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SING STREET (2016) - Page 2

post #51 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by User_32 View Post
 

Did anyone actually see Begin Again? Was Knightley bad in the film?


That one I did see, though I didn't see Sing Street.  It was a fine summer afternoon watch - both Knightley and Ruffalo were perfectly charming, and the music was good.  I also liked that it didn't actually end up in a contrived romance between the two and instead Ruffalo's character reconciles with his ex-wife.  It's not like it was anywhere near Knightley's best work, but it's not like she was awful/movie-ruining either.

post #52 of 172
This is out on video!

I only mildly enjoyed it, because my heart is cold and dead, and all children should be forced to work in salt mines until hope and joy have been wrung out of them.

... anyway, Johnny's description of this as a superhero film is spot on.
post #53 of 172
Good lord, this had me grinning like an idiot. It's the feeling if growing up, discovering yourself, captured in 105 minutes. Who cares if the words aren't right? Cuz I'm tapping along to the beat.
post #54 of 172

Meredith Border's article on Sing Street, which ties it into this week's political climate, is worth a read in my opinion.

post #55 of 172

It's on Netflix, so I'll be watching it this weekend.

post #56 of 172

Best movie of the year. Just a pure dose of happiness.

 

You know what, conflict is great. But what movies need more of is collaboration, team work and confidence. Conor knows what he wants, even if he doesn't know how or why, and he just keeps doing it. There's struggle, but I kept waiting for the band to break into rivalries or petty differences. No, just synergy and the amazing art of creation. 

 

Definite spiritual sibling to Once and We Are The Best! when it comes to capturing that perfect moment of art coming together.

 

Will probably watch the "Drive It Like You Stole It" concert scene a million times throughout the rest of my life.

 

And oh ho ho, ending with them following in the wake of that boat. I see what you did there, movie.

post #57 of 172

Hi Johnny!

 

I saw this over the weekend, and fell in love with it. Charm coming out its ears, great music and a very well-balanced coming of age story. A companion piece to Vi är bäst! is a dead-ringer, for sure.

 

What I loved most was how the film was a love letter to 80s Brit-Pop while totally and lovingly lampooning it at the same time. "Riddle of the Model", both the song and the video, killed me.

post #58 of 172

Wonderful.  Definitely Muppet Baby version of The Commitments, but seeing as how TC is one of the greatest movies ever made, that is a fabulous and delightful thing.  

post #59 of 172

Thanks to prodding from Bartleby, I gave this a watch last night. 

 

It's a lovely film. Someone (or more than one person) above namechecked Bill Forsyth, and I think it's an apt comparison. While I can't say I fell in love with the film, I can say it's not the film's fault. Just not in a place at present where a love story and a shoot-for-your-dreams story this earnest is going to light me up. 

 

Having said that, I did really like it. I don't feel like I have much new (if at all) to add to the discussion, but I was struck by the film's confidence in its focus. The lack of a big bad villain or caricatured arch-nemesis for Conor is so to the credit of Carney. I also loved that the film commented on things like gender roles and expected behaviors so effortlessly and deftly, without ever slowing the film down or turning it into a polemic. I thought everyone onscreen was solid. I especially liked the understated friendship of Conor with the Rabbit Guy; it seemed like the film told us so much about their friendship with virtually no exposition and minimal dialogue between them. It felt like we were watching idealized young versions of Lennon and McCartney.

 

The band constantly changing their look threw me at first, but then I rolled with it. It parallels their own musical maturation and growth, as well as making external their internal search for identity.

 

I also really liked the relationship between Conor and his older brother. They did make a lot of that explicit, as far as the dynamics informing it, but it still worked.

 

And like other great films and stories, it treats nearly all its characters with respect and understanding. Even the fucked up bully who threatens Conor is humanized and sort of redeemed by the film's thematics. (And how great was the scene when Conor stood up to him in the schoolyard?)

 

~~~

 

Two minor nitpicks:

 

First, as someone who was a teenager during the 80s, it sorta bugged me that a film taking place in 1985 treated Duran Duran's video for Rio, which came out 3+ years earlier, as some sort of thunderbolt from heaven. By 1985, Ireland's own U2 were already global superstars, with a good many video of their own in play. This felt like lazy research or disregard for the setting. Not even close to a dealbreaker, let me be very clear. But it was a niggling detail that felt really off, given how important music was to the film.

 

Second, the actress playing Raffina (sp?) looked at least 5 years older than Conor. She was likely 21 when the film was made, and looks to be in her mid-20s, while the actor playing Conor seemed a very realistic 15. I was able to loosen up as the film went along, but there was almost an ick factor at first, seeing as how she looked like she could've been in college and he appeared to not even having started shaving yet.

 

~~~

 

Meta-commentary: I would love to see films like this become bigger conversation pieces here on the boards. But my own meager film analysis skills are failing me, as well as the truism that it's easier to dig into something that doesn't work than something that does. And Sing Street works. Whatever my own circumstantial limitations in really getting into it, it's a confident, romantic, and very smart piece of storytelling. It's hopeful without being blind to reality, it sidesteps expected tropes and plot tricks, and it loves all the characters.

post #60 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSaxon View Post

Meredith Border's article on Sing Street, which ties it into this week's political climate, is worth a read in my opinion.

I can only hope that the film's reputation will continue to grow. As of recently, Sing Street feels less like a salve and more like a treatise on one of the ways we're going to deal with this shit.
post #61 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelM View Post
 

Thanks to prodding from Bartleby, I gave this a watch last night. 

 

It's a lovely film. Someone (or more than one person) above namechecked Bill Forsyth, and I think it's an apt comparison. While I can't say I fell in love with the film, I can say it's not the film's fault. Just not in a place at present where a love story and a shoot-for-your-dreams story this earnest is going to light me up. 

 

Having said that, I did really like it. I don't feel like I have much new (if at all) to add to the discussion, but I was struck by the film's confidence in its focus. The lack of a big bad villain or caricatured arch-nemesis for Conor is so to the credit of Carney. I also loved that the film commented on things like gender roles and expected behaviors so effortlessly and deftly, without ever slowing the film down or turning it into a polemic. I thought everyone onscreen was solid. I especially liked the understated friendship of Conor with the Rabbit Guy; it seemed like the film told us so much about their friendship with virtually no exposition and minimal dialogue between them. It felt like we were watching idealized young versions of Lennon and McCartney.

 

The band constantly changing their look threw me at first, but then I rolled with it. It parallels their own musical maturation and growth, as well as making external their internal search for identity.

 

I also really liked the relationship between Conor and his older brother. They did make a lot of that explicit, as far as the dynamics informing it, but it still worked.

 

And like other great films and stories, it treats nearly all its characters with respect and understanding. Even the fucked up bully who threatens Conor is humanized and sort of redeemed by the film's thematics. (And how great was the scene when Conor stood up to him in the schoolyard?)

 

~~~

 

Two minor nitpicks:

 

First, as someone who was a teenager during the 80s, it sorta bugged me that a film taking place in 1985 treated Duran Duran's video for Rio, which came out 3+ years earlier, as some sort of thunderbolt from heaven. By 1985, Ireland's own U2 were already global superstars, with a good many video of their own in play. This felt like lazy research or disregard for the setting. Not even close to a dealbreaker, let me be very clear. But it was a niggling detail that felt really off, given how important music was to the film.

 

Second, the actress playing Raffina (sp?) looked at least 5 years older than Conor. She was likely 21 when the film was made, and looks to be in her mid-20s, while the actor playing Conor seemed a very realistic 15. I was able to loosen up as the film went along, but there was almost an ick factor at first, seeing as how she looked like she could've been in college and he appeared to not even having started shaving yet.

 

~~~

 

Meta-commentary: I would love to see films like this become bigger conversation pieces here on the boards. But my own meager film analysis skills are failing me, as well as the truism that it's easier to dig into something that doesn't work than something that does. And Sing Street works. Whatever my own circumstantial limitations in really getting into it, it's a confident, romantic, and very smart piece of storytelling. It's hopeful without being blind to reality, it sidesteps expected tropes and plot tricks, and it loves all the characters.

We talked about the Duran Duran thing already, but there's obviously a conflated time period in the movie. This few-month period is supposed to represent the entirety of early to mid-80s influences on the band, basically all of New Wave all at once. I don't understand why that's a problem, as the movie chooses a combination of visuals and music to get a point across. Would you rather Cosmo already like Duran Duran, even though this is supposed to be his musical awakening? Or maybe the brother playing their album for him, which would surely be less dynamic than what we get? There's also the great contrast by Little Finger and the older brother arguing about what a real band is, as CIA Douche remembers the Beatles on Ed Sullivan while older brother argues the new generation of music videos. "They don't even play live!" Hah.

 

Filming was from September to October 2014 you mad bastard. She was 20 playing like 17. WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU PERVO?!?!?!

post #62 of 172
I think defending STID so much has done something to you. I fully admitted they were minor nitpicks, and that the film works.

So get off my back, maaaaaaaaan!
post #63 of 172

I know where you live.

post #64 of 172

post #65 of 172

Actually I don't know where you live. I know where your friend lives.

post #66 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartleby_Scriven View Post
 

Actually I don't know where you live. I know where your friend lives.

 

Not true, but I'm guessing you tossed the envelope with the invite away. It had my actual address on it!

 

I, OTOH, know precisely where you live.

 

BWAH HA HA

post #67 of 172
oh nooooeeeessss

Send me more DVD box sets.
post #68 of 172
Fuller House isn't on disc yet.
post #69 of 172

Seen it 3 times.  love it.

post #70 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by cccc View Post

Seen it 3 times.  love it.

Jodie Sweetin got hot, I'll give you that, but three times?
post #71 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelM View Post
 

 

Spock thought that was a glass door standing between him and Hollow Man, but Hollow Man is craftier than he might seem.

post #72 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by D.T. View Post


Jodie Sweetin got hot, I'll give you that, but three times?

How rude!

post #73 of 172
Holy shit this was great. Saw a tweet about this and never heard of it before. Looked for a movie on Netflix and Boom there it is. Utter delight. The younger brother of Once. Easily my fav movie of the year so far.
post #74 of 172

oops repost.   Didn't know I already posted my love for this already.

post #75 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by User_32 View Post
 

Did anyone actually see Begin Again? Was Knightley bad in the film?

 

I didn't think so.  At least I don't remember be bad?

 

Begin Again is good, but lacks the magic as Once and now Sing Street.   

post #76 of 172
I saw Begin Again. I quite liked it, actually. It's sappy, but Ruffalo sells it and it's actually pretty touching in places.
post #77 of 172

I just watched this and I still have a huge smile on my face. It turned my cynicism off so much that I have no doubt that Connor and Raphina succeeded in London.

 

 While Connor started the band just to impress a girl, making music became an outlet to work though all of his problems. He was able to stand up to his bully using his wits, instead of fighting. Normally a scene like that would cause me to roll my eyes, but I bought in this.

 

  The actor playing Brendan was good. I liked his Jack Black in High Fidelity vibe. 

 

  The Drive It Like You Stole scene was brilliant. I've had that song stuck in my head the whole I've been typing this post.

 

  As far as movies that are love letters to rock n roll go, this is up there with Almost Famous.

post #78 of 172

Was home sick from work yesterday and watched this on Netflix and it was the best possible medicine.  Best of 2016 easily.

 

I do think it treats the '80s the same way Stranger Things does -- not as an attempt at depiction, but evocation.  So I didn't mind the somewhat misplaced musical references.  It's about the feeling.  And this has completely dethroned That Thing You Do for most period-accurate fictional music in a film.  Every single one of those songs sounded like something I'd have heard on the radio back in junior high or high school.

post #79 of 172

This movie owns most of this year's Oscar contenders.  It's a shame it's been overlooked.  

post #80 of 172

I'd like to forward a motion that Jack Reynor gets cast in everything now.

post #81 of 172

Seconded.  He was a fucking jet engine.

post #82 of 172
Check him out in TRANSFORMERS 4!
post #83 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

Check him out in TRANSFORMERS 4!

No.

post #84 of 172
PLEASE!
post #85 of 172

Granted, I haven't seen La La Land but with the way everyone's slobbering all over it (and I'll join in, too, I suppose) it just saddens me that while we'll get a great live performance, Drive it Like You Stole It won't pick up Best Song at this year's ceremony.

post #86 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

Check him out in TRANSFORMERS 4!

I'm considering it.

post #87 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

PLEASE!

 

Only if it's one note.

post #88 of 172
As I post in this thread earlier this year, it really made me recognize how much one movie makes a difference in how I perceive the talents of an actor.

Because Reynor leaves NO impression in Transformers.

(my suggestion to watch Transformers 4 for him was not serious!)
post #89 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

(my suggestion to watch Transformers 4 for him was not serious!)


Not enough robutt ballz for you?

post #90 of 172
never enough

not even BB8 could satisfy me
post #91 of 172

Finally got around to this. What a pleasant film! It's charming, fun, and sweet without being overbearing.

post #92 of 172

I give this movie an A-grade if for nothing else that it's one of the few movies that my wife and I can watch together and both of us fully enjoy. Similarly true of Carney's Once (and Begin Again, to a much lesser extent).

 

Likable characters (Eamon is my dude!), great music, some poignant moments. It's tried-and-true plotting and conventions (this kind of feels like Carney doing a Carney-esque mash-up of School of Rock with The Squid and the Whale) but a lot of beautifully realized details here. The actress who played Raphina was great. The "Up" scene where she's taking her make-up off... winner.

 

The kids are hilarious but not in a cheap way, the film really respects its characters, and that's something to revel in because we rarely get that kind of integrity from films in this particular wheelhouse. I do agree that the band (and Connor's sister) kind of abruptly drop out of the picture, but that's also sort of part and parcel with the film's kind of blunt way of proceeding through things and not over-playing certain aspects.

 

Loved when they went to recruit Ngig...

 

"Four doors down..."

 

"You here to see Ngig?"

"What's that?"

post #93 of 172

Oddly enough for the most contentious political year in recent memory, 2016 had several movies that I would feel comfortable recommending to darn near everyone, which is rare for even capital-G Great movies.  This and Hunt For The Wilderpeople are pretty delightful for just about anyone 8 and up.  Everybody Wants Some!! is the most amiable jock movie ever made.  Hell Or High Water is rated R, but the violence is non-gratuitous, the sex is barely there, and politics are handled with a weary reserve that I can't imagine turning off partisans of either stripe.  And I have to imagine even ardent superhero haters could find something to enjoy in Civil War.

post #94 of 172

Finally got around to this.  Now if you'll excuse me, I have to get around to getting everyone I know to finally get around to this.

post #95 of 172
Thread Starter 
I feel like this took way too long to happen, but I'm glad people are finally catching on.
post #96 of 172
One of us!
One of us!
post #97 of 172

Another movie streaming on Netflix no one has any excuse not to watch.

post #98 of 172

It's aiiiight.

post #99 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelM View Post
 

It's aiiiight.

 

 

post #100 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelM View Post
 

It's aiiiight.

You have no soul.

 

I think I've seen it 4 times now.  It's such a joyous movie and re-playable. 

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