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The Classic Science-Fiction Thread - Page 2

post #51 of 153

KRULL is up there for James Horner.

post #52 of 153

If James Horner scores were Pokemon evolutions, Krull is the Charizard.  It's like everything he did previously rolled into one and cranked up to 11.

post #53 of 153
Ahhhhh, Krull <3

Quick....help me dig a moat around this thread and fill it with crocodiles before the haters arrive!
post #54 of 153
The scores for Krull, Battle Beyond the Stars and Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan all came from the same womb.
post #55 of 153

It's quite instructive to listen to Horner's Battle Beyond the Stars and Wrath of Khan back-to-back. They both use the same influences, but BBS is straight-up stealing and cutting/pasting, while WOK works as an organic whole.

post #56 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

Battle Beyond the Stars changed me as a kid.

 

post #57 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Reese View Post
 

Have you seen Strange Days, Codename? That's the ultimate Cyberpunk movie for me. It has all the hallmarks of the genre: Noir detective lead character (Ralph Fiennes' fabulous hair, and the rest of his body), mind/memory recorders as the main Macguffin, etc. It doesn't quite have all the cosmetic Cyberpunk elements, but there is a key scene in a nighclub where people are dressed up in weird shit, and Juliette Lewis is singing PJ Harvey songs for bonus mid-90s achievement points. It's like Johnny Menomenanicknolte, except with great filmmaking by Kathryn Bigelow and script by James Cameron.

 

I have not! But you have definitely made me interested. Will look that one up, pronto.

post #58 of 153
You've never seen Strange Days? You'll love it.

Where is THAT blu?
post #59 of 153

Best trailer:

 

post #60 of 153

Hahaha, they are totally riffing on Achtung Baby-era U2 there. Add some sunglasses, and you'd have Bono in every early 90s interview. The flashing text would follow him around wherever he went, too.

 

 

I've never seen that teaser. It's fun when they use unique footage and 4th wall breaking in trailers.

post #61 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Reese View Post
It's fun when they use unique footage and 4th wall breaking in trailers.

 

Agreed!

 

post #62 of 153

That's a nice one too.

 

I watched the Eric Stoltz version after, so so weird. Can't imagine why they didn't want to go with the serial-killer vibe for Marty McFly.

post #63 of 153

I feel compelled to bring up one of my all-time favourite films.  Classic?  Opinions may vary.

 

post #64 of 153
Thread Starter 

My most watched Science-Fiction film over the last decade plus has to be THE INCREDIBLE SHRINKING MAN. One of my favorite films of all time. It's a fun B thrill ride that turns soul-stirring as it wrestles with the existential.

 

Matheson, of course. But Jack Arnold is one of the heroes of the genre.

post #65 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Somewhere View Post
 

I feel compelled to bring up one of my all-time favourite films.  Classic?  Opinions may vary.

 

My late uncle's favorite movie. We played it in the lobby at his funeral. It was awesome.

By the way, the Blu-Ray comes out on the 16th. Looking forward to it.

post #66 of 153
Thread Starter 
post #67 of 153
I am definitely going to watch that, but for the moment I just have to say, holy shit, I had no idea Bass was behind so many iconic logos. Was there anything the man wasn't great at?
post #68 of 153

If you're in the San Francisco area, check out the Kubrick exhibit currently at the Contemporary Jewish Museum. There are some gorgeous storyboards Bass did for Spartacus.

post #69 of 153
My favourite sci-fi novels (Alphabetically)

All You Need is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka (The book Edge of Tomorrow is based off)
Armour by John Steakley
Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell
The Forever War by Joe Haldeman
Gateway by Fredrik Pohl
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
The Martian by Andy Wier
Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C. Clarke
UBIK by Philip K. Dick
VALIS by Philip K. Dick
War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells

I know it's a very typical list, but I'm sorely behind on reading all the classics. I'm soon about to re-attempt William Gibson's Neuromancer after giving up on it when I was a teen because I had no idea what the fuck was going on.
Edited by dude hallenbeck - 8/17/16 at 2:52am
post #70 of 153
I just finished reading through Neuromancer for the first time myself. Fucking great novel.
post #71 of 153
It really is.
post #72 of 153

I keep coming back to The Long Tomorrow, by Leigh Brackett. It's like a post-apocalyptic Huck Finn.

post #73 of 153

NEUROMANCER is indeed great.

 

Give STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND a go (Robert Heinlein).  Definitely an 'interesting' read.  There's a reason why it's a classic.

 

Also, DUNE by Frank Herbert.  The series devolves into pretty standard fare (especially now that it's being mined for money by his son), but that first novel is simply fantastic.

post #74 of 153
I just recently discovered Neuromancer as well. It melted my brain. I'd really love to see someone attempt a REALLY faithful movie adaptation of it. No matter how it turned out, there's no way it would be uninteresting..
post #75 of 153

I've been meaning to re-read Stranger. I think the edition I'm familiar with has been superseded by more 'complete' versions.

post #76 of 153

John Varley's Gaia trilogy (TITAN, WIZARD, and DEMON) makes for an interesting read.  I'm pretty sure that heavy drugs were involved in the writing process. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaea_trilogy

post #77 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyle Reese View Post

That's a nice one too.

I watched the Eric Stoltz version after, so so weird. Can't imagine why they didn't want to go with the serial-killer vibe for Marty McFly.

Ooh. Link?
post #78 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fraid uh noman View Post

I just recently discovered Neuromancer as well. It melted my brain. I'd really love to see someone attempt a REALLY faithful movie adaptation of it. No matter how it turned out, there's no way it would be uninteresting..
That would be rad indeed. (I smell a fan-casting coming on...) In the meantime, the BBC did a pretty good radio-play version (albeit one heavily edited for content and time - but almost all the meat of the story is there.)
post #79 of 153

Add me to the Neuromancer fan club, though prescient as it was I do love the fact that Gibson thought to himself "Man, what would be, like, an INSANE amount of memory to have in the future?" and the answer was...3 MB. Not a knock on him at all, just an amazing testament to how quickly technology has evolved over the fast few decades. 

post #80 of 153
Yup. I could also nitpick on the fact that Gibson doesn't seem to be particularly familiar with computers beyond surface jargon (compare Neuromancer to Snow Crash and it's really clear which author has a technical background - however fictional the gimmicks - and which doesn't,) but it's executed with enough panache and such an engrossing read that I can't bring myself to care.
post #81 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post


Ooh. Link?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iM7Plnl7kN4

 

Seeing his empty soulless face is like gazing into the void.

post #82 of 153

Man that's weird.

post #83 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Judas Booth View Post

NEUROMANCER is indeed great.

Give STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND a go (Robert Heinlein).  Definitely an 'interesting' read.  There's a reason why it's a classic.

Also, DUNE by Frank Herbert.  The series devolves into pretty standard fare (especially now that it's being mined for money by his son), but that first novel is simply fantastic.

I definitely, definitely need to read some Heinlein.

Dune was another one I'd attempted as a teen but dropped because I couldn't make heads nor tails of the Sci Fi gobbledygook. But I'm certainly keen to re attempt it too.

I do enjoy a lot of the modern stuff, for example Robopocalypse, METRO 203#, Ready Player One, but all of it seems like 300 page film/game/TV show pitches.
post #84 of 153
I've tried three times to read DUNE. Just can't do it.
post #85 of 153

Maybe Kyle can help you?

 

post #86 of 153
...yeah, that's about the size of it.
post #87 of 153
I love that.

Everybody reads Dune. No excuses!
post #88 of 153
But Herbert's prose and dialogue is so bad!

I've seen the David Lynch film. Isn't that enough?
post #89 of 153
Dude. You trolling? Terry Brooks is still writing shit-ass Shanarra novels and Herbert has bad prose?
post #90 of 153

It does help to read the glossary at the back of Dune first.

post #91 of 153
For sure! Or using it like a glossary and looking up stuff while you're reading the book.

It's funny, lots of people consider Dune to be action-light even though it has several battles and a climactic knife fight.
post #92 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lightning Slim View Post

Dude. You trolling? Terry Brooks is still writing shit-ass Shanarra novels and Herbert has bad prose?
I've never read anything by Brooks, so I dunno!
post #93 of 153

A warning. Stay the hell away from the Dune prequels by Kevin j Anderson. Some of the shittiest books i've ever read.

 

With regards to Cyberpunk, has anyone here seen Christopher Lambert's Nirvana (1997)?

post #94 of 153

You can probably stop at Children of Dune, to be honest. Although one of the later books does have a very funny scene where a character orgasms from just watching Duncan Idaho rock climb. 

post #95 of 153

God Emperor of Dune right?

post #96 of 153
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtomTastic View Post
 

You can probably stop at Children of Dune, to be honest. Although one of the later books does have a very funny scene where a character orgasms from just watching Duncan Idaho rock climb. 

 

Sounds like it was the inspiration for Mission: Impossible 2.

post #97 of 153

Neuromancer is sort of the Star Wars of cyberpunk -- it gets a bit looked down on for launching a hundred pale imitations that flooded the genre for a while -- but it's still fantastic.  You don't get many opening lines better than, "The sky above the port was the color of television, tuned to a dead channel."

 

I've only read the first four Frank Herbert Dune books and enjoyed them all.  I've also read the first six prequel books his son and Kevin J. Anderson wrote, and hey, did you know everybody's parents knew everybody else's parents?  There are apparently only four or five important families in the Dune universe and that's it.

post #98 of 153
His dad's last couple of novels veer in that direction. It's thousands of years into the series' future, and any character worth naming is still either an Atreides or a Harkonnen.

Children of Dune and God Emperor are both fine places to stop.
post #99 of 153

And going old school, Childhood's End and The Martian Chronicles are musts.

post #100 of 153

The Martian Chronicles exists in several variations, with chapters that get dropped or swapped. Make sure your edition contains "The Wilderness", "The Fire Balloons", and "Way In the Middle of the Air".

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