CHUD.com Community › Forums › THE MAIN SEWER › Focused Film Discussion › Bone Tomahawk Pre-Release of cerebrospinal fluid
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bone Tomahawk Pre-Release of cerebrospinal fluid - Page 3

post #101 of 120

The thing about close-ups is they're drastically overused.  I love it when films use close-ups as a weapon... you hold back, so when you show a close-up it actually means something.  If you're cutting to a close-up every five seconds, it doesn't mean shit.  Same with wide shots.  Each shot means something and should vary depending on the needs of the scene in concert with the whole.

 

Kubrick was a master at this.

post #102 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambler View Post
 

The thing about close-ups is they're drastically overused.  I love it when films use close-ups as a weapon... you hold back, so when you show a close-up it actually means something.  If you're cutting to a close-up every five seconds, it doesn't mean shit.  Same with wide shots.  Each shot means something and should vary depending on the needs of the scene in concert with the whole.

 

Kubrick was a master at this.

 

Great read: http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/

post #103 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil View Post
 

 

Great read: http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/

 

Excellent, thanks!

post #104 of 120

Heh, I was reading that late last night!

post #105 of 120

I've definitely always been more of the classical school of cinema, with dynamic staging of actors and moving them in the frame rather than cutting back and forth incessantly... it's just lazy filmmaking, or filmmaking done by people who aren't skilled enough.  It's an area of filmmaking that hasn't survived much... Spielberg and Zemeckis are some of the few Hollywood guys who've maintained it.  

post #106 of 120

In film school we had a pretty cool exercise where we had to stage a scene using only one camera and we couldn't move it off the tripod the entire scene, we could only tilt and pan, so we had to get clever and stage the actors much more aggressively in order to get the requisite wide, medium and close shots.

post #107 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil View Post

The guy upthread who is telling you there's no close-ups. He should have said "so far", since several posts later he says he's only halfway through. He was live-tweeting* it, essentially.  There are plenty of close-ups, eventually. 





*You know what I mean. 

Phil sort of acknowledged my existence.

I am ful-Phil'd.
post #108 of 120

It's up now on Amazon Prime.

post #109 of 120

Watched and loved this last night, but I went to bed thinking about the sweet little old couple out there somewhere who loved TOMBSTONE and is going to see this or THE HATEFUL EIGHT for more of the same. I need to call my parents and make sure it's not them.

post #110 of 120
See, I think I'm going to trick my dad into watching it.
post #111 of 120

Good movie.  I totally tricked my sister in watching this.  It was worth it.  

 

 

Its actually not that violent of a movie save for that one scene.  

post #112 of 120

Tangentially related, but I just caught up on Zahler's two books currently on Kindle, Corpus Chrome, Inc. and Wraiths of the Broken Land. I enjoyed Chrome, but Wraiths...well, it makes this movie's content seem downright tame. Apparently Ridley Scott's going to direct an adaptation, good luck with that shit. This is like The Road levels of "this can't possibly be this depressing in the movie...can it?" 

post #113 of 120
I watched this movie. Rented it with no knowledge of it other than i was excited when i found another kurt russell western on redbox. Kurt russell does great work imo. I first came to love him as An actor in Big Trouble Little China as a kid. I respect the viewpoints in this thread. But my impressions were this: the mid to long range shots in this movie were clearly deliberate as was the sparse language. You feel as if you are an observer in a circumstance, or even the reader in a novel, because you have a wider view of the scene than a close up would allow or convey. You get the sense you are viewing this from afar, which adds to the no nonsense realism of the movie and does not detract from involvement with the scene or characters one bit. Also you dont get clear views of some of the ancillary characters because frankly thats not important (like the mexicans). Also, the matter of fact dialogue helps to convey that these people know each other. They dont need to explain themselves to each other, they are at least somewhat aware of the nature of each other but still manage to grow closer and understand one another better as they go. Its hard for a screenplay to convey backstory and let you get to know the characters well enough to identify with them without seeming like they are hashing over their life story with people who should already know enough about them. This is done very well in this movie, rather than many movies with more manufactured sounding dialogue.
Also, the movie was more brutal than many withut alot more violence. I do not agree that the exchanges between the troglodytes and the men detract from their sense of being completley dangerous at all. They ambush you. Sneak up and are on you in a flash, they do not talk, so there is no quarter. If you do not keep on your toes and get the drop on them you are finished, and in most scenes the victors do not come out unscathed. Brooders character is the most formidible yes, but they are caught while he is on scout/survey duty. Not even he can react quick enough for that, nor can he level a gun before the tomahawk is flying at him. He is able to react quick enough, even injured to kill his attacker though. The trogs are silent, experienced, stealthy, and capable. Long drawn out scenes are not possible with the quick ferocity of their attacks. Either you dispatch them, or them you. Most hand to hand fights with legitimate weapons between warriors or even fistfights dont last long.

I dont agree at all with the notion that their is something shallow or less than menacing about their roles in this movie. Once theyre on you, you cant do nothing. Thats the point. And thats what makes them so dangerous, even with a jawbone.
post #114 of 120

Super late to the game, but I adored this flick. It had similar pacing as The Assassination of Jesse James and that's one of my favorite movies. I can't wait to watch this again.

post #115 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by wd40 View Post
 

Super late to the game, but I adored this flick. It had similar pacing as The Assassination of Jesse James and that's one of my favorite movies. I can't wait to watch this again.

 

They go in slightly different directions in their 3rd acts, though.

post #116 of 120
Matthew Fox hasn't been in anything (or is scheduled to be in anything upcoming, according to imdb) since this movie.

I wonder if he's taking a break...

I really liked him in this one.
post #117 of 120

The casting of Emile Hirsch and Matthew Fox as brothers in Speed Racer was apt, but unfortunate. 

post #118 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwartz View Post
 

 

They go in slightly different directions in their 3rd acts, though.


Heh, absolutely. The first 2/3rds was similar enough that that was the movie that immediately came to mind.

post #119 of 120
Call me odd, I prefered those 2/3rds.
post #120 of 120

Not odd. I liked the whole movie, but I did prefer the first two acts as well.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Focused Film Discussion
CHUD.com Community › Forums › THE MAIN SEWER › Focused Film Discussion › Bone Tomahawk Pre-Release of cerebrospinal fluid