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Mass Effect: Andromeda

post #1 of 640
Thread Starter 

Holiday 2016 for XBOX One, PS4, and PC

 

 

SQUEE!!

post #2 of 640


God, waaaaay too much stuff dropping all of a sudden at year's end, now. My life is gonna be totally consumed by Fallout come November, but I know I'll still manage to carve out some space for this fucker too....somehow.
post #3 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leto II View Post



God, waaaaay too much stuff dropping all of a sudden at year's end, now. My life is gonna be totally consumed by Fallout come November, but I know I'll still manage to carve out some space for this fucker too....somehow.

Well you got a year.  Isn't this holidays 2016?

post #4 of 640

Oh just take me like the Mass Effect whore that I am.

post #5 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dalyn View Post

Well you got a year.  Isn't this holidays 2016?

Woops...you're right; saw "Holiday 2016" there, and immediately "Winter 2016" (which sometimes means late December this year/early January next year) somehow flashed through my head.

Thank Satan.
post #6 of 640

It sounds like it's going to be Voyager wrapped in ME clothing and I'm fine with that. Committing acts of complete idiocy millions of light years away from home in the search of a good cup of coffee, I am totes down.

post #7 of 640
I don't buy games very much anymore (hell I can't seem to find the time to play any more than an hour or two a week), but this is undeniable. Had all of the games at launch and played the shit out of them multiple times. Can't wait to get back into this world.
post #8 of 640

FYI, there was info from a survey that leaked about 2 months ago that seems to match up with what we know about the game so far:

 

https://www.reddit.com/r/masseffect/comments/32yzxf/last_month_i_took_a_random_survey_about_mass/

 

Quote:
 The next Mass Effect game takes place in the Helius Cluster (a cluster of 100s of solar systems in the Andromeda Galaxy), far removed by time and space from Commander Shepard’s heroic acts and the final events of the Mass Effect trilogy. You are a pathfinder, a combat trained but un-tested explorer leading an expedition into the Helius cluster to establish a new home for humanity. As you explore this sprawling series of solar systems (over 4x the size of Mass Effect 3), collecting resources and building colonies, you will encounter the savagery of untamed lands in the form of cut-throat outlaws and warring alien races. To survive and colonize the wild reaches of space, you will need to grow your arsenal, your ship, your crew and make strategic (and often uneasy) alliances to fight against increasingly menacing foes. Along the way, you will encounter the remains of a once powerful and mysterious alien race, the Remnant, whose forgotten technology holds the key to gaining power in this region of the galaxy. As you uncover who the Remnant were, and the mysteries their ruins contain, you are drawn into a violent race to find the source of their forgotten technology that will determine the fate of humanity.

Collect Resources to Fuel your Growth:
Scour solar systems and planets within the Helius Cluster to find valuable resources and blueprints of long forgotten alien technology that will allow you to craft better equipment and weapons, such as improving your leg armor to allow you to jetpack jump, or upgrading your cryo-beam (laser cannon) to target enemies or do area damage around you to clear out close threats. As you build your arsenal and resource infrastructure, you will be able to explore deeper into the increasingly dangerous and resource-rich solar systems of the Helius Cluster.

A Capable Crew:
Throughout the story, you will recruit seven distinct crew members to fight by your side. Each crew member has a unique personality and specific abilities that open up strategic options as you choose which two of them to bring into each mission. For example, Cora has the ability to deploy a biotic shield that protects everyone in the bubble while still allowing you and your squad to fire out of it. Your crew will grow alongside you as you explore the Helius Cluster, and you can choose how you upgrade your crew’s weapons, gear and abilities to increase their individual combat effectiveness. Create the perfect squad to react to any situation and to support your preferred gameplay style.

Your Crew, Your Story:
Your crew members aren’t merely hired guns – they are part of the living universe in the Helius Cluster that develops in response to your actions and choices. Increase each crew member’s loyalty by pursuing missions that are important to that specific character. For example, when a Krogan colony ship has been stolen by one of the outlaw factions leaving the colonists stranded without resources to survive, your Krogan squad mate, Drack, is determined to strike out against them. If you take the mission and help him track down the outlaws’ hideout to return the ship to its rightful owners, Drack’s loyalty toward you and your squad will increase and Drack will unlock a brand new skill tree.
Explore each individual’s backstory and develop your relationship with them through conversations and unique missions. True to Mass Effect, what you choose to say will directly affect your crew’s loyalty and relationship with you, and will open up different conversations and narrative opportunities at the end of the game depending upon how you approach each encounter.

Deployed Strike Team Missions:
The Helius Cluster is 1000s of light years across, and you can’t be everywhere at once. As you develop more colonies, resource bases and settlements, you have to be able to keep them safe. Spend resources to recruit mercenaries and develop an AI controlled Strike Team that you can deploy to take on randomly generated, time-sensitive missions. Strike Team missions take many forms, including settlement defense and Remnant artifact recovery, which will take real-time to complete. Send your Strike Team out on a mission while you continue playing the main game and they will return, 20 – 30 minutes later, having gained rewards such as XP, currency and equipment based on the success of their mission. Spend money and resources to train your Strike Team and acquire better gear for them, which will increase their success rate and allow them to take on more difficult missions for greater rewards.

Active Strike Team Missions:
When you encounter a Strike Team mission in the Single-Player mode, you can leave your Strike Team at their base and decide to tackle the mission yourself with your Multiplayer roster of characters. You also have the option of tackling the mission by yourself, or recruiting up to three friends to play with you. The more friends you bring, the greater the challenge and the greater the reward. These missions will play out using the Next Mass Effect’s multiplayer Horde mode (more details on this later). These missions will include a variety of thematically appropriate objectives, like defending a Settlement against Khet attacks, or recovering a Remnant artifact off of a planet before an outlaw gang gets there first. By taking an active role in strike team missions, you can earn special Single-player rewards in addition to the usual multiplayer specific characters, weapons, weapon mods, and pieces of equipment which can be customized between missions. Additionally, players who join another person’s Strike Team mission will receive bonus in-game currency and multiplayer XP for helping others with their missions.

Multiplayer “Horde” Mode:
The next Mass Effect’s “Horde” multiplayer pits you and up to three of your friends against waves of enemy troops on various battlefields throughout the galaxy. Players fight together to survive increasingly difficult enemy attacks and accomplish objectives, like disabling a bomb near a colony base or assassinating a target. Progress through multiplayer missions to gain XP and earn new multiplayer specific weapons, characters, weapon mods, and pieces of equipment, which can be customized between matches. Multiplayer play will also earn you APEX funds (in-game currency), which can be used to purchase items and gear in the Single Player game.

Establish Settlements:
Search solar systems for rare habitable planets to establish a settlement that could serve as a base for humankind’s new home in the Helius Cluster. As you build permanent settlements, you will make strategic choices on where to focus your new base’s resources. For example: Recon Settlements will clear fog of war from the space map and give the player more strike team missions to choose from, while Mining Settlements will periodically supplement the player’s supply of crafting materials.

Dialogue:
Building upon the rich history of strategic dialogue that has defined the Mass Effect series, you can make meaningful choices in every conversation you have with characters that impact the way your game evolves. The next Mass Effect adds deeper control over your conversations through a greater ability to interrupt and change the course of the conversation as it is happening. During certain conversations, you will be able to take action based choices, such as the option to pull out your gun and force someone to open a door instead of convincing them to do it through conversational guile. Action based choices give you more options for how you approach dialogue with characters in the game and can lead to more extreme outcomes on the story as it evolves around the decisions you make when interacting with a huge cast of NPC characters.

Seamlessly Travel Through the Next Mass Effect Universe:
As you pilot your space ship, Tempest, across the 100s of solar systems that are seamlessly connected in the next Mass Effect, you will encounter new planets filled with valuable resources, intelligent life, conflict, and alien technology that all give you opportunities to increase the power of your character, your ship and your team so that you can build them into a force that perfectly suits your gameplay style. Transitions between activities, like flying your Tempest (space ship) across a solar system to land on a mineral rich planet, then jumping into your Mako (land vehicle) to explore the surface of planet, all happen smoothly without loading screens.

Customize and Share Your Experience:
Discover new things in Andromeda Galaxy, like alien artifacts and natural wonders, that serve as trophies and decorations that you can use to modify the look of your character, Tempest (Space Ship) and Mako (land vehicle). Customize the way your squad and your character look with clothes and aesthetic modifications that you unlock throughout the game. Photos you take from the far reaches of the galaxy can be used to decorate your starship or sold to certain characters.

Remnant Vault Raids: Find and activate Remnant Monoliths to unlock Remnant vaults. Explore abandoned Remnant ruins to find and locate a powerful artifact, but once you remove it you will trigger the vault defenses that will arm traps, activate defense robots and even change the architecture of the vault itself to stop you from escaping. Fight your way out of the vault and you will be rewarded with valuable loot, including powerful gear, crafting resources and Star Keys that can be used to unlock massive orbital facilities in space that grant permanent stat bonuses.

Optional Elite Remnant Vault Raids are scattered around the Helius Cluster located in special orbital facilities that are unlocked by Star Keys. Similar to the standard Remnant Vaults, you enter them to retrieve a special artifact which will trigger the vault defenses that arm traps, activate defense robots and change the architecture of the vault itself to stop you from escaping. However, Elite vaults ratchet up the difficulty of the encounter with increasingly powerful defense robots and traps, as well as roaming outlaws and deadly Khet patrols that are also in search of the elite artifacts. Elite Remnant vaults will test the limits of your combat and puzzle solving acumen, but with greater difficulty comes greater rewards. Gain rare loot, narrative acclaim and huge rewards for completing these daunting challenges.

Khet Outposts:
As you explore planets throughout the Helius Cluster, you will encounter Khet Outposts. These outposts are optional combat experiences where you enter the outpost and fight off waves of enemies. Destroy Khet outposts to earn XP, rewards and thwart their growing power in the region. Your allies will reward you with praise and increased narrative options as you fight to remove the Khet presence from the region.
Drive and upgrade your Mako (land vehicle):
Explore the surfaces of 100s of planets in the Helius Cluster in your versatile land vehicle, the Mako. Whether you are looking for a place to set up a colony, searching for a Remnant vault or attacking a Khet Outpost, you will enjoy getting there in your Mako. Equip and upgrade your Mako in dozens of ways, like adding turbo boosters, upgrading your shield generator or adding a Hostile Detector to your radar to create the ultimate planetary exploration vehicle. Finally, get your Mako looking the way you want with a custom paintjob.
...

 

I hope this turns out to be true because that sounds awesome.

post #9 of 640

Never played any of the Mass Effect games (and see no point now as I read endless articles on the franchise's "disappointing" finale after that game's release, thereby spoiling the ending for myself) but, based on that summary above, this sounds pretty awesome. Would definitely give it a go. 

post #10 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSaxon View Post
 

Never played any of the Mass Effect games (and see no point now as I read endless articles on the franchise's "disappointing" finale after that game's release, thereby spoiling the ending for myself) but, based on that summary above, this sounds pretty awesome. Would definitely give it a go. 

 

Just to give my two cents on that controversy...it's all bullshit.  Sure, the main plot is wrapped up rather disappointingly.  But you never play a Mass Effect game for the plot (all 3 games have pretty rote plots) you play them for the characters.  And the amount of payoff you get when it comes to characters you grow to legitimately love makes the ending of 3 completely worth it.

 

Moral of the story:  The Mass Effect Trilogy is well worth your time despite what idiots on the internet would have you believe.

post #11 of 640
Eh, it's hard to argue with some of the more rational complaints about "tragedy for the sake of tragedy" and no one really WANTS to be the protagonist of a story with a tragically transhuman-advocacy ending, but the ME trilogy is brilliant. Saxon, you're definitely missing out.

And if you do feel disappointed by the ending, you can always pull up the FilmCriticHulk archives, read his extremely tiny piece on ME and make yourself feel better about the climax. The article may take more time to read than the three games put together though.

So excited for this! I'm glad they're going to a whole new galaxy.
post #12 of 640

I'm sure the ME series is great - there's a lot of love for it everywhere, despite how things turned out - but my reason to avoid it isn't to do with the ending itself... but because I know what that ending is. At the time of its release and subsequent outrage, I wasn't involved in gaming and therefore figured it wouldn't matter if I spoiled the ending for myself. I just wanted to know what all of the thinkpieces were talking about.

 
It's a personal preference but I'm the same way with books or movies. If I know the ending, I won't read/see it. I know the saying goes "It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end", but endings are always my favorite part of stories and stories lose their power for me if I start at the end and then work backwards. 
 
It's why I'm excited about this. I like what I know of the universe and I relish the chance to explore it as part of a new story.
post #13 of 640

All I really want from Andromeda, is an Elcor party member.  With shoulder mounted cannons and a sunny disposition to killing people.

 

That, and female Turians.  Make it happen Bioware!

post #14 of 640
... Poor Nyreen Kandros. frown.gif

And diplomatically: an elcor squad member would get old real fast. Embarrassed: no offense.
post #15 of 640

Well shit, that'll show me for not paying to get the Omega DLC.  

 

And you say that, Aurora.  But what if said Elcor had a special ability where you could ride him or her into battle?

 

"Grandstanding:  I am here to kick ass and chew bubblegum.  And I am all out of bubble gum."

 

Alternatively, I would settle for a Hanaar that hates the Blasto movies with an utter passion.  "This one is tired of being compared to Blasto.  This one thinks it is filled with racist stereotypes."

post #16 of 640
Guys, I was really looking forward to playing Metal Gear Solid V but given that I already know that Big Boss ultimately ends up going off the deep end, gets blowtorched by Snake and ends up in cryo for a couple of decades before succumbing to a genetically engineered virus transmitted by his son, I guess there's no point is there?

Saxo you are being very silly. It's all about the journey, not the destination.
post #17 of 640

I have no problem ignoring the ME3 ending in my mind, it was still a really good game. There were plenty of memorable character bits (Morden...), and the levels and gunplay were as good as ever. Ping ponging and slamming your way around as a Vanguard is the only way to play.

 

ME2 had a weak as hell non-ending after the gameplay climax, and you don't see people bitching about that one. It doesn't really matter when you have so much fun being Jack Bauer In Space on the way.

 

Everything I see and read about ME: Andromeda has me worried as hell. It sounds like all the worst gameplay systems from Dragon Age 3, except the zones are supposed to be planets, not regions. I'm going to guess a third of the gameplay time is going to be scanning/hunting minerals on foot, hunting baubles in the sand for busywork, yadayada and so forth.

 

The good parts of the ME series are the character interactions, adventure/dialogue/choice bits, and the gunplay/power use through linear missions. Replacing the linear cinematic missions with wandering busywork accomplishes what exactly?

 

The one planet the show us in the teaser looks the same as the desert level in DA3. It doesn't exactly have me feeling the hype.

 

If the game still lets me be evil female Space Bauer as has good conversation bits I might still slog through it. I much prefer the ME world setting to the DA:I one, so that'll make the bad bits more bearable.

post #18 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sentinel Red View Post

Guys, I was really looking forward to playing Metal Gear Solid V but given that I already know that Big Boss ultimately ends up going off the deep end, gets blowtorched by Snake and ends up in cryo for a couple of decades before succumbing to a genetically engineered virus transmitted by his son, I guess there's no point is there?

Saxo you are being very silly. It's all about the journey, not the destination.

 

I don't know if I buy that completely. That's like saying "sure the last bite had a human finger in it, but you enjoyed the rest of the hamburger right?" A rough start is much easier to forgive than a rough finish, and even setting aside the complete clunker of an ending, Mass Effect 3 as a whole still felt like a poor man's Mass Effect 2 (which, granted, is still pretty good). Recycled mechanics, limp sidequests, and if you played the previous games like me with an eye towards keeping people alive, a comical who's who of returning character cameos that felt borderline fan-servicy by the end. 

 

Also, while I'm certainly willing to give them another stab at it, I'm already starting to get feelings of deja vu. Guys, there are other motivations besides saving the universe with mysterious alien technology! They already fucked up one climatic ending and the best parts of Mass Effect have always been the smaller stories and character interactions, so I wish they'd just ditch the overarching HUGE CONSEQUENCES plot. Then again, I guess that would make it hard to justify the inevitable trilogy...

post #19 of 640

I've tried rationalizing the ending of Mass Effect 3, and there's just no getting around the fact that it's a rip-off of The Matrix trilogy. Which is a pretty poor thing to want to rip off.

 

I still love the series though, and think Mass Effect 3 is a stellar game right up until Shepard meets The Catalyst.

post #20 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by D.T. View Post
 

I've tried rationalizing the ending of Mass Effect 3, and there's just no getting around the fact that it's a rip-off of The Matrix trilogy. 

 

Wha?  Huh?  Eh?

post #21 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dark Shape View Post
 

Wha?  Huh?  Eh?

 

I'll spoiler all of this, just in case:


 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

So, Shepard is humanity's one hope and the person who's supposed to save everyone from the Reapers. When things are at their worst and it looks like it's all over, Shepard meets the "Catalyst", an all-important figure who takes on an unassuming form to make a difficult conversation easier (just like The Architect). The Catalyst reveals that it's the one controlling the Reapers and that the Reapers have a distinct purpose to come in and wipe the slate clean after the organic species reach a certain point in development and evolution. And that they've been doing it forever. Just like the Machines have been allowing humans to rebel and build Zion, just to come in and exterminate them again. It's all a system of control.

 

But Shepard is special, so a choice is presented (even though a long conversation about how choice is a myth has just been had -- as it was in The Matrix). One choice is to be a part of the system, do what you're supposed to do and let things go on this way forever. Another is to go against that, continue the fighting and suffer the deaths of many. The third choice (which isn't directly presented to Neo, but he ends up making it anyway) is to force a truce between the two factions (in Shepard's case, it's a blending of synthetic and organic life into a new unifying species).

 

And the real sinker is that both scenarios require the hero to "reinsert their code". Neo's supposed to go through the door on the left, reinsert his code into the Matrix and let the system continue. Shepard has to throw himself into that weird beam thing, get disintegrated and have his DNA be the trigger for whichever choice he's made. It's like Bioware made a Mad Libs out of Matrix Reloaded and Revolutions and filled in the gaps with new words.

post #22 of 640
I'm actually coming around on ME3's ending. I think a lot of the hate it got was that we all wanted to bring peace to the galaxy, save all our buddies and still have a roaring rampage of revenge. And the game tutted at us for that.

Maybe it's all the ugliness happening around the legacy of slavery in the US right now, but I'm starting to see what they were going for when they tried to nudge players away from the smiting.
post #23 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightning Slim View Post

I'm actually coming around on ME3's ending. I think a lot of the hate it got was that we all wanted to bring peace to the galaxy, save all our buddies and still have a roaring rampage of revenge. And the game tutted at us for that.

Maybe it's all the ugliness happening around the legacy of slavery in the US right now, but I'm starting to see what they were going for when they tried to nudge players away from the smiting.

 

For me at least it was more the fact that it made a lot of what you'd done (especially regarding the whole war effort thing) seem totally pointless. What the heck was the point of making peace amongst all those different species and building this huge unified force if I'm going to be able to hit the magic "make everyone robot people" button at the end? It was literally a Deus Ex Machina that rendered large swathes of the story irrelevant. It would have been one thing to let you have the big hammer but choose not to use it. It's another to just say "Army? What army?" I can understand wanting to tweak genre conventions, but introducing such a gamey mechanic (it's literally a points system!) then disregarding it at the end feels less like innovative thinking and more like they wrote themselves into a corner and needed a way to clean break all the decisions that had come before. Which again, would be fine if they hadn't suggested that those decisions would DIRECTLY INFLUENCE THE ENDING!

 

This is why I think something like Walking Dead handled the choice thing much more smoothly. Objectively you could argue that many of the choices were just flavor moments, but within the context of the game the impact feels immediate and satisfying (or horrifying depending on the outcome). By trying to tie all these threads into the end game, Bioware seemed to create a situation where they were just checking off endings on a list rather than providing a natural, satisfying conclusion. 

 

EDIT: Plus, the kid thing is just dumb no matter how you slice it. 

post #24 of 640
In a gameplay viewpoint that makes sense. The point system was a cheap way to get the "extra" coda at the end to play. And most of your decisions from previous games in the series were followed through with ending storylines throughout the ENTIRE game, not just the very end.

Thematically I thought the end worked perfectly well with what they had been talking about in all of the games to that point. The survival of all of these species were touched upon constantly. The Quarian Armada vs the Geth, the Krogans dying DNA, Thane's entire storyline, and many more were about survival or accepting your impending doom. Being given different final choices on how to end the main storyline of Civilization vs the Reapers fits for me because it's what the series as a whole had been about. Saving one thing means sacrificing another. There is no big "happy" ending where we all triumph over the Reapers. The safest path is the one where we all merge with machines and choose acceptance. And that dramatically changes all of us on a fundamental level.

But I understand why a lot of people had issues with it.
post #25 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splatoon View Post
 

 

For me at least it was more the fact that it made a lot of what you'd done (especially regarding the whole war effort thing) seem totally pointless. What the heck was the point of making peace amongst all those different species and building this huge unified force if I'm going to be able to hit the magic "make everyone robot people" button at the end? It was literally a Deus Ex Machina that rendered large swathes of the story irrelevant. It would have been one thing to let you have the big hammer but choose not to use it. It's another to just say "Army? What army?" I can understand wanting to tweak genre conventions, but introducing such a gamey mechanic (it's literally a points system!) then disregarding it at the end feels less like innovative thinking and more like they wrote themselves into a corner and needed a way to clean break all the decisions that had come before. Which again, would be fine if they hadn't suggested that those decisions would DIRECTLY INFLUENCE THE ENDING!

 

Except that they do?

 

Your alliances in this game (some of which, like the Quarians and Geth on Rannoch, are 100% dependent on decisions you made in Mass Effect 2 to achieve peace) determine how powerful the Crucible is, and the power of the Crucible is what gives you the extra options like Control and Synthesis.

post #26 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dark Shape View Post
 

 

Except that they do?

 

Your alliances in this game (some of which, like the Quarians and Geth on Rannoch, are 100% dependent on decisions you made in Mass Effect 2 to achieve peace) determine how powerful the Crucible is, and the power of the Crucible is what gives you the extra options like Control and Synthesis.

 

You're absolutely right, mechanically it definitely affects it, but it doesn't feel like the actual choice has any consequence, it just pushes a number higher. Yeah I just ended decades of genocidal conflict, but who cares because A. It doesn't factor in narratively and B. I'm going to end up doing that anyway by hitting the magic peace button. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RodofWar View Post

In a gameplay viewpoint that makes sense. The point system was a cheap way to get the "extra" coda at the end to play. And most of your decisions from previous games in the series were followed through with ending storylines throughout the ENTIRE game, not just the very end.

Thematically I thought the end worked perfectly well with what they had been talking about in all of the games to that point. The survival of all of these species were touched upon constantly. The Quarian Armada vs the Geth, the Krogans dying DNA, Thane's entire storyline, and many more were about survival or accepting your impending doom. Being given different final choices on how to end the main storyline of Civilization vs the Reapers fits for me because it's what the series as a whole had been about. Saving one thing means sacrificing another. There is no big "happy" ending where we all triumph over the Reapers. The safest path is the one where we all merge with machines and choose acceptance. And that dramatically changes all of us on a fundamental level.

But I understand why a lot of people had issues with it.

 

Character-wise I felt a LOT of stuff got wrapped up a little post-haste but I'll admit YMMV on that point, which leads into a larger problem that lies at the root of my (and anecdoatally, other people's) discontent. Yes, the "everything's fucked, we need to tear it down and rebuild it to survive" approach does fit some people's stories, but that's just not how I played the game. At basically every turn I managed to find a way to save the day, whether it be the genophage, the Rachni, the Geth and the Quarians etc. Yeah you could argue that "shit happens" is realistic, but up until this point I'd been given free reign to play as the bastard lovechild of Jesus and Master Chief who makes peace by sheer force of will, so to suddenly have that yanked away in service of "themes man, themes!" felt like a kick in the nuts. This isn't Spec Ops: The Line, it's big Star Wars style space opera, so yeah, after putting in all that fucking time building this alliance I DID want a god-damn happy ending were we all get together and kick the ever-loving shit out of the reapers. Which made having the option to fight them (with 100% readiness BTW) be a guaranteed failure even more grating. It's one of the weird new problems this kind of narrative scope brings to gaming, because the more freedom you give to people, the more they start to feel like they're really in control rather than just along for the ride. Again, I think Walking Dead is one of the few games that manages to handle it well, in part by establishing the "we're fucked, we're SO fucked" mentality from moment one. Here it just left me feeling cold. 

post #27 of 640
I get your point and understand it completely but I love it. I just started another play through after getting excited for Andromeda. I still think that some of the gameplay is clunky, and since it's been a while since I've played it takes a little while to get the hang of it again.

I never played Dragon Age past Origins, but what were the major gameplay differences that you think will be incorporated into Andromeda?
post #28 of 640

I never really got into Dragon Age, but I've heard some people mention that they're worried the game may trend into MMO grind territory which I really hope isn't the case. I didn't hate the planet exploration elements and I think they could be handled in an entertaining manner, but for me the best parts of the Mass Effect series were the specific character driven narrativess in 2, and I'd hate to see them get away from that. Then again, if they could pull off something like The Witcher which apparently has great story-based sidequests, maybe they could go for the best of both worlds. It seems like EA has realized the mistake of trying to pull an Activision by putting their marquee titles under the development gun, so hopefully Bioware gets the time/money to go big with this one. 

 

Also, PC player problems, but my enthusiasm is also tempered in part by the fact that if I do want to play this, I'm going to have to load up Origin again. Not a horrendous service, but it's nice just having things under one umbrella.

post #29 of 640
I've never liked Origin. I don't game on PC but registering it for ME3 and the Battlefield series on my Xbox has always been annoying.

And I don't see Mass Effect leaning toward an MMO grind territory and ditch the character arc missions. That is the hallmark of the series. It's exciting that they are tweaking it constantly, which they've always done. Hopefully some of the gameplay can be streamlined, and by that I mean the exploring concept. I like the combat pretty much as is, but it could be a little more smooth. I'm now spoiled by a lot of newer combat games that make everything very fluid.

If launching probes, using the Mako, mining for minerals, or whatever they plan on doing for exploring can be more fun than the other games then I'll be happy. It's been reworked basically from the ground up on each game and it's still not very good.
post #30 of 640

...I can see them eventually doing a Mass Effect MMO. Done right, it would blow Destiny right out of the water (even though Destiny's managed to do that to itself).

 

Would I want that? No. I'm of the mind that Bioware is meant for one-player experiences, and I'm not a fan of Star Wars: TOR by any stretch. But they could to it, and it'd make a lot of money.

post #31 of 640
Fuck Destiny. They sold gamers a game engine for full game price and have been parcelling out the actual content as DLC.
post #32 of 640
So I wonder if there will be a main character like Shepard this time out or (based on the multiplayer "horde" mode mentioned previously that takes place seemingly in game) we will be able to create a generic character from the ground up. Maybe even be different races from the start?

I say this after the disappointing (to me) Destiny which has some of the open world multiplayer elements I was excited about upon its release yet none of the story or drama the Mass Effect series has. I would say I'm spoiled now but we should expect games to try for basic standards such as interesting characters and intriguing storylines that have meaning besides just shooting things in the face.
post #33 of 640

New trailer:

 

 

Great to hear Jennifer Hale again, if only for a trailer (BioWare has confirmed that Shepard is not in the main game proper).

post #34 of 640
Very minimal, but I still have chills. I love selling the idea of space exploration into the unknown. Can't. Wait.

I'm guessing Shepard will be like Anderson from the original series. If they go with Femshep as default (which they should) it would that much better.
post #35 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by RodofWar View Post

Very minimal, but I still have chills. I love selling the idea of space exploration into the unknown. Can't. Wait.

I'm guessing Shepard will be like Anderson from the original series. If they go with Femshep as default (which they should) it would that much better.

Yeah. I like that too. Hopefully, it's not another OH SHIT A BIG, STUPID ROBOT ALIEN IS TRYING TO DESTROY THE WOOORLD plot. I would totally be down if ME4 was about space exploration and fucking around different planets--because that's the only thing people really care about those games anyways.

post #36 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ska Oreo View Post
 

Yeah. I like that too. Hopefully, it's not another OH SHIT A BIG, STUPID ROBOT ALIEN IS TRYING TO DESTROY THE WOOORLD plot. I would totally be down if ME4 was about space exploration and fucking around different planets--because that's the only thing people really care about those games anyways.

 

I mainly like fraternizing with my crew.  And renegade interrupts, because they're always f'ing baller.

post #37 of 640
In retrospect, the ending controversy feels like a real tempest in a teacup. I didn't remember that people hated it, indeed, that I hated it, until this thread reminded me. The extended conclusion they updated in really worked for me too.

These were like my favorite games ever. I'm sure I'll be picking this up. But I'm already preparing to not see this until well into 2017, maybe the Fall. Ain't been one of these that released on time.
post #38 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post

In retrospect, the ending controversy feels like a real tempest in a teacup. I didn't remember that people hated it, indeed, that I hated it, until this thread reminded me. The extended conclusion they updated in really worked for me too.

 

I still cringe and facepalm when I think about that. To this day, I can't believe that was a thing that happened, and a developer actually caved in to it (though the extended ending was quite good).

post #39 of 640

I should probably be outraged by the ending brouhaha, particularly as someone who didn't mind the original ending, but in a series that was already all about multiple story paths and extensive DLC, I can't muster it.  I also like that they made the added ending option everyone was clamoring for by far the darkest of them all.  It's really a phenomenally bleak way to end a rollicking space epic, and I love it.

post #40 of 640

Agreed about the "new" ending being possibly the most subversive of them all. I mean, I was sad, I wasn't expecting that whole controversy to erupt that way, but I really didn't think it was my place to tell BioWare how to write their stories. Holy shit, can you imagine if that reaction was thrown at J.K. Rowling for some of the character-deaths in her books? Fuck, George R. R. Martin would have to live in a bunker if his readers were as immature as the gaming derpbros who howled at the moon over ME3's ending.

post #41 of 640

My only problem with the ending is the colors for the choices were the opposites of what they should be.

post #42 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leto II View Post
 

Agreed about the "new" ending being possibly the most subversive of them all. I mean, I was sad, I wasn't expecting that whole controversy to erupt that way, but I really didn't think it was my place to tell BioWare how to write their stories. Holy shit, can you imagine if that reaction was thrown at J.K. Rowling for some of the character-deaths in her books? Fuck, George R. R. Martin would have to live in a bunker if his readers were as immature as the gaming derpbros who howled at the moon over ME3's ending.

 

That's like comparing apples to steak. 

post #43 of 640
How so?
post #44 of 640
So what do you guys make of the indoctrination theory?

I'd need to play ME3 again to guage how I feel about that ending, but I remember feeling that people were being ridiculous about the ending.
post #45 of 640

For me, the only real choice was for Shepherd to meld with the Reapers and use them to help rebuild the galaxy. Killing the Reapers (and thus all sentient technology) wasn't cool because it was genocide. We spent all that time learning that the Geth weren't truly terrible, saw Joker fall for EVI, and so forth. Deciding to merge all the organic and synthetic life was shit because no one had any say. One person was deciding the fates of every organic being in the galaxy, and not everyone would want to be a hybrid. It went against everything the Normandy crew was fighting for.

 

Nah, Shepherd sacrificing his or herself and making the Reapers a force for good instead of evil was the only choice for my Paragon Shep.

post #46 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leto II View Post

How so?

 

This has been discussed ad nasuem on these very boards, but bullet-pointed:

 

1. Video games are an interactive medium, and by their nature produce a different kind of engagement than traditional media.

 

2. The Mass Effect series in particular went to great lengths to encourage the idea of player agency in shaping the narrative. Between the 3 games people could have easily spent 100+ hours in a story featuring a character they had both shaped (visually) and guided (narratively), which is a long time to engage people in a "you're gonna save the galaxy!" narrative before pulling the rug out in the last 5 minutes in what  one could argue was a rather arbitrary case of Deus Ex Corpsica. It's kind of like they let us choose how we wanted to pimp out our sweet ride for 3 days, only to then ask us which of the three bats we'd them to smash it to pieces with. If they were gonna do that, why the heck did we spend all that time accessorizing? 

 

I could go on (and on) about the ways the Mass Effect 3 ending in particular feels stupid (and have, in other threads!) but that's the gist. I think it's fine to argue the relative merits of the ending, but the literature comparison felt inaccurate. You can certainly have whiny, self-entitled fans in either medium, but there is a fundamental difference in how those mediums work that cannot be ignored. 

post #47 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Splatoon View Post

I could go on (and on) about the ways the Mass Effect 3 ending in particular feels stupid (and have, in other threads!) but here's the gist:

post #48 of 640
Ugh. Does this mean if the game is set after ME3 all the characters are post-singularity transhumans?
post #49 of 640
It sounds like an Old West/Pilgrims kinda thing, exploring a new galaxy. And I believe the singularity was confined to the Milky Way? Ugh who knows what they're doing.

I bet it's a lot like Firefly.
post #50 of 640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightning Slim View Post

Ugh. Does this mean if the game is set after ME3 all the characters are post-singularity transhumans?

 

"Shepard, Shepard wake up."

 

"Oh god, are we all meat robots!?"

 

"What? No, you got hit on the head with a piece of debris during the final battle . Thankfully we had a 100% War Readiness waiting, so we kicked the ever loving shit out of those evil robots. You ready to go have sweet, sweet episodic adventures in an unknown galaxy?"

 

"I was born ready."

 

*Sweet rock music plays, Rex headbutts something, end opening cinematic*

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