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Dark Disney - Page 2

post #51 of 296
Definitely bump a Bill Cosby movie to the top of your queue.

@_@
post #52 of 296
Thread Starter 

Maybe I'll make a whole day of it and toss in some Polanski movies while I'm at it.

post #53 of 296
Mix yourself a nice qualuude cocktail. Make a day of it, a day you won't remember.
post #54 of 296

Got some Fatty Arbuckle to throw into the mix as well?

post #55 of 296
Thread Starter 

I keep an entire shelf of movies made by people with questionable (or nonexistent) morals.

post #56 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post
 

I keep an entire shelf of movies made by people with questionable (or nonexistent) morals.

post #57 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

Definitely bump a Bill Cosby movie to the top of your queue.

 

What about HICKEY & BOGGS?

 

Bump two.

post #58 of 296
Thread Starter 

On the subject of darker Disney, what do people think of Tim Burton's stop-motion FRANKENWEENIE from a couple years back?  I know it's more "macabre" than "dark," but I blind-bought the Blu-ray for $2 at a yard sale today, and am curious what I'm in for!

post #59 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzRod View Post
 

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES - I still have nightmares about the Spider sequence in the bedroom in that flick.

 

So damn real and you can feel the fear from the actors in that scene.

it shows true darkness, if that horrid scene still resonates with me.

 

Damn.. I was shaking when I typed this..... go figure

What's nice about that scene is that the kids play it just right.  It's not over-the-top histrionic.  Plus, James Horner's proto-ALIENS scoring in that sequence doesn't hurt, either. 

 

While I'm glad the spider scene works for you guys, I find it hard to focus on anything other than the fact that the actors playing Will and Jim are (approximately) fifty years older than they appear in the rest of the movie.  The mirror maze climax suffers from Glaring Reshoots Syndrome (GRS) as well.

post #60 of 296

One of the more obscure PG-rated titles in the catalog is TAKE DOWN (1979), which was distributed (but not produced) by Disney: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Take_Down_%281979_film%29. Never released on DVD.

 

Also Michael J. Fox's film debut, the teen comedy MIDNIGHT MADNESS (1980), the John Hurt thriller NIGHT CROSSING (1982), and the comedy TRENCHCOAT (1983) starring Margot Kidder and Robert Hays.

 

More well-known but underrated is the S.E. Hinton adaptation TEX (1982).

post #61 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post
 

On the subject of darker Disney, what do people think of Tim Burton's stop-motion FRANKENWEENIE from a couple years back?  I know it's more "macabre" than "dark," but I blind-bought the Blu-ray for $2 at a yard sale today, and am curious what I'm in for!

 

It's everything you'd expect from current vintage Burton doing a stop-motion animated film.  Whether that's a good or bad thing depends on how you feel about current vintage Burton.

 

I will say Laika's ParaNorman mops the floor with it though.

post #62 of 296
I grew up on this crop of Disney. Saw a few at the drive-in and on Betamax. I even had a stuffed Gurgi from BC.

Revisited Tron last week with my daughter. Such a headscratcher. Need to pop in SWTWC soon for a rewatch (Halloween maybe?)

I had completely forgotten the twist ending to WITW until I bought the Anchor Bay release.

Dragonslayer and Return to Oz still absolutely hold up. Craftsmanship and eerie as hell. Great scores and creature FX both.

Jungle Book and Fox and the Hound both (still personal faves of mine) had some INTENSE and perilous sequences. Animal on animal violence. Hard for this kid who was forever scarred by Watership Down.
post #63 of 296
I've never seen Dragonslayer. I need to fix that. I do know enough about it that if a blu was ever made it would be a very easy blind buy..
post #64 of 296

I haven't seen Dragonslayer since I was about five years old. The dragon scared the hell out of me back then. I distinctly remember walking home after seeing it at a friends place and carefully scanning the sky for dragons.

post #65 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post
 

On the subject of darker Disney, what do people think of Tim Burton's stop-motion FRANKENWEENIE from a couple years back?  I know it's more "macabre" than "dark," but I blind-bought the Blu-ray for $2 at a yard sale today, and am curious what I'm in for!

Basically what Richard said. It was received well by critics, but I found it to be quite boring. I hope you like it better than I did!

 

I used to love Something Wicked This Way Comes as a kid, but it has been many years since I've seen it. I remember some scenes vividly, but otherwise not much else. I am terrified to rewatch it out of fear of ruining my nostalgia for it; much like my rewatch of Monster Squad did.

post #66 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by wd40 View Post

Basically what Richard said. It was received well by critics, but I found it to be quite boring. I hope you like it better than I did!

I used to love Something Wicked This Way Comes as a kid, but it has been many years since I've seen it. I remember some scenes vividly, but otherwise not much else. I am terrified to rewatch it out of fear of ruining my nostalgia for it; much like my rewatch of Monster Squad did.
My nostalgia-tinted feelings toward Monster Squad are still intact. Goonies was more of a strain last rewatch.
post #67 of 296

Heh, opposite for me. Although Goonies is a lot more flawed than I remember, I feel like the story and actors work better. Monster Squad not only ventures into inappropriate moments, it just feels edited and cut to hell. I was seriously let down several years ago when I bought the DVD. I had a viewing party with my wife and friends; none of whom had seen it before. One of my friends walked out of the room when Dracula called the little girl a bitch. Needless to say, there were crickets once the credits rolled. These friends constantly remind me of "that time I brought that shitty movie over".


Edited by wd40 - 8/23/16 at 12:57pm
post #68 of 296
You need new friends, wd.
post #69 of 296

But I didn't disagree with them in this case...

post #70 of 296

I had a similar experience with Monster Squad, except everyone liked it and had a good time. Dracula throwing dynamite at their clubhouse was the highlight.

post #71 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by wd40 View Post

Heh, opposite for me. Although Goonies is a lot more flawed than I remember, I feel like the story and actors work better. Monster Squad not only ventures into inappropriate moments, it just feels edited and cut to hell. I was seriously let down several years ago when I bought the DVD. I had a viewing party with my wife and friends; none of whom had seen it before. One of my friends walked out of the room when Dracula called the little girl a bitch. Needless to say, there were crickets once the credits rolled. These friends constantly remind me of "that time I brought that shitty movie over".
The credits roll with the rap song.

Crickets? Boo to your friends

Goonies is aggressively abrasive and screechy (and racist!). But has a decent sense of adventure and energy.

/derail
post #72 of 296
Friends are the worst.
post #73 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

Friends are the worst.
Unless you can get a squad of them together. To fight Monsters.


New derail... I know that Tim Burton (and Selick) comes from this era of Disney but his renaissance of stop-motion has definitely ushered in a new era of darker kid tales. Which Im sure has made Laika's interesting darker-kid-fare output possible. Roal Dahl would approve.
post #74 of 296
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malmordo View Post
 

One of the more obscure PG-rated titles in the catalog is TAKE DOWN (1979), which was distributed (but not produced) by Disney: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Take_Down_%281979_film%29. Never released on DVD.

 

Also Michael J. Fox's film debut, the teen comedy MIDNIGHT MADNESS (1980), the John Hurt thriller NIGHT CROSSING (1982), and the comedy TRENCHCOAT (1983) starring Margot Kidder and Robert Hays.

 

More well-known but underrated is the S.E. Hinton adaptation TEX (1982).

NIGHT CROSSING could have absolutely shown up on my original list.  Though not necessarily dark, it's a mature and fairly restrained piece of work, and a totally odd fit for Disney to have made.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post
 

 

It's everything you'd expect from current vintage Burton doing a stop-motion animated film.  Whether that's a good or bad thing depends on how you feel about current vintage Burton.

 

I will say Laika's ParaNorman mops the floor with it though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wd40 View Post
 

Basically what Richard said. It was received well by critics, but I found it to be quite boring. I hope you like it better than I did!

I just finished FRANKENWEENIE, and enjoyed it.  It's so clearly full of love for genre that it would be hard to dislike it.

 

But yes, PARANORMAN does the same sort of thing even better.

post #75 of 296

I assume this has to have been mentioned already, but if not you guys need to check out the documentary Waking Sleeping Beauty. It came out a few years ago, and covers both the Dark Disney days (starting around 1980) and the Disney Renaissance from 1984 to 1994. You see lots of candid footage of scrappy animators, including a young Tim Burton!

 

post #76 of 296

I had never heard of this, so I'm grateful you brought it up!  Sounds like it's focused on the animation side of things, but still sounds like a must-watch.

post #77 of 296
Thread Starter 

WAKING SLEEPING BEAUTY is fantastic.

post #78 of 296

It ran on Turner Classic Movies a month or so ago, but it doesn't seem to be available on Watch TCM.  It's definitely worth checking out.

post #79 of 296

Great thread, I'll have to check out that doc, and track down Dragonslayer too!  I hadn't even heard of it until a few years ago.

 

While I'll harp on Return to OZ for it's creepiness, it's a great production.  Most horror movies wish they could nail a tone like Oz.

 

Black Hole and Tron were staples of my youth.  Black holes' score is a masterpiece, and I'm glad that hack Kosinski didn't get his mitts on it like he wanted to.

post #80 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzRod View Post
 

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES - I still have nightmares about the Spider sequence in the bedroom in that flick.

 

One of the things that makes that sequence feel so weird to me is that the actors are obviously older there than at any other point in the film. It was a very late re-shoot.

post #81 of 296

I remember being excited for Waking Sleeping Beauty when it was released, and then somehow never actually seeing it. Need to fix that.

 

Regarding the "Dark Disney" timeline, it's perhaps interesting to note that it dovetails directly into the Touchstone era where, starting with Splash, the studio embraced a slate of films that weren't aimed at young kids at all.

post #82 of 296
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammerhead View Post
 

Regarding the "Dark Disney" timeline, it's perhaps interesting to note that it dovetails directly into the Touchstone era where, starting with Splash, the studio embraced a slate of films that weren't aimed at young kids at all.

Very true.  That whole period was full of enormous change for the company.

post #83 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post

Very true.  That whole period was full of enormous change for the company.

Change that brought on 3 RATED R BETTE MIDLER MOVIES.
post #84 of 296

Touchstone was pretty crafty that way. Midler's career had hit a bump and they got her cheap. Same story with Richard Dreyfuss and Nick Nolte.


Edited by Hammerhead - 8/26/16 at 2:51pm
post #85 of 296

You can't discuss the Dark Disney timeline without also touching on Don Bluth Productions, the studio formed in 1979 by disgruntled Disney animators who were trying to revive the old days while Disney was undergoing its identity crisis.  We have them to thank for THE SECRET OF NIMH, AN AMERICAN TRAIL, THE LAND BEFORE TIME, ALL DOGS GO TO HEAVEN and even DRAGON'S LAIR.  They were basically making Disney movies when Disney wasn't.  Shame about A TROLL IN CENTRAL PARK, though.

post #86 of 296
I have memories of a movie which gave me nightmares as a kid, took me a while to track it down based on fragments of a movie, but yeah, turned out to be SWTWC. So I have a soft spot for it, haven't rewatched it though. Waiting for the kids to get a little older....smile.gif
post #87 of 296

I think that movie works more than it doesn't, but it doesn't quite pull together.  I find it extremely rewatchable.  As mentioned, the library confrontation between Jason Robards and Jonathan Pryce is classic stuff.  I'd be interested to know what the modern kid would make of the flick.

post #88 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatherDude View Post

I think that movie works more than it doesn't, but it doesn't quite pull together.  I find it extremely rewatchable.  As mentioned, the library confrontation between Jason Robards and Jonathan Pryce is classic stuff.  I'd be interested to know what the modern kid would make of the flick.
I'll have my daughter join me for a rewatch and holla back.

There's a huge Don Bluth sized hole in the animation landscape right now. Ghibli (and in a sense, Pixar and Laika) picked up the somber baton. But I miss the pouty lipped mice and reptiles and dogs of Don Bluth. The Pete's Dragon remake has been reminding me.

I miss the uber-melancholy of SoNIMH and R/B's Last Unicorn.

Mickey's Christmas Carol (and Small One speaking of Bluth) came from this misunderstood experimental era. Figures that Dickens and the Bible would be tapped in Dark Disney Days.
post #89 of 296

With Disney losing its dominance in the marketplace, the late 70s and 80s saw a mini-revolution of independent animated features, notable for their unmoderated personal vision and disregard for market forces. Besides Bluth and Last Unicorn we got Rock & Rule, The Adventures of Raggedy Ann and Andy, Hugo the Hippo, Twice Upon a Time, Watership Down, The Plague Dogs, Starchaser: The Legend of Orin, When the Wind Blows and a couple of Peanuts movies.

post #90 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by DARKMITE8 View Post

There's a huge Don Bluth sized hole in the animation landscape right now. Ghibli (and in a sense, Pixar and Laika) picked up the somber baton. But I miss the pouty lipped mice and reptiles and dogs of Don Bluth. The Pete's Dragon remake has been reminding me.

I miss the uber-melancholy of SoNIMH and R/B's Last Unicorn.
Amen to that.
post #91 of 296

I probably watched All Dogs Go To Heaven about 25 times on VHS as a kid. I don't think I've seen it in over 20 years, I'm very interested to see if it holds up. I remember a lot of wild stuff happening in that movie.

 

I watched Secret Of Nimh again a few years ago, that one is still very solid.

 

An American Tail, I probably haven't seen since I was 6 or 7. I can't remember anything about it.

post #92 of 296

I find American Tail frantic and shrill. Love NIMH though.

post #93 of 296
Jeez, I haven't revisited An American Tail in probably twenty years or more.
post #94 of 296

Let's not forget The Land Before Time, which released its ... holy shit, TWELFTH direct-to-video sequel earlier this year.  The original film was the Bambi for a lot of '80s kids; hell, I remember teenage friends of mine absolutely losing their shit when Littlefoot's mother died.

post #95 of 296

WATERSHIP DOWN got a lovely Criterion last year.  THE PLAGUE DOGS, which handily out-depresses it, by the way, needs one too.


Edited by FatherDude - 8/26/16 at 1:22pm
post #96 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by commodorejohn View Post

Amen to that.
The feeling of longing and regret in Last Unicorn (see also R/B Hobbit) is PALPABLE. Even in their "happy" endings. It's the music and grown up themes and the large dewey eyes. Im totally an easy mark the older I get.

https://youtu.be/9bmxSt4xcGw

https://youtu.be/k2gE7-J9B6w


Sorry to derail off Disney again.
post #97 of 296

I've long held that the Rankin-Bass Hobbit was the last gasp of the hippie ownership of Tolkien.  For most of the '60s and '70s, LOTR was this gentle, pastoral thing.  Even with the grand battles, most of the art I remember seeing was fat happy hobbits and smoke-shrouded wizards and idyllic scenery.  Which is very much evident in the cartoon.

post #98 of 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Dickson View Post
 

I've long held that the Rankin-Bass Hobbit was the last gasp of the hippie ownership of Tolkien.  For most of the '60s and '70s, LOTR was this gentle, pastoral thing.  Even with the grand battles, most of the art I remember seeing was fat happy hobbits and smoke-shrouded wizards and idyllic scenery.  Which is very much evident in the cartoon.

 

I loved the R/B RETURN OF THE KING even more.  Just great stuff.

post #99 of 296

There are things I like in their ROTK, but I feel it really suffers not having had the build-up from the previous two parts.  But The Hobbit?  Man, that was my JAM.  Remember, we got that AND Star Wars in the same year.  There was no way I wasn't going into 1978 a bona fide geek.  I had the story album for The Hobbit that was the entire soundtrack -- dialogue and music -- on two records and I played the living hell out of it.  Had that thing memorized cold.

post #100 of 296
Man, The Hobbit. I haven't watch that in years either. Sad that it's still the best adaptation of the book, but...it's still the best adaptation of the book. (Except for Smaug's cat face - the hell!?)
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