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DC Cinematic Universe Discussion - Page 22

post #1051 of 1066

She's there in case Katana needs to go to the restroom, because ladies always need to go in pairs. 

post #1052 of 1066

Huh? Is Bradley Cooper a juggalo?

post #1053 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post

Huh? Is Bradley Cooper a juggalo?

This has been a tough year. Lots of death of artists I respected and admired. And if course, Trump.

That's why asking, no begging. Please. Please make this true. Cooper with clown makeup, being doused in Fanta, good Christ that image makes me so, so giddily happy for no apparent reason- I... I.


I think I need help, CHUD.
post #1054 of 1066
post #1055 of 1066

I've seen a couple of pieces of concept art from a few different iterations of the proposed remake of The Crow and they all seem to miss the fact that part of the character's appeal for male and female audiences was his somewhat (less so in the 1994 film) androgynous appearance.

post #1056 of 1066
As a longtime fan of the source material, it's definitely part of the story. Eric Draven is a ballet dancer with Bowie's face and Iggy Pop's body. If the new one makes him Tom Hardy it will fail so hard.
post #1057 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

Been catching up with some notable DC runs from the early to mid-2000s. This was my prime reading for DC, what I'd call "my" Batman and Superman, as I grew up a Marvel guy but got into DC around 2000, lured in by the "No Man's Land" event.

So I'm reading Brian Azzarello's "Broken City" arc of Batman and it's clear to see how his style has an influence on the DCEU and Ayer's Suicide Squad in particular. It's very neo-noirish, with a streak of sleaze. Everything, like Killer Croc's "skin condition" and how the Penguin got his name has to be explained in a grounded way. This is before Nolan, btw. But it was Azzarello's Joker graphic novel that had a big influence on The Dark Knight, after all. Worth a look for some pretty art and a Batman written with a dry sense of humor, and who in several scenes is totally DTF.

Also been reading Jeph Loeb's Batman/Superman comic that started in late 2003 and ran for a few years. It's the epitome of big, bright action figures getting banged together but it does two things: it makes the DCU feel cohesive in a way that few other writers can achieve, and Loeb really captures the lead characters' voices. He has a dueling narration, with the inner monologues of Batman and Superman complementing each other. The stories themselves can be rather silly at times, but if you enjoyed The Long Halloween and For All Seasons, this furthers those characterizations. It's about as hopeful and joyful as you can get with this universe, in stark contrast to Azzarello and the DCEU.

"Joker" came out after TDK. I bought a copy when it first came out and was disappointed in how nothing interesting was done with the Joker, despite it mimicking The Dark Knight's characterization.
post #1058 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chet Ripley View Post

"Joker" came out after TDK. I bought a copy when it first came out and was disappointed in how nothing interesting was done with the Joker, despite it mimicking The Dark Knight's characterization.
Yeah, it's a pretty lame comic.
post #1059 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chet Ripley View Post

"Joker" came out after TDK. I bought a copy when it first came out and was disappointed in how nothing interesting was done with the Joker, despite it mimicking The Dark Knight's characterization.

Hmmm, you are indeed right. Had Lee Bermejo drawn the Joker before with the Glasgow Smile? Could swear he had.

My argument about "Broken City" still stands. It feels influential on both Nolan and Ayer in tone.
post #1060 of 1066
post #1061 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by neil spurn View Post


This has been a tough year. Lots of death of artists I respected and admired. And if course, Trump.

That's why asking, no begging. Please. Please make this true. Cooper with clown makeup, being doused in Fanta, good Christ that image makes me so, so giddily happy for no apparent reason- I... I.


I think I need help, CHUD.

 

OOOOOOHHHH.  ITs a reference to that Crow remake I'd forgotten about with Cooper.  Forget it, I don't want it anymore.

post #1062 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post

Hmmm, you are indeed right. Had Lee Bermejo drawn the Joker before with the Glasgow Smile? Could swear he had.
He did. TDK was already in development at the time, so I'm not sure who influenced who.
post #1063 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chet Ripley View Post


"Joker" came out after TDK. I bought a copy when it first came out and was disappointed in how nothing interesting was done with the Joker, despite it mimicking The Dark Knight's characterization.

 

 

I disagree. It's a companion piece to Lex Luthor: Man of Steel, but if you read Azzarello in interviews around that time, he makes the argument that he didn't want to reveal a lot about the character or delve too deep into his psyche because as he saw it, part of the character's appeal is the mystery behind who he is and what drives him on the deepest, most fundamental level. You see a little bit, but Azzarello still keeps the reader at a distance before they see too much. This is why the story is more about Jonny Frost and his misplaced interest in the Joker as someone to aspire to be. By depicting the character like the Whitey Bulger of Gotham City, Azzarello is de-romanticizing a guy who would be fucking terrifying if he were real.* In the end, Batman and the Joker do their usual thing off panel, but Jonny Frost is the guy suffers the consequences (ex-wife raped, accomplice to dozens of increasingly grisly murders of the criminal and the innocent alike and having his face shot off) for his willfully ignorant entry into their world. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Shit, that book is sort of like Black Mass in its own way. Just an observation. I don't particularly like that movie, so I'm not using it to be complimentary.

post #1064 of 1066

 

He's got a sense of humor about it. That's good. Maybe he also learned not to let Zack Synder direct. 

post #1065 of 1066

 To his credit, Affleck has a sense of humor about his missteps. There was an SNL skit where an extra pointed out all of Giglia's flaws to Affleck.

post #1066 of 1066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaz View Post
 

 To his credit, Affleck has a sense of humor about his missteps. There was an SNL skit where an extra pointed out all of Giglia's flaws to Affleck.

And a mentally challenged person.

http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/gigli/n36898?snl=1

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