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STEPHEN KING'S IT Pre-Release Thread

post #1 of 1930
Thread Starter 

Anyone else super jazzed about this? Cary Fukunaga is a super talented director and True Detective had many elements that reminded me of IT. Seth Graham-Smith is also co-writing with Fukunaga and although I feel his big screen output has been more miss than hit, this could be something very special for the horror genre. A two-part epic film on this scale has never been attempted in horror.

 

It's also time we got a worthy adaptation of this story. Other than Tim Curry as Pennywise, I wasn't a big fan of the 1990 mini-series. I feel they missed a lot about what made the novel so special.

 

If everything goes to plan they'll start shooting this summer. Part 1 will apparently follow the Losers Club as kids and Part 2 will pick up with them as adults. The novel interspersed the timeline.

 

One big question will be if they keep it late-1950s to mid-1980s or adapt it to today with late-1980s to mid-2010s. I think adapting it to today could work although some of the themes of segregation and racism in the 1950s was a big part of the novel.

 

Quote:
 “I think that if anything, [the new film] will bring back some of the viciousness of the book that they couldn’t do with the miniseries because it was for broadcast,” Grahame-Smith says. “I think it’s going to be very scary, but I also feel like you’ve got Cary who is going to direct these kids—and he’s incredible at casting, incredible at shooting. He’s incredible with tone and atmosphere. One of the things I wanted to do is be a part of one of the really good King adaptations. As we know, there is an echelon of King adaptations that are classics. There are some that are okay. There are some that we’d rather forget.”

 

http://insidemovies.ew.com/2015/01/16/beetlejuice-2-something-wicked-gremlins-seth-grahame-smith/6/

post #2 of 1930
I don't trust anybody to adapt King who isn't named Darabont. But I'm always super excited to see a new King adaptation. Really talented people can get the best out of a mixed back of text.
post #3 of 1930
The most interesting sections of the book, the history of Derry, never seem to end up on film.

Maybe that's for the best. King's deconstruction of nostalgia for the "good old days" works on the page as well as it does because of King's strength at character creation, which never translates to screen because of the amount of inner monologue King uses. The disappointing TV adaptation from 1990 didn't diminish the book's power, and neither will whatever Grahame-Smith is making.
post #4 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeman View Post

I don't trust anybody to adapt King who isn't named Darabont. But I'm always super excited to see a new King adaptation. Really talented people can get the best out of a mixed back of text.

 

post #5 of 1930

Fukunaga is perfect for IT. 

 

True Detective feels like some grand novel taken with care. And when this thing starts casting, my ears will be perched.

post #6 of 1930

It will be difficult to follow in Tim Curry's massive shoes.  For me, he'll always be THE quintessential Killer Clown, Horned Devil and Plaza Concierge. 

post #7 of 1930

Tough for sure, but I'm more concerned on who they cast for the kids and the adults.

post #8 of 1930
I don't know if Curry is unbeatable. Just so iconic IMO. You cant replace Freddy (NOES) and you cant replace Pennywise.

I havent seen True Detective or anything from Cary, so I'll take your word for it.

I was the right age when the mini-series came out. Even then, I knew the end was mangled. The book was seminal and I read it way too young.



Spoiler...


Whatever happens, the gangbang better stay on the page.
post #9 of 1930

There's no way a gangbang will happen. It would draw too much unwanted controversy. I even doubt a Bowers hand job too. 

post #10 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnotaur3 View Post

There's no way a gangbang will happen.
Not with THAT attitude.

Oh... In the movie?... no of course not.
post #11 of 1930

I know, I play hard to get.

post #12 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reasor View Post

The most interesting sections of the book, the history of Derry, never seem to end up on film.

Maybe that's for the best. King's deconstruction of nostalgia for the "good old days" works on the page as well as it does because of King's strength at character creation, which never translates to screen because of the amount of inner monologue King uses. The disappointing TV adaptation from 1990 didn't diminish the book's power, and neither will whatever Grahame-Smith is making.

 

 I'd love to see the killing of the Bradley Gang make it to screen in some fashion. 

post #13 of 1930

To me, reading Ben's pipe dream of the clown floating up to him in the wind, held up by a balloon, wearing a silvery gown and bright white eyes (IT'S deadlights) is the image I want to most see get transferred to film. Terrifying.

post #14 of 1930
Super pumped for this.

The protagonist's trip through Derry in 11/22/63 filled me with nostalgia.
post #15 of 1930
.
Edited by Agentsands77 - 6/4/16 at 6:01pm
post #16 of 1930

I'm so stupidly excited for this that it's probably unhealthy. Case in point: I was watching it earlier this week and happened to be finishing it up as I stumbled across this thread; when I wasn't doing that, I was reading the book sample on Amazon via my phone.

 

I have nothing but great memories associated with the story of IT, despite only having read the book for the first time in its entirety within the past 3-5 years. I tried a few times over the years but being someone who's too easily drawn to electronic-based stimulants, I had a hard time sticking with it.

 

No, I mainly came up with the goofy 2-part mini-series. I recall hanging out with a pair of twin boys a few years younger than me when I was a kid and their mom showed it to us. I would always repeat the (modified) line "Helloooo, Georgie! Want a balloooooon?" and they would ask me to say it over and over. But it wasn't until I was probably in my late teens/early 20's when I bought the DVD that my enthusiasm really took root.

 

As strange as it sounds, the movie carries with it a strange sense of warmth for me. It's very much a comfort piece of entertainment. Something about the atmosphere... the woods the kids play in that are similar to my childhood; the sewers they traverse like I did in my youth; the bond they capture so well that reminds me of friends long gone. I love the idea of a villain so foreign to our world that he affects an entire town with his presence, yet remains hidden away among the perception of the adults. He terrifies children, but is still written well enough that he's fucking terrifying to adults - being a clown makes it 100x more fun.

 

I wasn't nearly as taken with Fukunaga's True Detective like most, it seems, but one thing he managed to capture was a dreadful sense of atmosphere while pulling great performances from his actors. My take for Pennywise?

 

 

(Other possibly interesting ideas: Michael Berryman, Peter Stormare, Michael Keaton, Idris Elba, Daniel Day Lewis)

 

In short: I. can. not. wait!


Edited by Shaun H - 2/4/15 at 2:01pm
post #17 of 1930

Unlike you I've never read the book, and my only exposure to the story is that TV movie.  Tim Curry is AMAZING and sort of creepy, and very very quotable.  The Stand By Me elements also work pretty well...  But the rest of that movie has so many Kingisms that I don't like that I've always wanted someone with a little bit more modern and serious of an eye to take on the story with state of the art cinematography and great actors instead of TV movie actors, and really really make Pennywise scary as fucking hell, instead of mostly this kind of charming character you can't wait to show up again, because Tim Curry is so amusing. 

post #18 of 1930

You really need to read it. So much more background about how long he's been infecting the town. I suggest reading the sample treatment via Amazon (it's about 50 pages) and seeing what you think.

post #19 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun H View Post
 

the sewers they traverse like I did in my youth

You hung out in sewers? Tell me more.

post #20 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waaaaaaaalt View Post
 

You hung out in sewers? Tell me more.


Shaun and I were once Ninja Turtles.  He was Raph.  I was Mikey.  Duh. 

post #21 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waaaaaaaalt View Post
 

You hung out in sewers? Tell me more.

 

I truly did, though most were storm drains that contained massive tunnels, or huge tunnels full of vast blackness that ran underneath highways that were littered with graffiti full of bad words and naughty bits. We had a specific tunnel we dubbed The Devil's Cauldron (which I literally just learned 3 days ago that I aped it from The Karate Kid: Part III) which older kids had said they'd tried exploring but it would split off too much and you'd get lost if you kept going. We would venture to it all the time, but never have the guts to try it, somewhat intimidated by bits of leftover string at the entrance from when other people had tried and given up (the string was for finding your way back).

 

One day we finally gathered up enough courage and planned a day-long excursion, packing backpacks with food, flashlights, lighters to burn down spiderwebs*, and great lengths of string in case we needed to find our way back. It turned out to be one of those formative moments of a person's young life, where we learned how much the older kids were full of shit. The tunnel lasted for about an hour, and while it did split off, it did so rather early and became a dead-end. So, no string was ever necessary. We kept going and it kept getting smaller.

 

Soon we got to the point where we were shimmying through, using our elbows to trek onward (think of when Bishop is moving through the tunnel in Aliens; just like that, claustrophobic as fuck) - in hindsight, it was fucking stupid. Imagine if something happened to one of us (there were 4)? No one would have a clue where to look. Thank God we don't have earthquakes here... The next "tunnel" could only fit the smallest kid and was bout 7 feet long; the next one was merely a drain pipe, drastically dropping in size - you could barely roll a tennis ball into it.

 

Ah, misbegotten youth.

 

*We had an experience prior where the lead person did it to one and a mama spider birth forth her babies and we ran terrified; that was also the time we found a human turd in the tunnel - good times!

post #22 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaun H View Post
 

 

I truly did, though most were storm drains that contained massive tunnels, or huge tunnels full of vast blackness that ran underneath highways that were littered with graffiti full of bad words and naughty bits. We had a specific tunnel we dubbed The Devil's Cauldron (which I literally just learned 3 days ago that I aped it from The Karate Kid: Part III) which older kids had said they'd tried exploring but it would split off too much and you'd get lost if you kept going. We would venture to it all the time, but never have the guts to try it, somewhat intimidated by bits of leftover string at the entrance from when other people had tried and given up (the string was for finding your way back).

 

One day we finally gathered up enough courage and planned a day-long excursion, packing backpacks with food, flashlights, lighters to burn down spiderwebs*, and great lengths of string in case we needed to find our way back. It turned out to be one of those formative moments of a person's young life, where we learned how much the older kids were full of shit. The tunnel lasted for about an hour, and while it did split off, it did so rather early and became a dead-end. So, no string was ever necessary. We kept going and it kept getting smaller.

 

Soon we got to the point where we were shimmying through, using our elbows to trek onward (think of when Bishop is moving through the tunnel in Aliens; just like that, claustrophobic as fuck) - in hindsight, it was fucking stupid. Imagine if something happened to one of us (there were 4)? No one would have a clue where to look. Thank God we don't have earthquakes here... The next "tunnel" could only fit the smallest kid and was bout 7 feet long; the next one was merely a drain pipe, drastically dropping in size - you could barely roll a tennis ball into it.

 

Ah, misbegotten youth.

 

*We had an experience prior where the lead person did it to one and a mama spider birth forth her babies and we ran terrified; that was also the time we found a human turd in the tunnel - good times!

Well......there we go.

post #23 of 1930

Riveting, I know! Unfortunately: no clowns.

post #24 of 1930

Hello, Shaun, don't you want a string?! Hehehehe

 

TRY A WHOLE BUNCH!

post #25 of 1930
.
Edited by Agentsands77 - 6/4/16 at 6:00pm
post #26 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

I loved the book up until the stuff with the turtle. It was all downhill from there.

 

It remains one of my favorite books to this day, warts and all, but I always found the history of Derry and 1958 sections far more engaging than the "adult" stuff. King has a real skill in capturing what the formative years are like. 

 

The Patrick Hockstetter character was extremely disturbing to me and in retrospect, one of the scariest parts of the book. I realize even with two movies we're going to get a streamlined narrative. I doubt Hockstetter will even make the cut (one sociopathic bully is enough, in movie terms) but man, what a chilling character. 

post #27 of 1930
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Edited by Agentsands77 - 6/4/16 at 5:59pm
post #28 of 1930
Agree on all counts about the Derry history. The story Mike Hanlon's dad tells him is a standout.

And completely agree about Patrick Hockstetter. The problem with even a two parter is you could never get that depth of stuff.
post #29 of 1930
Thread Starter 

In True Detective, Cary Fukunaga dealt with two separate timelines very well I thought as well as a confrontation through a "labyrinth" at the end. If nothing else he'll make this scary. He might be too old but I could see Matthew McConaughey play adult Bill. Curious to see if they go with "big" stars for the adult versions.

 

I also wonder how much of the racism angle of Mike Hanlon will be relevant if they move the childhood section into the 1980s. Obviously racism is still prevalent but there's a difference between what it was like in the 1950s and the 1980s.

post #30 of 1930

The True Detective parallel is a very good point. 

 

I have to wonder if Stephen King had a psychotically insane bully as a kid.  He MUST have. 

post #31 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeman View Post
 

The True Detective parallel is a very good point. 

 

I have to wonder if Stephen King had a psychotically insane bully as a kid.  He MUST have. 

 

In On Writing, he talks about being babysat by a huge fat woman that would lock him closets or sit on him, nearly suffocating him, farting and laughing, only to  slap/punch him into darkness randomly.

post #32 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by User_32 View Post
 

In True Detective, Cary Fukunaga dealt with two separate timelines very well I thought as well as a confrontation through a "labyrinth" at the end. If nothing else he'll make this scary. He might be too old but I could see Matthew McConaughey play adult Bill. Curious to see if they go with "big" stars for the adult versions.

 

I also wonder how much of the racism angle of Mike Hanlon will be relevant if they move the childhood section into the 1980s. Obviously racism is still prevalent but there's a difference between what it was like in the 1950s and the 1980s.


For all we know the new drafts positioned the dates back where they should.

 

Oh hell... here it goes.

 

Fan casting:

 

 

Beep Bepp, Richie!

post #33 of 1930
Giamatti and Keaton would both rock as Pennywise.

Like Shaun, I was also a tunnel-exploring Goonie. Also did my fair share of trespassing and suburban archaeology.
post #34 of 1930
Thread Starter 

I could actually see Jim Carrey as Pennywise. The Mask crossed with The Number 23.

post #35 of 1930
Maybe...

post #36 of 1930
Has anyone brought up Dafoe yet? I can't believe no one's brought up Dafoe yet!
post #37 of 1930

I'd rather not. 

 

This film needs an actor that nobody can recognize. One that blends into the background and behind the face of the clown. Dafoe would stick out like a sore thumb.

post #38 of 1930

Yeah, I considered it, but it would be too noticeable. I also considered Jim Carrey. Serkis ain't a bad idea at all.

post #39 of 1930

Even Serkis would be sort of recognizable.  I'm really thinking Fukunaga should find an unknown.

post #40 of 1930
Thread Starter 

With the higher budget and two-part film angle, I doubt they'll go for a total unknown. Especially since the first film will be made up of unknown child actors, I'm sure the studio will be asking for a "name" for Pennywise.

 

How about Woody Harrelson?

post #41 of 1930

Yeah, but it wouldn't be the way to go. 

post #42 of 1930

How about Doug Jones? Coincidentally, one of his first film roles was playing a clown in Batman Returns.

post #43 of 1930

Keaton or Carrey could be interesting. I'll also throw Sam Rockwell in the mix for Pennywise.

post #44 of 1930
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnotaur3 View Post

I'd rather not. 

This film needs an actor that nobody can recognize. One that blends into the background and behind the face of the clown. Dafoe would stick out like a sore thumb.
Okay then, Javier Bardem?

Still too obvious?
post #45 of 1930

.


Edited by Agentsands77 - 6/4/16 at 5:59pm
post #46 of 1930

I actually thought of Jones yesterday, but figured the voice would have to be replaced. Bardem could be awesome.

post #47 of 1930

Tom Waits, baby.

post #48 of 1930
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Edited by Agentsands77 - 6/4/16 at 5:59pm
post #49 of 1930

Why would we want Heath's Joker in IT.

post #50 of 1930

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Edited by Agentsands77 - 6/4/16 at 5:59pm
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