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STRANGER THINGS (Netflix) - Page 4

post #151 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelios View Post
 

I'm hoping the next season will be Night of the Creeps influenced. Considering the end of this season, I really hope so. And for the one after that, The Blob.


I'd be up for any of that!  Considering the Duffers left the Upside Down fairly vague, it's not hard to imagine a pretty crazy assortment of creatures living down there ready to come into our world.  In line with both NIGHT OF THE CREEPS and THE BLOB, I wouldn't mind seeing the town of Hawkins itself actually end up in jeopardy as a way to expand the scope a bit more.

post #152 of 673

Finished it tonight and I can definitely say that I loved every minute of it.

 

So glad to hear it got renewed!

post #153 of 673

"Going through #StrangerThings withdrawal? Here's a bunch of stuff you should watch now"

 

Love Netflix's 'Stranger Things'? Watch These Movies and Shows Next.

 

https://www.thrillist.com/entertainment/nation/stranger-things-netflix-coming-of-age-movies-sci-fi-tv-shows

post #154 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headless Fett View Post
 

Finished it tonight and I can definitely say that I loved every minute of it.

 

So glad to hear it got renewed!

Is this confirmed?

post #155 of 673

Finished this last night.  Just fantastic.

 

Happy to hear its getting a second season, but I liked the vague, foreboding ending we got.  I was hoping this would be the scifi/horror equivalent to FX's Fargo.  A new story every season with hints of connective tissue.  But I'm up for revisiting these characters.  Hell, if they just followed these characters and nothing supernatural ever happened again, I'd be up for watching them navigate the perils of high school in the eighties. Freaks and Geeks 2.0.

 

Thought the shot near the end panning from Nancy's milquetoast dad sleeping on the recliner to Steve wearing the dorky sweater, was hilarious given Jonathan and Nancy's argument earlier.

post #156 of 673

This was a lot of fun.  A little too heavy on homages?  Yeah, I'd say so.  It never really casts aside the homages either, but I think the story finds its own footing and the casting was very good (I didn't mind Ryder, but my favorite work here came from other people).

post #157 of 673
I am on episode seven, and skipped the last couple of pages until I finish, but...is Jonathon an actual Stephen King clone?

If someone tells me to see them after school on Monday to have this conversation, my response would be: "You are always telling us to explore every door of curiosity. Why are you locking this door of curiosity?"
post #158 of 673

He's more of a Leo / Dane Dehaan and Eddy Furlong brundlefly, I think.

post #159 of 673

I'm not reading anything until I finish the season but holy shit this show. Just finished Episode 3. CRUSHING IT. Thrilling, heartbreaking, creepy, and smart. This fucking show.

post #160 of 673

Wow! I marathoned the last half of this today, and loved it. So very very 80's, it was amazing. Loved nearly all of it and the homages to me were nothing but bonuses, they didn't really stick in my craw or anything.

 

Think it would have been cool if the kids had accidentally managed to find a way to kill the creature, or at least slow it down. I kept thinking that Lucas would accidentally load something from the science room into his slingshot or something and found it's kryptonite, but overall, yeah. Loved it.

 

Will really needs to see a doctor about that though, instead of vomiting the sequel into the sewer system.

 

The rules of the Upside Down began to baffle me though. Things didn't seem to move when they moved in the real (like doors and things), but people were clearly parking their cars and stuff. And Hopper's bit at the end implied that things moved from one world to another.

post #161 of 673

Half in the Bag, guys:

 

post #162 of 673

I just finished the last episode. This shit was electric.

 

I was born in '83, so this entire show walked the line between all the fun stuff I was allowed to watch, and all the stuff I either wasn't or was too scared to watch. Every episode made me feel like a kid again, in ways that other nostalgia-rich shows and movies haven't quite achieved.

 

And yeah, the plot is formulaic (albeit pretty damned clever and suspenseful) and the show is entirely unabashed in being at least 50% homage, but damn if it doesn't make it work almost completely. I'll be high on that ending for at least a couple of days.

post #163 of 673

Holy shit, when he was younger, the kid who played Dustin toured as Gavroche in Les Miserables.

post #164 of 673

The eight-hour length makes this pefect for a re-watch.  Somehow ten hours would make me think, "Nah, I'm good," but eight hours feels like, "Hey, it's a lazy Saturday morning, let's run it again."  It's really not much longer than marathoning the OT.

post #165 of 673

I need to read the entire thread, but we finished this Friday night. I really loved it but I am wondering how it does on repeat viewings. 

 

I was 3-4 years older than the main kids, but they really nailed it: good friends, riding everywhere on your bikes, D&D, and the problems that arise when romantic rivals enter the picture.

post #166 of 673

I had a friend who watched the first episode and considered this show awful. And then the more he talked about it, the more I agreed to his points, but one of the finer things he had to say was about the D&D playing. As someone who had grown up in the 80's, my friend said, "Parents didn't accept their kids playing such a game. Kids wouldn't do it out in the open because the parents thought they were dabbling into the occult. This show was made by people who weren't even around for the 80's. Also, just because you ride a bike, doesn't make you The Goonies." 

 

I was like, yeah, I guess that makes sense.

post #167 of 673

Okay, his D&D comment is absolute BS, because my parents knew I was playing D&D and once I explained to them I wasn't out in a field swinging fake swords at my friends, they were fine with it.  The D&D fear-mongering was fairly minor and short-lived and confined mostly to evangelical broadcasts.

post #168 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post
 The D&D fear-mongering was fairly minor and short-lived and confined mostly to evangelical broadcasts.

 

Yeah, the D&D hysteria was a small minority that naturally got far more media attention than it warranted. It's not like kids were buying game modules in back alleys from guys in trenchcoats. "Psst! Hey kid. Wanna try some Dragonlance? First one's free..."

post #169 of 673
Even back then, there was nothing dangerous or transgressive about D&D. Watching any kids playing for five minutes would completely dispel any parent of the notion.
post #170 of 673

Yeah, that's complete bullshit. I had a wide circle of friends who played D&D. None of us hid it from our parents. None of our parents EVER expressed concern over it. 

post #171 of 673

It was the same sub-set of people then who think Harry Potter teaches children witchcraft now.

post #172 of 673

Nice to hear it from some 80's kids.

post #173 of 673

My mom was paranoid and raised us to fear everything, so I wasn't allowed anywhere near anything Dungeons & Dragons. She totally bought into that urban legend about the kids who went crazy playing it and killed themselves. I was only allowed to play Eye of the Beholder on our PC under supervision, and that was after my dad argued with her over it being fine.

post #174 of 673

But, for the record, they're playing D&D in the beginning of E.T., so that one guy's theory is bullshit.

post #175 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by D.T. View Post
 

But, for the record, they're playing D&D in the beginning of E.T., so that one guy's theory is bullshit.

 

It's not his theory, it's his experience, I'm sure. Like all of us in this thread, everyone's got their own different experience in regards to it.

post #176 of 673
To be fair, the show does muck up some of the details of the game. A single session is NOT a "campaign," for instance.
post #177 of 673

Late to the conversation, but yeah, I played D&D when it came out with my cousins, and my aunt was a big time catholic woman. She didn't have a problem with it at all. I was around 12 at the time. I do remember when I got older, and still played for a few years after I joined the service, there were news stories about the whole occult thing. It didn't go anywhere from what I remember.

post #178 of 673
The 1980s heavy metal kids laugh at this Dungeons and Dragons occult "hysteria"
post #179 of 673

I'm surprised I made it out of that decade without killing myself as a sacrifice to satan with all the metal I listened to.

post #180 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelM View Post

To be fair, the show does muck up some of the details of the game. A single session is NOT a "campaign," for instance.

I don't think I ever once played D&D the way it was intended to be played until I was in my thirties, and I definitely preferred our rules in middle school.
post #181 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arjen Rudd View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelM View Post

To be fair, the show does muck up some of the details of the game. A single session is NOT a "campaign," for instance.

I don't think I ever once played D&D the way it was intended to be played until I was in my thirties, and I definitely preferred our rules in middle school.

 

Well, sure. Everyone houseruled the shit out of it. But I never encountered anyone who referred to a single session of gameplay as the entire campaign.  The campaign was essentially the world of the game; even if all the characters died in that session, the campaign could (and often did) still easily go on.

 

It's a nitpick, I understand. But it's a glaring one that makes me wonder if the writers really know the game at all because it's so obviously wrong. 

post #182 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post

Okay, his D&D comment is absolute BS, because my parents knew I was playing D&D and once I explained to them I wasn't out in a field swinging fake swords at my friends, they were fine with it.  The D&D fear-mongering was fairly minor and short-lived and confined mostly to evangelical broadcasts.

I had friends of Evangelical/Southern Baptist backgrounds whose parents very much objected to D&D (and just about everything else) on Satanist grounds, but yeah, they weren't anywhere near a majority, even in Texas. Once the "Mazes and Monsters" type panic blew over in the early 80s you just didn't hear about the game's "corrupting influence" from anybody but hardcore Bible thumpers.

My dad actually bought me the classic red and blue box sets when I was seven (probably too young to fully grasp the game)... He was and is a good ol' boy and a believing Christian, who, had he grown up under different circumstances, would likely rival any of us in sheer nerdiness... A couple years later when I was really big into the game, I was looking at the D&D stuff in a Waldenbooks (those were once a thing) and out of nowhere a total stranger holy roller interrogated me at length about the gane and did my parents know I played, etc... the upshot being, naturally, that I was going to hell.

I wasn't really bothered. I came up Catholic, so I'd been told I was hellbound any number of times by various Evangelicals, and had come to enjoy arguing with them. But when I told my dad about the incident on the way out of the mall later, he got as pissed off as I've ever seen him. Had he been around at the time, I think there'd have been a fight, though I imagine it'd be more over having his parenting skills questioned rather than concern that I was somehow traumatized by that asshole...

Anyway, there were a few things about the D&D "campaign" in "Stranger Things" that struck me as not quite right, but couldn't put my finger on, it's been so long since I played (was there ever any such thing as a demogorgon?). But I decided to write off anything like that as house rules.

I was more bothered by the fact that the Millenium Falcon toy was clearly not of 1980s Kenner vintage, and a music cue/ reference or two I thought was unlikely or anachronistic. I understand the creators are about a decade removed from the period in terms of childhood, so there are a few things that just barely miss the mark like that. But otherwise the attention to detail on this show is pretty impressive.
post #183 of 673

Granted, they said they'd been playing for ten hours.  That could be a campaign.

post #184 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by stelios View Post
 

I'm surprised I made it out of that decade without killing myself as a sacrifice to satan with all the metal I listened to.

 

You and the kid from The Gate.

post #185 of 673
The things people fixate on. I swear we are living in a age where people are going into everything looking for reasons to dislike something and just zero in on the negatives. All of the stuff going on in this show and the game play of DVD is something people decide to zone in on or not like the show because of that? My God.

Most important for me, I'm not watching TV or movies and breaking it down like it's supposed to be a documentary. Liberties will be taken. Some facts will be glossed over. I don't care. The show feels truly authentic to the Era and nothing happened to take me out of the setting. That's all that matters to me.
post #186 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slim View Post

I was more bothered by the fact that the Millenium Falcon toy was clearly not of 1980s Kenner vintage...

 

This is why I love CHUD.

 

As for the music cues, that seems a bit unfair, as it's a series set in the '80s, but they are still free to use modern recording instruments and cgi. 

post #187 of 673
Only grief I got playing D&D was from a religious ed teacher in my school. We used to play in a spare classroom in lunch breaks and she objected on religious grounds. Other teachers told her to fuck off seemingly as it never went anywhere.

Other than that, the moral panic about it in the 80s was something you read about but hardly ever experienced, unless I guess you were in a hard-core bible thumping town or family.
post #188 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slim View Post

I was more bothered by the fact that the Millenium Falcon toy was clearly not of 1980s Kenner vintage

 

Hah! Yeah, I recognized it as the one from the 90s that I got for Christmas one year. That 70s Show had a bunch of scenes with 90s Star Wars action figures, too.

 

I imagine original stuff from the 70s and 80s is too much of a pain in the ass, and too expensive, to track down for a quick shot in a film or TV show.

post #189 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacob Singer View Post

This is why I love CHUD.

As for the music cues, that seems a bit unfair, as it's a series set in the '80s, but they are still free to use modern recording instruments and cgi. 

I meant a couple of the songs (The "Hazy Shade of Winter" cover and I think it was "Nocturnal Me" by Echo and the Bunnymen) came out after '83. To be fair they were used over end credits and not necessarily diagetic.

On the Falcon thing, there was a close shot of it at one pont, that if you spent as much time as I did playing with the toy when I was a kid leaps right out...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Racj82 View Post

The things people fixate on. I swear we are living in a age where people are going into everything looking for reasons to dislike something and just zero in on the negatives. All of the stuff going on in this show and the game play of DVD is something people decide to zone in on or not like the show because of that? My God.

Most important for me, I'm not watching TV or movies and breaking it down like it's supposed to be a documentary. Liberties will be taken. Some facts will be glossed over. I don't care. The show feels truly authentic to the Era and nothing happened to take me out of the setting. That's all that matters to me.

So nobody's "fixating" or looking for reasons to dislike the show. I ended my post saying that the period detail was impressive. But if they did take such care with the details, you can't blame me for being observant and actually noticing them.
post #190 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by D.T. View Post

Hah! Yeah, I recognized it as the one from the 90s that I got for Christmas one year. That 70s Show had a bunch of scenes with 90s Star Wars action figures, too.

I imagine original stuff from the 70s and 80s is too much of a pain in the ass, and too expensive, to track down for a quick shot in a film or TV show.

Yeah, I'm sure that availability/expense is the reason. An intact Falcon toy from back in the day has got to be worth a pretty penny. Wish mine still had all the parts.
post #191 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slim View Post
So nobody's "fixating" or looking for reasons to dislike the show. I ended my post saying that the period detail was impressive. But if they did take such care with the details, you can't blame me for being observant and actually noticing them.

 

Yep. The off details on the gaming didn't ruin the show for me. I really enjoyed it, and loved all the care and time that went into telling a compelling story. The season ended satisfyingly while still leaving plenty of storytelling possibilities open for exploration. It's just fun to go over the details and kibitz about them.

post #192 of 673

Even though the show says it's 1983, to me, this simply takes place in "the '80s," much like Happy Days simply took place in "the Fifties" without really worrying about song chronology or history or anything.  It's more about the feel than the strict accuracy.

post #193 of 673
We just had a person on here talk about how someone stopped watching because of the D&D stuff and there are plenty of people that do just what I said and it bugs. Feel free to ignore if it doesn't apply to you.
post #194 of 673

I mean if you're gonna be upset about something...be upset at how everyone except Nancy ignores my girl Barb being missing and later dead. None of these fuckers cared about her...

But I cared!

post #195 of 673

Yeah, that storyline sorta got dropped/ignored. There were a few things like that where the budget showed; you could tell the showrunners had to make some strategic decisions about what to follow through on. I hope S2 gets a bigger budget.

post #196 of 673

#JusticeForBarb

post #197 of 673
I mean, that's not even a Barbara thing. I feel like the town in general should have been in more panic. If I'm remembering correctly,there were much more people missing.
post #198 of 673

Finished this during the weekend. Absolutely loved every minute of it, and even though it has some flaws, the narrative, characters and the feel of the show more than make up for it.

One bit that I absolutely loved was 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Steve coming back to help Nancy and Jonathan against the Demigorgon; in typical 80's fashion, not only it subverts 80's tradition of jock boyfriends, but it comes along with him realizing how awful his friends and his treatment of both Nancy and Jonathan were.
Plus, the whole confrontation makes it clear Steve saved the pair, as he was far stronger and more handy with the baseball bat than the others, and essentially managed to make the monster move towards the trap.
 

As for that bit on the ending with Hopper

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I think its the surviving goverment agents making sure he honored his deal with Brenner, that is, covering up the truth of Brenner's experiments and Will's dissapearance...with the added reveal that the show hints that Hopper hid the truth about what happened to Eleven, as he leaves dead drops of food and supplies for her on the forest.

Really loved this, they nailed the feel, narrative and look of an 80's Spielberg/King movie/series.

 

As for the sequel....

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Im game for finding out who Eleven's father was and  what else there is in the upside down.
Plus, I'd love to see some Red Scare involved here, maybe with the soviets doing something similar to what Brenner was doing?
Also, i think the show hints that Eleven's mother also was gifted, as she is shown to know her daughter is alive despite her condition?
post #199 of 673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post
 

Even though the show says it's 1983, to me, this simply takes place in "the '80s," much like Happy Days simply took place in "the Fifties" without really worrying about song chronology or history or anything.  It's more about the feel than the strict accuracy.

It's sort of like The Goldbergs, which takes place in "1980-something." I didn't mind that aspect of the show at all.

The reaction to the show has been so positive that I'm sure they're doing another season with a bigger budget.

post #200 of 673

Oh god, I fucking HATE The Goldbergs, especially for the show's willy nilly 80s references. My nerd stench becomes obnoxiously strong anytime I watch that show.

 

For the most part, Stranger Things got things right. No show or film will hit 100%, but it felt like the producers and production folks made a real effort to keep things real in terms of the year.

 

( I will say that Steve's hair was in no way 1980s style. If it was 1983 and small town Indiana, it would've almost certainly been parted down the middle and feathered back. Or spiked, like his friend's hair.)

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