1981 book Elvis! served a similar function.

 

John Carpenter’s Elvis deals compassionately with Elvis’ rise to the top, and it is an act of almost aggressive positivity."

post #9569 of 10170

"A tribute to Neil Jordan. Just the beginning. (I should have included Byzantium as one of his masterpieces.)"

 

Armondheader

https://www.out.com/armond-white/2018/1/16/how-mona-lisa-outed-lesbian-archetype-and-broke-enigma-code

 

How Mona Lisa Outed the Lesbian Archetype and Broke the Enigma Code

post #9570 of 10170

That reminds me I need to check out ELVIS.

 

And look at me, agreeing with Armond. Mona Lisa is a great film. 

post #9571 of 10170

And it reminds me that I need to check out Byzantium. Yes, Mona Lisa is indeed a great movie.  Miss you, Bob.

post #9572 of 10170
post #9573 of 10170

Art of the Title has their ten best credit sequences of 2017 up. I'm not a fan at all of the Mindhunter titles, but I adore their number 1 choice: 

 

http://www.artofthetitle.com/feature/top-10-title-sequences-of-2017/

post #9574 of 10170

I agree with their number 2 entry. 

post #9575 of 10170

I like most of their choices there.

post #9576 of 10170

They're all good sequences. 

post #9577 of 10170

Our man Phil:

 

 

Sunday Reads: David Cronenberg - Love Is The Drug

A steadfast atheist, the director has spent his career exploring the ways humans try to transcend their mortal shells.
 
post #9578 of 10170

This may not turn anyone around on Armond, but as a fan I found the interview an interesting illumination on his philosophy:

 

 

post #9579 of 10170
Thread Starter 

OH MY GOD YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

 

post #9580 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

Art of the Title has their ten best credit sequences of 2017 up. I'm not a fan at all of the Mindhunter titles, but I adore their number 1 choice: 

 

http://www.artofthetitle.com/feature/top-10-title-sequences-of-2017/

 

Disagree on the Mindhunter one. Every time I thought about skipping them I didn't cause I was just so captivated.

 

Captivated. By watching a fucking tape recorder assembled. 

 

That's some A+ Cinematography right there. 

post #9581 of 10170
happy birthday bart
post #9582 of 10170
Thread Starter 

It's my birthday in all threads!

post #9583 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

OH MY GOD YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAASSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS



Its fine, guys. Its fiiiiiiiiiiiine.
post #9584 of 10170
I’m glad Ellis had an attack of conscience.

She’s still wrong though. Twilight is garbage writing for garbage people; forever and ever amen.
post #9585 of 10170

 

One hundred years after its release, Intolerance offers an inspiring vision of love and history.
 
"For many critics and scholars — myself among them — D. W. Griffith’s Intolerance is the greatest film ever made. A century later we are as close to its subject as we are distant from its art. Political specifics, moral arguments, and movie styles may look different today, yet the only real difference is Griffith’s still-daring ingenuity, which calls for a more open-minded reception than in our simplistic habits we are accustomed to: It calls for an optimistic, united popular audience, which Griffith took for granted.
 
When Intolerance premiered on September 5, 1916, its opening intertitles introduced silent-movie viewers to an extraordinary narrative device: “Our play is made up of four separate stories, laid in different periods of history, each with its own set of characters.” Employing a prologue and two acts, Griffith called it “a sun-play,” marked by florid melodramatics developed from Emersonian Transcendentalism, which film scholar Bill R. Scalia has described as “calling for an original American literature,” for “poets with the ability to ‘see’ past the material, apparent world to the world of eternal forms, which shaped nature in accordance with a divine moral imperative. Through this connection, man-as-poet would discover God in himself.”
 
Griffith’s idea of cinematic “sun-play” to illuminate a darkened world might sound cornball to cynical Millennials, but his sincere, way-out-there expression of emotion and spirituality gave immediacy to each period story. In place of the saccharine, he interweaves four tales of religious and political persecution: the invasion of Belshazzar’s Babylonian kingdom by Cyrus’s Persian army; Christ’s crucifixion; the Catholics’ massacre of the Huguenot Protestants in 16th-century France; and, in the early 20th century, a young couple wronged by urban reformers.
 
Intolerance (available now from Cohen Media Group, on Blu-ray) derives from that moment when the mass audience — particularly the audience for the kinetic arts — was first being created, before niche marketing and solidified genres began to segregate peoples’ tastes, as is so egregiously the case with separate categories for film, television, and video games. Yet then, as now, the fact of artistic expression is that artists will ignore or take up social issues, seeking to persuade or else risking inevitable contradiction. Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation (1915) was a perfect example of this. It was based on the primal issues of slavery, U.S. Civil War lore, and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan. The Birth of a Nation was not just America’s first film epic. It was the country’s first political film, and the considerable outcry it raised compelled Griffith to make a follow-up — a grand statement — that would clarify his position on both bigotry and censorship."
post #9586 of 10170
Disagree.
post #9587 of 10170
Not worth reading after ridiculous opening sentence.
post #9588 of 10170
It’s pretty good, but it’s no UHF
post #9589 of 10170
I mean, I've suffered through both "Birth of a Nation" and "Intolerance." I understand their importance in film history. But I'd rather get a root canal than watch them again.
post #9590 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightning Slim View Post

I’m glad Ellis had an attack of conscience.

She’s still wrong though. Twilight is garbage writing for garbage people; forever and ever amen.

Yeah. Im willing to agree that a lot of the vitriol against Meyer was unecessary. But that book was baaaaaad.


She's right that RPO is far, far worse.
post #9591 of 10170
Most certainly. My FB feed has its RPO defenders and that makes me fear for their souls.
post #9592 of 10170

I think Ellis was spot on in nailing the tone and apparent motivation of much of the Twilight and Meyer hate being misogyny. 

 

I think Ellis was dead wrong in moderating her critique of the work itself. I'm sure some (*cough*Bart*cough*) will say any such separation is artificial and essentially impossible, but my main objections have always been the shitty, shitty writing. The video brings up Dan Brown who is a fucking hack. I'd actually hold up Brown as far worse than Meyer, because at least Meyer started out writing from passion and simply telling the story she wanted to read. Brown wrote a carefully constructed populist piece of shit and continues to do so. His writing is so, so fucking bad.

 

Hard for me to decide who deserves more vitriol - Dan Brown or James Patterson. They're both cynical, artless hacks who write purely for immediate gratification.

post #9593 of 10170

I'm putting this here because it's a pretty dope line up:

 

"💋 Tickets now on sale for CRIMES OF PASSION: THE EROTIC THRILLER, a 24-film series running Feb 2 - 17, featuring a torrent of risky couplings, deadly obsessions, bad girls, worse guys, criminal behavior, and bodies"

 

https://quadcinema.com/program/crimes-of-passion-the-erotic-thriller/

 

"Among the darker pleasures of moviegoing is the spectacle of men and women enacting scenarios that link illicit sex and less-than-accidental death, sensational events few of us have experienced but for which we may, perhaps, secretly hunger. Restrictions on what could be shown or spoken yielded decades of film classics in which we read between the lines. But once those cinematic taboos were broken, filmmakers actively pushed the censorship envelope, dared actors to disrobe and dissemble, and held up a mirror to audiences’ changing mores. By the 1990s, the erotic thriller was a genre and a cottage industry unto itself. In looking forward to the Valentine’s Day release of François Ozon’s delirious psychosexual mystery Double Lover, the Quad turns up the heat with a torrent of risky couplings, deadly obsessions, bad girls, worse guys, head games, criminal acts, and bodies either heading for each other or heading for the morgue."

post #9594 of 10170

This is also super cool:

 

https://www.bam.org/film/2018/fight-the-power-black-superheroes-on-film

 

"Before Black Panther there was...an entire alternative cinematic history of black screen heroes who challenged establishment power structures through their sheer existence. From blaxploitation icons to supernatural avengers to anti-colonial outlaws, this series spotlights industry-defying images of black heroism and empowerment in films that are as socially and politically subversive as they are downright fun."

post #9595 of 10170

Re-reading this excellent overview today:

 

The Essentials: The Films Of Jim Jarmusch

The Playlist Staff
 
 
"I think of poets as outlaw visionaries in a way."
 
"There’s no one in independent film quite like Jim Jarmusch, one of American cinema’s most idiosyncratic filmmakers. Born to Episcopalian parents in Ohio in 1953, the director fell in love with B-movie double bills his mother left him in as a child, and fell into counter-culture arthouse movies in his teens. The director studied Journalism at Northwestern before dropping out and studying literature at Columbia, moving to Paris for ten months and then returning and applying to the film school at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, where he worked under legendary “Rebel Without A Cause” director Nicholas Ray, who encouraged the filmmaker’s unique, particular approach.
 

Jarmusch is a sort of perennial outsider: at 15 his hair turned grey, which his friend and collaborator Tom Waits thinks made him “an immigrant in the teenage world. He’s been an immigrant — a benign, fascinated foreigner — ever since. And all his films are about that.” And it’s not hard to see Waits’ point — from little-seen debut “Permanent Vacation” and breakout follow-up “Stranger Than Paradise,” to more recent star-laden films like “Broken Flowers” and “The Limits Of Control,” he’s painted a bleak, disconnected, wryly comic view of the world that’s never quite given him mainstream success, but has made him one of American indie’s most consistent and valuable filmmakers.

 

Jarmusch just got underway on production for his latest film, vampire tale “Only Lovers Left Alive,” which stars Tom Hiddleston, Mia Wasikowska and Anton Yelchin alongside Tilda Swinton and John Hurt, and that should arrive in theaters in 2013. But today sees the Criterion re-release of his third film, 1986’s “Down By Law,” on a shiny new Blu-Ray, and to mark the occasion, we thought it’d be a good time to look back over Jarmusch’s unique filmography (of fiction features, at least). Read on below."

post #9596 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Elvis View Post
 

I'm putting this here because it's a pretty dope line up:

 

"💋 Tickets now on sale for CRIMES OF PASSION: THE EROTIC THRILLER, a 24-film series running Feb 2 - 17, featuring a torrent of risky couplings, deadly obsessions, bad girls, worse guys, criminal behavior, and bodies"

 

https://quadcinema.com/program/crimes-of-passion-the-erotic-thriller/

 

"Among the darker pleasures of moviegoing is the spectacle of men and women enacting scenarios that link illicit sex and less-than-accidental death, sensational events few of us have experienced but for which we may, perhaps, secretly hunger. Restrictions on what could be shown or spoken yielded decades of film classics in which we read between the lines. But once those cinematic taboos were broken, filmmakers actively pushed the censorship envelope, dared actors to disrobe and dissemble, and held up a mirror to audiences’ changing mores. By the 1990s, the erotic thriller was a genre and a cottage industry unto itself. In looking forward to the Valentine’s Day release of François Ozon’s delirious psychosexual mystery Double Lover, the Quad turns up the heat with a torrent of risky couplings, deadly obsessions, bad girls, worse guys, head games, criminal acts, and bodies either heading for each other or heading for the morgue."

 

Quad's always been a low-key great theater - I have very fond memories of seeing MICHAEL CLAYTON and LOST IN TRANSLATION there - and along with Cinema Village and Anthology, one of the few places in Manhattan where if you were an aspiring indie filmmaker and had the cash, you could screen your movie. But they went through a rebranding/remodeling a few years back, and since then, they've been killing it with regards to their revivals and programming. 

post #9597 of 10170

I can't stand the Quad. The remodeling at that place somehow didn't include raking the seats, so if you're not sitting in the front row you're looking at someone's head. It's just awful. You'll have a much better experience watching the films in the comfort of your home.

 

The Anthology is great, though. No argument there.

post #9598 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malmordo View Post
 

I can't stand the Quad. The remodeling at that place somehow didn't include raking the seats, so if you're not sitting in the front row you're looking at someone's head. It's just awful. You'll have a much better experience watching the films in the comfort of your home.

 

I seem to recall that that was always an issue with the Quad regarding seat raking. 

post #9599 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightning Slim View Post

Most certainly. My FB feed has its RPO defenders and that makes me fear for their souls.


I've made this point in its respective thread, but I really do view RPO as "Twilight for nerds,"  a piece of work that constantly and shamelessly provides fanservice. Just trade in hot, sexy vampires with hot, sex gamer chicks, and it's really the same shit.

 

Which is probably the point Ellis is trying to make.

 

 

Weirdly enough, I think the Twilight films are far better than its source material because they know what trash the books are.  ESPECIALLY THAT LAST FILM. Holy crap, did anyone see that Vampire battle? Why the fuck wasn't the rest of the series like that?

post #9600 of 10170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

 

I seem to recall that that was always an issue with the Quad regarding seat raking. 

 

Yep. Which is why I was a little surprised that nothing changed after the remodeling.

 

The most recent review on Yelp is a complaint from a customer who couldn't even read the subtitles because of the seating/level of the screen.

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