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STAR WARS: ROGUE ONE (Gareth Edwards, 2016) - Page 26

post #1251 of 4021
That's why I stopped watching too much footage of anything prior to viewing a movie. I find that I'm much happier that way.

Oh and nobody should eat bologna. EVER..
post #1252 of 4021

Pickles are my go to choice for jazzing up a sandwich.

 

  I already typed this tonight, but the reason I'm still psyched for this movie is that the Celebration footage made the movie look like a gritty war flick, not a fun space opera.

post #1253 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSaxon View Post
 

Poor Gareth Edwards. This has really turned into such a public humiliation for him. It's like not being able to satisfy your wife, and so someone else has to come in and satisfy her, but lots of people on the internet find out and, before long, you're sitting in the recreational room at work with nearby co-workers whispering about how another guy has to satisfy your wife, and you're forced to sit there smiling whilst eating your ham (but no mayonnaise) sandwiches. 

 

I put a lot of thought into this metaphor. 

 

 

In this case the whisperers are also saying "Well we thought he was shit all along, really.  Shoulda been obvious!"

I reckon Rian Johnson, Lord & Miller and Duncan Jones (c'mon, he'll cave eventually)  ought to be watching this process very closely.  Trevorrow has already been broken so we don't need to worry.

post #1254 of 4021
Why continue to hire these young indie directors who have a low-budget sleeper hit to helm your tentpole only to jump in when they fail to deliver the middle-of-the-road McMovie you really wanted? Either let them create their visions or get a no-name hack who you can push around from the start.

I kind of feel sorry for Edwards hit at the same time it's obvious they studio was going to get involved and start poking.
post #1255 of 4021

As far as I'm aware (and I'm prepared to be corrected), this meddling shit didn't happen with Nolan's Batman trilogy, right? And look how those turned out! 

 

Imagine if the original Star Wars had been made today. Those photographs we see of Lucas standing around with his cast would have featured twenty extra people in suits scribbling on scripts and shaking their heads. And we'd have probably gotten a watered down version of the original movie, with none of that movie's eventual magic, and certainly no subsequent franchise. 

post #1256 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSaxon View Post
 

As far as I'm aware (and I'm prepared to be corrected), this meddling shit didn't happen with Nolan's Batman trilogy, right? And look how those turned out! 

 

Imagine if the original Star Wars had been made today. Those photographs we see of Lucas standing around with his cast would have featured twenty extra people in suits scribbling on scripts and shaking their heads. And we'd have probably gotten a watered down version of the original movie, with none of that movie's eventual magic, and certainly no subsequent franchise. 

 

It's funny because some people hold Star Wars up as a movie that was totally saved in editing by DePalma and Spielberg.

post #1257 of 4021

Shut the fuck up, Bill!!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(I'm only joking, Bill.)

post #1258 of 4021
It's true though. Plus Lucas wanted extra time for reshoots etc that 20CF refused to pay for so he was right up against it until the wrap and had to work with what he had. The result of which was met with blank faces at 20CF and only after the effects etc was added did anyone see the light.

Mirror that with what Edwards is dealing with - he got what he wanted in the can, but the suits still aren't happy so they ordered and paid for reshoots.

Fuck knows what we'll end up with.
post #1259 of 4021

 

Quote:

It's funny because some people hold Star Wars up as a movie that was totally saved in editing by DePalma and Spielberg.

 
 
Marcia Lucas's editing and John Williams's score elevate Star Wars to an extent that can't be overstated, but the increasingly common wisdom that Lucas's flop was rescued really gets on my tits - all film is collaborative, but Lucas created, wrote, directed, and spearheaded the damn thing: he deserves enormous credit for the film. 
 
Star Wars, moreso than any other bit of fiction, inspires a lot of Monday morning quarterbacking - people who don't know what they're talking about, who don't understand that all film-making is collaborative, that all art can be reduced to its influences, really love to rail on Lucas ( and J.K. Rowling, George RR Martin, Nic Pizzolatto, and Peter Jackson,  and any other artist with at least one beloved hit work). 
 
I wasn't bothered by Disney's acquisition of Star Wars, and so far I really like their handling of the franchise - Kennedy, Abrams, Johnson, Kasdan, are all great; however, it turned my stomach that so many people were celebrating a series changing hands from its creator to a faceless group of suits.
 
There's a good line in the Hannibal series (I think lifted from the books) where Hannibal says, if he exists, God must love death: 'Typhoid and swans - they all come from the same place'. In regards to Star Wars, you might say the same of Vader and Jar Jar, Yoda and Ewoks, the Trench Run and Yub Nub. Disney will never produce anything as good as the former examples if it's not willing to take the weird creative risks that produced the latter ones. It's so pervasive in culture now that we don't really think of Star Wars as weird, but so much of it is bizarre, and that weirdness is key - not 'the' key, but key - to its success. They should be hiring people they trust to make a good film and leaving them to it - not hiring young talents for their experimental pitches then deciding they don't like those ideas. 
 
I am worried that, after TFA's success - specifically, for all the glowing critical remarks about it being a course correction, washing the taste of the prequels away, saving Star Wars from its creator, etc - that the Disney suits are going to double down on re-tooled OT setpieces and quips (the tone of TFA was perfect, but a few pieces of Finn and Poe's dialogue sounded awfully Marvel-ly). 
 

Edited by RexBanner - 8/4/16 at 3:53am
post #1260 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

Why continue to hire these young indie directors who have a low-budget sleeper hit to helm your tentpole only to jump in when they fail to deliver the middle-of-the-road McMovie you really wanted? Either let them create their visions or get a no-name hack who you can push around from the start.

I kind of feel sorry for Edwards hit at the same time it's obvious they studio was going to get involved and start poking.

But a no-name hack doesn't have indie movie cred! You have to make fans feel excited that they got a "real" filmmaker behind the camera!
post #1261 of 4021

I agree with Rex Banner.

 

I'm just saying, you tend to hear that Star Wars was saved in the editing room a lot.

 

I think most of it has to do with trying to somehow deny George Lucas credit for its best moments.

post #1262 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill View Post

I agree with Rex Banner.

I'm just saying, you tend to hear that Star Wars was saved in the editing room a lot.

I think most of it has to do with trying to somehow deny George Lucas credit for its best moments.

I think like Gene Roddenberry was for Trek, we can all at least acknowledge that Lucas was the best and worst thing to happen for Star Wars in the best possible senses. He hit a home run at the start, but as time passed by he started to become more concerned over trivial matters like giving Ewoks blinking eyes. In the end, the studio got more control over the material and the attitude since then has been "George, we're happy you created this thing, but don't call us, we'll call you".
post #1263 of 4021
It seems that (despite liking it A LOT) that you'd think that TFA had mined the OT almost completely of retooled "moments." Save for Snoke standing in for The Emperor. I mean, in one movie...to kickstrart this whole sequel set of films...fine, I get it. But surely they're ready to move to fresher territory now..
post #1264 of 4021
I'd rather have an interesting box-office failure than a billion-dollar-earning run-of-the-mill beige studio movie.

It's the odd and weird ones that keep franchises alive.

Surely they can focus-group the hell out of the saga films, but I thought these anthology films were meant to be the ones where they didn't have to play by the numbers and were allowed a bit more free reign and vision.
post #1265 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

I'd rather have an interesting box-office failure than a billion-dollar-earning run-of-the-mill beige studio movie.

It's the odd and weird ones that keep franchises alive.

Surely they can focus-group the hell out of the saga films, but I thought these anthology films were meant to be the ones where they didn't have to play by the numbers and were allowed a bit more free reign and vision.

 

Seems like the budget is at least comparable though (or in the nearby ballpark).

 

The execs don't see a distinction.

 

It's still Star Wars.

 

And it's a riskier Star Wars at that.

post #1266 of 4021
So halve the budget and let them take risks. Even a poor performing SW movie would make $700m.
post #1267 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

So halve the budget and let them take risks. Even a poor performing SW movie would make $700m.

 

But by their logic if they doubled the budget they could make 1.4 Billion minimum!

post #1268 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

It's the odd and weird ones that keep franchises alive.
 

That's the truth. Every time I watch it, I'm amazed "Empire" got released, and I'm more convinced than ever it never would have been made today. It really is an entire movie where the good guys are either running from a fight or getting their asses kicked in a fight. Even the tiny victories they have on Hoth (bringing down a couple of AT-AT's) are done to coverage to a massive rebel retreat.  The asteroid sequence? Running from a fight, then eventually hiding in a cave (mouth) from a fight.  Everything on Bespin? Getting their asses kicked. Then : The End.

 

It works, but I can just imagine the notes that script would have gotten today.

post #1269 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

I'd rather have an interesting box-office failure than a billion-dollar-earning run-of-the-mill beige studio movie.

It's the odd and weird ones that keep franchises alive.

Surely they can focus-group the hell out of the saga films, but I thought these anthology films were meant to be the ones where they didn't have to play by the numbers and were allowed a bit more free reign and vision.
Hell, JJ Abrams probably WELCOMES being focus grouped up one side and down the other. Despite liking most of his movies he just seems totally like a guy who shows up to "play ball.."
post #1270 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

I'd rather have an interesting box-office failure than a billion-dollar-earning run-of-the-mill beige studio movie.

It's the odd and weird ones that keep franchises alive.

Surely they can focus-group the hell out of the saga films, but I thought these anthology films were meant to be the ones where they didn't have to play by the numbers and were allowed a bit more free reign and vision.


That was probably the intent until TFA made a bazillion dollars.  And then the mandate became - DO THAT instead.

post #1271 of 4021
Quote:
 Every time I watch it, I'm amazed "Empire" got released, and I'm more convinced than ever it never would have been made today.

 

Empire has so many weird elements, most of which were so influential that no-one thinks about how amazing and risky they were.  

 

  • The walking tanks (Lucas talked about how he was inspired by The War of the Worlds, released 80 years before, but no-one had put anything like that on screen before). 

 

  • Yoda! A backwards talking green puppet who needed to be the most seriously-taken character in the film. 

 

  • The carbon freeze - the concept is very imaginative and unique. A guiding rule for each Star Wars film should be to aim to have an original science-fiction concept in it. 

 

  • Cloud City - I didn't consciously appreciate it  when I saw it on VHS as a five year old, but the film makes a lot out of how its ethereal, dreamlike atmosphere contrasts with the stark/industrial/swamp environments that have filled the film up to that point. 

 

  • Luke's injuries and fall - the wonderful reveal (made up after Star Wars, and more impressive for that fact I believe) is obviously talked about a lot, but Luke getting his hand lopped off and then limping about traumatised, helpless, and agonised really made a huge impression on me as a kid. I'm surprised this aspect doesn't get talked about a lot more - amputations are common in Star Wars, but I cannot think of another fantasy film which has its boy scout protagonist get so graphically injured. It was a relatively late addition to the script - originally Luke was just cut across the arm - but it really, really gives the film edge. Then Luke chooses to kill himself by throwing himself into a cold, endless void - there's a lot of primeval, psychological stuff going on once Luke kicks Vader off the freezing chamber. As a kid, I used to feel sorry for Luke watching Star Wars and thinking about all the horrible shit he was going to go through in the sequels. 

 

There's more, but the point is, all of these things are imaginative and risky. They're effects that could've looked shit - in the case of Yoda, sunk the film; plot points that could have put off sections of the audience (and back in the 80s, RotJ was considered a return to form after the dreary and dark ESB); and generally things far, far more complex than they needed to be. Every director and writer's first thought making these things should be about what new things they can do, what things haven't been done, what concepts can they introduce. 

post #1272 of 4021
My thinking is based on who they hired as director for each Episode and how they'll mirror the original trilogy.

Episode VII: Make people rediscover Star Wars again. Make them feel safe.

Episode VIII: Now that you have them, screw around a bit, change stuff, get weird

Episode IX: Now make them feel safe again. Bring them back to the familiar after throwing them around a bit.

For this, Episode VIII will be the lowest grossing of the new trilogy.
post #1273 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by User_32 View Post

Episode VIII: Now that you have them, screw around a bit, change stuff, get weird

 

The hiring of Johnson might have signaled this as the original intent (to some degree), but I am fairly confident that won't happen - at least not now. I would be shocked if, a year from now, we aren't hearing similar reports that Disney is "unhappy" with Johnson's version and someone else has been handed control to keep it in line with TFA. 

post #1274 of 4021
People eat up weird atypical stuff more than they realize..
post #1275 of 4021

*Hugs his VHS copy of Naked Lunch*

post #1276 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by RexBanner View Post
 

 

 (and back in the 80s, RotJ was considered a return to form after the dreary and dark ESB);

 

I agreed with much of your post - but I just needed to quote this because you couldn't be more wrong in this. I was a teen when these movies came out, and was big into the behind the scenes stuff and what the fan magazines were saying. Now obviously there was no on-line community of instant gratification, but the general consensus was this:

 

 ESB was thought of as genius right from the start. It really blew people away. That Lucas had taken the ideas behind the first, fairly simple story and amped it up but at the same time went for something with such a downer ending, which of course only sucked fans in further. (I can't think of a better cliff-hanger ending of a movie that both successfully wrapped up the story of the first movie while still setting up the second. Actually for all it's flaws - Episode VII does this bit pretty well.)  There really wasn't anyone that considered the darkness of ESB a problem. (It was Indiana Jones

 

RotJ was also much beloved upon initial release - but I don't remember anyone saying it was BETTER than ESB. At first I think it was considered a close 3rd place in the trilogy and a fitting wrap-up, but it was within a very short time it became: "Yeah - but those ewoks". However, beyond that, RotJ remained a solid part of the trilogy. I think it was only in more recent years that it was seen as inferior to the other two. But I think ESB was always considered the best sequel.  (I saw Jedi 9 times in the theater that summer of 1983 - so I don't think they bothered me that much - that opening stuff in Jabba's palace was just so good.) 

post #1277 of 4021
I was 9 when RotJ came out and I much preferred it to ESB because after the snow battle it was just a visually dark and muddy film full of talky bits and not enough spaceships or aliens. Then there was that bit at the end with all the steam and in dark.

RotJ had the visually great Jabba sequence, followed by another boring talky bit in the swamp follows by the ewoks and spaceships and shit!!

I think which films worked obviously depends on your age when viewing them.
post #1278 of 4021
Quote:

I agreed with much of your post - but I just needed to quote this because you couldn't be more wrong in this. 

 

Glad to be corrected!

post #1279 of 4021
Man, there was such a mystique around the Star Wars movies PRE-prequels. They were just the coolest things ever. I was only born after the first two had already been released but the hype for them never seemed to go away. Which is why I got swept up into TMP hype just as much as everyone else. I hope these new movies continue to distance themselves from that shitshow. With the new one not even using the words midichlorians or Sith it seemed pretty obvious that's what they were attempting to do..
post #1280 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

Man, there was such a mystique around the Star Wars movies PRE-prequels. They were just the coolest things ever. I was only born after the first two had already been released but the hype for them never seemed to go away.
Yup. It's so strange to think that there's a whole generation that has grown up never knowing a time when there were only just the three, and the EU was this obscure thing that only the Star Wars nerds knew anything about instead of having multiple video games and whole TV series set in it.
post #1281 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post
With the new one not even using the words midichlorians or Sith it seemed pretty obvious that's what they were attempting to do..

 

The word Sith was used. So was the word clones. They might be distancing themselves but they're not ignoring it either.

post #1282 of 4021
I grew up with 2 SW friends as a kid but once the OT was over with SW was dead in the UK until the Special Editions in '97.

At uni in '97 it made a big 'retro' comeback in an ironic way but it also turned out there were a lot of first gen fans like me who'd also kept the flame burning on the quiet.

But as far as the OT went SW didn't have a mystique, if anything you were a social leper if you liked SW in the UK after '83.
post #1283 of 4021
I swear I don't remember when Sith was said. I'm not disputing it but...I've seen it three times (twice theatrically and once at home) and I never caught it..
post #1284 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

People eat up weird atypical stuff more than they realize..


General audiences can take a lot more weirdness and dark tone than studio executives and marketing departments would ever think.

 

As long as you grab them with a decent story hook and characters they want to follow, they'll go along for the journey, through whatever weirdness happens.

post #1285 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

I swear I don't remember when Sith was said. I'm not disputing it but...I've seen it three times (twice theatrically and once at home) and I never caught it..

I think it was during Maz's "I've seen this evil before" speech.  She references the Sith/Empire/First Order

post #1286 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

I swear I don't remember when Sith was said. I'm not disputing it but...I've seen it three times (twice theatrically and once at home) and I never caught it..

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mondguy View Post
 

I think it was during Maz's "I've seen this evil before" speech.  She references the Sith/Empire/First Order

 

That's it;

 

Quote:
 Through the ages I’ve seen evil take many forms. The Sith. The Empire. Today, it is the First Order. Their shadow is spreading across the galaxy. We must face them. Fight them. All of us.
post #1287 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Reese View Post


General audiences can take a lot more weirdness and dark tone than studio executives and marketing departments would ever think.

As long as you grab them with a decent story hook and characters they want to follow, they'll go along for the journey, through whatever weirdness happens.
If you've got scene that just makes the movie come out swinging in the first 10-15 minutes then you've got them hooked...I seriously believe that. Like the blood rave in Blade, the foot chase in Casino Royale or the bank robbery in The Dark Knight. It doesn't ALWAYS have to be that way but it sure is a nice handy hook. And buys a lot of goodwill. Not that every...or even MOST...great movies follow this pattern. But if I was making movies that's how I'd do it..
post #1288 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierpete View Post
 

 

 ESB was thought of as genius right from the start. It really blew people away. That Lucas had taken the ideas behind the first, fairly simple story and amped it up but at the same time went for something with such a downer ending, which of course only sucked fans in further. (I can't think of a better cliff-hanger ending of a movie that both successfully wrapped up the story of the first movie while still setting up the second. Actually for all it's flaws - Episode VII does this bit pretty well.)  There really wasn't anyone that considered the darkness of ESB a problem. (It was Indiana Jones

 

I'm not sure. Seems reviews were mixed at the time. The box office, while still great, was the worst of the three.

 

http://www.starwars.com/news/critical-opinion-the-empire-strikes-back-original-reviews

post #1289 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

If you've got scene that just makes the movie come out swinging in the first 10-15 minutes then you've got them hooked...I seriously believe that. Like the blood rave in Blade, the foot chase in Casino Royale or the bank robbery in The Dark Knight. It doesn't ALWAYS have to be that way but it sure is a nice handy hook. And buys a lot of goodwill. Not that every...or even MOST...great movies follow this pattern. But if I was making movies that's how I'd do it..

TFA didn't start out particularly strong - that village scene and what followed was pretty blah. It was the quiet life with Rey that grabs you and makes you stick with it - right up to the Rathtars, then it's snoozville for 45 minutes.
post #1290 of 4021

ANH has always been my favorite. as a kid I definitely preferred RotJ over ESB. now, I can "objectively" recognize ESB as the better film and maybe the best SW film, but I still have the stronger soft spot for RotJ. I enjoy the scenic variety and color, the Jabba stuff really is a fantastic way to open the third movie after the ESB cliffhanger, and Ewoks don't bother me as much as they seem to bother some (I mean, I get watching teddy bears take out stormtroopers with ease was dark foreshadowing of some of the shit that would come in the prequels, but at least it was counterbalanced a tad by that one brutal shot of that Ewok getting taken out and its/his/her companion mourning it/him/her). a new Death Star was definitely a guilty double-dipping into the proven well (but at least it wasn't Abrams' triple-dip plus Hoth mash-up to get it all in one movie!) but I can forgive that because it set the stage for a backdrop of distant spaceships fighting against the stars as the Emperor, Vader, and Luke engaged in one of my favorite dramatic scenes in any genre movie. I'm big on endings and, especially as the effective narrative ending for a trilogy, they KILLED it with that throne room scene in a way that few movies or trilogies have ever managed to kill it with their climaxes and conclusions. It was "space opera" actualized. And in moments, such as Vader's taunting of Luke, Luke's pained face in the shadows, Vader's silhouette and red lightsaber looking, searching, always voicing Luke's deepest fears, fears Vader once knew (and, turns out, still knew, deep down), then Luke lashing out and that glorious tracking shot with my favorite John Williams cue EVER... it felt like this genre flick, in those moments, had crossed over into high art--pure image, motion, sound, light, shadow, and overwhelming pathos.

 

Vader's choice and ultimate sacrifice/redemption are almost as good, too, in terms of its cinematic execution. which is the main reason I am never going to watch the prequels again and will do my best to repress them from memory, for that handling of the Anakin character and that portrayal of his arc rob that final redemption scene of too much of its power.

post #1291 of 4021
Just released today...

post #1292 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post


TFA didn't start out particularly strong - that village scene and what followed was pretty blah. It was the quiet life with Rey that grabs you and makes you stick with it - right up to the Rathtars, then it's snoozville for 45 minutes.


I don't know I thought the village scene was pretty great. some cool ideas were introduced with how Finn was shaken from his conditioning and marked with blood and the laser bolt that Kyle freezes in place (and how they executed that visual was great) and then it concludes the scene by unfreezing and blammo. the escape scene from the Star Destroyer stretches all plausibility but you are too busy enjoying the interactions between Finn and Poe to care (well, some of the interactions, anyways, like "Stay calm..." "I am calm." "I'm talking to myself.")

 

And as much as Jakku or whatever its called is a total Tatooine retread, they did a great job introducing you to Rey and showing some details of life built around scavenging and survival and scavenging happening in massive Imperial wrecks from some long-gone battle just makes it that much cooler and more evocative.

 

Like, really, I was sitting in the theater for that first act amazed that I was watching a SW sequel that was actually working and, more than that, a JJ Abrams movie I actually liked. But then JJ goes on his full-bore nostalgia OT remix trip trying to figure out how to work all the OT characters and familiar sights and sounds and rehashes in while also trying to figure out how to set up a trilogy and I'm like, yeah, there's the JJ I know and don't so much love.

 

And, tonally and aesthetically, I see no reason that these anthology films have to bear much resemblance to TFA or even the OT. So I really, really hope that Disney isn't pushing that. If they are going to do this anthology, I want to see NEW stuff, new ideas, new perspectives in this universe.

post #1293 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by wasp View Post
 

Like, really, I was sitting in the theater for that first act amazed that I was watching a SW sequel that was actually working and, more than that, a JJ Abrams movie I actually liked. But then JJ goes on his full-bore nostalgia OT remix trip trying to figure out how to work all the OT characters and familiar sights and sounds and rehashes in while also trying to figure out how to set up a trilogy and I'm like, yeah, there's the JJ I know and don't so much love.

 

My sentiments dead on.  I had that same experience of "Oh, this is working for me!" followed by a slowly developing sense of "Oh no, this isn't going anywhere, is it?"

post #1294 of 4021

That was my experience as well.  I quite liked the opening with Finn and Poe, and then the interlude with Rey and BB-8.  It was absolutely clicking.  New characters, but same adventuresome feel, the same optimism.  And then they find the Millenium Falcon and Han and Chewie, and it becomes a bit redundant.  It was totally working for me just fine before that. 

 

And it works fine after that for what it is.  But it felt much more fresh before it fell back into nostalgia.

post #1295 of 4021
Out of interest, how many of you manage to sit through TFA at home? As previously mentioned I'm hooked right up to "don't tell me a Rathar's escaped." then I just check the fuck out and find something better to do until the snow fight at the end.
post #1296 of 4021
Naw I dig it even at home. But I have AWFUL taste so I can't say I speak for anyone else here..
post #1297 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

I grew up with 2 SW friends as a kid but once the OT was over with SW was dead in the UK until the Special Editions in '97.

At uni in '97 it made a big 'retro' comeback in an ironic way but it also turned out there were a lot of first gen fans like me who'd also kept the flame burning on the quiet.

But as far as the OT went SW didn't have a mystique, if anything you were a social leper if you liked SW in the UK after '83.

IIRC they used to be shown every Christmas on ITV, the first in particular, and the toys were still a thing for a while after. Considering though that it was over a decade before the special editions came out, in retrospect it was weird how big a deal the re-releases became. I suppose it showed just how incredible they were to watch on the big screen, but I'd be fascinated to understand how they went from, as you say, fairly marginal space adventures you used to play act in your lunch hour at school to the absurdly over-hyped phenomenon they became by the time TPM came out.
post #1298 of 4021
I didn't see any of the rereleases in the theater in '97. Even back then in my teens, the thought of new crap crowbarred into an existing film to make a SPECIAL EDition sounded absurd. I watched em on video ONCE each out of curiosity and couldn't stand it..
post #1299 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post

IIRC they used to be shown every Christmas on ITV, the first in particular, and the toys were still a thing for a while after. Considering though that it was over a decade before the special editions came out, in retrospect it was weird how big a deal the re-releases became. I suppose it showed just how incredible they were to watch on the big screen, but I'd be fascinated to understand how they went from, as you say, fairly marginal space adventures you used to play act in your lunch hour at school to the absurdly over-hyped phenomenon they became by the time TPM came out.

It was the 10/15 year hiatus. Turns out there was always a hardcore fanbase in the UK on the quiet, but on the rerelease everyone was ready for it on the big screen again and in every other medium it seemed, even the people who used to loathe it jumped on the bandwagon. Seems strange to think there was a time when Star Wars was over and was no longer a thing. There's too much money to lose now by putting it on a 10 year hold, but in retrospect it was one of the most savvy things Lucas did, just rerelease the videos every other year with new cover art.

One thing to note, I studied graphic design at uni in 97 and various art courses before that - pretty much everyone within the creative circles regardless of discipline or gender was an first gen OT fan and still are right across the industry. College and uni is where I finally felt at home and happy to say I was a SW fan nerd.
post #1300 of 4021
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

I grew up with 2 SW friends as a kid but once the OT was over with SW was dead in the UK until the Special Editions in '97.

At uni in '97 it made a big 'retro' comeback in an ironic way but it also turned out there were a lot of first gen fans like me who'd also kept the flame burning on the quiet.

But as far as the OT went SW didn't have a mystique, if anything you were a social leper if you liked SW in the UK after '83.

 

I can vouch for this. I was born after the trilogy (by like two months. It counts!) and knew a couple of people into Star Wars as a kid, but in mainstream terms it was a niche cultural relic until the re-releases.

 

The notion that something that successful would voluntarily be left fallow for so long is such an alien concept here in the 2010's.

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