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STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON -- Post Release Thread

post #1 of 65
Thread Starter 

So... my first post release thread!

 

I had the opportunity to go to the world premiere on 8/10/15 at the Microsoft Theater.  F. Gary Gray, Dre, Yella, Cube, and Ren were present and gave a little speech before the movie, with a very loving tribute to Eazy E.  The movie clocks in about two and a half hours, which is probably 45 minutes too long.

 

The opening scene of the movie is straight out of the Cary Fukunaga playbook, with Eazy E scrambling to escape a drug deal that goes wrong.  Very reminiscent of the drug bust scene in True Detective.  From that point on, the movie uses NWA's music as a propulsive force, barreling through the group's meteoric rise.  There are a few tender moments in the movie that humanize the NWA members, but this is clearly an exercise in hagiography.  The most "gangsta" moment of the movie is when Cube smashes a record exec's office, which at this point is just a trope in music biopics.

 

The movie loses steam right around the time of the LA riots and the Rodney King verdict.  At that point, it's just checking off boxes until Eazy E's demise of AIDS-related complications.  But it coasts on the good will built by the emotionally true first half of the movie.  With a little more editing, this could have been great.  Gray said his first cut came in at three and a half hours.  I have no idea what else he could have covered that didn't play in the movie.  You could have excised whole scenes from the latter half of the movie and not lost a beat. 

 

One thing I didn't expect was how resonant the experiences of NWA's members would be to what's going on today in terms of police brutality/abuse against minorities.  The scenes are powerful and when Cube first raps Fuck Tha Police, you really get pissed and can't but remember that this is still a problem that hasn't been addressed.  We've made zero progress, and you could even say we've slid backwards.

 

Ice Cube's son is great at playing his father, as are the actors who play Eazy E and Dre.  Ren and Yella are more or less non-entities.  

 

The premiere itself was massive.  It was great to see people who lived through that time there.  Although I almost had a stroke from the cognitive dissonance--the guys who wrote Fuck Tha Police are being celebrated with a multi-million dollar tent pole and an expensive premiere, paid for by a major American public company.  

 

All in all, worth watching with a full theater.  NWA's music pumped at full volume can't but make it a great movie-going experience.  

 

YT, I think you won't be disappointed. 

post #2 of 65
Quote:
  The movie clocks in about two and a half hours, which is probably 45 minutes too long.

Yeah, they're trying to cover an entire decade of hip-hop (1985-1996?) in the film. Might be too long for casual viewers, but for a guy like me who grew up listening to N.W.A and the whole Ruthless-Death Row era of hip-hop, I'm excited to see all that history shown onscreen. 

 

Quote:
 I have no idea what else he could have covered that didn't play in the movie.

I haven't seen the film yet, but reviewers are criticizing the film for not including the despicable incident from 1991 where Dr. Dre assaulted TV host, Dee Barnes at a party.You can read the details here: http://www.highsnobiety.com/2015/08/06/dr-dre-dee-barnes/. I hope that since Dre is now married with kids, he looks back on this event with shame. 

 

Also, around the time of his second album, Death Certificate, Ice Cube began to dabble in the Nation of Islam and brought a lot of their rhetoric into his lyrics. You can hear them in bigoted songs like "Black Korea (where he raps about killing Korean shopkeepers), the N.W.A diss track "No Vaseline" (where he makes anti-Semitic slurs towards N.W.A's manager, Jerry Heller), "Lil' Horny Devil" and "Cave Bitch" (both songs where he talks about white women seducing black men). 

 

Since Dre and Cube are producers of the film, I guess they don't want to be reminded of their dark moments, but they could have included these scenes to show that they weren't perfect and learned from their mistakes. 

post #3 of 65
Thread Starter 

There's faint references to both of those currents in the lives of Dre and Cube.  The second half of the movie isn't bad, it's just that it can't match up to the first half.

post #4 of 65

I'm guessing the stuff with

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Suge Knight's

driving the latter half of the film, right? He was arguably the one who caused Dr. Dre to split from Eazy and kept fueling the fire to their feud (something he'd continue to do with Tupac and Biggie). 


Edited by Ravi - 8/11/15 at 11:58am
post #5 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravi View Post
 

Yeah, they're trying to cover an entire decade of hip-hop (1985-1996?) in the film. Might be too long for casual viewers, but for a guy like me who grew up listening to N.W.A and the whole Ruthless-Death Row era of hip-hop, I'm excited to see all that history shown onscreen. 

 

I haven't seen the film yet, but reviewers are criticizing the film for not including the despicable incident from 1991 where Dr. Dre assaulted TV host, Dee Barnes at a party.You can read the details here: http://www.highsnobiety.com/2015/08/06/dr-dre-dee-barnes/. I hope that since Dre is now married with kids, he looks back on this event with shame. 

 

Also, around the time of his second album, Death Certificate, Ice Cube began to dabble in the Nation of Islam and brought a lot of their rhetoric into his lyrics. You can hear them in bigoted songs like "Black Korea (where he raps about killing Korean shopkeepers), the N.W.A diss track "No Vaseline" (where he makes anti-Semitic slurs towards N.W.A's manager, Jerry Heller), "Lil' Horny Devil" and "Cave Bitch" (both songs where he talks about white women seducing black men). 

 

Since Dre and Cube are producers of the film, I guess they don't want to be reminded of their dark moments, but they could have included these scenes to show that they weren't perfect and learned from their mistakes. 

But I don't think that's every going to happen, and the slick Bio-film was never going to be the raw, humble look at NWA that everyone might want.

post #6 of 65
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravi View Post
 

I'm guessing the stuff with

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
THE MEAN MAN WHO SHALL NOT BE NAMED

driving the latter half of the film, right? He was arguably the one who caused Dr. Dre to split from Eazy and kept fueling the fire to their feud (something he'd continue to do with Tupac and Biggie). 

 

Do we need to worry about spoilers?  This is the post release thread, and this stuff happened?

 

Anyway:

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Continuing with the hagiography/myth-making trend in the movie, Suge isn't as instrumental from a plot standpoint as one would think.  He gets diminished to pretty much just muscle.  First for the D.O.C. and then for Dre when they form Death Row.  In fact, Dre constantly berates Suge for not taking the work seriously and just partying all the time, which I don't think is entirely accurate...

 

The feud between the NWA members is really played down.  It essentially comes down to a youthful misunderstanding between Dre, Eazy, and Cube about money.  Jimmy Heller, played by Giamatti, and, as always bringing his A-game to a one-note character, is portrayed as more or less driving the train of cutting out Dre and Cube from the NWA money. But even Heller comes off as somewhat noble; clearly he cared for these guys.  The movie more or less paints the dispute as the product of guys who never had any money being blinded by the dollar signs.  I don't know enough about NWA's history to know whether this is accurate or whether the dispute also involved ego/talent/jealousy.

 

100% this:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ska Oreo View Post
 

But I don't think that's every going to happen, and the slick Bio-film was never going to be the raw, humble look at NWA that everyone might want.

 

 

I mean, these are the producers of the movie:  Dre, Cube, and Eazy E's widow.  This is very much the after-school special version of the story. 

post #7 of 65

Do they touch on Cube's studying architecture at all?

 

post #8 of 65
Thread Starter 

Nope.  Not at all.  The movie glosses over the fact that both Dre and Cube came from relatively educated households with working parents.

 

So much of the movie perpetuates the ongoing myth that successful musicians are preternaturally talented without effort. This was particularly emphasized in connection with black musicians in the early age of jazz and has roots in the racist belief that black musicians just weren't educated, so it's kind of troubling (for instance, for years Louis Armstrong kept up the facade that he couldn't read music, even though he was classically trained). But at the same time, the movie emphasizes Cube's and Dre's work-ethic. In that respect, it's all over the place.  

 

Devin's review is up and it's spot on with my (less articulate) impressions above.

post #9 of 65

I feel like a I really only want to see this so I can hear a crowd sing "Fuck Da Police." That would make my night pretty damn special.

post #10 of 65

So does this movie cover Are We There Yet?, Are We There Yet? and Are We Done Yet?, or just Are We Done Yet?

post #11 of 65

This movie would have benefited a lot from either:

 

a) Focusing just on the group's lives leading up to and immediately following the development, creation, release, and aftermath of the titular album, or

 

b) Not being a movie and just being a fucking HBO series instead

 

The first half is pretty damn good, even if it steps over the line of hagiography, and that the second half just runs out of steam as it piles on more and more stock biopic conventions. This movie has good guys and bad guys. To me, that's fucking insane, because as far as I know, N.W.A. is a rap group comprised of human beings instead of superheroes, but whatever.

post #12 of 65

Oh but and also: why the fuck are MC Ren and DJ Yella supporting characters in their own damn movie?!

post #13 of 65

One thing that bugged me about the trailer was that it looked like it was set today, with a few gheri curl wigs thrown in. You look at Ice Cube, for example, and he's wearing a black Dodgers cap, which didn't even exist until the late 90's, and it seems like they wanted the group to have this specific look from the start, glossing over their earlier, less "gangsta" days:

 

 

 

 

post #14 of 65

God how I love those uncool/embarrassing pre-fame photos of badass "no nonsense" bands. Like Slayer wearing eyeliner with cheesy glam metal studded vests and wristbands, or Bon Scott in bellbottoms singing Build Me Up Buttercup.

post #15 of 65

Eminem wearing an ALF shirt is pretty good:

 

post #16 of 65
The first half was indeed pretty awesome but I felt the back half (while not as electric as the first part) wasn't the steep drop off that some might claim.

There was some great stuff there as well charting the rise of the core members of NWA to Moguls and how they broght the streets into the mainstream culture.

The problem with the second part is that there's 2 or 3 movies worth of material in that last hour that it feels bloated and slight at the same time.

The rise and fall of Death Row Records alone deserves it's own film.
post #17 of 65
I thought this was pretty good.
post #18 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynamotv View Post

The first half was indeed pretty awesome but I felt the back half (while not as electric as the first part) wasn't the steep drop off that some might claim.

There was some great stuff there as well charting the rise of the core members of NWA to Moguls and how they broght the streets into the mainstream culture.

The problem with the second part is that there's 2 or 3 movies worth of material in that last hour that it feels bloated and slight at the same time.

The rise and fall of Death Row Records alone deserves it's own film.

That's kind of how I felt too. It's one thing to cover an entire decade on NWA, it's another to also cover the off shoots with the solo careers which could have each had their own film. I just realized that it glossed over the major beef that happened between Dre and Eazy. That should have been covered so to punctuate Dre breaking down in the hospital room and deciding to leave Death Row. Dre in his Aftermath period always talks about the regrets he had over what happened between him and Eazy.

The first cut is said to be over three hours. I can believe that. I'd be curious to see how that plays compared to the final cut. All that said, this is as good as biopics can get, at least from what I've seen on that genre. There's always going to be short hands with this genre, so yeah...

Did Arabian Prince make it in this cut? Yella and Ren were certainly relegated to supporting players, but I can't recall a single line AP had.
post #19 of 65

A recent interview by N.W.A's manager, Jerry Heller: http://grantland.com/features/jerry-heller-nwa-straight-outta-compton/

post #20 of 65
One bit that threw me off. 2Pac recording at Death Row, "Hail Mary" no less, which was recorded in 1996, a year after Eazy died. Curious to know what other major anachronisms are in this film besides wardrobe choices.
post #21 of 65

In non shocking news, a movie with a almost all black cast doesn't garner much discussion around here despite it opening with nearly 60 million.

 

Anyway, I enjoy it but I do agree that it gets pretty bloated in the second half.

 

I wish they wouldn't have approached their lives with such kiddie gloves in some aspects but it was still a good story being told.

 

I've seen some people bash Cube's son in the movie but I thought he did well.

 

Aldis Hodge is actually the actor I know best (minus Giamatti) in the cast and I wish he would have gotten more to do (MC Ren). Big fan of him after TNT's Leverage. Although, I like to not think about him playing that asshole Voodoo in the first season of Friday Night Lights.

 

Universal is destroying it this year.

post #22 of 65
Because music biopics about white people have always been such a hotbed of discussion on this forum.
post #23 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Stockslivevan View Post

One bit that threw me off. 2Pac recording at Death Row, "Hail Mary" no less, which was recorded in 1996, a year after Eazy died. Curious to know what other major anachronisms are in this film besides wardrobe choices.

I was also confused by the Tupac scene. Suge Knight bailed out Pac in late 1995 and then he (Pac) started writing "California Love" and songs for All Eyez on Me (which was released in February 1996). "Hail Mary" was written for  The Don Killuminati: The 7 Day Theory album and that was written/recorded in Summer 1996. All of this happened a year and half AFTER Eazy had passed. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Racj82 View Post
 

In non shocking news, a movie with a almost all black cast doesn't garner much discussion around here despite it opening with nearly 60 million.

To be fair, not many people on this forum listen to hip-hop, much less the gangsta rap subgenre. 

 

In case some of you were wondering who the background goateed guy was supposed to be, it's The D.O.C. He was one of the main lyricists of N.W.A (next to Ice Cube and MC Ren) and functioned like their "Fifth Beatle". Here's a page about him: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_D.O.C.

 

Some of his classic songs: 

 

The Doc and the Doctor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QdgC6w0gL4

 

It's Funky Enough: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UiPbeIXZpD4

 

The Formula: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9k1XyvwM4no

post #24 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravi View Post
 

 

To be fair, not many people on this forum listen to hip-hop, much less the gangsta rap subgenre. 

 

Yeah, I was that was part of the joke.

 

I don't even know why they needed to put Tupac in this sense he play so little into the anything going on. I guess it would have been weird if he wasn't there at all but don't shoehorn in stuff that doesn't added up timeline wise.

 

They must have thought that no one would be thinking about that because Tupac was recording all the time so what was recorded when isn't exactly known.

post #25 of 65
I think it was just to have 2Pac make an appearance because it would be something of a treat for the fans, especially since the actor they got to play him is uncanny.

My bet is that the filmmakers basically wrote all the major events from 1986-1995 onto the script, a sort of "greatest hits" that's known in pop culture. NWA's beginnings. Cube leaves. The D.O.C. gets in an accident crushing his throat. Dre leaves and makes Death Row with Suge. Snoop Dogg entered the scene. Eazy-E died from complications of AIDS. 2Pac joined the label. Dre left Death Row entirely to start his own thing. Gray takes all of those events and tries to make a movie out of it.

It's that some of the details get mixed up and I'm now kind of upset about that because now everyone who isn't familiar with the history will now assume from this film that Dre left Death Row because of Eazy-E's death having an immediate profound effect on him. Whereas in reality, Dre stuck with Death Row for another whole year before ultimately leaving in May of 96.

Again, that's just how most biopics are. In spite of that, it's still a really well made film with the strongest asset being the cast.
post #26 of 65

My overall thoughts on the film (sorry for the long post, as this was a film I'd long been anticipating) - 

 

Things I didn't like:

 

- Cube and Dre softening N.W.A's history. They're both producers, so they would probably not want to mention the darker moments from their past (the misogyny of N.W.A.'s lyrics, Dre brutally assaulting female journalist, Dee Barnes and Cube's Nation of Islam-inspired hate), but I feel they could have included those scenes and the aftermath. These guys are now hip-hop icons, and showing that they too made mistakes then had self-reflections would have made for a more satisfying film, I feel. This was a group that claimed to be "real", yet they don't want to acknowledge their dark past? 

 

Granted, they show Cube hanging with the NoI bodyguards, but they sort of glamorize his attitude and not see the hypocrisy. For a guy who claimed to be a victim of prejudice, Cube seemed to enjoy participating in it himself when he calls Jerry Heller the "Jew that broke up my crew" or when he's a dick to the white reporter at his house.

 

- MC Ren and DJ Yella are minor characters. OK, I'll admit Ren and Yella get overshadowed by their more famous bandmates (similar to Inspectah Deck and Masta Killa from Wu Tang) and most of the compelling real life drama was between Cube, Dre and Eazy. But even if they never garnered the solo success of the main trio, Ren and Yella were integral to N.W.A's music. Ren - along with Cube and D.O.C - wrote all of the lyrics. Yella also worked with Dre in producing the music. Both also did their own thing after the N.W.A breakup: Ren, a devout Muslim with family and Yella became a lucrative porn director (he claims to have directed more than 300 films). They could have hinted at this in the ending montage instead of a fucking ad for Dre's headphones!

 

- The Dre-Eazy beef. This was one of the great beefs in hip-hop and they dedicated their entire solo albums to verbally destroying each other. They even made two classic diss songs: "Dre Day" and "Real Muthaphucckkkin' G's". In the film, it's barely touched upon.

 

Everything else that I LIKED:

 

- The actors playing the N.W.A. members. They all did a terrific job and had good chemistry with one another. Jason Mitchell had the biggest character arc to go through as Eazy-E and he knocked it out of the park. O'Shea Jackson and Corey Hawkins were very good as Cube and Dr. Dre respectively. Neil Brown Jr. had some funny parts as Yella in the first half and while him and Aldis Hodges (as MC Ren) weren't given much to do in the later half, they both did fine with what they were given. Even if the narrative could lag in points, I was still interested due to the actor's performances.

 

- Hearing N.W.A's music in a big theater makes for a great experience. Their lyrics have a very cinematic feel to them, so it's fitting to hear all their classic songs blasting on theater speakers. That whole "Fuck tha Police" sequence is great.

 

- The scene with the abusive cops was brutal and resonates with today's current events of similar situations. I agree that it shows how far we still have to go with race relations.

 

- The bit when Eazy's learning to rap. Got a good laugh in the theater. 

 

- Paul Giamatti as Jerry Heller. Having watched interviews with the real life Heller and reading his autobiography, I'm not sure this "dweeby white guy" characterization is 100% accurate, but Giamatti's fine in the part. He's sleazy, but not truly evil and he does respect the N.W.A member's talents. Giamatti and Jason Mitchell (Eazy) are good in their scenes together.

 

- R Marcos Taylor as Suge Knight. If hip-hop ever had a larger than life villain, it would certainly be Knight. Taylor's got the physical presence required and he does a good job at balancing Knight's calm scheming and violent outbursts. His evil gaze creeped me out.

 

- The entire first half of the film from the exciting opening to the group's insane tour sequences offers lots of good character moments, musical performances and bits of humor. It definitely feels like the titular album - with its ghettos, gangs, abusive cops, drugs, etc. - come to life.

 

- The Dre/Suge stuff. This was one of the more memorable partnerships in music history as Dre was intrigued by Suge's power and Suge with Dre's emerging production skills. It all ended badly of course and seeing it played onscreen was interesting for me. I never knew that whole incident with the dog in the Death Row offices was true!

 

- Jason Mitchell does a great job in Eazy's emotional final scenes. 

 

While Straight Outta Compton falls short of greatness, it's still a good film and worth watching if you're a fan of N.W.A or just looking for an entertaining biopic. 


Edited by Ravi - 8/16/15 at 11:26pm
post #27 of 65

I have to give it to Dre and Cube on how this movie was marketed.   The trailer was on point and the "Straight Outta ______" meme was brilliant.   In fact, at my showing, there were more white people there than minorities.   Not surprised it's the number 1 movie in America.   Curious to see if any other acts from that era get the biopic treatment.   Ice-T anyone?

post #28 of 65

Good point about the marketing. My theater was a mix of all ethnicities and ages. 

 

Ice-T's lead a colorful life and could be an interesting subject for a biopic. He was a pimp and bank robber before becoming a rapper turned actor. 

 

Other choices for future hip-hop films: Public Enemy, Wu Tang (though they'd have issues trying to cram all the members!) and KRS-One/Boogie Down Productions. 

 

As somebody else said, the rise and fall of Death Row is a compelling story of its own. It's quite Shakespearean if you think about! 


Edited by Ravi - 8/17/15 at 7:44pm
post #29 of 65

Yeah, so many of my white friends were trying their best to look hard with that straight outta compton meme.   It was pretty brilliant.   While there's probably a lot of truth stretching and mythologizing in the movie, I have no doubt that scene of the gangbangers boarding a school bus to give  a motivational speech went down exactly like that.

post #30 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravi View Post
 

Good point about the marketing. My theater was a mix of all ethnicities and ages. 

 

Ice-T could be an interesting choice for a biopic. He's was a pimp and bank robber before becoming a rapper turned actor. 

 

Other choices for future hip-hop films: Public Enemy, Wu Tang (though they'd have issues trying to cram all the members!) and KRS-One/Boogie Down Productions. 

 

As somebody else said, the rise and fall of Death Row is a compelling story of its own. It's quite Shakespearean if you think about! 

 

Public Enemy would be a good choice but aside from Flava Flav's foray into Reality TV, there doesn't seem to be much story progession to explore.   What's fascinating about the NWA story is how these kids from the streets became moguls and took over the system in their own ways.   I think just a story about what Dre did after NWA would be fascinating to see.

post #31 of 65

RUN DMC and the Beastie Boys. Or, maybe just make a movie about the rap scene back then:

 

 

 

 

But no biopics. I'd rather see a moment in time.

post #32 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by t3cii View Post
 

RUN DMC and the Beastie Boys. Or, maybe just make a movie about the rap scene back then:

 

 

 

 

But no biopics. I'd rather see a moment in time.

Agreed. Would really love like a Netflix produced doc on oldschool hip-hop

post #33 of 65

Anybody reading Hip Hop Family Tree?

post #34 of 65

Only allowed myself to skim this thread because I spent the past week out of town and way far from civilization but I'm engineering a way to see it this week.  Loved that it slayed at the box office though...

post #35 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post
 

Anybody reading Hip Hop Family Tree?

Checked it out on Amazon, looks really, freaking cool.

 

In recent years, I definitely have been consuming a lot more Hip-hop than I used to when I was younger. Probably a good idea to get into some history as well.

post #36 of 65

Check out "Back in the Days". Some great photography from the early rap era:

 

 

 

 

I think that's what I want to see. A movie that looks like these images, that feels authentic to the time period without being sentimental, with no real plot. Maybe Beastie Boys recording Licence to Ill, touring with Public Enemy. Or the early days of RUN DMC. Not a biopic, but more of a being a fly on the wall, being part of the scene, type of feeling.

post #37 of 65
Another thing. Christilee (sp) one of the label mates that was name checked in the movie has been on record saying that Dre used to beat her on numerous occasions while dating. I can't say that's completely true but that's another issue skipped over.
post #38 of 65

I'm definitely going to check out both "Hip-Hop Family Tree" and "Back in the Days". Thanks for the info!

 

Quote:

 

Originally Posted by Racj82 View Post

Another thing. Christilee (sp) one of the label mates that was name checked in the movie has been on record saying that Dre used to beat her on numerous occasions while dating.

Do you mean Michel'le? Yeah, I read those disturbing stories too. She was with Dre during the time N.W.A was still together and released a self-titled album on Ruthless Records. Michel'le left Ruthless along with Dre and D.O.C. to join Death Row. Dre and Michel'le broke up and she married Suge Knight. 

 

"No More Lies": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTA1Xg4Ejww

 

"Nicety": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6m1Vz7I0BA

post #39 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravi View Post

Do you mean Michel'le? Yeah, I read those disturbing stories too. She was with Dre during the time N.W.A was still together and released a self-titled album on Ruthless Records. Michel'le left Ruthless along with Dre and D.O.C. to join Death Row. Dre and Michel'le broke up and she married Suge Knight. 

"No More Lies": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTA1Xg4Ejww

"Nicety": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6m1Vz7I0BA
Yes, that's the right name. My apologies. Suge sure enough beat the craps out her. I know that for sure.
post #40 of 65

http://gawker.com/heres-whats-missing-from-straight-outta-compton-me-and-1724735910?

 

Quote:
 

On January 27, 1991, at a record-release party for the rap duo Bytches With Problems in Hollywood, producer/rapper/then-N.W.A. member Dr. Dre brutally attacked Dee Barnes, the host of a well-known Fox show about hip-hop called Pump It Up! Dre was reportedly angry about a Pump It Up! segment hosted by Barnes that aired in November 1990. The report focused on N.W.A., and concluded with a clip of Ice Cube, who had recently left the group, insulting his former colleagues. Soon after the attack, Barnes described it in interviews: She said Dre attempted to throw her down a flight of stairs, slammed her head against a wall, kicked her, and stomped on her fingers. Dre later told Rolling Stone, “It ain’t no big thing – I just threw her through a door.” He pleaded no contest to assault charges. Barnes’s civil suit against Dre was settled out of court.

Barnes agreed to watch F. Gary Gray’s just-released film about N.W.A, Straight Outta Compton, and reflect on it for Gawker.

post #41 of 65

I just read that same exact article, Nooj and while I knew about the assault, it was truly stomach-churning hearing it from Barnes herself. I feel bad for her and the other women Dre abused. 

 

It goes back to my earlier point, that I wish Dre and Cube would admit their past mistakes like men. These guys pride themselves on being "real" yet they don't want to acknowledge their darkest moments?  

post #42 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravi View Post

 

 

It goes back to my earlier point, that I wish Dre and Cube would admit their past mistakes like men. These guys pride themselves on being "real" yet they don't want to acknowledge their darkest moments?  

 

That's not how one builds profitable legacies and empires!!!  They're too big to be 'real' anymore.

post #43 of 65

And F. Gary Grey filmed the segment that caused Dre to attack Dee Barnes.  ANd yet he still wanted to work with these guys and direct the movie.  What a huge dick.  Would have been nice to get a more objective view on this group and not one made by the people involved.

post #44 of 65
I thought he got onto this project because of Cube, who he worked with 20 years ago on FRIDAY.
post #45 of 65

But hey man they said fuck tha police.

post #46 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Stockslivevan View Post

I thought he got onto this project because of Cube, who he worked with 20 years ago on FRIDAY.

He also directed several of his music videos. 

post #47 of 65

The only thing to hope is that maybe with the success of this movie, it might inspire someone to film a more objective look at either NWA or rap during this time period. We all knew that this was going to full-on Hero-worship no matter how good the movie is. 

post #48 of 65

As a dumbass white boy who's about as hard as a cooked noodle, who has a passing appreciation for NWA...  Will I get anything out of this?

post #49 of 65
Hearing NWA tunes in a theater should excite anyone that likes their work.
post #50 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freeman View Post
 

As a dumbass white boy who's about as hard as a cooked noodle, who has a passing appreciation for NWA...  Will I get anything out of this?

Well.....I would hope some self esteem.

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