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Forgotten prestige movies - Page 8

post #351 of 380

THE KINGDOM is the first of many Peter Berg films in which he would carry water for the imperialist security state. I use that term semi-sarcastically, but Berg has been in the tank for a while wrt "the real heroes" (cops, federal agents, the military, blue collar workers), and his particular worldview - especially in PATRIOTS DAY, which has some good stuff in it but ultimately functions as an infomercial for the suspension of the bill of rights - filtered through those pictures is distasteful. No matter how many times he tells Mitt Romney to stop using his slogan from Friday Night Lights. 

 

It's a movie, also, where he really, really wants to be Michael Mann. 

post #352 of 380

I have a weird history with THE KINGDOM as I watched it once on DVD (ten years or so ago), liked it, and kept meaning to watch it again but never have.

 

My own personal politics were very much in transition around that time, and even that recently my limited powers of film analysis were even weaker.

 

What I remember most is pitying Jennifer Garner as she was plainly trying to break into film but was sidelined most of the movie's running time.

post #353 of 380

I just remember all the headlines for Foxx, Cooper and Garner. But who wound up stealing the film? Jason Fucking Bateman.

post #354 of 380
Thread Starter 
Syriana absolutely belongs, in fact I think it was one of the films that first planted the idea of forgotten prestige movies in my head, but by the time I got around to making it it slipped my mind before I could think to throw it in there with The Reader etc.

I just looked him up, and after directing another prestige misfire Gold, he's now working on a Dr Doolittle movie, which just about says it all.

But what about that other pointedly respectable mid-00's Clooney effort Michael Clayton? I never saw it, but I do feel like, despite almost daring you to forget it with that name, it's managed to retain a certain modest status over the years.
post #355 of 380

CLAYTON is one of the most rewatchable movies in recent memory, even though it came out ten years ago. It gets forgotten among the Greatness of 2007, but it's just a fantastic, well-done thriller from start to finish. Clooney does such a great job at inhabiting this beaten, broken character for much of the movie that when "George Clooney" comes out in the last few minutes, it's tremendously satisfying. 

 

It's also gotten a lot of play in the last few months as the "you're so fucked" gif has found a myrad of uses. 

 

I've always thought a pseudo-prequel to Clayton would be a fun tv series. 

post #356 of 380

Yeah, Clayton has the advantage of Clooney, Swimton, and Wilkinson all on their A-games. It's a terrific actor-driven thriller that feels like a throwback in a good way.

post #357 of 380
Thread Starter 

Clayton definitively knocked off the list! I'll have to check it out.

 

Actually I kind of indirectly called Syriana a misfire up there, that's maybe being a bit harsh. From what I remember it wasn't bad exactly, but tried very hard to be this very grown-up film for well informed broadsheet readers, without managing to be very dramatically involving at all. Which is of course a big part of that magic Forgotten Prestige Project formula.

 

I looked it up and had completely forgotten Matt Damon was even in it! I literally can't remember a single thing about Damon in that film. I do however remember it as part of Alexander Siddig's brief second wind as Hollywood's middle-easterner of choice.

post #358 of 380

Matt Damon and Siddig are both great in it. 

 

I'm watching it again right now. 

post #359 of 380

MICHAEL CLAYTON, as we repeat from time to time on these boards, is just an excellent film and as Boone points out, its rewatch value is ridiculously high.

post #360 of 380

Clayton is definitely one of those films I watch at least once a year. 

post #361 of 380

Michael Clayton is great and from one of the all-time great fall film-slates. I remember seeing that opening weekend and thinking, "Tilda Swinton should win an Oscar for this... but she won't. Sigh."

 

Nice to be proven wrong.

post #362 of 380

Speaking of early 20th century spy thrillers: THE GOOD SHEPHERD. and THE GOOD GERMAN for that matter. 

post #363 of 380

My take on Syriana, way back when:

 

http://www.chud.com/7092/dvd-review-syriana/

post #364 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

Speaking of early 20th century spy thrillers: THE GOOD SHEPHERD. and THE GOOD GERMAN for that matter. 

 

THE GOOD GERMAN is just awful -- tedious and endless, guaranteed to please no one. After that movie and OCEAN'S THIRTEEN, I lost faith in the Soderbergh/Clooney partnership.

 

Not a fan of MICHAEL CLAYTON, either, especially the lazy ending that falls back on the cliche of a hidden tape recorder. It's not bad -- there's entertainment to be had, mostly from the performances, but it's full of contrivances.

post #365 of 380

GOOD GERMAN has a great unhinged Tobey Maguire performance.

 

I like Ocean's Thirteen. 

post #366 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

GOOD GERMAN has a great unhinged Tobey Maguire performance.

 

I thought he was embarrassingly bad.

post #367 of 380

What I remember about The Good German was Soderbergh using only film cameras made from the 30's/40's (which he bought) and the one-sheet being on a De Palma level of "Is this homage or plagiarism?" towards Casablanca. Yeah and psycho Tobey. Always appreciated and respected Soderbergh's fearlessness towards experimentation. Succeed or fail, he always goes all out like Boorman in his heyday. God bless him.

post #368 of 380

Great to see the MICHAEL CLAYTON love.  Fucking great movie.

post #369 of 380

Michael Clayton is a very good movie.  But I think of it primarily as the movie that, when people named it their best of 2007, immediately made me question their taste.

post #370 of 380

You know... I was looking back on Spielberg and how he was constantly the "Always a Bridesmaid, Never a Bride" with the Academy during the 70's/80's.

 

The fact they didn't even nominate him for directing Jaws and The Color Purple is what's so damn egregious. But I get why he lost to Woody Allen, Warren Beatty and Sir Richard Attenborough. The latter especially gets all the Hell-storm for besting ET but Gandhi is a fine movie. It gets categorized unfairly in the "Oscar Bait" line of films but it was considered a risky project at the time and Attenborough spent 20+ years trying to get it made.

 

Part of the drive that makes Schindler's List work so well is that rejection from his peers in the industry that fueled him to prove them all wrong. Which granted... he did already prove them wrong with the aforementioned Color Purple and the criminally-underrated Empire of the Sun

post #371 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

Speaking of early 20th century spy thrillers: THE GOOD SHEPHERD. and THE GOOD GERMAN for that matter. 


Yeah, I remember THE GOOD SHEPHERD definitely being advertised as Oscar-bait, and having revisited it lately, it's got some great "based on a true story" spycraft and reversals in it.

 

As far as already seemingly-forgotten prestige pics?  Anyone still talking about ATONEMENT?

post #372 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jmacq1 View Post

 

As far as already seemingly-forgotten prestige pics?  Anyone still talking about ATONEMENT?

People still talk about that long one-r on the beach, but I never hear anything about the movie that shot comes from.

post #373 of 380

Atonement's pretty good.

post #374 of 380
Saorse Ronan and Vanessa Redgrave are very good in ATONEMENT too. It did put Ronan in the map in a big way so it will always have that going for it.
post #375 of 380

More to the point, Darkest Hour is currently being advertised as "from the director of Atonement."

post #376 of 380

Speaking of British period movies starring Gary Oldman, we don't talk nearly enough about TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, whose pleasures are subtle and satisfying. 

post #377 of 380
An amazing Double bill with Tiptoes.
post #378 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boone Daniels View Post
 

Speaking of British period movies starring Gary Oldman, we don't talk nearly enough about TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, whose pleasures are subtle and satisfying. 


Tinker Tailor owns. The scene where Smiley talks about his meeting w/ Karla is one of the high points of Oldman's career.

post #379 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by FilmNerdJamie View Post
 

You know... I was looking back on Spielberg and how he was constantly the "Always a Bridesmaid, Never a Bride" with the Academy during the 70's/80's.

 

The fact they didn't even nominate him for directing Jaws and The Color Purple is what's so damn egregious. But I get why he lost to Woody Allen, Warren Beatty and Sir Richard Attenborough. The latter especially gets all the Hell-storm for besting ET but Gandhi is a fine movie. It gets categorized unfairly in the "Oscar Bait" line of films but it was considered a risky project at the time and Attenborough spent 20+ years trying to get it made.

 

Part of the drive that makes Schindler's List work so well is that rejection from his peers in the industry that fueled him to prove them all wrong. Which granted... he did already prove them wrong with the aforementioned Color Purple and the criminally-underrated Empire of the Sun

 

I don't think Jaws is a great example of a Spielberg snub, as great as Jaws is. The five nominees that year were Kubrick, Forman, Altman, Lumet, and Fellini. I can see the idea of "tie goes to the guys with the proven track record, not what may be a one time flash in the pan". Yeah, if they had a crystal ball and knew Spielberg would be seen as a peer to all of them, maybe the voting would have gone differently, but not one of the five stands out as an obvious mistake either.

 

A great film / director losing out to another great film / director isn't really a snub in my book.

post #380 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post

More to the point, Darkest Hour is currently being advertised as "from the director of Atonement."

Speaking of the “director of Atonement”, always dug Hannah more. And it’s another great Ronan performance.
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