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BOND 25 pre-release - Page 2

post #51 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belloq87 View Post
 

I'm more with Agentsands77 on this one.  I feel like Hardy's Bond would probably be cut from much of the same cloth as Craig's Bond.  INCEPTION tells me he can pull off charming in fits and starts, and in theory I'd have no problem with seeing him become 007... but I'd like someone with just slightly more of a light touch first.

I just want someone who really sinks their teeth into Bond's hedonism.

 

That element was certainly there with Craig--who was immaculately dressed in cutting-edge fashion and harbored an affection for a very specific, unique variation on the martini--but suppressed compared to previous Bonds. Heck, even Brosnan wasn't particularly snobbish (or particularly stylish; Brosnan's Bond dressed like an international banker). I want Bond's snobbery back in full force. I want a Bond who once again will diagnose a disappointing brandy as being "indifferently blended; with a overdose of bombois," who will chastise a villain for drinking red wine with fish, or who will, on MI6's bill, swap out a lackluster champagne for a bottle of Bollinger under the rationale that he found the suggested brand questionable.

post #52 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post
 

I just want someone who really sinks their teeth into Bond's hedonism.

 

That element was certainly there with Craig--who was immaculately dressed in cutting-edge fashion and harbored an affection for a very specific, unique variation on the martini--but suppressed compared to previous Bonds. Heck, even Brosnan wasn't particularly snobbish (or particularly stylish; Brosnan's Bond dressed like an international banker). I want Bond's snobbery back in full force. I want a Bond who once again will diagnose a disappointing brandy as being "indifferently blended; with a overdose of bombois," who will chastise a villain for drinking red wine with fish, or who will, on MI6's bill, swap out a lackluster champagne for a bottle of Bollinger under the rationale that he found the suggested brand questionable.


Absolutely agree.  I'd like to see a bit of Fleming's culinary, luxury interests make a strong return, or a return to scenes where we get to see Bond order breakfast again.

post #53 of 1119
Some of you will be happy to hear I've picked up Casino Royale again and am willing to give it another go.

Perhaps I'll get past page 55 this time.
post #54 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

Some of you will be happy to hear I've picked up Casino Royale again and am willing to give it another go.

Perhaps I'll get past page 55 this time.

Is Casino Royale the only Fleming novel you've tried?

If you've struggled with that one, you might be better off with Thunderball.

post #55 of 1119
Heads up: There's no double taking pigeon.
post #56 of 1119
I read Goldfinger about 20 years ago.

Picked up the Bond box set about 10 years ago and got 55 pages in and almost died from a boredom-induced coma.
post #57 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

I read Goldfinger about 20 years ago.

Picked up the Bond box set about 10 years ago and got 55 pages in and almost died from a boredom-induced coma.


Goldfinger, along with Diamonds Are Forever, is kind of a bore.

 

Now, I love Casino Royale, but it's a slow burn. If you want something brisk and exciting, Thunderball is the Bond novel for you.

post #58 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

Goldfinger, along with Diamonds Are Forever, is kind of a bore.

Now, I love Casino Royale, but it's a slow burn. If you want something brisk and exciting, Thunderball is the Bond novel for you.

Kind of ironic as the movie was such a chore.
post #59 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

Goldfinger, along with Diamonds Are Forever, is kind of a bore.

Easily the two weakest. I love a lot of GF all the way up to Bond passing out in the pressure room. After that, it's not great. The stuff with Bond and Tiffany in DAF is good, but everything regarding the villains is below the kind of villains expected from Fleming. It's no coincidence that the Spangled mob has never been used in film.

Funny that both happen to have better films by Guy Hamilton.
post #60 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

Kind of ironic as the movie was such a chore.

The novel works a lot better than the film. I think the film could have done better sticking closer to the novel. There's an amusing small section with M becoming a health nut, Bond thinking the old man had finally gone senile when ordered to go to Shrublands. Bond briefly becomes a health nut and everyone hates him for it, even M after he gets out of that phase.
post #61 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

Kind of ironic as the movie was such a chore.
In attempting to outdo Goldfinger, the filmmakers padded the story out a lot to make it into an epic, and, in the process, discarded some of the best stuff in the book.
post #62 of 1119
I'll say the nicest additions was Fiona Volpe. Emphasis on the pluralization of "additions".
post #63 of 1119
I'm reading Bond in Dalton's voice.
post #64 of 1119
Makes sense.
post #65 of 1119

I had a great time with Skyfall and it's a real shame to hear Spectre (which I haven't seen) couldn't keep that momentum. 

 

You'd think Craig will do one more if only for a last chance at sticking the landing.

post #66 of 1119
I don't think Craig gives a shit outside of one or two more zeroes on his paycheck. If the producers want to generate real excitement, casting a new Bond would accomplish that more than having Craig do it again.
post #67 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny View Post

If the producers want to generate real excitement, casting a new Bond would accomplish that more than having Craig do it again.
Agreed.
post #68 of 1119
One of the best things about the books is how good Moonraker is compared to its film adaptation.
post #69 of 1119
Funny thing is that the 1979 film is as much an "adataptation" of Fleming's book as any non-Fleming based film. It couldn't be any more different.
post #70 of 1119

Anyone here read Fleming's The Spy Who Loved Me?

 

No Lotus Esprit here i assure you.

post #71 of 1119
For the record I'm enjoying this 1000 times more this time than the last time I tried to read it. Half way through now, Chapter 12, Bond has just got wiped out at baccarat.
post #72 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by felix View Post

Anyone here read Fleming's The Spy Who Loved Me?

No Lotus Esprit here i assure you.

But it does have a henchman with steel capped teeth. That's about it, of course.

I've only read it once but I did listen to the Rosamund Pike audiobook last year. May be the only way I can plow through it again, the book itself is pretty dull. I love Fleming's idea of telling a story via point of view of a Bond girl, he could have done better than a bunch of goons wanting to torch down a motel.
post #73 of 1119

Ah Rosamund Pike. One of the few good things about Die Another Day.

 

post #74 of 1119
Dear God yes. On par with Eva Green for me.
post #75 of 1119
The thing about "Casino Royale" is that it's the first and last time Fleming even vaguely tried to write a proper Cold War spy novel. They quickly degenerated (or were elevated) into Charteris style boys-own stuff with a more adolescent ruthlessness and viciousness. I love the Bond novels but after Casino it's obvious that Fleming realised that lurid would sell more than drawing room tension. "Live and Let Die" is one of the more bizarre, and yet retrospectively valid, sequels in serial history.

All the best bits of the film came from the novel too, and it's commendable just how much they managed to translate well.
post #76 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post

The thing about "Casino Royale" is that it's the first and last time Fleming even vaguely tried to write a proper Cold War spy novel.

Hmm. I think From Russia with Love also qualifies.

post #77 of 1119
Fiiiiiinished. Never read a whole book in 6 hours before.

Started off reading it in Dalton's voice but Bond rapidly evolved into the smugness of Lazenby.
post #78 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

Hmm. I think From Russia with Love also qualifies.

Yup.

Though I get it. CR was special not just because it was the first but that it's everything Fleming poured himself onto without the idea of Bond being something he could milk with later works. Had a story of his like "Quantum of Solace" not had Bond tacked on just to grab more readers, it could have just been a Benedict Cumberbatch period Oscar drama instead of whatever Marc Forster ended up making.
post #79 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhp1608 View Post

The thing about "Casino Royale" is that it's the first and last time Fleming even vaguely tried to write a proper Cold War spy novel. They quickly degenerated (or were elevated) into Charteris style boys-own stuff with a more adolescent ruthlessness and viciousness. I love the Bond novels but after Casino it's obvious that Fleming realised that lurid would sell more than drawing room tension. "Live and Let Die" is one of the more bizarre, and yet retrospectively valid, sequels in serial history.

All the best bits of the film came from the novel too, and it's commendable just how much they managed to translate well.

Actually, I think some of the most memorable parts of the Live And Let Die novel were included in the film productions of For Your Eyes Only and Licence To Kill.  ;)  

post #80 of 1119
I'm still waiting for a Bond film to do something with the pirate treasure angle. Such a fun hook.
post #81 of 1119

(And I say that as a fan of both LALD as novel and film.  But the novel is better, except for Fleming's unfortunate dialogue for black characters.)

post #82 of 1119

FYEO could almost have been that "treasure hunting" film, were it not for the Cold War seriousness of the actual McGuffin.  

post #83 of 1119
Re-rail attempt: Someone above mentioned that Jack Huston might be under consideration. He's a little soft in the face for my taste, but otherwise, I'd be good with that. I think Matthew Goode might be a fine option as well.
post #84 of 1119
Matthew Goode fits my main criteria for casting the Bond role: actors cast as Bond should be actors that would otherwise be cast primarily as villains.
post #85 of 1119
To paraphrase Jon Stewart, Matthew Goode may as well come in a box stamped "Bond".

He's sort of perfect in that he's rarely the lead in anything and as far as I know, doesn't have any ongoing series commitments.
post #86 of 1119

I just had a thought...what if they picked an older actor than expected?  Just to switch things up a bit.  Who do you think would be the oldest actor currently working that could convincingly portray Bond over a 3 film contract?  

post #87 of 1119

Daniel Craig is nearly 50. They're not going to hire an older actor to play Bond, if only to avoid the whole Roger Moore / granddad porn thing. I certainly have no interest in watching a pensioner Bond.

post #88 of 1119

Maybe I should have been more specific.  I was thinking convincing might be someone in their 50s at most.  Not someone at or beyond retirement age.  Just an interesting thing to think about.

post #89 of 1119

I don't think we'll ever see another Bond actor who's much older than 40 (at the most) when he's hired.  EON likely wants these guys locked in for at least a decade if possible, and I don't think they want to end up with an actor playing the role into his 50s like Moore.

post #90 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stale Elvis View Post

Fiiiiiinished. Never read a whole book in 6 hours before.

Started off reading it in Dalton's voice but Bond rapidly evolved into the smugness of Lazenby.
Funny...I always read the books in Connery voice. It makes OHMSS even better.
post #91 of 1119

I'm not saying that they would -- they definitely could, and depending on the actor, maybe they should.  I'm kinda hoping they do something unexpected because they've essentially slammed their once-promising reboot series into a brick wall.  

post #92 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agentsands77 View Post

Hmm. I think From Russia with Love also qualifies.

I thought about that before I posted but the idea of the Russian intelligence services choosing to dedicate resources to embarrass the British by targeting their most famous spy is straight up hero material rather than anything vaguely redolent of actual Cold War shenanigans. At least Casino was about disrupting the foreign currency treasury of SMERSH, not let's get him because he's our nemesis.

Good book though.
post #93 of 1119
True, though I like that in the book humiliating Bond and the British intelligence by tying him in a murder/suicide love affair was only part of the plan. There's that whole business with the bomb hidden in the "Spektor" that would have blown up as the British inspected it. The film changes that up of course so Bond can actually have a victory in recovering the MacGuffin.
post #94 of 1119

The Bond novels are fascinating for their Travelogue aspects and for Fleming's research efforts.

 

Those who find DAF the novel lacking fail to realize that Fleming is depicted a real Diamond smuggling operation that he researched in Africa (and he wrote a "non fiction" book on that subject, the Diamond Smugglers. Can't recommend it unless you are a completist).

 

Also the Spangled Mob is probably an accurate, unromantized depiction of American Midwest Gangsters. And in this novel Bond's snobbery (he looks down on the Spangled Mob more than CHUD readers!) is almost his undoing. 

 

I like that Fleming constantly tried new things with Bond, moving from the "proto Le Carre" "realistic" Bond novel Casino Royale, to the first (and imo best) Super Villain plot with Live and Let Die, the rather grubby Mobsters of the aforementioned DAF, etc. 

 

But some of his plot choices baffle me, especially since he was so careful with his research and getting the technical stuff right. 

 

Like having Goldfinger try to steal all the Gold in Ft. Knox, or having SPECTRE demand EIGHT PLANELOADS of Gold bullion be dumped on an Italian mountain, and expecting to get away with it. 

 

In both cases, the film versions made needed and obvious corrections (the plan in Goldfinger was at least doable, if still batshit crazy. In the film DAF SPECTRE demands the ransom in uncut Diamonds, which at least are portable). 

 

The one  that really bugs me though is the choice of Baccarat in CR. Because it's just not a game of skill. At all. So there's no way MI6 could expect Bond to purposefully wipe out Le Chiffre, short of cheating. Again, the use of Poker in the Film version is an improvement. I think Fleming used Baccarat because it was the In thing, and may also be the real life game/plan he based CR on. But still. 

post #95 of 1119
It will never happen. But I would love to see (assuming they re-cast Bond) the next adventure be set back in the 60's/70's. Give us another Cold War story. Bond and Leiter vs the Soviets.
post #96 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul755 View Post

It will never happen. But I would love to see (assuming they re-cast Bond) the next adventure be set back in the 60's/70's. Give us another Cold War story. Bond and Leiter vs the Soviets.

You may (kind of) get your wish - we're headed for CWII in the real world so using a fictional second Cold War as a backdrop for some solid espionage stories, especially with all the real life wikileaks/Snowden/Russian hackers/Chinese hackers intrigue that's filtered into the public consciousness, seems like a great idea.
post #97 of 1119
It really is too bad they accelerated Craig's Bond timeline so much. After the opening of CR, I remember being so completely excited for a series of films about a young, new, fallible Bond. "Do I look like I give a damn?" indeed, but for more than a single film.

Recently rewatched Spygame (which I adore), and found myself wishing for a Bond movie about his pre-007 days where the entire film might be basically the vignette where Pitt is trying to sneak that dude across the German border while Redford is running a different game.
post #98 of 1119

Assuming Craig is done, what do we think the odds are that they'll keep the current MI6 staff around? I wouldn't mind Fiennes, Harris, and Whishaw sticking around.

post #99 of 1119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pither View Post

Assuming Craig is done, what do we think the odds are that they'll keep the current MI6 staff around?
50/50
post #100 of 1119
Im sure it's up to the actor but I don't see why they would make the change.
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