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Eyes Wide Shut - Page 3

post #101 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post
 

Nolan talks about his sense of how "finished" EYES WIDE SHUT is:

 


That's an interesting take.  I've never really noticed these "technical flaws" that he talks about, but I'm sure I'll definitely be on the lookout the next time I watch the film.

post #102 of 112
Thread Starter 
I think knowing that Kubrick died in post production has encouraged people to look for "flaws", as well.
post #103 of 112
I didn’t even know there were technical flaws in the film. The trouble is, we will never know what Kubrick would have finally done with the picture. This is the same man who pulled The Shining from screens just to cut out one hospital scene at the end and burned all traces of it from existence (that last part might be an urban legend).
post #104 of 112
Thread Starter 
I actually doubt it is an urban legend. Based on the testimony of one of the couriers recruited to do the job of collecting the physical extractions from the final reel, the frames were very diligently accounted for from all of the handful of prints that were in circulation at that time. If they were shipped back to the Kubrick estate, they probably met the same end that all of his unused negative footage did in the 90s.

The only hope is that a copy of the scene ended up in a Warner Bros. vault like the 17 minutes of footage deleted from 2001 after its preview apparently did. Of course, in that case Warner has no apparent interest in releasing it.

The more interesting deleted scenes from THE SHINING (like Jack Torrance finding the scrapbook and later talking to Wendy about it) sound as if they were removed before any public exhibition and thus we can be even more confident are gone for good.
post #105 of 112
I don’t think it’s been mentioned in this thread, but Frederic Raphael, Kubrick’s collaborator on the screenplay, wrote a memoir about that experience called Eyes Wide Open, which I read earlier this year. Though I haven’t seen the movie since around the time it came out, it was a really interesting read, both for the creative process for that particular movie, and for the experience of working and interacting with Kubrick creatively in general. And it’s entertainingly, engagingly written as well (no surprise for someone who writes for a living), so I strongly recommend it for anyone interested in the man and his work.
post #106 of 112
Thread Starter 

Raphael's provocative memoir is fascinating and worth reading, but it must be taken with an enormous grain of salt.  It definitely comes off as someone with an axe to grind against Kubrick.  That Kubrick's family and the likes of Spielberg and Cruise were publicly displeased is predictable, but the fact that it earned Michael Herr and Diane Johnson's ire I think speaks volumes.  Those two were fond of Kubrick, but they were also pretty sober about him when they wanted to be.  I ascribe a lot of weight to their opinions.  From The Kubrick FAQ:


Quote:

Upon its release, this book prompted Christianne Kubrick to issue a strongly worded protest on her web page about its accuracy and his exploitative intentions. I would not wish to disagree with her assessment but my impression is that it was not Raphael intention to harm Kubrick's reputation, although his motivation for writing the book was undoubtedly a financial one.

 

Michael Herr's assessment sums it up best: "it wasn't just that it was so antagonistical to Stanley, or even that it was so bitter and self-humiliating, but that is was so unfailingly patronizing. Stanley, we gather, hadn't been sufficiently deferential to Raphael's credentials, to his academic attainments and his immense store of knowledge, his often unfortunate command of foreign words and phrases and the insolent presumptions of superiority that came along with it all, however unentitled. We read of Stanley the tyrant, secretive Stanley, Stanley, and a new one - particularly distasteful because it was so gratuitously trumped up as to look like a mere projection - Stanley the self-hating Jew."

 

Perhaps "Eyes Wide Open," Rather than being "A Memoir Of Stanley Kubrick," should be re-titled "An Account Of Failure;" Raphael's failures to write a script that satisfies Kubrick, his failure to befriend Kubrick, and ultimately his failure to penetrate Kubrick's enigma. As an account of a screenwriter coming to terms with these failures it is of marginal interest only. Perhaps then its rush-release, so soon after Kubrick's death, is merely Raphael's attempt to salvage something for himself.

 

And Diane Johnson's take:
 

Quote:

 

MS: What did you think of the books about Kubrick by Michael Herr (Kubrick) and Frederic Raphael (Eyes Wide Open)?

 

DJ: I completely agreed with Michael Herr's assessment. I visited the Kubricks when Michael was there and Michael and I have talked about him a little bit since then. My Kubrick was very much like the Kubrick that Herr described. I think that Frederic Raphael must be a dangerous paranoid. I don't know what that was about.

 

All that said, there are some terrific anecdotes in Raphael's account.  It's just that the point of view is really suspect, and the timing of publication is no coincidence.

post #107 of 112

I've got a copy of the book on the way, so that is some welcome context.

post #108 of 112
Thread Starter 

When you get through with that I highly recommend Michael Herr's own remembrances, simply entitled Kubrick, though that book is only a hundred pages and the 12,000 word excerpt published by Vanity Fair that I've already linked to may represent most of it.

Herr also penned this response to the reviews of EYES WIDE SHUT, though it may also be sourced from that book. I really need to dust it off.


Edited by FatherDude - 12/27/17 at 3:35pm
post #109 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post
 

When you get through with that I highly recommend Michael Herr's own remembrances, simply entitled Kubrick, though that book is only a hundred pages and the 12,000 word excerpt published by Vanity Fair that I've already linked to may represent most of it.

Herr also penned this response to the reviews of EYES WIDE SHUT.


Thanks for the recommendations!  I received the BARRY LYNDON Criterion Blu for Christmas, and it's got me in the mood to expand my Kubrick library.

post #110 of 112
I agree that Eyes Wide Open is best read as a subjective account of one person’s — a “big personality,” like Kubrick — experience of working with Kubrick, by no means a documentary. Still very insightful, though.
post #111 of 112
Thread Starter 

I don't know what interview this comes from, but here's Gary Oldman saying that he'd heard Keitel left EYES WIDE SHUT because he couldn't tolerate Kubrick's extreme number of takes.

 

 

post #112 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post
 

I don't know what interview this comes from, but here's Gary Oldman saying that he'd heard Keitel left EYES WIDE SHUT because he couldn't tolerate Kubrick's extreme number of takes.

 

 

Sounds very plausible to me.

 

I still maintain it all worked out for the best. 

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